Blender Camera Change Tutorial | How To Change Between Cameras?

Blender Camera Change Tutorial | How To Change Between Cameras?


Hello and welcome. This tutorial will teach you the basic technique
that allows you to automate the process of changing between cameras. Yes, this is the technique that you are going
to use if you want to render an animation without having to stop the rendering process
to change cameras. So, let’s begin. See that camera? That camera should be the active camera for
the next shot. So, how do we change cameras? It’s simple. First, select the first active camera. Press M on the timeline to create a marker. Now press control B to bind the camera to
that marker. Not much will change, as this camera is already
the active one. Now, select the frame in which the next camera
will become active. By selecting the second camera and looking
at the timeline, you can see the frame in which it starts to move. Now, with the second camera selected, set
a marker on that frame and bind the second camera to it. As you can see, now, on frame 150 the first
camera is active, but on frame 151 the second camera becomes active. The animation is now playing as intended,
with all the camera changes and such. You can apply this technique to create some
pretty dramatic scenes. Anyway, if this tutorial was helpful, like
this video and subscribe for more tutorials, animations, news and a lot of other stuff.

Street Photography Part 1c

Street Photography Part 1c


I’ve got the wide angle lens on this body as i’m walking down the street. because i’m far more likely to see
something interesting and be able to grab it with the wide lens, than to faff around and zoom in with a a long lens. but here’s something which is usually
pretty interesting isn’t it we all kind of go for shots of colorful fruit and veg and stuff on the market. i quite like this stuff, i just need to ask the man if it’s okay. hi mate, do you mind if i take a few shots of your fruits and veg, is that alright? yeah. who’s the boss? are you the boss? yes, hello my dear, do you mind if we take a few shots of your fruits and veg and stuff, what is that for then? we run, and shoot little films teaching people to use there cameras and that sort of thing. everybody want’s to take nice pictures down the market. okay, well as long as when i get a few customers, don’t block them out, nah, nah i won’t get in your way of customers at all. that’s very kind of you. she’s a nice lady. well the first thing i like is, well isn’t it weird the first thing about market shops fruit and veg traders all have signs like that, i don’t know why, it doesn’t matter who you are or in which country anywhere in the world in any city or any town they always look like that, i don’t know why. i don’t know, it must be some kind of deep psychological thing. Look at that. we have the pink grapefruit cut in half. now i expect when it was first cut i half it looked lovely, i expect it was all, bright and vibrant and gorgeous, it’s not quite so good now but none the less i still think there’s a shot to be had here, with the grapefruit sign above it. wide lens again, i’m going for the, wide lens, i don’t know why, i don’t know i just am. because i wan’t to try and get close to the grapefruit, yeah that’s going to work i want to get very close to the fruit, i want the feeling that you’re almost in the box with the fruit. i like this halved grapefruit, because it i dunno kind of breaks up the grapefruit. i like the market trader sign. and i like the building in the background, and of the canopy, because this bit of canopy really really says market. also right now, we’ve got clouds in the sky if the sun was out and it was a bright sky, that would just burn into white, but at the moment i think they’ll be some detail in the sky too. so bright sunshine isn’t always the best let’s just get in close here, ow there’s even a strip of street light going on over there. so let’s get in close, and focus on the cut fruit, here we go. adjust and just squeeze that. i want to get a different angle on it. i’m going to zoom my lens only a bit. it’s not working, that’s better. so i’m focusing on the cut fruit. I’ve zoomed it in only very slightly, from ten to about thirteen millimeters. focus on the cut fruit, and and i’m tilting the camera slightly, and I’ve got the pink grapefruit three for one pound going on in the background. i quite like that. i think that’s okay, that’s cool. now then sorry i’m very tempted to say melons, aha can’t help myself i’m such a kid. but let’s have a look at your melons dear. now then. what does this look like at the moment I’ve got, ordinary people in my shot, have a look. there’s janey with the camera, now let’s see, janey can you go that way a bit. i’m going to have a look along the stall. That’s quite cool, melons one pound. people walking up the street. here we go, there’s a little bit of street photography going on. now look at that, now as i took that last shot, and i had to do it very quickly i focused on the melons I’ve just got a bit of the sign there, but not as much as i wanted the reason i did it quickly was i liked the two guys walking up the street. i wanted to put them i the opposite corner of the picture to the fruit. this is were you’ve gotta kind of have eyes everywhere, and you’ve gotta move quickly. this is why aperture priority semi-auto mode works so so well and you don’t want to have to be thinking about is my shutter speed going to be fast enough so use a faster ISO in the first place. so kind of worked. i really really like these kind of clementine oranges. and we’ve got a guy being served, that’s really cool. so i’m talking quietly because i don’t want the to over hear me. uh… look at that, look at that. large clementines. cool. really really nice isn’t it aw nice. ca i take a picture of your carrots my dear? you may take a picture of the carrots. thank you right, i like that, i do like that. sorry i’m going to use the wide angled lens. look at that. i love that. oh look. how much more market-y could this get? than that. i’m going to have another go, ow i knocked her stall there. look at that, let’s get real close. i want them i’m gonna get real close to
the carrots. ah, if i can just focus. it’s difficult to focus there we go we’ve got a focus. choice carrots. look at that. how market-y is that for a still life? it’s cool isn’t it? and it’s so easy, and how nice people are. it’s not like these are people who have met me loads of times. but if you come back each week to the market and talk to the traders, and get people used to seeing you, their going to be really really cool about letting you take some pictures. do you mind if i just go round the other side? no that’s fine you’re very kind, thank you. the labels will be the wrong way. but i’m being sneaky actually because i just like looking across them from this angle like that. because it’s a real market-y sort of a shot i like the colours too. let’s just tilt this that way, look at that. they’re nice. yeah, i quite like that you see, that’s quite a nice wide angle very much on the market shot. the preserves a really really strong in
the foreground leading it up to the guy in the corner. So let’s just analysis this composition, because i need to make sure i tell you things not just let you watch me do things. I set the shot up ten mill lens, very very wide i’m still working at, no i’m not i’m working at a four point five, i must have knocked it by accident, i was hoping i’d get a great depth of field. but with that lens it shouldn’t be an issue. very in close so the so that the left hand corner of the picture has got jams and preserves very very strong but i compose it by moving the camera very slowly so that the guy who runs the stall is in the right hand corner. so we’ve got a bit of a dynamic going on these jams and preserves going to the man in the corner. there’s quite a diagonal dynamic going on there. i’m still shooting aperture priority i’m letting the camera deal with the
exposure i’m keeping my iso high. Then hopefully, seeing what’s been going on here is giving you an insight into how easy it can be to do a bit of street photography. the big thing is you have to own, there’s a kind of thing in your head it’s a mental space you have to be happy to just talk to people, ask them things be up front be straight about it, if you start being sneaky and kind of going, like that and think oh my god there watching, then they’re going to think what’s that bloke up to. so there we go, we’re gonna come back again and we’re going to look at photographing with the traders rather more than photographing their products. Get out there with your camera, have a play with this, go and take some still life’s on some markets and post them to our Facebook page, we’d love to see them.

