Capturing Movement With Continuous Shooting | I AM Different Tips ‘n Tricks

Capturing Movement With Continuous Shooting | I AM Different Tips ‘n Tricks


[Continuous shooting.] Hi, I’m Thomas from Nikon School. We’re here
on the set of the Blossom project and I will give you
some tips about photography. In order to capture
the moment you really want, especially when you take
some pictures of movement, the burst mode will help you to break down the movement
with many images. Especially if you have a moment
that will never happen again. You can use this burst mode
and secure your images. So about the D7200,
what makes it stand out is that there is a special burst mode
at 7 frames per second which is made by the crop mode. And then you’ll have
even more images to bring back
the right moment in your images. [Discover other inspiring ideas!
Explore more.]

Part 2 of 7: Steve Thornton and his very personal style of lighting

Part 2 of 7: Steve Thornton and his very personal style of lighting


and none of that worked he was unusable light basically unless you want to shoot something gray with with no details whatsoever just the shadows was blocked up it was just it was just horrible especially dealing people who are going to move so you can’t use long shutter speeds so when I went to start using the strobes we had an assistant hold a reflector up and we attached the arm that some bounce now makes and I put a strobe head on it there’s a battery power stroke and we just adjusted to power up and down a little bit until it overpowered the light that was shooting into I was actually shooting into the Sun or where the Sun should have been he was brighter than we were had but i had to overpower that so i was running about f8 and i was using about 12 was seconds of power to get them and it overpowered the sun and you really came up with a stupendous image sorry the one good thing about yesterday morning as I learned a new trick Peter yes thank you yeah what I thought was I wish I had a lot earlier the Sun had been up for 45 minutes and the clouds were solid there was no edge the light it was gray it was ugly this is a commercial job i’m shooting for a client and i’m spending thousands of dollars every few minutes the very good people of California Sun bounce dragged out something that I’ve never seen before something that allow me to attach a strobe head to any of the reflectors and put like where it did not exist before it’s very controllable it’s incredibly lightweight if you use a portable flash or battery-powered flash you can have an assistant walk wherever the models going or moving on a little bit or move out a little bit and quite honestly for that portion to shoot it probably saved my keister because it was new I could do nothing absolutely nothing at all I’m thinking you’re right I look at every project as an individual there are some clients want me to do the same thing over and over and I try not to do that clients come to me for a photograph but I don’t give this photograph I give them my vision of the photograph my perspective on what I think that client is going to need to grow and to make money so as a result when I do is I will maybe follow the storyboard makes all the layouts they have and shoot that they now almost always go and shoot what I want the way I would have shot it before they even open their mouth I work very hard on locations locations are one of the teams I take the time to scout locations of the project I just finished up I’ve spent three days scouting and doing prep work finding out where I needed to be in what needed to be there in terms of elements whether it was just models or models and horses or models and horses and cowboys and longhorns at sunrise at sunset I spent a lot of time finessing every image I’ve already got in my mind what the photographs going to look like before I shoot it because I know the player is going to be brought to the shoot I know what the lights going to do I know what the location is going to give me I know what my wardrobe

