Taking Incredible People Photographs with Jeff Rojas | Adobe Creative Cloud

Taking Incredible People Photographs with Jeff Rojas | Adobe Creative Cloud


(upbeat music) – You guys holding up okay? It’s the last day of MAX. – [Audience Member] Woo. – I don’t think woo. We gotta go back to work. What are you wooing? (audience laughing) What have you guys loved? By the way, I’m clumsy even with sleep. (audience laughing) What are you guys loving about MAX? What did you guys love in terms
of the experience overall? – [Audience Member] Inspiration. – Inspiration. – [Audience Member] Get out of work. – To get out of work. I like that. (audience laughing) What else? – [Audience Member] The
entire week has been awesome. – Entire week has been awesome. For me, it’s a great show to meet each and every one of you. For me, it’s about the
community that comes to MAX and being able to just work
together towards something, and really push the creative environment. Getting the chance to meet
each and every one of you. You guys are all creating
something wonderful. We have a room full of creatives. We have over 15,000
creatives at this conference. It’s one of the only
places that you can come in the world and say the same thing. I can’t think of any better place to build relationships with people and just get a chance to see cool things that are happening in the future, so for that, I’m incredibly
grateful to be here, and thank you guys for
waking up at seven o’clock in the morning to be at an
8:15 class and be here as well, so thanks to each and every one of you for your partation being here. Just outta curiosity, how
many of you are aspiring or currently photographers? Can you guys raise your hands for me? Awesome. How many of you are
currently having difficulty making people look amazing? Awesome. I love that. I love the honesty. By the way, this is the
therapy, so if you guys have any issues whatsoever, let me know. I’m here, let’s have that discussion. I picked up a camera about
eight or nine years ago for the first time, and I, by all means, never planned to be a photographer. That wasn’t my trajectory in life. I used to work at a
private equity company. I picked it up to document
a car I was restoring. That turned into taking lighting classes and workshops, and getting a
chance to understand people in a different way, learning
how to light people, learning how to capture emotion, learning how to work with people and have dialogue with people. That was important to me. Getting a chance to just
spend time with people was important to me, so
being able to capture the essence of who a human being is and what they’re trying to build. From there, getting a
chance to study photography. I wound up going to teach a
couple workshops and whatnot, and I realized there
was a niche and a market for specifically photographing
men, which is weird. It’s a weird niche. Why would you wanna spend
time photographing men? No offense, men. I love you guys. (audience laughing) But when you think about
even wedding photography, right, most people cater to who? The bride. The groom is almost like an
accessory to the whole day, (audience laughing) right? And then you kind of
get quality of accessory depending on what they
look like, as an example. But I remember going
through somebody’s class and they had the beautiful
bride as the front headshot and she’s beautiful, and
she has this glowing dress, and she had the husband hidden behind a bush in the background
(audience laughing) and I was like, this is not okay. Nobody wants to go through that. And then I also noticed that people had a hard time being creative with men. When you see different ad campaigns and things like that, you usually see some beautiful ad campaigns with women and then you see a watch
campaign with a man and it’s like, I have a watch, right? (audience laughing) That’s kinda the thought process there. So I started really understanding or trying to understand and doing research and photographing people what that meant and getting a chance to just study the psychology of each
and every one of us, what bothers us, with the things that innately make us not wanna
take a professional photograph, and here’s what I mean by that. How many of you have taken
a professional photograph? Hired a photographer
to take your portrait? Raise your hands for me. Awesome. How weird was that? Felt awkward, right? It felt like you were on stage in front of 100 or 200 people. It’s not the most natural
thing in the world. I realized when I had my portrait taken, it felt like being here, and this isn’t the most comfortable thing
in the world for everyone. There’s a lot of you that are introverts that would die up here. I’m one of those. Secretly, I’m going into a
cave the second I leave here. (audience laughing) But I say that because it gave me a chance to start understanding why
people perceive themselves as lesser than beautiful. We all have perceived
flaws about ourselves. I guarantee if I go to
each and every one of you and I go, what do you love about yourself? What don’t you like? Your list of I don’t like
would be greater than the I like, and that’s
not just with women. That’s also with men,
and if you don’t think men care about their appearance ’cause they dress schlubby,
I want you to think of how many ads you’ve seen
for Rogaine and weight loss. Women, I understand. You guys had Barbie. You grew up having to idolize this figure whose, the waist is this
big, abnormally small and has all these different jobs and has a completely
non-realistic lifestyle. Men grew up with Batman who has ripped abs and is a billionaire. That’s something else that we
have to think about as well, is we’re constantly
being presented in a way that we get to see other
people as better than because they have certain qualities. There’s lots of men and
women that just have certain perceived flaws about themselves. So I started looking at
all those different things trying to understand how can we capture a better essence of a person? How do we build up that relationship? One of the things I learned really quickly was it doesn’t have to do with the camera. It has to do with conversation
and communication. Those of you that are interested
in becoming photographers, I guarantee that if you spend less time photographing people and
more time communicating, you’d get a lot better photos. I’ll say that again. The less photos you take,
the more you communicate, I guarantee the better your
photos are gonna come out, because when you build real relationships with real people, you get the emotion from behind their eyes. You get a chance to
build up that confidence, and that’s what you’re trying to capture. You guys are familiar
with Annie Leibovitz? You guys are familiar with Mark Seliger? You have all these
professional photographers. What I want you to do not now, but what I would love for
you to do at some point is go to YouTube, go look at
their behind the scenes videos, and go look at how they
interact with people. They’re less of a focus on
the camera and the settings, and obviously, they have the assistants to compensate for that, which is why I say master your craft enough
to put the camera down and know what you need to go back to, but they build a
relationship with a person. They are asking questions. They’re talking. They’re joking. They’re laughing, and then
photography is almost second because that’s what’s capturing
the essence of a person. I think now more than ever,
because of digital photography, we’re so used to just holding that button, spraying and praying,
and hoping that we get an amazing image, when in
reality, when you guys shot film, those of you that shot film,
you had a couple frames in order to capture the
emotions and essence of someone, and you had to communicate those things. So what I would encourage you to do is slow down the shooting. Build better relationships. Does that make sense? This is therapy. If you have any questions,
comments, concerns, this is your safe haven. Just let me know. As I’m looking at photography as a whole, by the way, for those of
you that are interested, I will put this up here. I have nothing to sell you guys. I have no books. I do have books that I’ve written. I don’t want to sell them to you. They’re old. They’re outdated. Don’t buy them. (audience laughing) My publisher isn’t here. You just download them. That sounds terrible
in a room of creatives, but I want you guys to
have access to tools that I’ve put together for free on a platform like YouTube
because I have lighting courses on there if you wanna build
a YouTube lighting setup at home or if you want to learn how to take a better photograph
’cause you bought a $50 light at home. That’s gonna be available for you. I also wanna give you a resource in terms of being able
to communicate with me if you guys have any
questions or concerns. My primary body of work
right now is two things. I’m a commercial and
editorial photographer based out of New York City
(audience member sneezing) which means I shoot ad campaigns now. Bless you. The second thing is I also work at Adobe. I’m a value consultant at Adobe. My job is to be a glorified calculator. I have 168 hours during the week, and somehow I own a production company, and I also work full-time
working at Adobe, but if there’s anything
that I can do for you guys if you’re trying to make that bridge of keeping a creative
environment ’cause you feel like you’re doing a lot
of manual labor at work and you just need a creative outlet and you have some questions,
YouTube, Instagram, E-mail, website, everything is that. Now I know it’s eight
o’clock in the morning. If you don’t know what that
