Responsive Full Page Background Image CSS3 | XO PIXEL

Responsive Full Page Background Image CSS3 | XO PIXEL


Hey, Pixels! In this week’s tutorial, I’ll be showing you
how to code a responsive full page background image in CSS3. This responsive background image will fit
the entire width and height of your web browser, without any scrollbars. If you’ve ever wanted to really impact your
audience with your photography, or an image that you really want to showcase on your website,
this responsive full page background image that you can place on your website is just
the thing you need. Be sure to visit my blog, xopixel.com, to
see all the code and source files used in this tutorial. Now, let’s start coding! First, we’re going to write some really
simple code between the body tags All we’re going to do is create a div with
the class “text-container” Within the div, we’re going to use the h1
tag and write some text “go big or go home” I think this best represents this tutorial!” That’s it for the HTML, now let’s head
on over to our CSS file and apply some styles First, we’re going to apply the most important
lines of code in this tutorial. We’re going to select the entire page by
selecting the HTML tag Then, we’re going to grab our background
image using the background tag We’ll be using the no-repeat center and
fixed values to make sure the image doesn’t repeat, is always centered, and its position
doesn’t move on the page Then we’re just going declare some browser
support properties and then finally, we’re going to use the background-size: cover declaration
which is going to make our responsive full page background image
I wanted to add some big text to the image to make it ever more impactful. Let’s select the text-container and set
it’s width to 960px. I’m going to set it’s position to absolute
and then position it on the page so that it’s in the middle but also mostly to the left
of the page Lastly, I’m just going to style the h1 text. I’m using the Google font Roboto for the
heading text. I want it to be really big so I set its font
size to 156px. I also added some shadow to the text using
the text-shadow property and I used the text-transform: uppercase declaration so that the text will
always be in uppercase. So there you have it. You’ve just coded a responsive full page
background image using some cool CSS3 properties. Give this video a big thumbs up if you liked
it. Subscribe to XO PIXEL for more great coding
tutorials like this one. I’ll see you in next weeks video. Thanks for watching!

COME PULIRE LA CAMERA  IN SOLI  4 MINUTI Pulizie di casa veloci

COME PULIRE LA CAMERA IN SOLI 4 MINUTI Pulizie di casa veloci


Hello adored friends we are at the third video of the series “cleaning in a few minutes”. Obviously they are a few provocative videos, but that offer a starting point for reflection on the fact that even in four minutes, if well exploited, we can get a good result. So good vision, ready to leave! I open the window. They put things back in place starting on the opposite side of the room from the door. To speed up this operation, I will avoid going backwards, but I will take as many things with me and set them down the road as I head for the door. I redo the bed trying also here to limit the movements from one side to the other. Shoot and interlock the sheets, first on one side and then on the other. I removed the nightstands with the anti-static duvet. Step on the floors a cloth catches dust starting from the opposite side of the door, backing away with an “s” movement. Now pass the mop, first wetting the microfibre cloth with water and wringing it out well. I repeat the same movement of the previous step.

How to make a wool felt picture: beach sea (Aannsha Jones creates)

How to make a wool felt picture: beach sea (Aannsha Jones creates)


