InDesign How-To: Put One Image in Multiple Frames (Video Tutorial)

InDesign How-To: Put One Image in Multiple Frames (Video Tutorial)


Hi, I’m Erica Gamet with InDesign Secrets.
In this video, I’m going to show you how to place one image inside multiple
frames inside of InDesign. On this page, I have several different graphics frames
ready for images to be placed inside. And I can tell they’re graphics frames because
they have the blue X in the middle of them. But what I want to do is place one
image inside all of these, so I get sort of this windowpane effect. To do that, I
need to create what’s called a compound frame. I’m going to select all the frames
on my page, go up under the Object menu, down under Paths and choose Make
Compound Path. And when I do that, you can see that I now have one big X that
basically tells me that’s one big image frame. They’re still sort of separate, but
it’s going to act as one frame. Now I can go up under my File menu, under Place and choose an image I’d like to place. There’s a nice picture to be looking at
outside your window. And since I have Replaced Selected Item already selected,
it will automatically put this image inside that frame we just created. I’m
gonna go ahead and click open…and it drops it inside. Now it’s not quite the
image that I was hoping to see. What happened was, it placed it at the size
of the image and it’s too big. So I need to head up to the Object menu, down to
the Fitting sub-menu and say Fill Frame Proportionally. Now it fits so that the
image fills the entire frame. Now remember this compound frame acts as just any other regular image frame. So I can actually use my Content Grabber to
click on the image and manipulate it in any way. Like I might want to hold down my Shift key, maybe the Option or the Alt key and just drag, just to make it a
little bit bigger, and I can also move this around inside the frame. Let’s just
frame that up nicely so we can see everything. Beautiful. On my next page I
have a series of circles. In this case, I’m going to place an image and sort of
position it where I want it to be and then we’re going to paste it inside our
compound path. So let’s go up to the File menu and choose Place and grab our image and I’m not going to Replace Selected Item…just gonna say open. And I’m going to just click and drag, sort of on top of
these circles that are here. I kind of want to get an idea of where everything
needs to be sitting. I can also send that to the back…so that I can see my image
sort of back behind those circles. And I’m doing that because I want to make
sure that all the components of this compound path are in place before I make a compound path. So I’m going to choose the Selection tool and just sort of move these images around. Now I do have white fills on those circles. It makes them
easier to see but also harder to see the image back behind. When I’ve got it about
where I want it I’m gonna leave it and I’m going to Command- or Control-X to cut that image. Now I’m going to go ahead and select all of my circles, go up under the
Object menu, down under Paths, Make Compound Path. And now I’ve got my
compound path ready to drop my image inside. I’m gonna go up to the Edit menu
and choose Paste Into, and it pastes it into that path exactly where it was when
I copied it. Again, you’re not stuck with this. You can go ahead and use the
content grabber and move that image just like you would in any other frame. On a new page, I’m going to go ahead and place an image and then draw some frames on top of that to place that image into. I’m gonna go up to the File menu and choose Place and click Open…and I’m just going to go
ahead and drag this out. And I want to draw some frames on top of this image. Now I want to make sure they’re easy to see, so I’m gonna make sure that my
stroke color and my size are easy enough to see. Now I just want to draw out some
regions that I want this image to fill. So I’m going to go ahead
draw out some squares. As I’m drawing them, I can actually see how they’re
coming together. I can use my Smart Guides to guide me. And make sure the
family gets in its own little frame here. I’ll draw that out very roughly. Then I’m
going to use the Selection tool, select the image, Command- or Control-X to cut
that, select all those frames, go up under the Object menu, Paths, Make Compound
Path, and choose Edit, Paste Into. And there you go! There are a couple ways to
take one image and put them inside multiple frames inside your InDesign
document. Well, I certainly hope you found this tip helpful. Be sure to check out InDesignSecrets.com for thousands of InDesign articles and tutorials, and to
subscribe to our monthly publication, “InDesign Magazine.” Thanks for learning
with us!