Top 5 Camera Controls To Master – Mike Browne

Top 5 Camera Controls To Master – Mike Browne


the very very best bit about being a
photographer is still riding the motorcycle and what a wonderful day for
doing it too these are my top five camera controls
these are things which in my opinion you really do need to be able to master
because your camera isn’t infallible there are times it’s gonna get it
horribly wrong and you do need to be able to step in and take control these
are the things which I think you truly need to be able to do that everything
we’re going to talk about in this video is covered in depth in my five week
online ultimate beginners course click little thing popping out up here right
now if you want to go and check it out you can also go and click it at any time
during this video but first I need to show you my camera being a complete and
utter cock right stop looking at that and come and have a look at this because
this is where your camera is going to get it wrong that is just the sort of
thing that the camera will actually get perfect but when you go off piste a
little bit like you’re on a skiing holiday or you’re out on a frosty bright
morning or photographing anything really bright I bet you’ve had shots that come
out looking gray and dull and really rather lifeless and uninteresting
imagine these bricks are your bright shiny scene of snow-capped mountains if
you take a picture of them and I’m going to do this with video because I want you
to be able to see what goes on here we go they’re looking pretty gray aren’t
they they don’t look very white now if I move down here and I go into a coal mine
which is dark see how that just brightened it up let’s get back up to
the snow and it darkened it down your camera doesn’t know how much light is
falling on something it only knows how much light is being reflected by it
therefore it can’t make choices about what an exposure should be and getting
the exposure right is really really really crucial so therefore there are things
you need to know how to control this really isn’t rocket science but it
is very very important because if you don’t understand what your camera is
doing when it cocks it up like it did over there with the snowy mountain peaks
how are you going to step in and put it right big question mark
look manual exposure all you’ve got are three controls imagine light is
water if you’ve got a great big tap with a spigot like that tons of light is
gonna come gushing out of it isn’t it if you’ve got a little tiny one like that
Litttle eeny thing not so much is gonna come out
even though they’re at the same pressure that is your aperture how big or small
your spigot is now shutter speed that’s how long you turn the tap on for so if
you’ve got a big spigot and you turn it on for a long time you’ve got a flood
of light coming roaring out through your camera and if you just do a little like
that you’ve only got a little bit you’re just
dancing between those two now the third one that’s your ISO think of ISO as
being like skin – skin type for example I’m insensitive I can go and
stand in the Sun for ages and I don’t really get burned not for a very long
time Jilly who’s on camera at the moment she’s much fairer skinned if Jill goes
and stands in the Sun for even a fraction of that amount of time she will
get burnt Jill is a high ISO she is very very sensitive to light I’m a low ISO
I’m not I can take an awful lot more light before anything happens
so a low ISO means it needs more light before it records the image and a
high ISO means it leaves less that allows you to play around with the other
two for creative reasons that I’m not going into right this minute let’s make
a manual exposure I’ve got a shot set up over here but I’ve got my t-bird against
a nice sort of neutrally background so all the shiny shiny stands out now let’s
set up a shot and take it and I’m going to talk you through the exposure and the
settings let me line up a shot hope we don’t get run over out here in the
carpark because it’s getting a bit busy all right I think I want to be down here
somewhere so look we have got here the shutter speed here we have got the
aperture which is currently on 7.1 and here we’ve got the ISO for sensitivity
of the skin on the left is the light meter right now it is showing that this
shot is about just under two stops overexposed to get the correct exposure
what I have to do is adjust spiggott the length of time the taps open for and the
sensitivity until that little dot there is on the zero so simple isn’t it look
so I can either make the spigot smaller we’ve got a smaller tap we’ve got a
there we go look it’s now on the zero our exposure is perfect take the picture
right next what else could we do well we could it says it’s too bright
let’s make this tap on for less time let’s speed up so look my shutter speed
has now gone to one two five or two 50s – dark one to five is so places to not
be a problem and we just take the picture that you can also of course
control how bright or dark your image is with your ISO but changing the skin
sensitivity here I can make the picture brighter or darker all you have to do is
dance between those three but what if we go into a situation where the camera
might get it wrong well if we go back to those snowy pristine white alpine peaks
which you saw it make a mistake with what if we make a manual exposure over
there same scenario different mountain range
because there’s a car parked in front of the other one let’s make a manual
exposure look at the light meter on the left there it’s saying – two stops
underexposed what do we got to do we’ve got to do let’s just turn the tap on for
longer and move the little pointer up to the zero here it comes here we go we’re
on the zero camera says that’s the correct exposure
take it doesn’t look very white to me I don’t know about you – to make that white
what do we got to do? We got to make it brighter but the
has said that is the correct manual exposure the camera’s an idiot we’re
going to have to go brighter let’s go to full stops brighter the light meter
screaming you have overexposed this but it isn’t that’s correct that’s white and
if you’re doing the same thing with black it’s just in the other direction
what you’ve got to understand is that when you’re shooting a manual exposure
is not just putting that single little pointer on to the zero you’ve got to use
this thing and understand how the whole that whole concept works otherwise if
you just follow what the light meter says it’s the same as shooting on auto
only you are twiddling the knobs and dials instead of the camera twiddling
them for you but it’s the same thing you’ve got to understand how manual
exposures work and how the light meter works – and my next top five is really
going to help you do that A histogram isn’t really a camera control it’s a
feature but it’s probably the most useful feature they ever put on a camera
ever because by using your histogram you need never ever have a bad exposure
again look what we’ve got here we’ve got quite dark shadows on myself and the
t-bird but look at the sky really really bright what you’re looking at right now
is kind of a balance between the two but if you’re shooting stills particularly
if you’re shooting raw your histogram will tell you how much data you need in
your picture you need never ever have a bad exposure again so let’s take this
shot and I’m going to set a manual exposure but I’m going to do precisely
what the camera tells me I should do so here we go let’s line up the shot what is
my camera telling me I need to do? It’s telling me that I need – there we go it’s
about there – it’s telling me I want about a four thousandth of a second at f5 on
the 200 iso if i look at that histogram it’s kind of bunched over to the left a
bit isn’t it it’s a little bit dark we have got a bright sky so what do we need
to do we need to brighten it up a bit histogram will tell you how far to go if
I line up the shot again and then start to brighten the exposure I’m going to
take the shutter speed down a bit we’re down to about a two thousandth, we’ve now got more
information in our highlight in our shadows and we’ve still got pretty good
highlight let those guys go and there we go You see your histogram is just one of
the most useful things in the world learn to use your histogram all you’ve
got to do is keep it within either end it really doesn’t matter if things spike
off the top. Histogram one of my absolute top fives. Now you know why it’s so
important for you to be able to make a manual exposure and you understand that
awesome feature which will tell you when your exposures correct you never need
get a bad one it’s completely safe for you to start using semi auto modes
shutter priority aperture priority and indeed P mode I use them tons you don’t
have to shoot in manual all the time you just need to know manual so that you can
step in when those modes get things wrong like they did with the black and