Hi I’m Aannsha Jones. Thank you for visiting. In this video you can learn how to make it felt painting and lay out the wool in a great design, so with that said let’s get started. Making felt paintings and wall hangings is fun! I began as an artist using acrylics and painting murals. I wanted to see what could be achieved with felt. Here are some of my felt paintings. I think you’ll agree you can create anything you can imagine. Today we’re making a simple painting with simple design layout, but from here you can explore your own style. All materials for this project are listed below. Start by laying the first of 4 layers. I use white wool as it makes a nice fresh base. Layers of wool blend as they felt so for the second layer, lay blocks of color as a background for your finished painting. So orange and yellow for the sand and light blue for the ocean. Lay these rovings at right angles to the first layer. The third layer will bring more variety of shades which will give the finished felt painting more depth. If it helps look at a photo of the beach to see where the sand is lighter and where the ocean looks darker. Here I’m adding different sand shades, getting lighter where the waves meet the sand. Again the tops are laid out at right angles to the second layer. I’m still using light blue for the ocean because I’ll use a mixed roving for the waves detail in the final layer. Pat it down and make sure it is even thickness. I’m using two mixed rovings for the waves: dark blues and ocean blues & greens. The white in each roving is silk which gives it lustre, like shiny water. As you can see I’m teasing out the shades of blues and see greens leaving pale blue showing through and this creates the look of waves. Where the waves meet the shore, I’m using white roving to create the white wavy foam, then I had more dark blue to create shadow and this gives the waves depth. Next I use variegated yarn and roll it up to create the effect when it’s felted of coral and shells. Once I’ve placed these in position I use a little wool roving the same color as the sand to place over the yarn and this helps it to felt well into the painting. To create more light in the waves and on the beach I add hand dyed silk rovings and these catch the light and and add shine. I balance the dark of the ocean with a stronger burnt orange on the sand at the base of the painting. Next I add some dimensional wool and gives really gives a great ripple effect to the sand. Finally I add wool nepps to the crest of the waves to give more of a frothy look the foam. Nepps don’t blend easily as they’re already pretty much pre-felted so these need white rovings over the top to help them felt. Now ready to felt, put down netting and wet the wool right through. Carefully rub soap over the wool and begin rubbing gently so as not to disturb the design underneath. I will quickly show most of the felting process here but for full details, materials and an explanation on how to make felt, please follow the link provided. And the pinch test shows it’s mostly ready for the next stage except one little detail and I rub that the bubble wrap. Now onto rolling around the pool noodle The video: How to make felt – tells you how long to roll and how many times to turn your work to get even shrinkage. Now for the following stage: rubbing the felt and dipping in soapy water and then more rubbing. It’s ready when you achieve that lovely recognizable textured finish. Then you need to rinse all the soap out. Add 2 tsp vinegar to the final rinse and make sure the wool soaks it up. Leave it to rest in the vinegar water while you tidy up. Squeeze out the excess water gently then towel dry. Pull into shape and there’s your beautiful finished felt painting. And here it is hanging on the line. I love the colours! And here is dry. If you’ve enjoyed this video please give it a LIKE! And if you want to be notified of my next creative videos please SUBSCRIBE to my channel! This is Aannsha Jones over and out.

How to Create a Time-Lapse Video from Still Images in iMovie

How to Create a Time-Lapse Video from Still Images in iMovie


In this tutorial, I’m going to show you
how to create a time lapse video from still images. Here is a time-lapse I created from
photos I took while sitting on a beach. This is how I created it. What you need is
a series of photographs taken in sequence. I started by setting up my camera on a tripod
so that all the photos would be taken from the exact same position. Then I snapped a
series of shots at about 5 minute intervals. You can choose any interval, depending on
the action occurring in the scene you are recording. Next all you need do is import those images
into a movie-editing program. I’m going to use iMovie for this tutorial. To create a
new project, just click the plus sign. Add a title and then click OK. Now you have a new project. Then just select
the photo browser and find the appropriate event in iPhoto containing your images. So
here they are. I’m going to select all of them and drag them into the project window.
The more images, the longer it will take to load them into your project. I have only a
few images, so it takes only a moment. Next, we have to make some adjustments. iMovie
automatically gives each image a duration of 4 seconds, which is too long. Also, it
automatically adds a Ken Burns effect to each one, which we do not want. So first, select all images using Command
A. Next, open the clip inspector and change the duration of the clips. In this case, I’92m
going to use 0.2 seconds. Make sure to check the box which ensures the change is applied
to all clips. Now, you see that we are closer to what we
want but not quite. We’ve got to turn off the Ken Burns effect. To do this, select all
images using Command A again. Now click the cropping icon, which opens up the inspector.
Now, just select fit, which removes any motion and fits the image to the screen. Then, when we play the video now, it looks
pretty good. We now have a short time lapse showing changes in the sky and people moving
around the beach. And here it is in full screen. All you need do now is export the video by
selecting share.