DIY Photo Props! | Tay from Millennial Moms

DIY Photo Props! | Tay from Millennial Moms


(sweet guitar) – Hey guys, welcome
back to Millennial Moms. I’m Tay, and that means that it’s Tuesday. (smooching) Alright guys, today I’m
gonna be sharing with you another fun prop we made for
Landice’s tenth birthday. This is really easy, and it’s inexpensive, so let’s get going. (cheerful strumming) (camera click) Alright, so we’re gonna start
by cutting out some images, picking out what we want, lips, bow ties, hats, all that is good. I’m using my Cricut,
because Cricut design space has all of these already,
although you can go onto Google and find all the images you want, print them out, and then
cut them out onto paper I found these stir sticks
in the Target Dollar Spot. And I just cut all my pieces of paper out, and then glued the pieces together. For some of them, I cut
out two different sizes, so that I could layer them, so that they were more sturdy, and had a fun little pop
of color behind them. And then I just glued all the
little pieces, well actually, Landice glued all these
little pieces together. So we had ties, bow tie, lips, masks. Just make sure that you
make them nice and big. So you can also cut them
out onto regular paper and trace them onto card stock. So then I took the stir
sticks that I found, and you can just buy, like chopsticks, or any type of stick that you can find, but I like these because
they had a big base that I could use to hot glue to the back. And then a way to decorate them, I used chalk pens for some of them, and I just used the hashtag that we were gonna do for the party, #PartyLikeAPanda animal. Most of these girls
don’t have social media, so this hashtag really didn’t get used. And then the other ones, I
used glue and some glitter, because you always have to have
a little glitter at a party. You just have to, it’s
just one of the rules. So my favorite way to do glitter is just to make, like,
a crazy mess with it, dump it out onto a paper towel, and then fold it in half
and dump it right back into the glitter container so
you don’t waste any glitter. So then I went and I embellished
all of the little crowns and things like that that I did. Just made ’em really cute. And these’ll be nice, because
you can store them away, and use them for more parties later on. And they’re always good to have on hand. (casual guitar) If you guys want to see yesterday’s video, check out right there. If you guys want to see more
from me at Millennial Moms, check out right there. And if you guys want to subscribe to Millennial Moms, Millennial Moms, check out right here. Alright you guys, thanks for being a subscriber if you’re
already one already. I love you guys. Don’t forget to check out my own personal channel, Auntie Tay. Love you guys, bye. (smooches)

Photography Tips: How dedicated to photography are you?

Photography Tips: How dedicated to photography are you?


a couple weeks ago I was sent a
question by a lovely guy calledf peter and he asked me, hi Mike does it happen with photography like music, that you could be a professional and/or great
photographer if you start at an early age? does age matter when it comes to
becoming an excellent photographer? Well the thing is, how much do you want to become an excellent photographer, is it
something you want to do or is it something you’re going to do? But what’s the difference? well I’ve been running my photography
business for a long time and many years ago I chose to turn my
hobby which was photography into my income and that’s a whole other
story but part of that was I wanted to be able to travel and to see
some of the wrold to sort of experience some of the amazing things that go on out there in the world, but it was always something
I’d like to do and time passed and the business started to grow and i was having a good time, i didn’t have to work terribly hard to cover my expenses and i could play on my motor bike and then last year something happened, my brilliant, awesome, inspiring, funny and witty incredible mum died last september, and it was very devastating despite the
fact I knew it was coming but something in me changed then. I kinda realized how old i was, i kinda realized that hey you’re in your fifties now and you’ve always wanted to go off and see some more of the world but that’s all it was, i wanted to. When my mum died it changed from i want to, to I’m going to, you may have already
seen there’s some workshops starting to appear in other countries and many of you
wonderful people have been inviting me to come in your country, but it’s because i got committed I got dedicated to doing whatever it
takes to make that happen, now whether that’s in what sort of photo’s you’re taking or wanna take, you wanna take great amazing pictures well you need to become dedicated to
doing it and that means giving yourself the time
it means dedicating time to doing it not sort of saying ok, i’ve watched all these videos on youtube that mike does or serge does or many of the othere awesome photographers put out there into the world, or going on courses, you have to become dedictated to giving yourself time to go and put
into action the things that you’ve been taught about.
last year I was teaching at a local nights school, i was just teaching an adult education to a bunch of people who were all paying a fairly reasonable fee to come on a photography course, and it was for the college it wasn’t me doing it at the college , i was employed by the college to do it for a short time. But something which really amazed me was that i would give poeple some homework to do which was assosiated with the leson which we just done and then the following week quite a large percentage of people would say I didn’t have time this week or I could see that they had sort of
come home and they maybe had half an hour before they jump in the car because they had to go and they sort of done their homewo because mike would grizzle at them. Well i don’t mind if they do their homework or not, and i don’t mind if you guys did the homework or not, i don’t mind what you do so long as you’re happy, but here’s the key if you want to take excellent photographs well or maybe become a professional photographer you’ve gotta do the homework, you’ve gotta put in the hours, you’ve gotta dedicate some time to doing stuff you have to get out there
and practice and get experience now when I say
dedicate and put time into it you know what time you can dedicate to it I mean when I dedicated time to becoming a
professional photographer I did it in a slightly unusual way as in I went on income support I told my
local a employment services office what i was
doing because i didn’t want ant trouble i wasn’t gonna sort of like try and defraud anyone and they were amazingly helpful, they gave me access to various courses and
training so I spent a year not working and everyday i was reading books i was practising, i was going out there i was taking pictures, wondering why it didn’t work and then trying something else until eventually I got to a point where
I could take pictures that people would pay me money for, and that was an amazing feeling but it’s within the dedication so whatever that may look like for you now that could be maybe an hour a week
because I know normal people they have jobs to go to every day they have to pay
their mortgage they have to pay their rent, their electricity bills and all that
kinda stuff. They’ve possibly gots kids and they’re mega expensive things to own aren’t they. So you’ve got calls on your time already but in order to get the experience that’s needed for you to take the excellent photographs or to become a
professional photographer that any of you guys not just peter you do have to dedicate some of your time in order to do the exercises to practice
stuff so that you get the experience because
photography’s experiential learning most things in life are you have to
experience it and get experience so that you know what
to do in a given situation much as I would love to be able to put
my hand up here and a clip unplug knowledge and then insert into your head for you for a
fee of course then it would be awesome but i cant do that wouldn’t that be easy I wouldn’t
have to webmaster the site, i wouldn’t have to keep thinking up new ideas for
films and shooting stuff and having lorna stand out in the cold and rain and all that kinda stuff while
we’re making films the thing is it’s a dedication thing so what
ever that may be for you I would suggest it’s a case of go on a
training course if you know you’re going on a training course, book some time into the diary the next day so that you can go and practice whatever it was because if you put it off and think oh we’re going on holiday i a couple of weeks in a couple of weeks time you would have forgotten all about it. It would have just kinda vanished into thin air like scotched mist. if you watch a video on YouTube, one of my videos make some notes maybe? go outside and then practice that and kep practising. dedicate time to it until you have your
head around that particular technique or building block as i like to call
them, there’s a whole new course on that coming fairly soon. Because that’s where you’re gonna get the knowledge you need to be fulfilled as a photographer and
become excellent and/or professional.subscribe to our
YouTube channel to be notified each time we upload one all cool
photography videos orfor more great photo tips workshops
and training come and see us at our website photographycourses.biz