Shooting Angles: Ask David Bergman

Shooting Angles: Ask David Bergman


Hey we’re looking at what effect your shooting angle has on today’s episode of Welcome back everybody, of course I’m David Bergman, as always here on Adorama TV, answering your photography questions. Today I’ve got one from Randy F, and he asks how much does shooting angle play into your concert shots, we see many pictures from slightly below the performer, is there a benefit from changing up the shooting angle at all. Hey thanks Randy, that’s a great question. Listen there are lots of things that you can do when taking pictures that effect the feeling of your photos, for example you can change your exposure to make a picture of lighter or darker, and that sort of gives it a feel right, if it’s bright and happy, or dark and moody, you can also change your aperture, which will change your depth of field, and make your subject either pop off the background, or really become more a part of it. Those are all things you can do to change the feel, but something you might not think about too often is actually how the shooting angle affects your image. Randy’s asking specifically about my concert photos, but this is true really with almost all kinds of photography. Where you decide to shoot from low, high, or centered – it actually does make a difference in the feeling, let’s talk about photographing kids, when you’re taking pictures of kids, most people just stand there and take a picture right, they you look down on the child and you take the picture, now adults are usually taller than kids so because you’re looking down on them this really makes them look kind of small, and it does affect the feeling of that picture because you’re looking down on that kid, and they just it just gives them a sense of like a puniness right, it makes them really look small, so, but if you can get down, so that you’re at their eye level, all of a sudden they become your equal, and it’s subliminal in a way, but now that person, however tall they are, is now equal size to you, and they don’t look puny anymore. So if you even take that further, and you get even lower than that, if you lay down on the ground, or really really get low or put them up on a platform, then they look massive, right, looking up at someone puts them in a position of strength and power, they actually look larger-than-life, so now let’s take this over to concert photography. Why does it seem that most concert shots are looking up at the musicians? Well first of course there’s the practical issue – they’re on a stage – it’s raised up. The fans who are watching them especially from the floor seats in the front are looking up with them, and usually the photo pit is lower than the stage. Two – it’s sort of in that area right in front of the front row, musicians are larger-than-life, when they’re on stage in front of people, and, and part of it is even just for the crowd looking at them, they do look larger-than-life, so be in that photo pit, they’re certainly going to look really, really big and tall and strong, right, Musicians on stage at an arena, or Stadium, you want them to look that way because there is an epicness to something like that. That really is that, that position, a lot of musicians, sometimes when you meet them in real life people I say oh they were shorter than I thought because you just imagine that everybody is super tall and bigger than life, a lot of times because of where they’re photographed from. Interestingly enough if I’m shooting something like a production rehearsal where there there’s no stage, and the band is on the ground, they’re at the same level that I am shooting from, those images in some way they sort of humanized the performers since we’re all on the same level, but even in a production rehearsal, if I still want to make them look larger than life, I might even kneel down, and just so that I can get lower than them, and make them look much bigger, it’s a creative decision that I’ll make, really depending on the story that I want to tell, now during a show since I have all access, I can go around the arena and make images from all kinds of other angles, for example I always go up into a high wide-angle shot that’s sort of a scene setting image, so you can get a feeling for the size of the crowd, and just see the the situation, where we’re at, if we’re outdoors at a stadium, and the Sun is setting, or if we’re you know in an arena that’s just packed with people, and I’ll do other things like, I’ll put up remote cameras, and shoot maybe above the musicians, looking straight down, because, just because it can be a really cool graphic, and a different way to look at an event, but that low angle shot is epic anytime you’re photographing a person, whether it’s a professional athlete, or just a kid with a nerf basketball, so pay attention to that, just make that decision consciously, on where you want to photograph somebody, because it does affect people’s perception of that person. So thanks for that Andy, I hope that answers your question. Don’t forget to go to AskDavidBergman.com, if you have your own photo questions, I’ll be picking the best ones and answering them right here in a future show, and of course you’re already here on Adorama TV, there’s all kinds of great content here from a lot of great photo hosts, so make sure you subscribe if you don’t already, click that little bell so you get notifications, thanks so much for joining me. I’ll be here, be right back here next week Monday 10:00 a.m. Eastern I’ll see you then.

