what is shutter & shutter speed – photography Basics – II

what is shutter & shutter speed – photography Basics – II


Music Music Hi Guys In my last photography basic videos I explained one of major Pillar of photography Is Aperture , Now Today I will discuss another Pillar of photography is shutter And what is shutter speed & How it works Shutter speed is responsible For two particular things First changing the brightness of the subject And creating dramatic effects of freezing the action and blurring the motion This video of photography basics I will explain all about shutter & shutter speed That we need to know about it Let’s go and know more about it Before watching this video I love to like to subscribe my channel if you would like Click the SUBSCRIBE button & click on the bell You can also subscribe my channel by clicking the subscribe icon embedded on any of my video So will keep enjoying my latest video What is shutter? shutter speed exists because of something known as your camera which shutter simply put is a curtain in front of the camera sensor that stays closed until the camera fires. When the camera fires, the shutter opens and fully exposes the camera sensor to the light that has passed through your lens. After the sensor is done collecting the light, the shutter closes immediately, ,stopping the light from hitting the sensor. The button that fires the camera is also called “shutter” or “shutter button,” because it triggers the shutter to open and close. When it comes to a DSLR camera shutter there are 3 basic mechanisms: the mirrorbox, the bottom door, and the top door. When you look through a DSLR view finder you are essentially looking through a series of mirrors that get their light directly from the lens. When you click the shutter button that system of mirrors flips upwards to allow light to pass to the sensor. This is why the viewfinder goes black for a short amount of time when taking photos. Once the mirror is flipped upwards a small door will move from top to bottom exposing the sensor beneath. After that another door will fall down, covering up the entire sensor. This process can vary in time depending on the length of your shutter speed. Sometimes a shutter speed can be so fast that your camera sensor won’t be entirely exposed at any one time. After the second door closes your mirror will fall back into place. The doors will then reset to their original positions underneath. This entire process from mirror up to mirror down is known as an Actuation. It is typically very easy to find the shutter speed. On cameras that have a top panel, the shutter speed is typically located on the top left corner, as circled: If your camera does not have have a top LCD, like some entry-level DSLRs, you can look through the viewfinder, where you will see the shutter speed on the bottom Left side And if your camera has neither a top LCD nor a viewfinder, like many mirrorless cameras, you can see your shutter speed simply by looking on the back display screen. Shutter speed is a measurement of the time the shutter is open, shown in seconds or fractions of a second: 1 s, 1/2 s, 1/4 s … 1/250 s, 1/ 500 s, etc. The faster the shutter speed, shutter speed, the shorter the time the image sensor is exposed to light; the slower the shutter speed, the longer the time the image sensor is exposed to light. If you are photographing a subject that is in motion, you will get different effects at different shutter speeds. Fast shutter speeds will “freeze” motion, while slow shutter speeds introduce blur from two sources: camera movement (camera shake) and subject movement In other words, the faster the shutter speed the easier it is to photograph the subject without blur and “freeze” motion and the smaller the effects of camera shake. In contrast, slower shutter speeds are suited to suggesting the motion, such as that of flowing water or other moving subjects. Changing the shutter speed gives you control over whether to “freeze” or suggest motion. A darker picture is produced when the shutter moves very quickly and only allows light to touch the imaging sensor for a tiny fraction of a second. So a shutter speed of 1/2 of a second will allow more light light to touch the image sensor and will produce a brighter picture than a shutter speed of 1/200 of a second.

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