Landscape Photography – A beginner’s guide to woodland

Landscape Photography – A beginner’s guide to woodland


If you’re interested in woodland
photography and you’ve always struggled on how to compose your images within
the woods and the forests, this is the video for you. My name is Julian Elliott
and I am a professional landscape and travel photographer. If you want to keep
up with my exploits as a professional landscape and travel photographer make
sure you click on the subscribe button just down there The absolute first step when it comes to
woodland photography is to go to somewhere that you know and that you can
practice. Why? Because you know it. And if you’re familiar with your surroundings,
like this woodland here which is about five minutes drive from where I live in
France, then you’re going to be able to create more successful images from that
particular area and also you’ll get to know the intricacies of this particular
woodland. So for me for example I know when it rains heavily where I’m stood
floods. I’ve had images, I think it was back in April or so, whereby this
whole area was flooded I had a really nice sunny day with blue sky white
fluffy clouds and I was able to get the reflections all in this woodland plus
the reflections of all the tree stumps here. So that is the first step to
creating your successful images within woodland. Get to know one of your local
areas. The next step to think about when
creating your woodland images is the light and the quality of the light.
Woodland is great in that it works both in flat light and also sunny light and
also when you have that low mist and there is the sun breaking through the
mist in the early morning creating those really nice ethereal looking images.
Absolutely wonderful soft light in the morning. You can’t beat it. So as I said
it works great in flat light. Today we have flat light. It’s a very overcast day,
there’s no long shadows anywhere and it pretty much works as you will see, not
necessarily here, but certainly in the next location
that we’ll be working on further on into the video.So that’s the next step you
must think about is light and the quality of the light in your woodland. Once you’ve got to know your local
woodland, and you’ve thought about the quality of the light that you want in
that woodland, the next step to think about is lens choice. Obviously we have
wide-angle; 50mm; short telephoto and long telephoto. Each of those
lenses will work in a particular area of woodland. Wide-angle, for example, is great
if you’ve got some foreground interest. We don’t really have any foreground
interest in this particular woodland so the next step up is to think about is it
somewhere around 35 or 50 millimeters that we’re going to work in. Here, because I
visit it very often, I know that around 50 mil and above works. Why? Because it
helps to compress a lot of the trees together and create a very nice
composition. Telephoto it kind of works in here but it brings things maybe too
close. So here, for example, I’m always thinking it’s around 50 to 70
millimeters. So 50 millimeters how our eyes see and then 70 millimeters so it starts
to compress things just a little but not too much. But what I’m going to do is I’m
going to take a picture.The same picture, the same composition and show you why
each of them does and doesn’t work so you can see what it is that I’m talking
about here in this particular woodland. I’ve set up my camera and I’ve put on a
zoom lens which is 28 millimeters to 70 millimeters and that’s because it gives
me most of the focal lengths that I would use in this particular woodland
specifically for me 50 millimeters and 70 millimeters. At the moment it’s set at
28 and you can see it’s it’s okay is probably maybe a little bit too wide. But
what I’ve done is I put this central trunk here in the middle this is what I
really want to focus on and you can see on the third’s here there is actually a
trunk and a trunk as well and the foreground is maybe just off the bottom
of the third and going toward the middle but not quite. But it’s just too wide and
especially on a day like today there’s nothing in the sky and it’s just white
and it’s going to be blown out so that’s 28 millimeters wide angle and that for
me is why this particular scene doesn’t work at wide-angle. If I turn live view back on again and I
go into 50 millimeters you will see, if I slightly adjust my composition just a
little bit, just around here that things start to become more compressed these
trunks in the background are becoming more prominent whereas they were quite
far away because of the wide angle of the lens so they’re starting to become a
lot more compressed into the scene and it’s how we see it with our eyes as our
eyes see around 50 millimeters focal length. So you can see there on the 3rd
we’ve got these trunks here so they’re starting to come in nicely. The
foreground is dropping down just a touch we’re losing the sky so when losing the
emphasis on what’s going to be an overexposed sky. Things are starting to
look that lot nicer. Let’s go in just a little bit more so if I go to roughly
here, and what I’m doing if I just turn live you back on, I’m paying very close