means, read it backwards. I was in a relationship with somebody for three years, and she had no idea. (audience laughing) I don’t blame you. My body of work now, I’ve shot for ELLE, I’ve shot for Esquire. On the business side, I’ve written for Entrepreneur magazine. I’ve written two text books. I’ve had a chance to
really understand people from a modeling perspective
and their insecurities. Believe it or not, models
have insecurities as well, ’cause they’re real people, right? There are things that they
love about themselves. There’s things that they
hate about themselves. I’ve had a chance to transition that over to working with you and I, regular people. People that have their own insecurities. Again, YouTube is a great
platform for those of you that are interested in content. If there’s something that
you’re trying to learn, if you guys can give me those questions as you find me on social
media, let me know what is that you’re trying to learn. I try to dissect that into a
three to four-minute format to give you guys back, ’cause I know nobody has time to watch an hour or two long video on a specific platform. For those of you that are interested, I’ve shot everything from
magazines to editorials to celebrities all the
way to regular people, and before you say those
are not regular people ’cause of the lady on the left-hand side, that’s my orthodontist, ‘kay? Beautiful woman, almost six-feet tall. I remember being on set with her and she’s very fit, has beautiful teeth being an orthodontist. She still wears her Invisalign
trays every single day. She’s been wearing them
for three years in a row, but you know, you guys
are supposed to wear them for a year, but she
wants the perfect teeth. Something happened in her childhood that said I don’t have perfect teeth enough for her, as an orthodontist, to wear Invisalign for three years. The second thing is, I don’t have abs. I’ve never had abs. They’re under there somewhere. They’ve never shown themselves. They’ll permanently hide
somewhere under there, and I’m okay with that. Somebody like that,
they work out two hours every single morning to
stay fit so they look great, and there’s a lot of
insecurities behind hers as a human being. She’s like, I feel fat. I look fat in the photos. I have this, I have that. Even somebody who’s beautiful
still has insecurities. The gentleman on the right-hand
side, his name is Charles. Charles is a good friend of mine as well. He has his own set of insecurities. He’s a little follicly
challenged in his head. Notice I didn’t say that I thought that. In his head, he thought
he’s follicly challenged. He thought that he didn’t have
the best skin in the world. He thought that plus, plus, plus. He has all these feelings about himself that aren’t necessarily
true, and I guarantee, if you go to yourself and you say, I hate this about myself,
and you go to the person to your left or your right and you say, did you see this about
me, nine outta 10 times, they never saw that. Whatever it is that you
have as an individual, I guarantee the person to
your left or your right never see, but we have all
these things about ourselves that have come throughout our entire life whether you were made fun
of for a specific thing. You know what, let’s
share a personal story. You’ll laugh at this
one, ’cause this is me at four or five years old. I have a cousin of mine. I started to grow into
them at 31 years old, but I had massive ears as a kid. They described it as a Volkswagen Beetle with the doors open. (audience laughing) Yeah. So you can imagine, as a kid,
I was like, that’s messed up. Right? Now I just share ears with Trevor Noah. That’s the easiest way to go with it. Now we just, whatever. But those things start
creating insecurities for you, even if somebody else doesn’t see it, all of us, and it’s
like, what is that thing? Just like if you guys
watched Stephen Colbert. Stephen Colbert has one
eye, one ear’s shorter than the other side,
and you don’t notice it until someone points it
out, and then you’re like, I can’t un-see that now, right? That’s what happens. So someone like Charles has
his own sets of insecurities. Getting a chance to talk to Charles, I don’t ask him, what do
you hate about yourself. I just go, what do you
love about yourself? What are you not so proud of? And that simple conversation led to, man, can you not make sure
that nothing happens up here? You can’t see all of this. Now I’m not gonna photoshop
hair onto Charles, ’cause that’s not. I mean, I could, but
that’s not him, all right? So what I did was, in a case like that, is use a wide open aperture,
shallow depth of field, focus in on his eyes, the
plane of focus on his face, and less so on the top of his head. Funny enough, for those
of you that are interested in photography lighting,
I’m not using a hair light, and I know that sounds counter-productive, but if I have a light up top, it’s gonna create focus
on that specific point. That’s not necessarily where
I want the eyes to lead, so therefore, a flat image,
just focusing on his face was of importance to him. When he saw the photograph of himself, especially ’cause he’d never seen himself in that handsome capacity in his mind, his head probably couldn’t
fit through those doors. (audience laughing) He’s an amazing guy, but what I loved is, I built up his self esteem, and I think as a great photographer, that’s what you have to do
for people, even yourself. You have to believe, I look amazing. I look wonderful. I can stand out in this specific shot, and I think that’s an incredibly valuable lesson for you guys. You’re taking an image of someone. Don’t beat them down. As a photographer, I’m
constantly communicating with someone, I love this about you. You’re beautiful. I love this specific thing. Your cheekbones are wonderful. I love your eyes. I’ll never say, “Eww, this is terrible.” I’ve never looked down, and I’ve seen a ton of photographers do it. They’re like, that’s a bad photo. Let’s not do that again. I’ve even seen photographers
quite literally say, “Have you always had grays?” Exactly. “What,” is exactly what I said. Don’t create insecurities for people. It’s about building that conversation and building somebody up. We all have our insecurities. It’s about helping someone
feel best about themselves. It’s really gonna help you
stand apart from everyone else. I normally don’t pace back and forth, but I have so much energy
from 12 hours of sleep, this is what’s happening
right now, by the way. (audience laughing) So. Let’s move forward. So the secret to photographing anyone. After the next slide, you
could take a photo of it. You could walk right out that door, and you know everything
about this presentation. I encourage you not to,
but this is something that you should know in
terms of how to photograph anyone to get the best photograph of them, and I encourage you, take
a photo of the screen. It’s very, very simple words. (audience laughing) Everyone wants to look taller, thinner, and younger than they are. Anybody wanna look fatter
than they are in a photograph? Raise your hands for me. (audience laughing) Exactly. Anybody wanna look older? Unless you’re under 21. Do you wanna look older
than you really are? Probably not. Right? Do you wanna look shorter
than you really are? No. So we all have this need
to look taller, thinner, more beautiful, and here’s
what I know as a photographer. I can use Photoshop to
make those things happen, but I can also use in-camera techniques to do the same thing. So think about making
somebody look taller. What’s the best way to
make somebody look taller? Photographing them from
above or slightly below? Slightly below, but that’s gonna give me some extra love just under here, right? Because I’m photographing
from underneath their chin. So now it’s tilt forward, chin down. Because now I’m
compensating from the angle that I’m photographing that person at. If I wanted to look thinner,
I can do that through posing and also do that through
people’s clothing. So as an example, I wear
all black all the time. I do it for a reason. It’s very forgiving, and
the most difficult question I have to ask myself in the morning is v-neck or turtle neck? That’s it. (audience laughing) Everything else goes away. Younger. Younger has to do with wrinkles. It has to do with blemishes. Those are things that
we see about ourselves that we look in the mirror
every single day and say I wish I could fix that. That last portion there is probably the most critical thing that you can learn as a photographer when
it comes to lighting. Lighting is everything as a photographer. You take that camera,
whether it’s your phone or whether it’s a DSLR,
a mirrorless camera, and what you’re doing is effectively capturing highlights,
sorry, lights and shadows. Everything else goes out the window. Just lights and shadows. Without light and shadows,
you can’t see anything. Light is obviously all
the light in the image. Shadow is the absence of light. So all you’re effectively
doing is just documenting light in a specific scene. So as an example, if you
guys walk outside right now, every single building out
here creates its own shadow. You guys ever seen people’s
shadows as they walk into the shadow area of the building? Their shadows start going away or they start blending into
the larger building shadow. The reason that’s
important to note is that light changes wherever you
area, but light’s the most critical thing that you
have as a photographer to make people look and
feel better about themselves no matter what type of
photography that you’re into, so I think it’s incredibly important. I’m gonna give you a