How to Crop Images in Photoshop with the Crop Tool

How to Crop Images in Photoshop with the Crop Tool


Well hey everyone, Steve Patterson here
from PhotoshopEssentials com. In this video, I’ll show you how to crop images,
how to straighten images, and how to crop an image non-destructively with
Photoshop CC. We’ll start with the basics and learn how to crop images using the
Crop Tool. Then we’ll learn how to straighten an image with the Crop Tool.
And finally, we’ll look at a great feature first introduced in Photoshop
CS6 that lets you crop an image without losing any of the original pixels. We’ve
got a lot to cover so let’s get started! We’ll start with the basics. Here’s the
first image I’ll be using. I downloaded this one from Adobe Stock. To crop an
image in Photoshop, we use the Crop Tool. I’ll select it from the Toolbar. You can
also select the Crop Tool from your keyboard by pressing the letter C. As
soon as you select the Crop Tool, Photoshop places a cropping border
around the image. And if you’ve used the Crop Tool on a previous image, the border
will be set to that previous size. So before we go any further, let’s reset the
Crop Tool to its default settings. In the Options Bar, we see that I cropped my
last image as an 8 by 10. To clear the preview settings and restore the Crop
Tool to its defaults, right-click or Control-click on a Mac on the tool icon,
and then choose Reset Tool from the menu. This resets the aspect ratio to just
ratio and leaves the Width and Height boxes empty. The problem is that it
doesn’t reset the cropping border itself, which is still set to that previous 8 by
10 size. To reset the border, press the Esc key on your keyboard. Then, if you
can’t see the border, select a different tool from the Toolbar and then reselect
the Crop Tool. The cropping border now surrounds the entire image. Tf you look
around the border, you’ll see little handles. There’s one on the top, bottom,
left and right, and one in each corner. The easiest way to crop your image is to
click and drag the handles to reshape the border into any size you need, The
area inside the border is what you’ll be keeping, and the area outside it will be
cropped away. You can also click and drag inside the border to reposition the
image inside it. I’m going to cancel my crop so we can look at another way to
work. To cancel it, click the Cancel button in the
Options Bar. Instead of using the initial crop border that Photoshop places around
the image, you can also click anywhere inside the image and drag out your own
border. Then drag the handles to resize it, or click and drag inside the border
to reposition the image. To reset your crop rather than canceling out of it
completely, click the Reset button in the Options Bar. By default, Photoshop lets us
resize the crop border freely without caring about the aspect ratio. But if you
want to keep the original aspect ratio of your image, press and hold your Shift
key as you drag any of the corner handles. This locks the aspect ratio in
place. I’ll click the Reset button to reset my crop. If you want to resize the
border from its center, press and hold the Alt, or Option key on a Mac, as you
drag the handles. Again I’ll click the Reset button to
reset it. And to lock the aspect ratio and resize the border from its center,
hold Shift+Alt or Shift+Option on a Mac, as you drag the corner handles. So what
if there is a specific aspect ratio you need? Maybe you want to print the image
so that it fits within a certain frame size, like 5 by 7 or 8 by 10. In that case,
you can set the aspect ratio in the Options Bar. For standard aspect ratios
like 8 by 10, click the Aspect Ratio option and then
choose from a list of presets, like 1 to 1 for a square or 8 by 10, 4 by 6, and so
on. I’ll choose 8 by 10. Photoshop enters the aspect ratio into the Width and
Height boxes. It actually enters 4 by 5, which is the same as 8 by 10. And as soon
as I select it, my cropping boarder jumps to the 8 by 10 ratio. To swap the Width
and Height values, click the Swap icon, or the arrows, between them.This lets you
easily switch between portrait and landscape mode. If the aspect ratio you