One Light, Three Looks: Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace

One Light, Three Looks: Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace


Hi everybody, welcome to another episode of Exploring Photography right here on AdoramaTV. I’m Mark Wallace, and I’m in a pretty amazing studio. In fact it’s pretty much the only studio that was available in Buenos Aires because of this crazy time we’re living in, so I hope you’ll forgive the echo, there’s really nothing we could do about it because of the situation we’re in, but we are committed to #creatnomatterwhat and that’s what we’re going to do today. In this episode I’m going to show you how you can use one light with one simple light modifier to create three different looks, so I’ve got a fantastic model, her name is Lana, she is right over there, we want to keep our social distancing intact, and so we are not going to get very close to each other during this video. We’ve figured out some creative ways to demonstrate things, and to do our metering, because we want to be responsible. Well the light meter or the light shaping tool that we’re going to be using is this this is a Profoto 1 ft Octa box, we’ve got a Profoto B2. I’ve got my Leica M10, a 50 mm lens, but the truth is you can do this with anything, this just happens to be my gear that I have with me. You could do this with a speed light, you can do this with a studio strobe, you can even do this with natural light, the point of this video is to create no matter what. get in somewhere keep your social distancing, but try to create some interesting looks, and that’s what we’re going to do, so the very first thing we’re gonna do is, we are going to be shooting on this white wall, so let’s get to it right now. Social distancing is very important at these times and so let me tell you how I’m metering, and so Lana is gonna be running the light meter. So okay she’ll put that – and she knows where to do that, she will push the button, then I can push my remote trigger – the flash, that’s gonna tell me what the meter reading is. I can see it from here it’s f/5.6, if that’s what I want fine, if I want to increase or decrease my power I can do that remotely. Once everything is dialed in, then ah…listo? I’ll just tell Lana that we’re ready, she’ll put that on a chair, and then we can shoot and we make sure that we keep a safe distance, because that’s really important, we are going to begin with this really awesome white wall, and again one single light with a softbox, actually an Octa box, and so for a situation like this, we can really change the look by changing the location of the light, because we have a white wall back here. That shadow is really going to show up coming from our light, and so I have my camera right here, this is really where I’m going to be shooting, and then what I’ll do is, I’ll change the location of the light to right above the camera, which is on-axis, We’ll maybe move it over to the side over here, and what that’ll do is, that’ll give us a bigger shadow for more contrast. Maybe we can start shooting in black and white, or desaturate things, we’ll move this closer, farther away just by moving our light, and not changing the model. The models location, or the background, we’re gonna get a lot of different looks, these look really good, but they’re sort of simple, and so what I want to do is, I want to add some contrast by just moving this light, and so I’m gonna move it right about here, something like this. I’m just doing this sort of by eye now, the problem is we’re gonna get a lot of shadows here, and because I moved this, I need to change my metering f/6.7, okay, so we’ve about a third of a stop difference. Okay? listo? And then so what we’re gonna do is, we’re gonna shoot this, and I’ll shoot it in the same location that I was, and then I’m gonna move around and see what that does. Okay listo? Alright. So I move that light to the side, and you can see from the photos that we’re getting a lot more contrast, but we get a lot more shadows, and I think on this white wall, it just doesn’t work out as well. So what I’m doing here is the light is on-axis, let me show you, this is my lens right here. The light is gonna be right above that, and what that does is, it keeps the shadows