attention to these corners here. So this here this branch, this trunk here is
frustrating for me so I’m zooming in just to remove it from the frame then
I’m going to push this down just a little bit and then what you’ll see is that we
have an image that’s starting to look a lot more composed and a lot more
organized and we’re starting to see the wood for the trees so if I take that
image then you’ll see the difference between this image and the wide-angle
image and how using 50 millimetres and longer in the woodland can help
emphasize those tree trunks. Bring things closer together. Compress them and help
to create a more balanced image. As I said, you can use wide-angle but I think
you’ll find a lot of the time you’re probably working 35 millimetres and up
where you’re starting to get more of an emphasis on bringing things together and
creating a more balanced image. For the composition of our images it’s
good to start somewhere like this and the reason is because it’s an orderly
wood. It’s actually a man-made wood everything’s been planted in an orderly
fashion and so you can work things out a lot quicker than if you were to go in
just to a woodland, in your local woodland that’s been there for hundreds
of years. Because everything’s planted we can start to find compositions a lot
easier and then we can take that knowledge and transport it into a normal
woodland that’s been there for hundreds of years and it’s just a tangle of branches,
trees, trunks and whatever else. So I’ll just
explain some of the compositions that you can do here in this particular type
of woodland so you can get an idea how we’re going to transport it back
into a proper woodland and that’s been there for a few hundred years or. So this
is the first type of composition that you could do in this managed woodland.
You can use the avenue here and here to create a line of interest going in and
in to go back towards here. The only slight problem with this is there isn’t
really anything back here to create any interest. There is some moss or something
up there in the tree I think it might be mistletoe back there it’s lying on that
third. Detail-wise what I am looking at, and I might do in a bit, is just here
there’s a huge mushroom which I might go and take a shot of. It looks quite
interesting. But that’s the kind of first kind of composition that you could do
here in this managed woodland. This is another example of a composition
that you could do here in this managed woodland. It’s similarish to when i was
demonstrating the focal length in that the tree trunk is in the middle and
other things start dropping in behind it. However this time the grass is more
along the top third but it’s another example of something
that you could do here in this managed woodland when you’re starting to see the
wood for the trees. Hopefully you’ve seen in this managed
woodland how I started to create compositional elements to be able to
bring some kind of order into a final image. So what I’m going to do from here
is decamp into an ancient woodland and we’re going
to see how we can manage that and bring some kind of order to the chaos of an
ancient woodland. So we’ve swapped managed woodland for chaos. Ancient woodland. Where do you look? Well if you take some of those elements of composition like
the rule of thirds or like the managed woodland where we placed the tree trunk
in the middle. If you start to look around and start positioning yourself;
the tree trunk here or here and just move so when you move here you’ll see
behind in the background that the other tree’s move. Try to position things in
such a way that you order the chaos of this ancient woodland. So I’ve found
something it’s taken me about 15 minutes or so just wandering around in here just
to have a look see what it is that I could find and I’ve started to pick
things up. I’ve never actually walked in this woodland. I’ve driven past it many
times. It’s only five minutes from my house. But I’m taking the time today just to have a look; see what’s here and see what
I can do with the chaos of this ancient woodland. As a first composition and the
first time here this is something that I’ve found just wandering around as I
said to see what it is that I could come up with. So I’ve placed this tree here not
it’s kind of on the third but not really is actually off the third itself and
then I’ve placed the foreground so it’s just up shy of the middle and then
there’s a color here and the background from all the autumn leaves. As well as
that I’ve started to try and make some sense of the background. So I’ve used a
corner up here for one of the branches that’s going off and up here as well. It
could possibly be just adjusted slightly there and the very simple reason is so
I’ve got this branch going up in this corner here and also here I’m creating
some separation which I didn’t have before. So that it’s not just a tree trunk in the corner here there’s actually some
color going here so you’ve got these bands of color and the tree trunks
themselves. Down here you have this new tree that’s growing up which is creating
interest on the third. So that’s the first composition that I’ve done here. I’ll