the white there is a tool to help you with those too and I’m going to come to
that in a moment because that’s my next of my top 5 but shutter priority you set
a shutter speed the camera goes away finds an aperture to work with their
aperture priority you say an aperture the camera goes and finds a shutter
speed to work with it and P mode it kind of takes care of both but my next top
tool still gives you control over that as well
so if you’re in a semi auto mode the light is pretty even like it is here
it’s not at all like it was over there with the bike all you need to do and I’m
in aperture priority is concentrate on the cool gray sexy stuff like light and
Composition and where to stand and when to click the decisive moment that’s real
photography there you go semi auto modes they’re one of my
absolute top five because they take a pile of work away from you so now you understand why you’ve got to
be able to make a fully manual exposure and it’s not that difficult you’ve also
got tools to help you ensure that exposure is always perfect because you
can do that and you know about manual you can use semi or auto modes now let’s
start looking at an amazing little thing called exposure compensation that allows
you to use semi auto modes and still be able to control the exposure this isn’t
great when you have creative critical settings you want to work with such as a
specific shutter speed for movement control or a specific aperture for depth
of field control but where most times it’s not really that important you can
just use your exposure compensation most cameras it’s a little button with a plus
and a minus on it that looks like this on this one on my x-series Fuji it’s a
little dial which I can just roll with my thumb when it’s up to my eye I know
that all I have to do is roll to the right makes it bright roll to the left
makes it dark how simple is that? if I set up a shot here we’ve got very
very contrasty just like we had with the bike earlier now what’s going to happen
if the camera is left to its own devices? I reckon something like that loads the
sky cuz I kind of like that and let’s look at the histogram yeah as always the
camera wants to put it in the middle because that’s what cameras want to do
we know that this scene is brighter therefore we got a brilliant brain what
we have to do is to brighten the picture up now instead of having to think about
shutters and apertures and things what we’ve got to do is add some exposure so I’m just
gonna add what just over plus one stop because I’m guessing and also I’ve been
doing this for a long time so with my guesses I’m usually fairly accurate that will
be just right let’s have a look at the histogram and get in that’s not happens
we’ve been doing it for a long time so exposure compensation combined with a
histogram combined with a semi auto mode is a fantastic thing and it can save you
hours of pondering when you’re shooting in a fast-moving situation if you’re leaving your camera on full
auto focus by which I mean it knows a little sparkly flashes every time you
touch the shutter button it means you’re not in control of where your camera is
focusing your camera is choosing where to focus for example if I was to take
your picture as represented right this minute by Jilly with the video camera if
I took your picture now I can choose whether to have you in focus like that
or whether to let the background be in focus your camera hasn’t got a brain it
doesn’t know and there’s times when it’ll get it wrong I bet you’ve tried to
photograph things and then gone why is it that’s all blurry and out of focus
that’s what I want in focus your camera doesn’t know that you have to tell it
and there is a plethora of auto focus modes built into your camera my little
Fuji’s they don’t have many – but it’s fine and I’m not going in depth with all
of them now anyway they’re all in my course they’re all available online do a
search you can wade through it on your own or I can show you it’s up to you but
look if I have my camera on single point focus and I come back here again and I
want to take a picture of you guys as represented by Jilly with the video
camera if I come forward and I don’t change that focus what’s going to happen
she is gonna be or rather you are gonna be blurry yeah but let’s say you put it
onto a continuous focus mode because you’re photographing your friend who’s
running a marathon they’re running down the street towards you, you think what do
I want my composition to be? I want audience or whatever they’re called
standing there on the side of the road watching and I want my friend running up
the left-hand side what we’ve got to do is choose say a continuous mode and choose
your single point autofocus where you want to focus within the composition
which I’ve just done I’m just going to pop my camera onto video mode
I’m just going to show you what happens as I change the distance
if I put that dot on Gilly’s face and start rolling some video as I walk
towards you the camera will keep you nice and sharp the background will start
to go blurry you should see it starting to happen now it is there and as I come
in here the background is really blurry you’re really sharp imagine how useful
that would be if you are photographing your friend running a marathon go and
learn how to use your auto focus modes they will make sure all your pictures
are sharp well you’ve got to do is set them up and use them appropriately So those are my top 5 camera controls you really need to know how to use them but
I have a bonus for you focal length this bad boy focal length is just the most
amazing thing it dances and is completely in love with composition let
me show you I am going to roll some video I’m going to take a picture of you
again as represented by Gilly and the video camera there you are watch what
happens as I change the zoom as I change the focal length and move back as I
change my distance look what’s going on look at the background I know it’s a bit
wobbly but look at that black house look what it’s doing it’s going to disappear
in a minute look at those beach huts behind Jilly they’re sneaking out behind
her look at that look that is a very very different thing to what we had
earlier let’s come back in the other way if I just sneak that in look the house
come back the black house I know it’s wobbling I can’t help it
tough live with it deal with it look you see how that is completely changed I’ll
do a quick still just to prove it here we go here’s our shot quick still of Gilly on camera big long lens take the same shot hope
there’s no one behind me if there is they will be trodden on… So look what
an immense difference it made between those two focal length it’s just an
amazing thing it doesn’t just make far-off thing
come closer it’s a really really useful creative tool the thing is the most
important thing in all of photography is you and you are often overlooked in
favor of some gadget upgrade new lens some other doodad or gizmo the great
photographers of the past had three controls on their cameras they had a
shutter they had a focus ring and they had an aperture that’s all they had and
their pictures were blowing us away and they still are today so with your
whiz-bang DSLR why can’t you do it you need to take control of your camera then
you can concentrate on real photography the decisive moment when to click when
the light comes out from behind the cloud and lights up little cottage in
the valley where to stand how to align the elements of a
composition so they’re harmonious and they look great
this is the real photography you have to be able to control that thing with the
top five that I’ve just given you in order to do that you can’t concentrate
on everything at once so I hope you found that a value everything we’ve
talked about is in my ultimate beginners course if you haven’t clicked the little
thing above well you can go and have a look now try a free sample if you like
you can of course find all this out for free online what you’re paying for when
you buy a course is for me to be your guide to coach you to feed you the
information in the correct order so you don’t miss a bit out and then find it
doesn’t work later on so I hope you’ve enjoyed this and found it of value
please if you liked it like share it subscribe to the channel helps me make
more free videos if you didn’t like it you did a thumbs down that’s completely
cool but please tell me why I want to know what you didn’t like can’t please
all the people all the time but I can’t do anything about it you don’t tell me
what you didn’t like and it’s interesting to know so leave it in a
comment below if you’d like to see more of my work more of my images there’s a
load of links again below this video in the description section go and check
them out this and cool stuff there for you meanwhile take care I’ll see you
next time I’m off to go and play on my thunderbird