full semester at college in 20 minutes. I’ve saved you guys a ton of money. Let’s go with that. So posing and lighting is
the two critical things that I have as a photographer
to make that happen, and I’m not joking with you in
terms of understanding light. What I’m gonna give you now is effectively a semester at college if you went to photography school to learn lighting. I don’t care if you decide
I hate photographing people, if you’re still a landscape photographer, you’re photographing
product, everything that I’m gonna tell you today
is incredibly applicable. If you wanna take a better
selfie, hint, hint, wink, wink, this is still applicable, ‘kay? So bear with me. I’m gonna try not to get
into too many physics and focus on creating a
simple conversation here, but if anything goes over
your head, this is therapy. Stop me. Raise your hands and we can go through it. No judgements. In terms of lighting,
quantity and intensity. How many of you were
an annoying little kid just like I was, took
a flashlight and put it under your chin and had this evil light and chased people around with it? I like you guys. But when you use a flashlight
and you think about the beam of light, and it’s going
out into the distance. It’s going out into the ether. The most intense part of the light is whatever’s closest to
the flashlight, right? Everything else as it goes
out starts losing light. Well, that’s important to know, because no matter what light
source you’re working with in the known universe
at the present moment follows those same principles. The closer you are to the light, the more light there is. The further you are away from the light, the less light there is. It’s a very simple concept, right? How large is the sun? It’s massive. It’s huge. It’s much larger than our earth. How far is it away? Incredibly far, right? It’s very, very far away from us which is why it looks like this big when you look at it in person. When you think about something like that, if we go closer to the
sun, we’re gonna have a lot more light and a lot more brightness as we walk towards the sun. As we’re moving away from it,
we’re losing a lot of light. Even the lights that are in this room, if you look on the wall
to your right hand side, you’ll see that. You see the lights above hitting the wall, and as it goes down, it
starts gradually losing light and losing the amount of overall intensity that that light source has. The reason that this is important to note is if I want more light on a subject, I just move ’em closer or I
move the light closer to them. If I was in a static environment where I couldn’t move my light source, so let’s say I’m taking a selfie. I happen to be at a bar or I happen to be at an amazing hotel bathroom
with beautiful lights and it’s not a large light source and it’s not creating a ton of light, I just need to step
into that light source. I need to move closer to
that to get more light. Just something simple to consider, and we’ll talk about the properties there, but it’s very, very
simple piece to consider. So what we’re talking about is it doesn’t matter if it’s
natural or artificial. All light’s the same. The intensity refers to
the overall amount of light that we’re seeing inside that image. Quality. Quality is gonna be the way
that you get rid of wrinkles. Anybody wanna get rid of wrinkles so far? Yes? Therapy. Come on. Who wants to get rid of their wrinkles? Thank you for being honest. If you went out at 12 pm, right at noon, and you walked outside in the bright sun, how many wrinkles can you see? – [Audience Member] All of ’em. – All of the wrinkles. All of them, and ones you don’t have. (audience laughing) How many blemishes do
you see on your skin? All of the blemishes. Every single one, and it has to do with the overall contrast
that you’re seeing of light, contrast being the difference
between lights and shadows. The more contrast you have in your image, the more likely you are to see blemishes. Now, sun’s really far. It’s giving a ton of light. We’re getting the light to the earth. It’s hitting us. We still have a lot of
contrast in our skin tones. What happens when it’s a cloudy day? Do we have as many wrinkles? You guys ever taken a
selfie on a cloudy day? From now on, you always will. (audience laughing) The light goes through
the clouds, disperses. The clouds act as diffusion, so the light has to go through those clouds,
and it has to go back out, and it starts softening the light. Now there’s less overall contrast, and therefore less wrinkles
that you’ll see in your skin and less blemishes, so
because it has to go through something, it’s
softening that light source, and therefore, I have less wrinkles. If you were gonna photograph grandma, I guarantee you don’t wanna photograph her with a ton of wrinkles,
’cause she’ll beat you, but if you soften that light source, she’ll thank you, because
that’s talking about eliminating some of those
wrinkles in that shot. When I’m thinking about
photographing anyone, I don’t need to bring
out 20 lights on the set. I don’t need to bring
a single light on set. I guarantee if I walked outside right now, I can find a soft form of light no matter where I am in L.A.. Here’s what I mean by that. If you walk outside when you leave here, I encourage you to walk outside and go look at the shadows
left by this building if you step into the shadows and take a photograph of yourself and you take a same photograph and you
do it inside the light, what you’re gonna see is that
the overall intensity of light is gonna be less, but you’re
also gonna have less contrast. It’s gonna be a flatter form of light because you’re in shade. You don’t have a direct light source. Write this down. This is homework. I’m not giving you options. Do this. (audience laughing) One, take selfie in shadows. Two, take selfie in sunlight. Three, take selfie when the
light is hitting the building and it’s a nice flat
plane, and that building bounces back at you. Here’s what happens. That light source is
hitting a giant building. That building is reflecting
that light source back at you, but it’s much larger than you are, and we’ll talk about what that is now, but because it’s larger, it
starts softening that light back at you, so you’re getting these beautiful tones all over your face. How many of you have, think about this for the next two or three seconds. How many of you have a north-facing window in your home or south facing window. Raise your hands for me. No light goes through
that window throughout any point of the day, right? ‘Cause it’s north or south. That’s gonna be a very soft form of light, because there’s no direct light source going through that window. That is now your selfie window
for the rest of your life or until you leave there
because it’s acting as a very large light
source, and it’s gonna go ahead and make sure that
there’s no direct sunlight coming through that
window directly at you, so it’s gonna soften that
light source for you, right? We’ll talk about what that looks like. So because we don’t
have a quantitative way of describing light, we just talk about how soft or harsh a light form is, or how hard the light source is, so when I look at a photograph and I say, you know what, it’s a
very hard form of light. Can you soften that down? What I’m saying is, can you
eliminate some of the contrast or bring down some of the contrasts and make sure that it’s more flat so I can focus on highlighting
and hiding key areas? Those are things that I’m trying to do for that specific image. If I was saying I want
a soft form of light, I’m saying I want a very large, soft form of light on my subject meaning there’s not overall contrast in the image. Does that make sense? Therapy. Raise your hand if it didn’t. I like honesty. I love this. Here’s what we mean. I’m gonna make it even easier. Soft light is one that doesn’t
have perfect transitions between highlights and shadows. You can’t see definitive lines. Hard light is the one
that you’re gonna see where you see defined lights and shadows. You can see the little shadows that are coming across in the image. So if I were to ask you
which image has hard light, right or left, what would you say? – [Audience Member] Right. – Why? – [Audience Member] The
shadow of the glasses. – The shadow of the glasses. You can see it really
defined underneath his eyes. How about the left side? Do you guys see the
graduation of the light? There’s no defined line
between highlights and shadows. It’s a very soft form of light
because the image on the left is taken with a five-foot
in diameter form of light. It’s a very soft light source. It’s not giving me a chance to
create a harsh form of light whereas the one on the right was taken with a small, little tiny
light source of about that big. The smaller the light source is compared to your subject or yourself, the harsher that light’s gonna be. So because the sun is incredibly far away, it doesn’t matter how large it is. It’s relatively smaller than
we are in terms of distance, and therefore, it’s a
harsher form of light. If we could survive and we didn’t burn up and you took the sun,
and you put it right next to the earth, it would be
a much softer light source. There would be a lot
more intensity of light, but it would be a much softer light source ’cause it’s starting to fill
in some of those shadows underneath our faces
because it’s so large. Does that make sense to everyone? And I’ll show you guys
exactly what that looks like. Here. Now light doesn’t bend,
so I want you to think about the concept that
this is trying to convey, not so much the physics
that it’s trying to convey. A smaller light source
has a more difficult time going around you as a