from really showing up, and so when I shoot this I’m going to be right directly underneath this light modifier here, this umbrella, and you’ll see when I shoot, that the shadows disappear, and so that’s the difference that this makes, just putting it on-axis, a little bit off axis, or way off axis. The look is much much different, the problem with the on-axis light is, my light stand, so I switch this out, luckily we had a boom stand in the studio that I could use, and so now this is out of the way of the camera. I can shoot underneath here without having a stand in the middle of my shot. I found this really cool look over here we’ve got some old grimy windows with light streaming in, however the light is on the north side of the building. These windows are on the south side of the building, so the light is not super, super bright, and that’s good news, because what I’d like to do in this scenario is, to shoot with a really shallow depth of field, meaning my aperture is wide open, and so I’m gonna see what I can get here. So I have my aperture at f/1.4, with a 50mm lens, and my shutter speed is set to my cameras sync speed, which is a 1/180th of a second so, we’re gonna take this first picture. Now for these, because the wall is sort of nasty below the windows. I’m gonna have to try to get close to really tighten the frame, so we don’t see a lot of this. So we’re gonna shoot first with no flash, just so you can see what it looks like, and so I’m gonna focus this up really
fast take a shot, okay, you can see clearly that Juana is underexposed but that’s okay, we can also see some really nice highlights on her cheek, and the background is out of focus. That’s what we want. Now what we need to do is – I can turn on my flash remotely, let me make sure that it’s firing, and it is, and then we’re gonna meter this, so I need my flash to balance with the ambient light. Remember the ambient light I’m shooting at f/1.4, so this flash needs to meter at f/1.4 for everything to balance. So okay, so Juana is gonna meter that for me, I am triggering that and it meters right at f/1.4 because we set the power beforehand, so let me just take a shot now with our flash on… beautiful, I’m gonna try to get as close as I can without breaking our social distancing rules, because I don’t want to show all the nasty wall underneath, and man these are some really gorgeous portraits. The cool thing though is, we have this neat chair, we’ve got this wall, we’ve got some stuff that we can play with, so we’re gonna do that, we’re gonna keep it simple, one light, open aperture, shallow depth of field. Let’s see what we get. This setup is sort of counterintuitive, we’ve been shooting with this small Octa Box,trying to get that on-axis and off-axis but let me just show you what I’m going to do, I’m going to take this Octa Box, and we’re going to get rid of it, so that’s off the camera, and what you can see back here is, this is a really shiny background, it’s reflecting tons of light, and so what we can do is, Juana A qui por favor – Juana is gonna get in her spot, and you can see that now she is on access with this light, and if my camera is on axis, we’re gonna get sort of a ring flash glamoury effect, which means it’s very forgiving, we can just shoot and have all kinds of fun, so we’ve already metered this at f/8. I’m going to start shooting, and I’ll show you what we get. While we had a blast, we just used a 2-foot Octa box, Juana was a fantastic, a fantastic model, we were even were able to get rid of that softbox and just use a Profoto head, with no modifier attached, but that’s sort of the point, get into your home studio, into your garage, wherever you are, and create, no matter what, try one single light modifier, try shooting against a white wall, try some backlit stuff, it doesn’t matter, mix it up and see exactly what you could get, thank you so much for joining me for this episode of Exploring Photography. Don’t forget to subscribe to Adorama TV. it’s absolutely free – click on the bell so you get notifications, and also check me out on Instagram I’ve also linked to Juna’s Instagram in the description of this video so you can see all the great stuff that she is creating as well. Thanks for watching and I’ll see you again next time.