need isn’t found in the presets, you can enter it manually. Let’s say I want to
crop my image as an 11 by 14, and I want it to be in landscape mode so that the
width is larger than the height. I would click inside the Width box and enter 14. And then I would press the Tab key on my keyboard to jump over to the Height and
I’d enter 11. Photoshop instantly resizes the crop border to the 11 by 14 ratio. I
can then resize the border by dragging the handles. Photoshop will automatically
lock the ratio as you drag, so there’s no need to hold Shift. But you can still
hold the Alt or Option key to resize the border from its center. If you know that
you’ll need to use the same aspect ratio again, you can save it as a custom preset.
Click the Aspect Ratio option in the Options Bar. And in the menu, choose New
Crop Preset. Give the preset a name. I’ll name mine “11 by 14 landscape”. Then click
OK to close the dialog box. The next time I need it, I can quickly
select it from the list. If you’ve entered a specific aspect ratio and want
to go back to resizing the crop border freely, clear the aspect ratio by
clicking the Clear button. You can then drag the handles independently. Well so far, we’ve been cropping to a
general aspect ratio or a general shape. But you can also use the Crop Tool to
crop your image to a specific size and resolution. To do that, open the Aspect
Ratio menu, and then choose “Width, Height and Resolution”. Well let’s say that
instead of cropping my image to an 11 by 14 aspect ratio, I want to crop it so
that it will print at a specific size of 11 by 14 inches. Since I want the width
to be larger than the height, I’ll click inside the Width field and I’ll enter 14.
But instead of just entering the number, I’ll also enter “in” for inches. Then I’ll
press the Tab key on my keyboard to jump to the Height field and I’ll enter “11
in” for the height. Notice that we now have a third box as well, and this is
where we enter a Resolution value. Since the industry standard resolution for
high quality printing is 300 pixels per inch, I’ll enter “300” into the box, and
I’ll make sure that the measurement type is set to pixels per inch.
With my settings entered, I’ll resize the crop border,
and then to crop the image, I’ll click the checkmark in the Options Bar. You can
also crop it by pressing Enter or Return on a Mac. Photoshop crops the image, and
if we check the size of the image by going up to the Image menu and choosing
the Image Size command, we see in the dialog box that Photoshop has cropped
the image to 14 by 11 inches at a resolution of 300 pixels per inch. We’ll
be learning all about image resizing in separate videos, so for now, I’ll click
Cancel to close the dialog box. To undo the crop, I’ll go up to the Edit menu and
I’ll choose Undo Crop. And this returns the image to its original size. Before we
move on to learning how to straighten an image, let’s look at one more handy
feature of the Crop Tool, and that’s the Crop Overlay. I’ll click on my image with
the Crop Tool to bring up the cropping border. And notice the 3 by 3 grid that
appears inside the border. This grid is known as the Rule of Thirds. The idea
with the Rule of Thirds is that you can create a more interesting composition by
placing your subject at or near one of the spots where the grid lines intersect.
While the Rule of Thirds overlay can be useful, it’s not the only one that’s
available to us. To view the others, click the Overlay icon in the Options Bar. Here
we can choose a different overlay, like Golden Ratio. The Golden Ratio is similar
to the Rule of Thirds but the intersection points are closer to the
center. Finally, one more way to crop your image is to just double-click inside the
crop border. And that’s the basics of how to crop an image with the Crop Tool.
Let’s look at a different image so we can learn how to straighten a photo.
Here’s an image I shot myself, and notice that the horizon line is crooked. To
straighten the image, I’ll select the Crop Tool from the Toolbar. And then in
the Options Bar, I’ll select the Straighten Tool. Look for something in
your image that should be straight, either vertically or horizontally. In my