Cinematic Retouching Deep Dive: Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace

Cinematic Retouching Deep Dive: Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace


Hi everybody welcome to another episode of Exploring Photography right here on AdoramaTV, I’m Mark Wallace and in this episode we’re going to revisit some post-production I did in an episode a few weeks ago, because I sort of got into a little bit of trouble because I didn’t show what I did. So I made this, ah really interesting video about emotional portraiture but because we didn’t have enough time, I didn’t show all of the post-production and instead I just smashed it all together and showed this really quick video clip and a lot of people have written and said “hey what the heck? Can you slow that down and show us what you did step-by-step?” And so first let me just show you this clip that got me into all the trouble. These images look great, straight out of the camera but they look even better with a few Lightroom adjustments, I took them to the next level by jumping over to Photoshop and doing some skin retouching and then I took them over to the Nik software collection specifically Analog Efex Pro 2, to add some texture. Now while I was in Analog Efex Pro 2, I discovered that the images, because of the color contrast, well they just lend themselves to all kinds of fun and so once you shoot your images like this, try some post-production to see the different effects you can get by just using the presets in Analog Efex Pro 2, you can get some startling results and it’s free software so why not play. I created my own Custom Preset and here are my results. Alright well I sort of liked the clip because it was fast based and it had some groovy music but so many people have written to me and asked me to slow it down and show the steps. Now the steps involve Lightroom, Photoshop and Nik software, specifically Nik software’s where a lot of people wanted to know a little bit more because one of the issues with Nik software is its destructive. Once you make changes to an image it sticks and then you can’t go back and change it, except there is a way to make it non-destructive, where you can make changes to see if you like them or not and if not, to go back, reverse it and make small minor changes, but that requires a jump through Photoshop and so that’s what I’m going to show you. I’m going to go back and revisit all the retouching that I did on those images but I’m going to show you the step by step process, so you can apply this to your post-production. So let’s hop in, right now we’re going to be using a technique called round-tripping and this is going to allow us to repeat our process, so if we have future photo shoots who want to do this all over again. We can repeat everything we did in the past. It’s also going to allow us to do non-destructive editing, so if we change our mind about how we’ve done something, we can always go back and change things to the original file without doing any damage. This is a four step process. We will begin in Lightroom, we’ll do our color and tonality changes, then we’ll hop over into Photoshop. In Photoshop we’ll do some basic skin retouching and then take our image into Analog Efex Pro 2. In Analog Efex Pro we’ll use a preset that we can use over and over. We’ll do some custom tweaking, then we’ll go back into Photoshop to save our image, which will then take us back into Lightroom where we can do our final Tonal Corrections, Color Corrections, Cropping and adding advent yet. So let me show you how all of these steps work together, you’ll notice in our final edited images they start out as .DNG files, this is what comes out of my camera, but they end up as Photoshop files. That’s one of the by-products of the round-tripping that we’re going to go from Lightroom over to Photoshop, to Nik back to Photoshop and then back into Lightroom. So they start out as one file form, at the end as a different file format, but because of the way we’re doing this, that’s okay, it’s still non-destructive. We can go back in the future and fix everything up or change things if we want without damaging anything, so what I’m going to do here is; I’ve selected two images and these haven’t been retouched at all, so we’re going to take this first image, we’re going to do all of our processes, all of our four steps and we’re going to do that a little bit slowly, so you can see exactly what’s going on and then really, really rapidly, what we’re going to do is, we’re going to apply all that stuff to the second image, so you can see how we can repeat our process and once we have it set up once, we can do it over and over again very, very quickly. So let’s start with step one. We’re going to go into Lightroom’s develop module. Remember we need to do our Color and Tonality changes and so I’ve already spent a lot of time figuring out all the values that I’m going to be plugging in here, so I’m going to be going through this to save time pretty rapidly, but normally you would take some time to adjust things. The first thing we want to do is we want to change our Color Temperature and our Tonality. Remember we want this blue background to really play with the warm colors, the oranges and the yellows and the reds in Nikki’s hair and clothes. So what I’m going to do here is just to take this Color Temperature down to 3000 Kelvin and then I also know that there is a shift here in our tint and so I’m going to make that 24. Again this took me a little while to figure this out but there we have that blue, really starting to pop. Now what we need to do is, we need to fix our Tonality, so the exposure here, I’m going to take that down by a just over 1/3 stop so -0.35 then I’m going to adjust the blacks down to about 44. I usually start with the exposure and the blacks just to start getting contrast, to know where I need to fix things. Now that the blacks are down this far, we’re going to start to see our shadows becoming blocked up so I’m going to open up those shadows to about 34 which is just about opposite of what we did with the blacks, then our highlights need to be fixed just a little bit so we’re going to take those highlights up to about 31. Remember I’ve played with this over time, so normally I would take some time, to sort of, fiddle with this and see exactly what I want to do. The other thing I want to do is take the Clarity Slider, I’m going to bump that up to about 16, just a little bit more clarity something I wouldn’t normally do with the portrait, but these will you want them to be gritty and really sort of clear, so we’re going to do that here. My default Vibrance is set to plus 15 for this camera so normally you might have to increase that, but that’s nice and vibrant. The other thing we want to do, remember there’s a background here, this blue background, we really want to play with that. The nice thing is in our Saturation Slider here on the HSL we can take that and we can just take this blue slider, take it left or right and you can see, we’re just affecting that blue background, so I’m going to take that up to +38 to really make this blue background punchy. Okay we have done all we need to do in Lightroom. We have done our Color and Tonality fixes. Now we want to do some effects. We want to add some grain and some grit and even more clarity to this, so to do this, what we want to do is do it in a way that we can recreate it and make it non-destructive, so instead of going straight over into Analog Efex Pro 2, we’re going to go into Adobe Photoshop CC 2018, so I’m going to click on that and then this is going to open up in Photoshop. We’re going to give that a second to do that, okay now we’re in Photoshop here, what we can do here, so I’m going to fill this frame, I’m going to duplicate this background layer, so we can do our skin retouching, so I’m going to do command or control J. I’m going to rename this layer to Skin Retouch, okay, now I’m going to go in here, go into full size, normally I would take, you know, as much time as I needed to do all the skin retouching but we’re just going to do a few quick fixes here. I’m using my Healing Brush tool, maybe I’ll get rid of Nikki’s little nose ringy, thingy here just to show you some things. We’re not going to spend any time doing some real skin retouching but this is where you would do that. Okay let’s say that our skin retouching is finished. We’ve got that done, if we need to go back and change anything we’ve got a layer just for our skin retouching. What we need to do next is duplicate this Skin Retouch Layer, so I’m going to do again command or control J, rename this layer to Analog Efex. You can name this whatever you want but this is where Analog Efex Pro effects are going to be applied. So what we’re going to do now, make sure you have this layer selected, we’re going to go to step 3. We’re going to click on filter. We’re going to go to Nik collection Analog Efex Pro, so we’ll click on that. That is now going to open Analog Efex Pro and apply your last used effects or camera or whatever you have, so it’s not going to be exactly what we want, right off the bat. We’re going to have to do some changes and good for us because this doesn’t look great. I need to give you a warning really quickly. If you’re using Adobe Photoshop CC 2018 there is a glitch with Analog Efex Pro and the Nik collection and Adobe Photoshop CC 2018 where things don’t work the way they used to, so go down to your settings in Analog Efex Pro and you need to go here and change one thing and that is, after clicking okay, make sure you have this set to; “apply the flter effect to the current layer. That’s not the default but if you don’t do that, you might have a crash in your editing. You don’t want that, so make sure you go to settings after clicking okay, apply the filtered effect to the current layer, that’s why we duplicated the layer. That should fix that little glitch. Okay after you do that once, you’re all set, forever hopefully. Okay now, what we need to do now is we need to create a Preset that we can use over and over, and over again for all of the photos we want to look the same way, so what we’re going to do here is, we’re to go to cameras. We’re going to go click this little right arrow here