human being, and therefore, you’re gonna see more overall shadows because of how many different light rays are going towards you, the
fact that it can’t wrap around. The second I increase that light source, we’re starting to soften that light, and it’s softening the overall
light source in the room which is gonna help me
create a softer form of light which is why images like this, even though I’m using a fairly small light
source as a main light or as my one-light setup in the front, I add a second light source to increase the amount of overall light and the size of the footprint of the
light source that I’m using meaning this is a two-light setup, so we’re using strobes. I’m using one above,
one below to make sure that I’m eliminating and
reducing some of those shadows. So as I’m shooting things, I’m thinking, how can we create a softer form of light for the things that we’re
trying to photograph. Softer light sources help
us make us look younger unless you’re photographing
a caricature of someone and you wanna show a ton of wrinkles, you generally wanna go
something that’s soft. Does that make sense? If not, I always say, it’s therapy. We’re here together. I’m here to help. Just raise your hand. Yell at me. I got you. So where does hard light come from? Again, hard light is coming
from smaller light sources. You’re getting something that’s
very harsh compared to you. The smaller that light
source is compared to you, the harsher that’s gonna be. That’s why when you use
a flashlight on yourself, you get all your wrinkles, but if I take that same light source,
and I put it through a piece of paper, it
starts softening the light, and I can practice that. You don’t need to have
photography equipment at home, ’cause I guarantee each of
you have one of these, right? So here’s what I would
encourage you to do. You’re gonna look like a weirdo. Just go with it. I want you to go home,
turn off your light, take your phone out,
put on the flashlight. Take your hand, put it
closer, move it away, put it closer, move it away, move it up, move it down, move it to the sides. Figure out what’s happening to light. You’re gonna see that your overall shadows are gonna start changing direction. They’re also gonna showcase more shadows and more contrast as you move that away. As you move it closer,
you’re gonna start to see it’s filling in some of
those shadows underneath, ’cause we’re increasing
the distance, sorry, shortening the distance between
my light and my subject, increasing the size and the footprint of this light source compared
to my hand and therefore, it’s gonna be a smaller light source. Why does that matter? ‘Cause if you have wrinkles,
get closer to the light. Make that light source
larger compared to you. Does that make sense? I see a lot of. I just saved you guys a $100,000 education at photography school. Questions, comments, concerns so far? Questions? No questions. I’m not gonna pick on you. I promise. We’re all friends here. Yes. – [Audience Member] I wanna
know that last image you showed. – Yep. – [Audience Member] How
close the light source was. – Here? We’re see it a light
source about, I would say about four feet from my subject, and it’s, I would say about three feet in diameter for the bottom one. The top one is about 21
inches in overall diameter. So it’s 21 inches compared
to her at three or four feet away is still a very small
light source compared to her, so it has a lot of contract
whereas if I had moved it closer to her, it would have a
much softer light source, and I would have larger catch
lights in the eyes as well. Speaking of catch lights, catch lights are exactly what they sound like. They’re those little lights in your eyes that you see in an image. I’m gonna press back for a second. Where do your eyes go to first? Whose eyes? The one on the left or
the one on the right? ‘Kay. That’s because the guy on
the right hand side has what I like to call shark eyes. They’re dead. They’re zombie eyes. There’s no life to them. When I’m photographing anyone, I want to create attention to detail. I want to keep catch lights in the eyes, and catch lights are a reflective surface as a mirror on whatever
is on the opposite side, meaning if I turn my back this way, the only catch light that I’m gonna have is this light strip underneath. If that were not on, I
wouldn’t see anything if somebody was photographing
me from the opposite side. If I turn around, I would
see one, two, three, four, five, all these different light sources reflecting back in my eyes. You would see a lot more
attention to detail in my eyes. Your eyes would focus in there. So the image on the left
hand side is a five-foot, let me see, just to double-check,
that is a beauty dish for that specific shot,
so we’re seeing something that is 21 inches, but
close to my subject, about two to three feet
away from the subject, so you’re getting a larger light source close to her, and I can see
that reflection back at her, hence why you’re focused on her. The image on the right hand side, again, is a small little light
source about that big, very far away, so we’re not seeing that catch light in the eye. If you wanna give yourself
life, or if you wanna photograph someone and say they look amazing, you always wanna make sure to
have a catch light in the eye. How many of you wear glasses? Raise your hands for me. How many of you hate
the fact that you have to take off your glasses
’cause the photographer doesn’t know how to
eliminate those reflections? I wore glasses for a long time. Every time I took a
photograph, I’d have glare, and it was the worst thing in the world. I’m gonna give you a quick physics lesson, and them I’m gonna go ahead
and never say that again, ever in my life. Not really in my life,
’cause the next class I do, I’ll say it again. After that, I’ll simplify it. The angle of incidence equals
the angle of reflection. I said it. What does it mean? It means that if I am at the direct angle of whatever light source is
hitting that reflective surface, I’m gonna be able to see
what’s on the opposite side. Here’s what that means even simpler. When you go into the
bathroom and you see yourself in a mirror, you’re seeing yourself at the exact same angle inside the mirror. If I move over to the
side, I can see anybody on the opposite side, right? So I can see that 45 degree angle for anyone that’s over there. In this instance, my camera is
me, my mirror is my glasses, and the opposite person
is the light source. If I wanted to reduce or eliminate them from that scene, what I need to do is either move them left or right so I’m not seeing them at the angle, move them behind me so that we’re not at the same plane, move
them up or move them down, but I don’t wanna see
that reflective surface, and you can do that in a
variety of different ways. The easiest way to make that happen is if I have the light source on that side, that light is bouncing. We’re now seeing a wall here. So this is our mirror,
our plane, our glasses, and it’s bouncing back at me. Simply just turn my subject or turn myself so I’m not
seeing that light source on the opposite side. If I don’t see that light
on the opposite side, physics says that I can’t see it. There’s no reflective surface. I therefore don’t have any
catch lights in my eyes. The second easiest way to do that aside from turning your head is just to tilt your glasses down a little bit. You’ll start reducing or
eliminating some of those. If you can, tilt your head
up, tilt your head down depending on what you’re
trying to photograph at. You’ll start eliminating the direction that you’re able to see
those specific points. Practice that. It’s a very simple thing to do. Take a selfie. Figure out, okay that light
source is directly at me. If I photograph that, I
can see the reflection. What if I just turn this way? Now I don’t see the overall reflection from that light source. Yes, I’m gonna have light
coming from the side of me, but I don’t see the flashlight,
see that specific angle. Maybe I’ll move a little bit more. Can I see that anymore? Potentially not, but
it’s about making sure that I’m eliminating
that from the reflection of my glasses. Is that simple? So if you get photographed
professionally again and they ask you to take off your glasses, you’re gonna say, “No,
I know how to do this. “I’m gonna fix this for you.” Yep, shoot. – [Audience Member] In
that photo on the right. – Yep. – [Audience Member] Let’s
say the lighting set up, let’s act like you wanted
to add a catch light, what kind of light would you
use and where would you put it? – That’s a good question. So if I wanted to add a catch light in the image on the right hand
side, where would I put it? I would simply take that light source and move it down, I would
say about six inches from where it is presently. So if you notice the
shadow just under his nose, that means that it’s
slightly higher, right? ‘Cause shadows are gonna
be in the opposite side of where that light source is, so I’d bring that light source down, make sure that it’s
flashing towards the camera, and then I would see a
catch light in the eyes. So, even the difference of six inches makes a huge difference
in terms of catch lights. – [Audience Member] Would you
see it in his glasses also? – Yes, absolutely, because the glasses act as a reflective surface
just like the eyes, and because they’re much
larger, it’s much easier to see the catch lights in there. Great questions. Image on the left hand side, mid-day sun. Image on the right hand side, controlled artificial light source that’s a five-foot-wide
in diameter light source. It’s a very soft form of light. Again, it doesn’t have to be