How to get CUTE PUPPY PICTURES | Pittsburgh Farm Vlog Ep. 1

How to get CUTE PUPPY PICTURES | Pittsburgh Farm Vlog Ep. 1


Stefanie: We’re at the farm again. Caleb: We got our Pittsburgh farm Vlog again
today, showing you guys around the farm. Check it out. Stefanie: Hey you. I’m Stefanie. Caleb: I’m Caleb. Stefanie: This is honey bear and our message
is simple; You are loved beyond measure. We’re so grateful you’re here. It means so much to us when you click that
button down below and subscribe, like, comment. We love hearing from you guys. It really encourages us to keep making fun
Vlogs. Caleb: Yeah, definitely. Our comment of the week this week comes from;
Professor Heather Austin. ” Wow, that was an epic gingerbread house
challenge. Great stuff!” Caleb: Thank you so much for checking that
challenge out. We had so much fun shooting that challenge. Really appreciate your comments, really appreciate
the love. Stefanie: I’m gonna get you next time. Caleb: Yes. No, actually, that’s not going to happen. Stefanie: I wanted to give you an update on
our nest bed. I told you I would and we love it. We obviously aren’t sleeping there now, ’cause
we’re in Pittsburgh on this Vlog. Caleb: Yes. Stefanie: We slept on it for a couple weeks. Caleb: Yeah. Stefanie: Right away, we just loved it. Caleb: It’s amazing. Stefanie: We slept so well. Caleb: Yeah. Stefanie: We can’t say enough good things
about it. Caleb: Usually my back starts hurting, but
it as not hurt. It’s been amazing. Stefanie: It feels so much better, ’cause
you’re back was hurting before. Caleb: 100%. Stefanie: Anyways, people have been asking
how we liked it and we wanted to update you and we say two thumbs up. We have no complaints, it’s amazing. Caleb: Today our secret mission is to get
a picture of Callie and Honey Bear at the same time. I don’t know if that’s possible. Callie is Stefanie’s sister Christina and
her husband, Daniel’s dog. It’s an Australian Shepherd and it’s a very
cute dog, but she is very hyper and Honey Bear doesn’t know what to do with that. It’s going to be tough to get a picture of
them, but I think… I mean Stefanie says yes. I’m saying, it’s gonna be tough. We’ll see. It could happen. Mission impossible on the farm today. Let’s go. Caleb: Come here Callie, come here. This is Callie. That’s Honey Bear. They’re playing. Who is that Honey Bear? Honey bear, come here. They play. Honey Bear doesn’t… Honey Bear as her tired face on, ’cause she’s
been chased by Callie for the last 10 minutes in our mission to get the perfect picture
of them two. Stefanie: How do we do it? Caleb: It’s the Christmas miracle. Callie and Honey Bear got a picture together. Stefanie: We got it. Caleb: Wow. It took some coaching. Stefanie: We’re matching right now, kind of. Caleb: We are matching. Man, dang boo. Okay. Okay. Wow. Stefanie didn’t like my victory dance at all. But it’s all good. Caleb: There’s Honey Bear, she’s traumatized
from the Callie taking taking a picture. But it was awesome, have to admit. Goal today, accomplished. Caleb: We are walking at the farm .I don’t
know if you guys saw our video back in November, October. We were at the farm in Pittsburgh. Stefanie: We’re having such a good time. It’s really muddy so I’m watching where I’m
walking. Caleb: It’s really cold. We’re like we’re going to go for a walk and
it’s really muddy. It doesn’t get muddy in California. Stefanie: Not that often. Caleb: Not that often. Not really. Honey Bear is enjoying herself I think. She’s like, what is all this mud? We’re going to go for a walk around the property. We checked out this really cool property over
the hill. Stefanie: That my parent’s just bought. Caleb: Yeah. That is cool .Always cool when people are
able to get property. Stefanie: Look how pretty it looks over there. Caleb: That’s where Daniel hunts from. Stands on top of that thing. I don’t think I’m brave enough. We’re walking through the back road trails
right now. Stefanie: A coyote. Caleb: What? Where? Speaker 3: Callie. Stefanie: All right. We think we just saw a coyote. That’s why Honey Bear had to get picked up. Caleb: She had to get picked up because of
the coyotes. Gotta watch out. Stefanie: I’m sorry if it’s shaky because
there is some crazy ground. I have really nice boots from my mother in
law, but I didn’t want to wear them because I didn’t want to get them messed up. Caleb: On a mad search for Callie right now. Stefanie: Come on Callie. Caleb: Hopefully she comes back around. [crosstalk 00:05:35]. Honey Bear is just hanging out. Speaker 3: Callie girl. Caleb: There’s a camera right there on the
tree. Stefanie: Oh my God. Caleb: Which is to see the different hunting
that Daniel can do. Caleb: Hey guys. This guy right here, this red one; that right
there, that’s the man. That’s gonna be the father of all the cows
and bulls and everything. He’s chilling. That’s Calvin right there. What a guy. Caleb: This is number six and that’s number
four. Caleb: Calvin, what’s up my dude? You’re not feelin’ it? Okay. Stefanie: This is Stormy and Honey Bear is
meeting Stormy for the first time. Caleb: Hi Stormy. Here’s the pig. He’s cute. This cow is a bad baby, as we like to say. This is number three and he keeps getting
out of the other fence. He was in there and we tried to trap him in
and now he’s stuck in here because the electric fence is a lot better. Stefanie: What’s up? Caleb: We are really to get one more day on
the farm. It was really nice to come out and get to
see number three and our family and everything else. It was a great day. I’m really happy we decided to make it out. Aren’t you boo? Stefanie: Yes. I love time with my sister. Caleb: It is a great time. We are happy and sad that we have to go, but
we love family and we love Pittsburgh. It’s awesome. Stefanie: We’re going to miss it. Caleb: We hope you guys really like our Pittsburgh
farm Vlog. We got to come back to the farm, we’re so
happy. It’s been so nice. Stefanie: Yeah guys, thank you so much. Please like, subscribe, comment, turn on that
little notification bell and you are loved beyond measure. Caleb: Well see you guys in the next video.