case, it’s the horizon line. Click on one end with the Straighten Tool, keep your
mouse button held down, and drag over to the other end.
Photoshop draws a path between the two points, and it uses this path to set the
angle that the image will need to be rotated. Release your mouse button, and
Photoshop rotates the image to straighten it. And because rotating the
image added some transparent areas in the corners of the document, Photoshop
also resized the crop border to keep those transparent corners out of the
image. At this point, I can resize the crop border myself if I need to. And then
to accept it and crop the image, I’ll press Enter, or Return on a Mac. And
that’s how to straighten an image with the Crop Tool. And finally, let’s switch
over to a third image so we can look at a great feature in Photoshop that lets
us crop our images non-destructively. I downloaded this image from Adobe Stock.
Again I’ll select the Crop Tool from the Toolbar. In the Options Bar, I’ll choose
the 8 by 10 aspect ratio preset, and then I’ll resize my crop border by dragging
the top hand hold downward. To crop the image, I’ll press Enter, or Return on a
Mac. So far so good. But what if I decide at this point that
I want to change the crop? Maybe I want to change its orientation from portrait
to landscape. In that case, I’ll go up to the Options Bar and I’ll swap the aspect
ratio by clicking the Swap icon. Photoshop again places the crop border
around the image. I don’t want to be cropped in so close, so I’ll drag the
handles outward to bring back more of the image. But notice that when I release
my mouse button, Photoshop just fills the surrounding area with white. And that’s
because Photoshop deleted all of those surrounding pixels when I made my
original crop. It’s filling those missing areas with white because it’s using my
current Background color. And the reason that Photoshop deleted those cropped
pixels is because, if we look in the Options Bar, we see that the Delete
Cropped Pixels option is turned on, which it is by default. Let’s look at a better
way to work, one that’s not destructive. I’ll cancel the crop by clicking the
Cancel button in the Options Bar. And then I’ll revert the image back to its
original size by going up to the File menu and choosing Revert. I’ll swap the
aspect ratio back to portrait mode, and then I’ll drag the handles to resize the
border, just like I did before. Bbut this time, before I actually crop the image,
I’ll turn the Delete Cropped Pixels option off by deselecting it. Then I’ll
accept the crop by pressing Enter, or Return on a Mac. And so far everything
looks the same as it did before. But watch what happens if I try to resize
the crop. I’ll swap the aspect ratio back to landscape mode, and as soon as I do, we
see something very different. The entire image reappears as if it was never
cropped at all. And that’s because, when Delete Cropped Pixels is turned off,
Photoshop just hides the cropped area instead of deleting it. I’ll drag the
corner handles outward to resize the border to include more of the image. And
then with Delete Cropped Pixels still turned off, I’ll accept the crop by
pressing Enter, or Return on a Mac. Another benefit of cropping the image
non-destructively is that, since Photoshop is just hiding the cropped
area, we can actually move the image around to reposition it even after we’ve
cropped it. To do that, select the Move Tool from the Toolbar. And then click and
drag on the image to move it around inside the canvas until you’re happy
with the composition. And finally, if you’ve cropped your image with Delete
Cropped Pixels turned off and you’re still working in your Photoshop PSD file,
you can bring back the entire image at any time by going up to the Image menu
and choosing Reveal All. And there we have it! That’s how to crop images, how to
straighten images, and how to crop your photos non-destructively, in Photoshop! As
always, I hope you enjoyed this video. And if you did, please consider Liking it,
Sharing it and Subscribing to our channel. Visit our website, PhotoshopEssentials com, for more tutorials! Thanks for watching and I’ll see you
next time. I’m Steve Patterson from PhotoshopEssentials.com.