and we’re going to go to camera kit. Now we’re going to get rid of all the stuff that’s over here already, so I’m going to get rid of Dirt and Scratches in Lens Vignette and Film Type, whatever you have selected just get rid of it, so all you have are the Basic Adjustments. Now for the look that I want to use for Nikki and this stuff what we’re using is Basic Adjustments and we’re going to be using some light leaks, so I’ll add that and we’re going to be using a Photo Plate okay, that is, those are the three things that we’re going to be using to make the effect that I want. so what we’re going to do here is, I’m going to turn off light leaks and Photo Plate. I’m going to go into our Basic Adjustments and I’m just going to set these to what I’ve already figured out here so detail extraction we’re going to have that at 16. Again you’re going to spend some time doing this to make it look exactly like you want it, so this might take you in reality an hour or more. So I’ve already done that, I’m just going to type in the values that I already have and so our saturation is at 9, you can see exactly what I’ve done here so that’s the Basic Adjustments that we’re going to use on this. Now I’m going to go into my Light Leaks and I am going to use this really dynamic Light Leak, this guy right here and we don’t want it to be so powerful, so we’re going to take that strength down to about 15% and then the other thing I’m going to do with this Light Leak is, I’m going to move it up over here, so it’s just very very subtle that looks good and then the last thing I’ve done here is, I’ve added a Photo Plate and the Photo Plate that I’m going to be using is a corroded Photo Plate, this guy right here and we’re going to set that string to about 53, that’s what gives us that really grungy look. Alright so now we can go, zoom this in 200%, you can see we’ve started getting that really grunge cool effect that we like, now that the basics are set up, I need to save this as a Preset and so over here on the right hand side you’ll see this little button that says Save. I’m going to click that and then I need to name this something so I’m going to name this Nikki Grungy, Nikki Grungy. You can name it whatever you want, then I’m going to click okay. Now all of these settings are set you can use them over and over, and over in the future and they’ll show up in our Custom Area over here and so you see now we have all these different things that I’ve named in the past. The one that is selected is this guy right here; Nikki Grungy and that’s all good, okay. We’re going to use Nikki Grungy on our, all of our future edits of this but one of the things I don’t like about this, is if we go into 100% you can see that this Photo Plate is on her face and so we’ve got texture on her face, I don’t want that and so what I can do here is go into the Photo Plate or whatever different effect that you’ve added and you can click this, this little Disclosure Triangle here to open up the control points, now I can add a control point so I’m going to click on that and go over here right on her face, click and so what I can do is the top slider, I can set the size of this so about that size and then I can say the texture strength so I want that to be zero so I want this to have none of that Photo Plate so I don’t want that texture on her face. If we zoom in you can see that it’s removed it from here. We still have a lot of it over on the edges, so what I need to do is add a bunch of different control points. That’s very, very simple to do. Once you have your first control point set let me go back out here. You can click alt or option right on the control point, drag it over and it copies it so you can just do this really very quickly. Maybe you can make one down here, that’s a little bit larger so I’ll increase the size of that, however take some time to put these all over and we’re not going to save these as part of the preset because your subject is not going to be in the same place or size in the frame and so you want to do this later on. Okay. we’re going to call that good, if we zoom in you can see that now the texture is not on her face but it is blending in on the side. That is great now all we need to do is click on OK and we have just successfully finished step 3. So we’ve gone from Lightroom to Photoshop, into the Nik collection now we’re round-tripping back into Photoshop. Now you see we have this Analog Efex Pro layer right here that we created. All we need to do now is save this, so command S, ctrl S to save. What that’s going to do is save our new Photoshop file into Lightroom and now we can do our 4th step. We can do our final color, and color and cropping, and all of that stuf, so once this is saved we’ll get right on that. Okay this is saved, I’m going to close this out of Photoshop, hop back over here into Lightroom and now you can see here is that file, so here’s the edit PSD. It creates that automatically, we want to do some final tonality changes, you can see here we’ve got all of our grungy effects and everything, I’m going to go into the develop module hit D, to get into the develop module and we’re going to do just our final fixes here, so the things that I want to do here is I want to first fix our, our tonality here, so the blacks we lost a little bit of that juiciness that I like, so I’m going to take that down to about -37, I’m going to take the Exposure up by about a third stop, just to make this a little bit punchier so that’s starting to be exactly where we want to go. I’m going to go back down here to our Hue Saturation and Luminance panel, I’m going to take the orange down just a little bit because we got a little bit orangie, when we did that processing and we’re going to take the yellow, we’re going to take that up, way up, we want that atomic blond kind of look which I really like, so you can play with this. That’s the fun of this kind of imagery, you can make it anything you want. The other thing we need to do, this was a Photoshop file and so it needs to have a little bit of sharpening, so what I’m going to do here is, I’m going to zoom in to 100% just so we can see exactly what we’re doing and then I’m going to sharpen this up to about 39. Again this is stuff that, I’ve already played with, so when you’re doing yours, you might take you a little bit longer to do it, and that looks pretty good, I think when we zoom out that looks pretty good. The other thing that we’re going to do here is we want to add a vignette, so I’m just going to go down here to my Effects panel. I’m going to take this vignette down to about -23, something like that, just burn in the edges a little bit. I’m going to leave everything else, all the defaults set to normal and there you go, we just went from start to finish and now what we want to do, is we want to repeat this process. Well the good thing is we’ve set everything up to be repeatable, so how do we do that? So here is our first file that we started with, this is our DNG file, so I’ll make these a little bit larger so you can see this. What we wanted to do is we want to take the Lightroom step 1, Tonality and Color changes and if, and copy and paste those over to this other .DNG file, so I just click on this, then command click that, then go down to the right hand side, sync settings, I’m going to check everything click synchronize, boom now that’s done, now I can right click, go over here to say edit in Photoshop CC 2018, that’s going to take us to our second step and jump us over now that we’re in Photoshop here, we’ll go and make this really nice. We’ll duplicate this, we will rename the skin “retouch”. Then we would normally go in and do all of our skin retouching. I don’t want to take too much time here, so I’ll just do one little skin retouch right there, okay, let’s call that done. Then what we’ll do is we will copy this layer, we’re going to call it Analog Efex Pro, great now what we’re going to do here is we’re going to go filter Nik collection Analog Efex Pro 2, we don’t have to do all the stuff that we did before because remember, we saved this as a Custom Preset, it’s a little recipe that we can use over and over, so what we’ll do is as soon as this loads in on our custom cameras over here, we’re going to go find Niki, Niki Grungy, there we go, BAM there’s our Niki Grungy Preset, so all that stuff we did before, it’s already there, all we need to do is we need to go into this Photo Plate, now she’s not in the same place that she was before and add our control point, we’re going to add this control point, take this down, make this a little bit larger, there it is and then we can go through very quickly and spend the time to get this right, so we take all that stuff off. I’m not going to spend all the time to do that but you can see where we’re going with this. Once we have that done you can click OK. That’s going to take us back into Photoshop. Now that we’re in Photoshop, I’ll double click this so it fits, all I do is click Save. That’s going to take us back over into Lightroom, that’s all saved, so when it closed that out, zip over here to Lightroom, here’s our Photoshop file from this, so what we’re going to do is we’re going to take this Photoshop file click on that command or ctrl click, then second, sync our settings. We’re going to say check all synchronize blam! Everything we did with that is done, so you can see that this is very, very quick. The other thing that I would normally do here is add a crop, so in the video I think I crop these to 16X9 to make them cinematic, so I might do that as well. There you go I want to apply that to this guy over here, command click, sync settings, synchronize BAM. Now they are synced. There you go. Those are two final processed images. Well I hope you’ve learned a few things in this episode, I think you’ll agree that it’s beneficial to have Lightroom and Photoshop because you can do some things that you can’t do when you have Lightroom all by itself. Thanks so much for joining me, I want to remind you to subscribe to AdoramaTV it’s absolutely free, that way you won’t miss a single episode, also check out the Adorama Learning Center and follow me on Instagram. Here’s my Instagram for you right here. Thanks so much and I will see you again next time.