just take a snap and then you can see when the image pops up in a minute how
that looked when we were here in this part of the woodland. Let’s move on to
something else and to show you how to bring more order to the chaos that you
see in front of you. There’s two more elements that I want to
add into composition within your image. The first is leading lines and as you
can see that’s running through me there’s this path that’s probably just
been created by animals such as deer and boar that we get here in central France.
They’ve created a pathway through the woodland. And that is another
compositional element that you can add in. Leading lines will always take your
viewer from the edge and bring them into the image let them look around and let
them explore. The next thing that I want to talk about and it’s extremely
important in woodland is the polarizing filter. And what that does is it
removes any glare from the leaves so yesterday it was raining a lot here so
there’s a lot of water on the ground. A lot of water on the leaves in the trees.
That polarizer filter is going to cut through the glare and be able to add
in more saturation to the image. So I will just show you what it is that I’ve
set up at the moment to give you an idea of how it is that I’m looking at this
scene and what you might be able to take away from it and be able to put into
your own images. This is the image that I’ve set up. I saw this path here while I
was walking along the main path. It’s not the main path obviously as I said it
looks like it’s been made by animals as it’s indistinct but it’s distinct enough
to give us an idea of a compositional element. And as you can see I’ve started to
arrange things here so this tree here the trunk is on the bottom third then
which is going out and then up to the top. I’ve cut out a lot of the sky as
it’s distracting and I’ve just started to arrange everything else so I’ve made
sure that there’s no trunks that are intruding on the edges here of the frame
and there’s no unwanted elements there at the top. So that for me, it starts to
create some order again out of the chaos that we have here in the woodland and
also as I said there’s a polarizer on the front which is taking the glare away
from the water that’s on the leaves that was from the fallen rain
yesterday so that’s helping to saturate the image a lot more than it is. So I’ll
take it a photo with the polarizer and without the polarizer so
you can see the difference and why it is that you should actually make sure you
have that polarizer with you and that it’s not just for those blue sky days. For this last sequence on woodland
photography, I want to use a blue sky day combined with the color in the trees to
help enhance the composition because very often all we hear about is the rule
of thirds; leading lines and s-curves. All these kind of things in composition.But
we never really hear about color. So if you look at a color wheel you’ll see
that yellow and blue are near to one another on the color wheel
thus they complement one another in any composition that you might
choose to use them in. The other thing that I’m going to do is I’ve changed my
lens to a wide-angle lens. So here I’ve got a Canon 17-40 millimeter lens. So
very, very wide angle of view. And when I look up, which is the last thing
that I want to do, it’s actually going to help the trees loom in above me while
looking up at the blue sky and the golden colors of the yellow leaves up
there. All the autumn color. So let’s take a shot and then see what it is that I’m
doing with that shot. So what am i doing when I’m looking up at those trees
trying to get an image that pleases me? Well the first thing that I do is I put
my camera in aperture priority and that’s very simple. The only reason I’m
doing that is just to take a few things off my mind what I’m composing my image
handheld. And in aperture priority I’m then adding in around one stop of
exposure compensation just to open things up a bit. The 6D has enough
exposure latitude that I know it will give me what I want for around
two-thirds of a stop or a stop over the the middle point on your exposure meter.
The next thing that I’m doing is I’m enabling the back button focusing on my
camera so that when I’m looking up my thumb is doing the focusing so I press
where I want to in the image to focus the camera and then when I’ve got what I
want my index finger then clicks the shutter to get the composition that I
want. So that’s it for this tutorial on
woodland photography. Hopefully you’ve picked up a few things here and there
and see how I finely compose some of my other images although it’s done in
woodland it might give you an idea as to how to really look at what it is that
you’re doing when you’re composing your images on the back of your camera. Will
there be more tutorials? There will be more tutorials! There’s going to be a
tutorial on a 10 stop ND filter very soon. As well as a few others so
make sure you click the subscribe button down there in the bottom right hand
corner and you’ll get notification whenever it is that I upload any videos.
So thanks very much for to all of my subscribers. See you again soon!