Digitize Your Hand Lettering Easily Using Image Trace in Illustrator

Digitize Your Hand Lettering Easily Using Image Trace in Illustrator


Hey guys, it’s Jenn from Hello Brio Studio. Today I’m going to show you how to vectorize
your hand lettering from paper to digital using Image Trace in Illustrator So now I’m just going to use my Tombow Dual Brush
Pen to write some letters. I’ve gone ahead and texted myself this
photo. I’m going to take it from Messages and drag it into Photoshop. From here we need to adjust the levels
of the picture so the blackest part of the text is black and then the background is really
white. If you hit CMD+L you’re going to
bring up the levels palette. The quickest way to do this is to hit the white eye dropper
and click somewhere until the white gets whiter. And then click the black eye dropper and do
the same thing for the black part of your text. Hit the lasso tool (L) and select the
most important part of the picture which is the center. You can see towards the outside because this is from
a photo there is some darkness going on that you don’t want to bring into your drawing
in Illustrator. So just do a quick crop around everything with the lasso tool, which is going to select it. Hit CMD+C to copy Open Illustrator and hit CMD+N for a new document Hit CMD+V to paste. Because the artboard is actually smaller
than the file, what I’m going to do is hit CMD+Shift+H to hide the artboard. Open your Image Trace Palette. If it’s
not already open, go to Window, Image Trace. You want to start with a preset that’s
going to give you black and white because that’s what you’re working with. Go ahead
and select Black and White Logo. That’s a really great place to start. It’s going to do some calculations and do some digitizing based on the edges of your artwork where the contrast is the highest. So this did a pretty good job. You want to make sure that your Advanced
section is expanded so you can see all of your options. Because there’s some weirdness going on with the T and the I I’m actually going to reduce the Threshold so these become separate pieces. Hit CMD+0 to see the entire piece. I’m going to reduce the Threshold a little bit That’s looking pretty good. What the Paths does: the lower the number
of paths, the smoother your drawing is going to be. Same with Corners. I generally like
to not have a ton of corners, but sometimes you lose some detail if you get rid of too
many corners. You can always go back and smooth later. Now that everything is done, I’m going
to hit the Expand button. This is going to convert all of these into different paths.
Then I need to ungroup this twice, do this by hitting CMD+Shift+G twice. Don’t ask me why it’s twice, Everyone says “I don’t know why you have to do it twice” but you do. So then take your Selection Tool (V)
and then select the outer part of your drawing and hit delete. Do the same for all of these
pieces within your drawing that you don’t want to be colorized. What I’m going to do now is go in and
smooth some of these out. Some things look kind of funky; they digitized weird. Zoom
in and select the path that you want to edit. Go to the smooth tool, which I’ve changed
the shortcut to be Shift+S. You can do that in Edit, Keyboard Shortcuts. I use the smooth
tool so often that I feel like it’s something that’s good to have on your shortcuts easily. Now that I have the smooth tool selected,
I’m going to go ahead and trace around this edge. It doesn’t have to be perfect; I’m just
doing this with my trackpad on my laptop. Whenever you need to switch from path to path,
you need to make sure to hit the (V) tool and then hit Shift+S again for the Smooth
Tool. I’m going to go through and hit (V) and Shift+S wherever I need to adjust the smoothness of some of these. Generally the less points along a path
the better, because then the smoother your work is going to be. But because this is digitized
hand lettering, you also want to keep some of its character. So, it doesn’t have to be
perfect. If you ever need to really need to go
in here and adjust an anchor or you want to get rid of an anchor point, you can hit the
(P) tool and hover over an anchor, and when the minus comes up you can subtract it that
way. You can also go in with the Direct Selection Tool (A) and click on an anchor, drag the
handles out, whatever you need to do. Generally I’m going to trust the Image Trace tool to do what it does best. Zoom out: Hit CMD+0 to view all your artwork.
You can plop this on top of photos, you can use it as your blog logo, et cetera, whatever
you need to do. If you like this video, please subscribe
and share with your friends and let me know if there are any other Illustrator or Photoshop
tutorials that you’d like to see in the future. Thanks!