HOW TO TAKE A PLANTED TANK PHOTO – CONTEST TANK PHOTOGRAPHY GUIDE

HOW TO TAKE A PLANTED TANK PHOTO – CONTEST TANK PHOTOGRAPHY GUIDE


Welcome to the beautiful world of aquascaping! Guys, today we’re gonna do a contest tank photoshoot session! So you’re gonna learn, how to make a beautiful picture of your tank. It all starts with a water change. As you can see, Gábor there is already taking out the hose. So this morning, we did a huge water change on this tank. It’s crystal clear. And we’re not gonna start the filter after that. We’re gonna start working with Viktor and Tommy, if Viktor gets in, because he’s always late. I don’t know, it’s… It’s already almost 10 o’clock, where is Viktor? We’re gonna do a photo session, he’s gonna bring in his Canon 5D. And we’re gonna talk a little bit about the technology of making a beautiful picture for a contest. Stay with us! We started the filters anyway, because I wasn’t happy with what’s happening here. The water wasn’t crystal clear. And Gábor now is adding back some mineral GH boosters here, from Dennerle at this time. I’m gonna add the Aqua Conditioner Clear Water. And Tommy won’t let me do it, while these particles are still trying to dissolve in the water. So let’s start adding the Clear Water! This thing works! Pretty much everything is in order. Except for the wood, which is not dark enough yet. But we would need probably half a year for the wood to darken. At least the Red Moor parts of it. So I’m gonna just you know, help a little bit with Photoshop. I’m hoping, that the camera dynamic range will not be wide enough. I see that everything else is cool. We just made a trimming on it. Gábor has just trimmed the roots – again. We trim those roots every four days. Crazy! Other than that, it’s not gonna get any better, than this. The plants will start to fill up in the background and they’re gonna start covering the rocks, so I want to avoid that. When you are shooting a tank, you’ve got glass everywhere. So it’s very important, that all reflections should be removed. So that’s the first thing that we do with shooting – removing the reflection from the tank from the glass. This is his T-shirt right there. So get a black shirt! And to remove the reflection from the glass, we’re gonna use some black curtains, that we’re gonna hang on tripods around the tank. We’re gonna use the lights, to actually raise a little bit of foreground here, because this tree is really in the shadow. Because the lights are behind the tree. Tommy! Please help! We need the widest lens, because that’s gonna give the biggest perspective. And this is a diorama tank. What I always do with the older lens, I don’t take the full wide angle, I’m just gonna close it a little bit. Wide lense will stretch the depth of the tank a lot, so it will look much deeper. We should mention, that you should always try – way before, months before you take the actual competition shot. You should try different focal lengths. For some wood-imitation aquascapes, sometimes it’s better to use 50, 60, 70mm distance, because you don’t want that huge distortion. Let’s just show them, how it looks! If you take a picture of Tommy with the close-up lens. This is a 50 millimeter lens. This is a 16 millimeter lens. If you have the chance to use a full-frame camera, you actually have a bigger sensor, you can use your – for example 16 millimeter lens, which means that you can get up to a much wider angle. To achieve the same on an APSC sensor, you would need about 10 millimeter wide lens, Yeah! which is almost fish-eye, which has a really-really weird distortion. Hi guys, good morning! Good morning! A bit late! Good morning! I just had to start the video (it’s Thursday)! Welcome to the beautiful world of aquascaping! What kind of lens do you have on your Canon 5D Mark IV? A 17-40, or the 16-35, and the fixed one from Tommy, – which I borrow sometimes, the… Yes, I have a Prime 24! Yeah, that’s very good! And if I do the close-up, that’s a 100 millimeter macro from Canon. That’s also very nice! Do you actually have the 16-35 now? No I don’t have, I… He had an issue… I’m at the… What do you have? I want to stretch the space to the back. Between 16 and 24, there’s a big difference. We need the 16 lens. Can you just jump home for it, please? [Laughter] No way! Yeah, it’s like 10 minutes! You’re fast, you can take my car! Good job! So we’re adjusting the height now. I don’t want to be at the middle of the tank, but I want to be a little bit higher, than the middle of the tank. So at this moment, I am at 134 centimeters. So you can see that the 134 is almost at the top of the tank, so we’re quite a lot above the middle. Probably 15 to 20 centimeters above the midpoint of the tank. The middle of the tank is almost here. Maybe one centimeter right to this line. So I got to place the lens a little bit to the left. This is the final shot of the image. We are about 10 centimeters from the top of the tank And we are exactly in the middle. And we are using the 24 millimeter, full-frame equivalent on the lens. So we’re gonna be much closer to the tank actually with the full frame lens, when Tommy comes back. And hopefully he didn’t crash my car. [Balazs] Okay Viktor, what’s next? [Viktor] I just check the old image, because it’s still on my card. [Balazs] The problem was that the tree did not separate from the background, enough. So what we need to do, is to kind of try to separate the tree from the background more. And we can do that probably with lighting. So what we need to do, is to kind of have a backlight from here. We’re trying to put this on a stand, on a tripod here. Just have the top shadowed down and also, I want to avoid the reflection of all the lights. Let’s move in with the fill light! The fill light is something, that comes from the direction of the camera and it will help you with the background. And for the fill light, we will need the big aperture 120 light, that we have currently on me. This is quite cool, because this has a remote control. So you can actually… It’s much better like this! I kinda like it. Maybe if we add some red color to the background, it will also help. So we can use some color, to light it. He has to figure out how to switch it on, though! Hahahaaa! Oh, Tommy’s here! I think the lighting is about ready. What do you guys think? You want the polarizer for it? Yes! So we’re gonna use a polarizer filter, to remove any reflection, that is caused by the glass, obviously. So we’ve got the 17 to 40. And I’m at 17 at the moment and I’m just gonna move it a little bit in, until it’s like 18. You see how much closer we are? Ready? So we’re raising the camera until a point, where you have the background visible already. I’ve got everything visible! It’s quite nice, right? [Shutter sound] I kinda like this picture! I’m gonna do a selfie now! Let’s do a selfie, Tommy! Us, all the technology and everybody behind me. [Shutter sound] You’ve got three things, that you can adjust in a camera. First of all, the aperture. Yep! That will tell you, how much depth of field you will have. The second thing that you can adjust is the time. You cannot play with that too much, because the fish are swimming around in the tank. And if you have the time too much, if you have too much time… It’s called the shutter speed. The shutter speed, yeah! Then… Thank you, for teaching me photography! This is 1/80. You can see, that the picture is very… [Tommy] Dark. [Balazs] Dark. The third thing, that you can adjust… [Tommy] Is ISO. …Is the ISO. It’s basically the sensitivity of the sensor itself, so how quickly it sucks up light. And this is why you should have a good camera and you should probably have a full-frame camera, because the better the camera is, the higher you can crank up the ISO, without having those little noisy dots on the picture. We have the final setup for the contest photo. [Tommy in Hungarian] Anyád! – Damn it! Tommy is switching off the filters now. And then we need to remove the lily pipes and we need to remove the TwinStar from the back. You don’t want any technology, to be visible. [Tommy] You really want to do this before setting up the camera, because now I have actually no idea, how I’m gonna get there. Cool! Let’s do the hair dryer trick! All the fish are below the tree, which is not very nice. So ideally, I’d want them to be up at the top. So the position of the fish is very important in a scape. So actually what we’re doing here, is we’re gonna try to train them. Yeah, Tommy is very good at training them! He kicks the glass, scares them, and they will just swim out. Now! Very good! [Clapping] Sorry! Wow! I like the last one! [Tommy] Okay! This is probably the best. [Tommy] Okay! [Tommy] Then we use this. The one without surface movement is just too… You have no idea what’s happening on the top. So it’s not very real. First of all, we remove the lens distortion. So that’s the first step, that we do. How you wanna cut it? This is the picture, that we took right after we set it up. So you can see that this is very vivid. So I wanted to go for a very vivid kind of image. And all the greens should be very fresh. I actually start off by actually clicking the “Auto” button. And checking, what the computer would tell me. To actually have it color correct, I like to pull up vibrance to full. And then you can actually see which way the image is tilted. So now you can see that it’s fully green. We can actually put it back to the purple side a bit. [Balazs] Let’s move it more to the natural look! So can we save this picture? So let’s call this Dream Land and save this image. Yeah, if you are into photography, you have the same picture with about 55 different versions of final. [Balazs] Oh yeah! It’s absolutely…
[Tommy] …in one folder. Do we want to make that guy disappear? Ah, like that! Yeah, we could, actually. And that’s not against the rules, right? Because you’re just changing colors. Actually, what we are doing right now, I think that’s on borderline. Borderline not proper… Because you can adjust colors obviously, but throughout the whole picture. And not parts like this. Why do you have yellow moss? [Balazs] It’s Willow moss, not yellow moss! It’s not Willow moss! [Tommy] It’s not healthy moss! That’s the actual reason, why you can’t do brush adjustments. You have a lot more surface in this photo. And this was the problem. Here it was a problem, that we didn’t have any detail any background above the tree. This is what we started with. And now, that we raise the camera just a little bit, we started to have a background here in the back and on the left side. But we kind of… We’ve lost the cave and we’ve lost the feeling of depth. For perfect combination, I would say this angle, but with much more blur in the background. [Balazs] Okay, let’s do that! So 24 millimeter, blurred background. Let’s go! Okay, third round! Let’s see, what Tommy does ! 55 final version, we have three original folders. Yeah! Oh, my lunch is here! Bye guys! [Laughter] It’s like eating is first all the time, right? We just had lunch! What did you do, when we had lunch? Someone has to work, so… This is from the first shoot. [Balazs] The last dreamy, from the first one. [Tommy] Yes, exactly! And this is the 24 millimeter shot from down below. [Balazs] Okay, so my favorite is the wide-angle lens, which was shot from above. Let’s wrap up this video! We’re done! Thanks so much for helping! It was fun! Guys, subscribe to the Green Aqua YouTube channel, if you didn’t do so yet! Hit that like button! And we’ll see you next week, right? Yeah! Next week! Bye! Bye! Take care!