studio versus natural light. You can still go outside,
use a reflective surface, bounce it off a large
building and still have that large of a light source because it’s a very soft form of light. Again, I encourage you to practice this as you’re walking around the city. What does my face look like in this light? Okay, let me take a photograph. You don’t have to post it
anywhere, but you can practice. Okay, what does my face look
like in this specific angle? What does my face look like over here? And just practice those different areas as you go out into light, as
you go into overhead light, as you walk into any scene kind of figuring that out for yourself. Color. All light has a different color which is why if I open
up those doors right now and you guys use the light source that you have in here and
you’re trying to photograph from what’s outside as
well, you might have a disparity between what your
camera’s trying to capture whether that’s the lights inside here or the lights that are
happening out there, and I’ll show you guys
what that looks like. Like this. How many of you guys have taken a photo and you had orange lights,
but everything outside is blue and you’re not sure why? I think all of us have been there. That’s because the color
temperatures of those lights are completely different. You have one that’s fluorescent and then you have one that’s daylight. Fluorescent is what my
camera is trying to capture because it’s what’s most
prevalent in the image. Everything that’s outside,
because my camera’s now shifting its white balance to match to make those yellow lights white will
turn blue because of that. This is why, when you look at LinkedIn and you see a bunch of green people, because they decided to
take a photo at a bar, I know who you are, this is what you say. We all live on the same planet. Doesn’t matter when you live. There’s gonna be a
different color temperature depending on weather. There’s gonna be a
different color temperature depending on time. All of that puts a huge amount of focus on changing the overall color. So from here, something that’s daylight to something like this that’s now, let’s say, glowing sun,
is a lot more orange. It’s still on the same planet. We’re not changing the planet here, but it’s overall time, presence, location. All of that matters. If I go to the right,
San Francisco, right? It’s nice and cloudy. Yes, I get beautiful tones in my skin. It creates some really
atmospheric images as well, but the color temperature’s
completely different compared to a couple hours before that day going up route one, right, because there’s no clouds out there. Even the difference of 100 miles can make a huge difference depending on the image that you’re trying to take. Why that matters, if you
don’t wanna look green, you wanna focus on eliminating
multiple light sources that you have on a set
or in an environment. So an environment like this,
I don’t have those doors open. Usually what I would have you
do is take your cameras out, face that door, see the
light source outside, see all those lights that
are happening overhead, and then seeing that your
camera has no idea what to do. In a situation like this,
what I would say is, take your camera and figure out which lights you’re going to eliminate. If I have two different light sources in two different colors,
I need to eliminate one. So if I have a fluorescent light
and I have a Tungsten light and I don’t want my camera to be confused, let me turn off or hide
one of those light sources. Just out of curiosity, how many of you have Tungsten lights
at home for your entire house? Nice warm, glowy lights. Can you guys raise your hands for me? Awesome. How many of you have fluorescent lights, what you would see at a medical place? I don’t trust you guys. (audience laughing) Psychos. No, I’m just joking. It’s always funny to see the disparity between the two, but if
you look at a building, you go to photograph a building with different color tones of light, some that are Tungsten,
some that are fluorescent, you’re going to see a disparity that your camera’s trying to figure out what’s happening here which
is why I encourage you to use manual controls. Our cameras and our
technology is incredible, but your brains are smarter I hope. Use the tools for what they’re used for which is to make decisions for yourself. When I’m photographing
a scene, how many of you have a DSLR mirrorless camera at home? Can you guys raise your hands for me? Awesome. Remember that this is therapy. I will not judge you unless you have fluorescent lights in your house. How many of you are still shooting on automatic on that camera? Raise your hands for me. Perfect. I always see a percentage
of people that do. When you’re shooting with
a DSLR or mirrorless camera and you’re shooting on automatic, you’re giving it full
controls of everything that you need to do. It’s not the smartest thing in the world, so it’s gonna make decisions based on an overall exposure. You’re not getting the full capabilities of using that camera that way. What you wanna do is be
able to control things like your aperture, your exposure, your ISO, and your white balance so you can capture the things that you wanna go ahead and create which is why I, generally speaking, if I’m gonna take a portrait of something or if I wanted to photograph a landscape that I wanted to show on Instagram, I don’t use the camera
that’s built into my iPhone. I use Lightroom to make that happen right from my iPhone as well,
’cause I have full control over what I want to go
ahead and take and capture. It also takes DNG profiles as well, so that way I have full quality of whatever I’m trying to photograph. Does that make sense? ‘Kay. The other thing is to
think about direction. As I mentioned before, monster light, if I hold a flashlight just under my chin, I’m gonna scare little kids. It’s what happens when
you do monster light. It’s not a natural form of light, but light has overall direction depending on where you put that,
and that’s gonna change the overall impact of the image in terms of what that pattern looks like. So as an example,
Two-Face from the Batman, I know you guys are all nerds too, but I’m showing my nerdiness here. Split face. Thinking about that, one side has light, one side has dark whereas flat light, I have no shadows underneath my nose, no shadows underneath my chin, ’cause it’s directly flat and plane to me. I’ll show you guys what that looks like. I’m not gonna just explain that to you, but flat light, by the
way, I know a lot of you are better artists than I am. That’s what I got. This is why I’m a photographer. Flat light is when I don’t
have shadows under my nose. I don’t have shadows under my chin. It’s a very forgiving form of light. If you’re scared of showing wrinkles, what you wanna do is
keep that light source slightly plane to your face,
and slightly neutrally plane. Any time it’s above, shadows
are the absence of light. You’re gonna see all those
little bags under your eyes. You’re gonna see all those
little pieces underneath which is why when I say go
to that north-facing window as I mentioned before, make
sure it’s nice and flat to your face, so it’s
nice and soft and glowy. Split light’s gonna be
when that light source is over to your left
or over to your right, and it’s gonna bring light
directly at your face, so it’s 90 degrees over to you. What that’s gonna do is
it’s gonna rake light across your face. If you do have any blemishes
on the opposite side, they’re gonna be showcased because it’s just creating shadows
on the exact opposite side. Even if you’re not trying to
create this form of light, just think, how can I
avoid this type of light? So think bigger picture here. Okay, that light source
is over to my right. Don’t want that. I can see wrinkles on this side. Let me just turn this way slightly. Does that make sense? ‘Kay. Loop lighting. Just a little loop under the nose. Anything that’s gonna keep that
little tiny loop underneath is gonna create a really
interesting and impactful image, but I’m still gonna see
shadows on my life side or my right side, and
slightly under my nose. It’s something that most photographers use in terms of a traditional portrait is generally loop lighting
or Rembrandt lighting. Just outta curiosity, how many
of you went to art school? You guys don’t know what that is? Still used in photography ’til today. We’re still using Rembrandt lighting in order to create a lot
of depth in the image and create something that looks
beautiful and traditional. Our last pattern of light
that I’ll discuss today is butterfly lighting which is gonna keep a little shadow just under your nose, and that’s usually, it’s
also called paramount, when that light’s just
above, facing 45 degrees down at you, and you get
that little shadow just under your nose which is created
from the tips of your nose, sorry, your nostril shadows,
and the tip of your nose. That’s creating that little
butterfly underneath. So, as an example, the young lady on the right-hand side, if you look just under her
nose and you pay attention, you see that little butterfly
that’s happening there? That’s what we’re talking
about as butterfly lighting. That’s when that light source
is directly 45 degrees at you. That’s gonna create something that’s gonna hint, hint, wink, wink,
carve out your cheekbones, and it’s really gonna help
you enhance those cheekbones which is gonna make you
look a lot thinner in camera than you otherwise would look. Does that make sense? ‘Kay. I gave you lighting 101. I saved you $100,000 education
going to photo school. You guys have that. Let’s talk about posing. How many of you have no idea