How To Move Pics With Background Change Using 3D PowerPoint Trix

How To Move Pics With Background Change Using 3D PowerPoint Trix


To Change Subtitles {CC} Captions Of Our PowerPoint Tutorials In French, Spanish, German, Arabic, Afrikaans, Chinese, Japanese & Lot More. Click Settings Button On YouTube Player Bottom Right>Choose Translate Option On Subtitles>Choose Your Language. Hello viewers! Welcome to RK Photomagic Trix. So papa, you have done the 3d pop out to our picture from Mauritius, but can you move it, make it nicely plain or something? Viewers, she wants me to do things using PowerPoint which are not even possible in Photoshop. As you can see behind, there is a picture of us, which has a beautiful background. We have done nothing to it, it is a completely natural picture, no color corrections have been made, nothing at all. This is what Mauritius Grand Bay looks like. Look at the blue color of the sky, the color of the water. It?s so beautiful. Now what Arkshya wants me to do is enhance the picture. How to enhance the picture? Now there is the sky, right? What if I could get a jumbo jet flying out of the sky? I am going to take another picture, as you can see, I have opened another picture, which is of an airplane. Now I will extract the plane out of this picture. How will we extract it? We will crop it. First we will crop it and then remove the background. If you want to know more about remove background, we have shown explanatory details in our other tutorials. So what we have done is we have cropped and removed. We’ve extracted. Extraction is similar to cutting out an airplane from a piece of paper and leaving the rest of it. Now we have extracted the airplane and we have the picture from Mauritius. So what should we do now? We should drop the plane. We should drop the plane and the police will arrest us for that… I don’t know what she is up to. What we have to do is…. We have this plane, we are slowly bringing this plane onto this picture and we will resize the plane. As we can tell from the box around it that the plane is selected, we will resize it from here so that it looks smaller. Now, what we are going to do is even more interesting. It will look like the plane is getting bigger and bigger exactly like in reality. A plane looks bigger as it comes closer. So we will give it an animation. We will right click the picture then select ‘add animation’ then ‘grow shrink’. Look, the size of the plane is gradually increasing, while the rest of the picture is the same. It is only the plane size that is increasing. This isn’t looking very nice since the rest of the picture is the same and only the plane size is changing so what we’ll do is …
and only the plane size is changing. So what we’ll do is … Can you make the clouds move as well? Yes, we can make the clouds move. What we will do is we will make three to four copies of this picture, one over the other. How do we make copies? Ctrl+c and ctrl+v for copy and paste respectively. Alright? So we will do exactly like this. So what we are going to do now is make the whole picture move. We now have five copies of the picture, one over the other and so on. From one of the copies, we will only crop out the sky, okay? We will extract the sky. So Arkshya, whenever you cut your nails, the edges become sharp and to smooth the edges, you then file your nails. Here we are using soft edges, as we use soft edges, it softens the picture and reduces sharpness. We now have clouds, water and ground in separate layers. Now we will also extract ourselves from one of the copies. Now please understand what we have done. If you understand, you have five photocopies. In the first one you have cut your picture, in the second one you have cut your clouds, in the third one you have cut the water, in the fourth one you have cut the ground. So now everything is in separate layers, right? So now if we make everything move, then it will appear as if the whole picture is 3d. And we have also cut ourselves and because we have extracted ourselves, we will make ourselves move as well. Like if the plane is coming closer from the back, then we will also increase or decrease our sizes, we will make the water move. So you see, the animations we are using in this, we have selected ‘add animation’ for everything and given grow shrink to one, right motion to the other and left motion to the other. We are picking and choosing whichever motion will look good on it. And we will make all the animations work simultaneously. We will select ‘with previous’, we can also select ‘after’, see as we are experimenting behind, what will look good. When we finish the animation we press F5, what does F5 do? We can watch our slide show. Alright so… Now I am pressing f5 after completing the animation and now see the magic. It appears as if the plane is coming from behind, the clouds are moving, the water is moving and everything. So this has become a 3d moving picture. Please read my lips, this is made by only using PowerPoint. PowerPoint 2010, PowerPoint 2013. So, people who thought PowerPoint was very boring, you have to eat your words. If you want to see more magic on PowerPoint, just visit our website www.rkphotomagictrix.com and don’t forget to like and share our Facebook page and remember this is a website where we are making PowerPoint do things that people thought were not possible before.