On the Job: Stay Focused with Doug McKinlay

On the Job: Stay Focused with Doug McKinlay


Hi, I’m Doug McKinlay and you’re watching AdoramaTV. Today we are going to take photography to the next level. You’ve been honing your skills for weeks, for months,
or even years and now you wanna dip your toe into the pro-market, so that’s what we’re going to look at. Let me just be clear, we are going to look at my little area of the photography
world, travel, documentary and reportage photography. AdoramaTV presents Stay Focused with
Doug MacKinlay. So you’ve landed your first commission or you are going do a self assignment with the intention of approaching some of the picture libraries. Now there is a million things going through your head right now. Not least of which is, will I
do the job properly? Now I know exactly how you feel, even now after all these years
before every commission I still get butterflies. But there are ways to
calm your nerves, over the years I’ve developed a little routine helps keep me grounded.
Now the success or failure of a job can be something as simple as not doing you
proper research, you need to know what’s already out there, you need to know how to fulfill your
commission, but at the same time you need to look for things where you can make a
little extra money. This is the nature photography today don’t forget your job
but keep your eyes peeled for other things. This can be something as
simple as looking through the picture libraries and seeing where there are any holes in the
market. Before you go on a job make sure you do your environmental
checks, make sure you know when the sun is going up or down and the times. Make
sure you know the weather, make sure you know the layout of the land. All this stuff will
add to the success your job. As photographers today we have to cast a really wide net. There are
no more staff jobs, we need to try and make our money where we can. Now one thing I tend to do a lot before I
go on a gig is to is to pre visualize what I’m going to be doing. I think it
really helps me get into the mindset of a job. Now I do this after my research is
done, after I read the briefs look at the pictures online, and I really kind of try
to get myself into that whole sort of ready to shoot kind of mode. One thing I do
that helps me is I kind of pre-visualize a flat plan or a magazine layout.
Now, it’s very simple, I just take a piece of paper and I grab pen and very simply
just draw a rectangle with a line down the middle, like the gutter in a magazine.
And I kind of just draw some of the boxes in really, where I might think that
pictures will lie on the page and just scribble in the lines for the copy so
you know most magazine spreads are going to be usually between six and eight
pages. So to really help myself to think about the finished product. I want to
have a look in my head about how it’s might look on a page. Now I do this because I’ve
done it many, many times and I have a lot of experience in shooting for magazines. So obviously as a photographer you have to think about your equipment, how much and I going to carry? How much damage is it going to do my back if I carry too much? Can I get it on
the plane and part of that is your bag. Now airlines are getting pretty strict
with their carry-on luggage. The size and such, and this bag just makes it..
barely! Each job might demand a different set of tools, but no less you got to think
about the weight as well. I always have a little mental checklist before I go
anywhere about what equipment I want to bring. Now as a novice to travel
photography you might want to like write all that down so you don’t
forget stuff because it happens, I’ve done it myself. So you can see my bag is full of
gear at the moment. Now the reason that it’s full of gear is because the job I
just did demanded I have this equipment I don’t
always carry this much stuff and sometimes even carry more, so you got to
figure out what you need for the job that you’re about to do. It’s a tool kit. So I’m in Grenada, in the West Indies, now
I’ve been commissioned to shoot some pictures for a high-end luxury magazine,
that’s the great surroundings, but even though this room is really cool I still want to
check it out. I want to make sure the windows and the doors
lock. Then going to find the safe, most decent hotels these days will have a safe in
the room somewhere. If they’re big, it’s a fantastic place to store extra kit and if they’re
small, good for passports and money etc but more importantly, a good place to
store your backup files. Now, how I work which is only the way I work, is I carry
these little digital tanks with me the little hard drives and I carry two of them. So my process is simple, end of a day of shooting I come back,
download the pictures on to both of the hard drives, store them in the safe. That
way I know that no one’s going to get a hold of them. Plus I have created redundancy and
got two sets of the images so if one drive goes down, I know I get another one. Now as
for the cards do I wipe the pictures from the cards or not? Depends on how
many days I’m away, if it’s two to three or four days, then I generally won’t wipe
the cards, I’ll just give myself an extra level of redundancy. If it’s longer, two, three
weeks or whatever, they’re not a necessity and I’m probably going to have to wipe the cards, but still I’ve still got my two hard drives I’ve got my redundancy as for card sizes I tend to
stick with the 8GB cards, now the reason why do that is because I think it gives
me that nice mix of capacity, and safety in terms of failure because flash memory
has a finite life so cards will fail, eventually they will all fail, so I’d rather
lose 8GB’s of data than 32GB’s of data so it’s just a simple matter of mathematics. One more thing to consider is your
insurance, now if using a small amount of equipment, your health insurance will probably cover it,
but if your like me and you carry a lot of gear then you’re going to need specialist camera insurance and the best place to find those companies is on the internet. So thanks for joining me here on AdoramaTV. I hope this has helped at least a little when contemplating taking your photography to the next level. So don’t forget to
subscribe to AdoramaTV for more great videos. Please tell us what you think, you
can like, comment or share on this video and do stop by the Adorama Learning Center for more great
tips and tricks. Do you want great-looking prints at low-cost, be sure
to visit our easy to use online printing service. AdoramaPix has
professionals who treat your images with the utmost care that you can count on.
For quick turnaround on photos, cards or albums use AdoramaPix.com

How to Rack Focus Your Camera Lens – 4 Methods Showing the Basics


[BUMPER] [MUSIC AND FOCUS PRELUDE] Some viewers were saying they have trouble
with rack focusing their cameras. Most think of rack focus as a quick refocus
shot from one subject to another. Rack focus simply means changing the focus
of your lens while shooting, and speed isn’t a factor. Let’s first look at doing this by hand. Here’s a slow rack in. You can usually pull it in slowly and by watching
the LCD screen, you’re going to see when you’re in focus. Obvious a large monitor helps. Let’s rack back out slowly, and when you see
the first object back in focus, stop. For a quick focus change, you’re going to
have to pay attention. Rack in, rack out, rack in, rack out. If you have focus peaking on your camera,
which I don’t have on this one, that can help too. The idea is to practice the shot beforehand. Like when you first learned to drive a car,
and you over and under compensated steering, until you got a feel for it. It’s no different with practicing “driving
the lens”. It doesn’t take long, and after a couple of
tries, you wonder why you thought it was so hard. If you’re racking focus in on a moving object,
like a person, this is a bit harder, as you’re follow focusing which isn’t a part of this
video, but again, if you practice the shot, it’s not too hard. The second method of rack focusing is a lot
easier and will ensure a good shot. You set the focus on the first subject, place
some tape on both sides the focus ring, and mark a line, the exact point of focus. Then move the focus ring until you have nailed
the focus on the second subject, add another piece of tape, and draw a line. Now I know I’ll nail the focus every time. I move my focus to this line, nailed it. This line, nailed it. This line, nailed it. This line nailed it. I can also do a slow rack focus, whatever
speed I want. If the subjects aren’t moving, I don’t even
have to look at the LCD screen, as the shot is set up, framed, and my rack focus will
be spot on every time. Now, if you have autofocus built into the
camera with a touch screen, it’s really nice. This $300 camera is great. I just gently touch the thing I want to focus
on, and it racks to it. I touch the other object, and it racks focus
to that one. Here we rack back in, and I touch again and
I rack out. I am barely touching the screen and as you
can see the camera is barely moving, even though it’s on a shakey light stand. Rack in, rack out. That’s the easiest way, although you don’t
get control over the speed of the rack, at least that I know of as I just got this camera
a few days ago. So that’s how you do that, touch the screen,
rack in and rack out. Here’s another method of both pulling and
racking focus. You have this wheel here, which is connected
to the focus ring on the lens, and as you turn the wheel, it turns the focus ring. The white plastic on the wheel is for focus
marks, You take a dry erase marker, make your first
point of focus by the indicator, then you focus on the next object as I’ve shown, and
draw another dry erase mark by the indicator. That way you fully rack the focus between
these two lines just like we did with our little tape marks. That should answer our viewer questions and
concerns, and yes, there is a lot more to this subject, but that should give you enough
information to get good rack focusing. Thanks for watching, thanks for subscribing,
and we’ll see you next time. [OUTAKES] OUCH! 🙂