what to do with your hands in a photograph and just
feel weird and awkward? If not all of you, it feels awkward. Taking a photograph with
anyone can feel awkward, but if you know how to
pose yourself better, you can make yourself
look taller and thinner compared to everyone else. The idea here is to make
yourself look better than every single other
person in that photograph. Draw the attention on
them so you look amazing. Here’s what I mean by that. If you see photographs of
me and I photograph myself with other people, I
always sit approximately a foot behind them so they look
bigger in camera than I am. I’m six foot three. If I sit one foot behind you,
we still look normal sized. I don’t look tiny. You sit in front, you
look larger than I do. It’s a good day. You did me justice, right? Those are things I’m
considering, but when we talk about posing, negative space
is incredibly valuable. Does everybody know
what negative space is? I wanted to see nos,
’cause then I knew if you were treating this like therapy or not. Negative space means
negative space from the body. If I keep my hands to my
sides, do I look very wide? If I do this, do I look
thinner than I did before? Because I have negative space on my body. I’m not putting my arms flat to myself. My visual width isn’t as wide compared to what it was before, so
when you take a photograph and you’re like this, you
have no negative space. I guarantee you’re gonna look wide. Women, I love you guys. Stop doing this. I know all of you do it. What you wanna do is hand on your hip. Negative space. Turning and shifting your body
at almost a 45 degree angle, I see photographs happening here. If this goes on Instagram, I hate you. (audience laughing) Turning your body 45 degrees, right? Tummy in, chest out. Hint, hint, wink, wink. Whatever’s closest to the
camera’s always gonna be largest. I’ll say that again. Whatever’s closest to the
camera will be largest. Chest out, tummy back, 45 degrees, and always negative space. Not here, not back here. Here, there’s not much negative space. Out, right? As I’m doing that, chin
out, chin down, right? And I can hug somebody from
about a foot behind them. I’m gonna look 20 pounds lighter, and I have a lot of negative space, and everything looks glorious. Men, it’s no different. Usually what I recommend is,
don’t do this, first of all. Everybody does this. Don’t bro hug. That’s also weird, right? When I’m taking a photograph of anyone, for me, it’s about being comfortable, feeling like we’re building
a relationship together. If I was gonna take a photo with my boss, as an example, and he’s
sitting next to me, I don’t have to touch him. I can put my hand behind him, and it looks like my hand’s on him, but
the next thing I’m gonna do is tummy back, hand in pocket, right? But I can keep my thumb out. By the way, body language. If my thumb’s out, it’s
usually like I’m comfortable, but I’m still cocky. That’s always been the premise. By the way, if you guys
haven’t read the book, what is it? “The Definitive Book of Body
Language,” read that book. It’s amazing. It’ll teach you how to
have better body language, what to express, what things are happening in terms of communication,
and we’ll talk about what I’m doing here to
build a better relationship with you momentarily, but
hand in pocket, thumb out, tummy back, chest out,
turning to the side. I now have a more triangular
shape than I had before. Men, you wanna keep that triangular shape. That’s generally what we
have when we’re photographing a man’s body, nice broad
shoulders, smaller tummy. I always have my leg out. You’ll always notice,
guys, friends of mine make fun of me all the time. They’re like, why is your leg out? ‘Cause I’m creating negative space so I don’t have chicken legs, right? (audience laughing) So I’m giving myself a
stance as I’m coming in, just giving him a hug, right? At the end of the day,
do I look comfortable? Do I look confident? Do I have negative space? That’s what I care about
when I’m photographing myself with anyone else. So from now on, if you
ever see a selfie of me, I will always do this. I’m like, hey, how’s it going. Yep, he’s my chubby friend,
’cause he’s flat and a plane, and I’m not gonna pose him correctly so he looks a lot worse
than I do in this shot. That’s what I go with. (audience laughing) I am a terrible friend.
(audience laughing) Body language is so
critical as a photographer because it can change the conversation that we’re having with the image, and what I mean by that is this. If I sat here during
this whole presentation, and I did this, and I was like hey, guys. How are you guys doing? Do I look comfortable or confident? No. If I sat here the whole
time and I was like, hey, how are you guys doing? How’s everything going? Do I look comfortable or confident? No. Notice what I do. Have two poses I generally go to. It’s gonna sound like I’m
manipulating you guys. I kinda am. Where’s my hands? Here. Where are they? Open. Do I have anything to hide? It’s assumed that I’m telling
the truth the whole time. I coulda lied to you
this whole presentation, but that’s what I’m conveying is that I have nothing to hide. The other thing that I do is when I talk to you guys, I do this. What comic book superhero
is famous for this? – [Audience Member] Spiderman. – Superman. Spiderman, that was a good,
generally it’s Superman. We’ll go with that first. (audience laughing) Chest out, arms to sides. I’m confident in everything
that I have to say. I’m not protecting my vitals. As a human being, we’re still
creatures and animals, right? So in terms of being scientific, if we look at ourselves as a whole, I’m not hiding anything of my vitals. I’m very confident where I am right now. I feel like I can answer any
questions that you guys have. Chest out, tummy in. Notice. (gasping) (audience laughing) Right? When I’m taking a photograph of anyone, I wanna figure out what body language are you trying to communicate? What is it that you’re trying to showcase? If I pose with my hands at my side, sorry, my feet together and I did this, I don’t look very
comfortable or confident. If I did this, and I
put my arms to my sides, it’d look very militaristic,
and if I sat there and walked back and forth the whole time, you’d feel like I was
leading an army, right? It’s all about confidence
and communication and body language. Here’s what I mean by that as well. When most people pose in a seat, ladies, this is your first go-to. Every single photograph
when you’re on a seat. Men. Take a photo of me, but what happens here? There’s a lotta love. (audience laughing) Sit back, sit forward. I still sit this way. I still cross, and I still cross over, because that’s giving he confidence, and it’s at least hiding some
of the extra love that I have, and I’m comfortable in this specific area, so as an example, when
we talk about comfort sitting on something,
have you guys ever seen James Dean standing up straight? Ever? What did he do? He slouched on everything
as a human being. He laid across anything at
the most horizontal plane that he can be as a human being. I still don’t know how he
lived his whole life like that, but every single
photograph is the same way. When we talk about body language and we talk about positioning, when you lean across something, like if I did this before, and you guys have seen me when I was leaning on here and I do this, do I look comfortable? This is mine. This doesn’t belong to anybody else. I feel comfortable. This is my house. I feel comfortable here. I’m claiming ownership over this, and I feel very comfortable with what’s happening here, right? I’m conveying my comfort. The same way, if I sat here on this seat the difference between this and
the difference between this, and you’ll always see me,
if you find me anywhere as a normal human being, do I look more comfortable like this? Would I take a professional
photo like this? Probably not. But body language dictates that
I’m a lot more comfortable. Even the difference of environment. When I spread my legs
a shoulder-width apart and I’m taking a
photograph, this is my spot. I’m claiming ownership of this. If you’re taking a photograph of someone, the more width that you
have between your legs, the more you’re claiming
ownership of the area that you’re being photographed in. So if I’m doing this
and I’m hugging someone, and I’m turning my body to my side, what I’m trying to do
is keep as much distance between my legs as I can so I look like I’m comfortable and confident
in this spot, right? It’s about that body language as well. I encourage you. I have two editions of the same book, “The Definitive Book of Body Language” is an amazing thing to learn. It’s why when you have two world leaders, everyone fights for that side. Can I borrow you for a second? Do you mind coming on stage
with me for a few seconds? Woo! Can you guys give her a round of applause? (audience clapping) Thank you very, very much. Do you want to introduce yourself? – No. – No. (audience laughing) At least she’s honest. That’s all that matters. So, think about world politicians. If we were to take a photograph
together, and I do this, who has power and dominance
in that photograph? – [Audience Member] Her. – Her, why? – [Audience Member] She’s
the one on the outside. – She’s the one on the outside. She’s dominating me, right? This is why Donald Trump tends to like. This side. If I run to this side, how are you? How’s life been? If I wanted to show
domineering over that shot, which side do I need to be on? On this side. Start watching politicians. When someone takes that photograph, they always wanna make