🔴 FREE 3D SCAN and PRINT: 3DF ZEPHYR – tutorial

🔴 FREE 3D SCAN and PRINT: 3DF ZEPHYR – tutorial


Hi! In this video I will show you how to make a 3d copy of an object with your phone. I will use a 3DF Zephyr free edition. Welcome to my youtube channel GreenEyedExplorer where I explore further and beyond! Hi! In my previous video I have shown you how to use Autodesk Recap Photo to make an object copy. See the link in the description below. As there is still a great interest, I decided to show you an alternative. A 3DF Zephyr program. It has some major benefits: free version without time limit, lower prices, many times we get the 3D model faster even though all the computing is done on a local computer. The program even supports NVIDIA hardware acceleration. The only major drawback is 50 input images limitation. Well, let’s start! Versions and downloading First we’ll download and install the program. Enter 3DF Zephyr into search engine. It’s located on 3Dflow.net page. Company offers few different versions. Let’s scroll down and see… The free version offers a 50 photos limitation. Others offer more input photos, more GPU support, advanced editing tools and even laser scan support, if you have one. Let’s get the free version. Now select the closest server and download. Wait for a 153 megabyte setup file. Execute it. Select language, accept the agreement. Select the target folder and proceed by clicking Next. Check the little box, if you want the program to be your default viewer for 3d files. The program Now start the program. As in my recap video I will use the same set of photos I have made. The object was a small seashell. All the conversion takes place under workflow menu. Let’s start a new project. You can check Mask images, if you want to manually trim photos beforehand, but it can be done at the end. Click Next. Now drag and drop images. A nice feature here is an option to import pictures from video. Click Next. Here is a calibration page. It’s usually not needed to change anything. You can select category here: Aerial, Close range, Human body or Urban. Urban for buildings etc. My seashell falls under close range. I’ll also choose deep preset. It will make more keypoints. I want details. Click Next and Run at the top. This process took 5 minutes on my Intel I3 notebook without Nvidia graphic card. We end up with sparse point cloud. Here you can see that some of the images weren’t used due to errors. Let’s spin it a bit. Blue dots in the air are camera positions. If you click one, it’ll display the corresponding photo. Now let’s start the next step under workflow menu. It’s a dense point cloud generation. Some info, click Next. I’ll live close range in high details. Run the process. This one took almost 30 minutes on my slow notebook. Nice result! I’ll water level the shell. Click the little atom or orbit icon at the top. It seems the program made the end object lean. Well, it doesn’t matter as the problem is manageable. At the end I’ll roughly cut off the underlying book. Adjust the plane by dragging it and click the scissors icon at the top menu. The next step in our workflow menu is mesh extraction. Leave the last selection or choose the one you like. I’ll leave close range and high details. Next and run the process. It took two minutes. It looks like a real sea shell in augmented reality! Now we just need some stinking rotten fish! No! Wait! The bottom still needs a small cut and a fill to make it perfect. I’ll use a plain selection tool and a cut – again. Bottom field will have to wait. So the next step would be Textured Mesh Generation under workflow menu. You can adjust some settings here to make a more detailed end result, but mind what the object will be used for. If it is only for printing, we have exaggerated all the way. You can probably leave anything on default. This last step took about 20 seconds. Now all you have to do is to export the object. I’ll select .OBJ file format and open it in Autodesk Meshmixer which I sometimes use for a fast object fixups. Don’t mind the odd-looking texture. For error checking I click analysis icon on the left and then auto repair all. I have selected flat fill for holes. You can do the same thing in the Zephyr. Go into “Tools”, then “Mesh filters” and choose “Fill Holes – Selective”. Program detects holes. You can see there is only one hole. Click “Fill Selected” and we are done! Now export the model. Just for demonstration – here – I will show you how it looks before printing. As in the Recap program, the Zephyr also makes a>7x smaller object. If I slice it into 0.1mm layers, we get most of details. So if you feel I have contributed to your knowledge please hit the LIKE button, SHARE video on social media, brainstorm your ideas in the COMMENTS below and do SUBSCRIBE to my channel! You can also buy me a COFFEE or even support me monthly we are PATREON. All the links are in the description below. See you next time!