WHY are there Recording Limits on Cameras? 🕤

WHY are there Recording Limits on Cameras? 🕤


What Brainiac put recording limits on DSLR cameras? Let’s find out. [SUBSCRIBE PLEASE!] DLSRs have limitations on how long they can record video. Why? Well, well, there’s a couple of reasons. Initially, recording video on a DSLR camera was kind of an accident. Adding video to a DSLR let press photographers capture short clips for their websites, but more so, consumers wanted to do video as well as photography with their cameras. It was kind of an afterthought and when people saw they could not only do video, but do it with all the cool features the camera they had such as they did with photos. Interchangeable lenses, beautiful depth, sharp images, without having to invest tens of thousands into high-end filmmaking video equipment, that market eventually [explosion sound] exploded. In many places across the world, there are laws that decide what makes a video camera, and what makes a photography camera, and the decision was based on, does it record video or take pictures? And the law stated what constituted a video, as in, X minutes long. And the difference was how much these items were taxed – import taxes. You paid much more tax on a video type camera than photo type cameras, and when you’re Sony, Canon and Nikon, that’s a hell of a lot of tax to pay – tens of millions of dollars in fees to get their product into a country. And why would a photographer, their bread and butter audience at the time, want to pay more for a camera to handle video, which they didn’t use? So, the first reason they have recording limits is tax and the cost to the company and consumers. Now, before you jump up and scream how terrible the manufacturers, governments and big business is, there are other reasons these cameras were limited in recording time. The next is the file system used at the time by these camera cards for recording. The file system was called FAT32, and that system could only handle a max file size of 4 gigabytes. That sounds like a lot, but manufacturers had to set some limit, as they don’t know if you’re shooting in a resolution of 480, 720, 1080 or beyond, and it’s mathematically simpler to just set a time limit of like 10 or 12 minutes. So, the technology, the file system at the time, also imposed this limit. Next, unlike video cameras, photography cameras were small and compact, and not designed with higher-end technology to handle heat. Recording for a long time would cause the camera to overheat, and a complete re-design to handle this new video shooting on a photography camera was not practical. For all these reasons, it was best for both the manufacturer and consumer to limit the recording time. If you have one of these older DSLRs, no problem, just plan what you are going to shoot, and frankly, just hitting record and letting it run for hours is not suggested – especially when you go to edit that footage. In the meantime, camera manufacturers are starting to use newer file systems, and even upgrade their firmware to accommodate. That camera over there, a Canon 5D Mark III, which I love and have no reason to replace at this time, records up to 4-gigabytes, which I can use up in about 6-8 minutes shooting full frame and capturing every frame. Not a problem – it’s been updated so when it gets to its limit, it starts a new file, and just keeps recording. I bring 28 minutes of video into my editor and it’s two or three files, I place them next to each other, and they are perfect, not a single frame was lost in that 28 minutes. As technology evolves, and since the volume of cameras being sold for video has exploded, these manufacturers are beginning to ignore the tax ramifications, and since many photographers now require video, the tax liabilities are coming off the table. You’ll see newer file systems, larger cards, DLSR type cameras that can record for longer lengths without overheating, and so on. And there are cameras that will do the type of activity you want, such GoPros and action cameras, which DSLRs aren’t design to do. The moral of the story is to purchase the type of camera for the type of things you will be doing. If you already own a DSLR, don’t forget to periodically see if firmware updates are available as they may have added features you didn’t know existed, such as longer recording lengths. You can also push record, let it play out until it fails, and see what happens to the footage when it stops recording. It’s always a good idea to know the limitations of your camera. And I’ll say this again, really long videos are a real pain to edit, and it doesn’t take much to shoot a video in segments, and makes it much easier on you and your computer in post. If you MUST shoot longer videos, either consider renting or buying a different camera designed for that purpose, or use the HDMI out on newer cameras to record the footage to an external recorder. Understand the limits of your DSLR, research the limits if you are going to buy a new DSLR, and don’t forget that a DSLR is not an end all shooting camera for every situation. I’ve included links in the description to various cameras you can take a look at, and don’t forget to click the subscribe button if you like these videos. I hope that helps, thanks for watching, and we’ll see you next time. [COMMENT…I REPLY] [LIKE…I SMILE] [SUBSCRIBE…I say YAY!] [WAIT FOR IT…] And many of these… [DROPS CAMERA} Oh…s**t! Oops!

3 Hitchcock Techniques We Should Copy More


How do you do? My name is Sven and I would like to tell you about my forthcoming video. It’s about Alfred Hitchcock and his lifelong relationship with the audience. In this video I hope to make you all aware of three of his most noble filmmaking techniques. And through it all you can play a most conspicuous part because not only can you appreciate his art, but you can also apply… *Screaming* What is this? Rear Window is my favorite hitchcock film. As a matter of fact, it’s one of my top three films of all time and all filmmakers. It’s a perfectly contained story taking place all in one location and demonstrating what constitutes as he calls it Pure Cinema. Look at the opening shot of Rear Window. This is visual storytelling; not a single word has been spoken. It tells us everything we need to know about where we are, who our hero is, why he is in this particular situation, and because Hitchcock treats the camera as if it was the viewer’s eyes, it engages us to use our curiosity to figure out ourselves, what the story might be. Hitchcock always prefers visual storytelling over dialogue. Partly because he directed nearly a dozen silent films. He never fully accepted synchronized sound cinema: “To me, they’re what I call photographs of people talking. There’s no relation to the art in the cinema.” For him, dialogue is just another sound among all others, so he treats it just as that. “Jefferies?” – “Congratulations, Jeff.” – “For what?” “You got rid of that cast!” “Who said I was getting rid of it?” That’s not to say that Hitchcock films have no dialogue; quite the opposite. But the important information and subtext is still given to us through visuals. “And if you don’t pull me out of this swamp of boredom, I’m gonna do something drastic.” – “Like what?” – “Like what? I’m gonna get married, then I’ll never be able to go anywhere.” You probably already know the difference between shock and suspense. “The suspense story is giving the audience full information before you start. Tell the audience that, then they will scream it out and say “Get out of there, get out of there!” Hitchcock suggests to let the audience know more than the character so that they can worry about the outcome. That is suspense. You keep the audience on the edge of their seats. While surprise or shock… …comes and goes. “The audience will get five seconds of shock.” Instead of the quickly dissipating rush of shock, the emotional involvement of the audience through suspense can be stretched for minutes or more. Suspense is probably the most important technique Hitchcock uses throughout his career. Unlike many other films who turn the audience into an objective spectator, a Hitchcock film entices you to not just watch but to actively figure out the story is and fear for the character. “You’re sure making time tonight, what’s the big rush?” “I want to get to bed, that’s the big rush.” So you’ve pushed your lead character to the brink of failure. And then someone else swoops in and saves the day, just because they happened to stumble upon the scene. “You’re all clear, kid. Now let’s move it, so I can go home.” Sam: “Mom, don’t do it!” Lucy: “Sam…” Sam: “Mom, no!” According to Hitchcock, that is terrible filmmaking. Characters should win or lose, meaning achieve their goals, because of the choices they made that are grounded on their experience and the courage to overcome their fears. So Hitchcock made it very clear as a rule for his films: There can only ever be one coincidence, often at the beginning of the film. Marion: “Do you have a vacancy?” Norman: “No, we have twelve vacancies. Twelve cabins, twelve vacancies. They moved away the highway.” That sets things in motion that are already latently existing, and then from that point forward the film resolves because of the hero and the obstacles she needs to face. Norman: “Cabin one, it’s closer in case you want anything. Right next to the office.” Tell your story visually, think of your film is a silent film where you don’t have the luxury to have characters inform the audience. Use suspense for a long-lasting audience engagement. Give the audience more information than the character so that they can worry about the outcome. Don’t use more than one coincidental event in your film and let everything else be motivated by your characters’ action. So these are my three favorite Hitchcock techniques. I’m surprised how little they’re used today, even though I think they can be pretty much applied to any film genre. Do let me know if there are some other Hitchcock techniques worth adding to the list. I’ll see you in the next video. Thanks for watching!