sure they’re on this side, because every time they’re on that side, they’re the ones that are in power in that specific shot, and you
might not notice it naturally and instinctually, but that’s
what they’re trying to do ’cause that’s a good media play. So if I have the President
of the United States meeting somebody from another country, I wanna show that I got this guy. This guy’s mine, right? He’s now submissive to me. It’s just something else to consider. Thank you very, very much
for not introducing yourself. (laughing) (audience clapping) Does that make sense to everybody? So if you want a power play
at work, that’s your secret. You take photographs,
you wanna look awesome, you wanna look like you’re having an environment where you’re the person leading the conversation, opposite side. Always make sure that your hand is over that person giving a handshake and taking that shot that way. Does that make sense to everyone? ‘Kay. This gentlemen here, when we
talk about negative space, is a good friend of mine as well. Had just recently lost 100 pounds which is an amazing thing for anyone, and for this specific shot,
he’s the exact same weight. There’s no Photoshop for
these specific two shots. What there is is something
called negative space as we discussed before. The difference of me
putting my hands to my sides verses turning myself 45 degrees, giving myself a little
bit of negative space, how much weight, visual
weight, did he lose from the left image to the right image? This is what we’re talking about here. It’s not just a concept. It’s something that you can use to take better photographs
so you don’t look as wide. Generally speaking, solid colors definitely help you look thinner. Avoiding certain patterns
makes you look thinner. If you’re gonna take a
professional photograph, as an example, blazers and a white shirt are amazing, because that
blazer, a black blazer with a white shirt underneath is that visual contrast, right? You look a lot thinner
than you really are, and add some of that negative space, and you’re good to go. You’re losing 20 pounds right off the bat. Those are things to consider as you’re taking images of people. We talked about perceived flaws. I’m gonna move this back, ’cause if not, I will trip over it. Perceived flaws. We talked about perceived flaws. Now, on top of talking
about my ears and being a Volkswagen Beetle with the doors open, my family has always, all
of us have five heads. Think about that. Five fingers for a forehead, and it’s something we always picked on each other on as a kid. We always made fun of one another. We all have those perceived
flaws about ourselves, right? Even if no one else sees
it, you still remember it, ’cause you’re like, oh I have this thing, and no one else sees it but you. Well, I photograph many people with a lot of different
quote unquote problems, perceived flaws, if you will, and not all of them are noticeable, but as an example, I have a gentleman here who has rosacea. Now here’s the thing. I’m about to take his photograph. I don’t care. I don’t see him for rosacea. I see him for who he is as a human being. He’s one of the kindest people that you meet in the world, right? So for me, that matters
more, but as a photographer, I’m critically aware that
people have their own anxiety for their perceived flaws, so in a case like this, I go, hey, what do you love about yourself? I love my eyes. What else do you love about myself? I don’t know just can you
do something about my skin? What do you mean? I have redness, and it breaks
out every now and then. What can you do for that? What can you do to fix that? Now I can run to Photoshop
and obviously fix it, but lighting also plays a critical role into hiding or masking some of that, so what I did was use a reflective surface on the opposite side,
not use as many shadows, and that’s starting to lighten
up some of those key areas. Do you guys see how quick that was? So I’ll do that one more time. Left to right. Light will help hide and mask redness, because the more your image is dark, the more saturation’s going to be present. Your exposure changes
the overall appearance of saturation in the image. It’s why, when I go to an
image and I lower my exposure, everything looks like it
has slightly more color versus when I raise it,
it looks kind washed out. Same thing with skin tones. So I don’t have to jump
to Photoshop right away. If he’s comfortable
with this specific shot, we can work on this image, but lighting definitely helps make that happen. Next, he was born with a cleft lip. Brian is an amazing
human being by all means, but he has his own fair share of personal body issues, all right? He’s a heavier guy, so the first thing that we worked on with him
was discussing clothing. All right, so if you look
at that specific shot, notice he’s wearing a v-neck. If he just wore complete
black, he would look like a wide mass, so using that v-neck helps him look thinner
in that specific shot. The next thing that we’re
talking about is the cleft lip. For him, he’s had it all his life, and I have kinda this
personal rule that I go with. Are you guys familiar with Terry White? Amazing human being, all right? This is someone who gave me this insight years and years and years
ago which was in Photoshop. If you’re not shooting something that’s a commercial client,
if you’re just shooting a regular person, if it’s
temporary, get rid of it. If it’s permanent, leave
it, because if not, what you’re doing is you’re creating insecurities for people. How many of you have scars
underneath your chin? Awesome. A lot of you. Statistically speaking, a lot of you have scars underneath your
chin, whether that was from ice hockey or football
or, I don’t know why ice hockey was the first
thing I went through out of all things, baseball,
but whatever it was that you hurt your chin underneath, if I remove that, as an
example, you would know. You’ve had it all your life. How many of you have scars
on your face right now that you’ve had for decades? Most of you. If I got rid of it, you would know. It’s not who you are as a human being, so my job is not to remove that, but if he has issues with
it, to help enlighten those enough not to hide them. So for this specific shot, as an example, I’m going to the right hand side, adding a little light helps
eliminate some of the contrast and fill in some of the
shadows in that area so you don’t see it as much. I don’t have to jump to Photoshop to make that change happen. Does that make sense? How many of you currently are retouchers? Raise your hands for me. Awesome. You guys are gonna hate me
for what I’m gonna show, but I wanna show you guys how to remove some of the redness out of the skin for those of you that have
never used Photoshop before or for some of you that
are not the most privy to advanced retouching techniques. It’s a very simple way that I’ve learned to eliminate some of that,
especially if you’re not the most efficient Photoshop user. So would you guys mind to
walk through that with me? And also, I request that you guys just grab out your cell phones,
take the screenshots, ’cause it’s a very simple
process that you can use to eliminate some of the
redness in your skin. ‘Kay? Let’s do this. Retouchers are gonna be
like, I’m walking out. Forget this guy. ‘Kay. There is a million ways to
quote unquote skin a cat. You should never do that, by the way. Not a good idea. I don’t know why that’s
even a term people use, but it is. ‘Kay. Let’s grab this one here. Open with, let’s open up Photoshop. Okay. So right off the bat,
what I’m looking to do is reduce or eliminate some of the reds in the skin, all right? And what I use is called a
non-destructive editing workflow meaning I’m not eliminating or changing the original photograph. I keep everything in layers so that I’m able to reduce or eliminate key areas. If I need to go back and lessen
something or eliminate it, I’m not having to do the
whole image over again. So non-destructive in that way. So for redness, the
first thing I wanna do, let me just enlarge the screen just to make it easier for everybody, is go to my adjustments,
head over to hue saturation, and what I am looking
to change is what color. Red. If I’m not sure what color I
wanna go ahead and eliminate, I click here, select the area
that I think is appropriate, and click that specific area
that I’m trying to change. In this case, that’s red. The next thing I’ll do is
increase my overall saturation to 100% which makes no
sense whatsoever just yet. Bear with me. What I can do now is change
my sliders to isolate what area of red I’m trying to change. Can you guys see as I move that
to the left and to the right it’s starting to change key areas? If I move it all the way to the left, the only thing that’s getting changed is the areas in his shirt,
not the areas in his face, but if I increase that,
now I’m starting to reduce or eliminate some of the
red areas in his face. Then I can go ahead and
select on both sides of that to just further select the
area that I’m trying to change. Go ahead and eliminate
that right about there. So I know that these are the
red tones that I’m trying to eliminate in the whole image. I’ve now isolated those ’cause they’re at 100% opacity. I’m gonna lower my saturation to 100, ’cause I don’t wanna see all the reds. That was just a guideline and a baseline to know what I was changing. Now I’m gonna change my
hue and change the blue, sorry, change the red, and
add some other tones like blue to reduce or eliminate them. Subtle change so far. Now here’s the problem. It didn’t just change
those specific areas. There are areas that are also
like his eyes and his shirt and other things that are being changed. In that case, what I use is making sure that I have a layer mask above. I’m gonna invert that layer, so command I and use my paintbrush tool on white to reveal tones that I’m
actually trying to change. I’m gonna go through here
and I can paint that, and one, two, one, two. If I need to go ahead and
add a little bit more, let’s go back to reds. I can do that. That subtle change. One, two, one, two. How much Photoshop time do
you think that would take if I wasn’t explaining it? Seconds. I could probably do that in about a minute in terms of being able to change that. And I didn’t have to sit there and retouch the entire image if I wasn’t
proficient at Photoshop, and again, those of you
that are retouchers, this isn’t something
that you’re gonna be able to utilize for yourself. I understand that you guys
have more advanced techniques to be able to utilize,
but for those of you that are just using Photoshop
for your first time, and you haven’t hired a
professional retoucher, this is something that you can do at home to feel comfortable
changing some of those reds. I would say if you’re
getting to a commercial-level quality retouch, I will outsource
to you every single day, but if it’s for a selfie
and you just wanna eliminate some of the redness, this is the way you make that happen, ‘kay? Now we talk about the eyes. In this specific shot, I personally think the eyes are very dull and very muted. The secret to good
retouching in my perspective is always been subtle changes. Nothing dramatic. I don’t want anyone to
look like an anime shot. I don’t want them to
look like a comic book. I want it to be subtle
changes to have huge impact. So there are a couple things
that I wanna work towards, and let me explain them before
I actually start doing them. First, ladies, how many of you are currently contouring your skin? Raise your hands for me. What is contouring? Changing the overall
appearance of your shape to enhance certain key features. So as an example, if I
want beautiful cheekbones, I just darken out my cheekbones. Men, how many of you wear
makeup at the present moment? Exactly. One or two. Most of you aren’t. So if I wanted to go
ahead and make somebody look like they had more defined cheekbones which helps make them
look thinner on camera, in order to do that, what I need to do is darken down the cheekbones. The second thing to think about the shot is I wanna go ahead and
enhance his eyes slightly, ’cause to me, they’re dull and muted. Two really quick things that I can do simply by using exposure or curves to make those things happen and using
two curve adjustment layers. One to darken out his cheekbones. One to highlight his eyes. So, effectively, the easiest
way for me to do that is to create curve adjustment layers. Curves and curves. I’m using a track pad which I never use. I’m just gonna go with this for right now. The first one I’m gonna say is eyes. The second one I’m
gonna say is cheekbones. On the cheekbones, I’m
gonna go ahead and look at my adjustment layer, and
what I wanna go ahead and do is just lower the overall
exposure of the entire image making sure that I’m darkening that, looking at the relationship,
the blend layer, blend mode, rather, and make
sure it’s set to luminosity. Luminosity’s only gonna change the overall exposure of the image, not changing some of the
saturation inside that shot. So as an example, if I drag down again, the colors are staying consistent, but the overall appearance
of exposure is being changed so I just want that to be slightly darker. I’m gonna go to that and
just invert that layer, so I’m hiding my changes so far. Going to eyes, doing the exact opposite. So increasing some of
the overall exposure, inverting that layer, and changing the blend mode to luminosity. Now on cheekbones, I just
grab my paintbrush tool, make sure that I’m set to 100% opacity in a very low flow so it’s
a nice, gradual change, and I’m literally just
gonna start enhancing his cheekbones and just
darkening those things down. The same way I would with makeup if we had a makeup artist on set. Do that here, and you’re
like what is he changing? Painting that over. One, two, one, two. Do you guys see how I start visually narrowing down his face? How much Liquify did I use? Zero, but the overall width of his face starts shortening down
because we’re changing the different between lights and shadows in the image to focus on key areas. If I focus on his eyes
and do the same thing with his eyes, all I wanna
do is those subtle changes as we discussed before,
maybe I wanna go ahead and zoom in there, do you
guys see me in the photograph? (audience laughing) So funny. It’s the coolest thing
about being in photographs. I’m in all of them. (audience laughing) I’m like, that’s a selfie is all it is. A selfie with my clients. One, two, one, two. I tend to overdo things
the first time I do them when I’m enhancing eyes,
so as a rule of thumb, I usually eliminate about
20 to 30% of my changes. Two. So in a couple seconds,
here’s what we have so far. Do you guys see all the
visual interest in his eyes? Your eyes focus on his. His cheekbones start to be narrowed. We start focusing on
those key areas, right? And I can start bringing attention to those key areas as well. I would say aside from
eyes, maybe lightening up some of this areas right around here. So one, two, one, two. The lighter those key areas are, the less I’m gonna see the wrinkles. So a client like this, if
they’re a little cautious about their wrinkles
and they wanna go ahead and maybe lightening those things down, I’m gonna add one more layer. Retouchers, close your eyes. You never saw this. I’m gonna add a new layer. I’m gonna go to my Clone Stamp tool. Head over to lighten. And I don’t want to eliminate wrinkles. If you do that, he looks
like a porcelain doll. All we’re gonna do is old my option key, go to a lighter area,
drag over those wrinkles, same thing on the opposite side. I’m gonna change my
blend mode on layer one, so this is gonna be wrinkles to lighten, and now I’m only
manipulating the darker tones to make them lighter. I’m not changing the lighter
tones to make them darker. The difference is one, two, one, two. Where do you guys see the
change in the overall wrinkles? So we’re lightening some of those areas. So we’re not eliminating them. By lightening them,
they look less intense, and we’re able to focus
more so on his skin. In a couple seconds, this
is what we have so far. Two, one, two. It’s a very simple way
to get a lot of impact in your image in a way
that’s gonna help you just focus on those key areas. If you need anything additional to that, I would start, and again,
just so you guys know, as my perspective, (thumping mic) I forgot that this was here. In my perspective, as I’m
looking around this image, I would absolutely remove any dry skin I would see in the image. This bothers me. He doesn’t need to know that
I’m gonna eliminate that. I wouldn’t remove areas like this, because he’s had that all his life. Unless he asked me to go
ahead and eliminate that, that’s not something I
would go ahead and do. I would probably, anything
that I see around these areas, I wouldn’t eliminate unless he’s asked me. Blemishes like pimples and things, I would go ahead and remove. Just a very basic way to
look at this as well is, again, anything that is
temporary, eliminate. Anything that is permanent, remove. If I wanted to go ahead and
eliminate some of the hairs, men, trimmer, please. (audience laughing) Brand new layer. Healing brush. Make sure that my sample
layer’s current and below. It’s on it’s own independent layer, so we’re gonna say nose hairs. And all I need to do is just
select that specific area. Photoshop does a really good
job at, nose hair selected, at using its algorithms to reduce or eliminate anything that I see there. In a couple quick seconds,
I can eliminate that. Now, it’s on its own independent layer, so if I feel like I did a muddy job, I can just delete those small changes. Notice, I’m not editing
on the original layer. It’s allowing me to
just reduce or eliminate that specific shot. So every change that I make
has its own independent layer, so I can go back to it,
remove it, eliminate it, do what I need to do
for that specific shot. With that, questions,
comments, concerns, complaints? Yes. – [Audience Member] What’s
your workflow for teeth? – Ooh, teeth. This is gonna be fun. Anybody want white teeth? Complete white teeth? Same thing that we did before. Changes are head over to hue saturation. Select these tones
which are yellow or red, depending on what you’re trying to change. In this case, it is yellow, making sure that those are changed. I wouldn’t desaturate. I would use just a slight
more blue or yellow depending on what you’re trying to change, and maybe a tiny bit of
saturation from there. Now, I’ve changed all
the yellows in the image, so I wanna make sure that my layer mask is inverted and I’m just
working on the teeth, and I can do that by just doing this. You see the whitening happening already, because I added a slight blue. So one, two, one, two. Again, two, one, two. No one’s ever gonna find
him in a missing report. If he went missing, no
one’s gonna know who he is. (audience laughing) Anyway, I digress. I think we have one minute left. I just wanna thank each
and every one of you for being part of the
class and for your time and attention and waking up at
seven o’clock in the morning. Thank you guys for your
time, and I hope you have an amazing MAX. (audience clapping) Take care. (upbeat music)

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