Auto Exposure Bracketing : Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace : Adorama Photography TV

Auto Exposure Bracketing : Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace : Adorama Photography TV


in this episode we learn about auto exposure bracketing – Adorama TV
presents exploring photography with Mark Wallace where you learn
innovative techniques on shooting a wide range of photography
here’s your host hi everybody welcome to another episode of Exploring Photography right here on Adorama TV brought to you by Adorama it is the camera store that has
everything for photographers you can check them out at Adorama.com well a few weeks ago I talking
to some of my photographer friends about auto exposure bracketing and where my
friend said he was having issues when shooting in shutter priority mode
specifically said sometimes exposure bracketing just
didn’t work well before getting to that I just wanna remind you that Adorama has some terrific contests and if
you enter you can win some great prizes Well first lets talk about what exposure
bracketing is bracketing is simply taking a series of
photos at the same scene usually 3 photos one that’s exposed
correctly one that is underexposed and one that is overexposed normally you under and overexposed by
the same amount so if you had an under Exposed shot there was uderexposed by
one-stop your overexposed shot would be overexposed
by one-stop as well well almost all cameras have an auto
exposure bracketing feature now this is normally referred to as AEB as stands for auto exposure
bracketing and it normally has a symbol that looks
something like this: so if you see that on your camera’s menu that is the I auto exposure bracketing
symbol. Before getting to how auto exposure bracketing works let’s talk
about why you might want to use it traditionally AEB is use in one of 2 scenarios the first is when you’re not
quite certain of your exposure what you wanna make absolutely certain you get the shot this
is something that landscape photographers have been using for years AEB is also
used to create HDR images HDR stands for high dynamic range and its when you take three or more photos and you combine
them to create an image that has a photo realistic effect in
fact I created in HDR image and used auto exposure bracketing in all
the last episode exploring photography to create this image the Basilica of the
National Val almost all cameras with auto exposure
bracketing have the same basic settings – now for the specific have your
camera make sure you check your camera user manual but generally all cameras work something
like this the first thing you need to do is turn on auto exposure bracketing next some cameras allow you to set how many
shots you’d like to take in your auto exposure bracketing series
the third thing you need to do is tell your camera how much to over and
underexpose each image this usually ranges from
one-third to 3 stops finally set your drive mode to
continuous or self-timer mode once this is all set
up you just press the shutter release once
to take all the shots in the series now some cameras you can
set the drive mode to single to allow you to take each in the shot
individually using a separate shutter Press for each up the shots it’s important to
understand that auto exposure bracketing works
differently in different modes and this is why my friend was having
issues when on exposure bracketing using shutter priority mode and understand this lets first take a
look at how auto exposure bracketing works in aperture priority mode – in aperture
priority mode you set the camera aperture now let’s
say we’ve set our aperture to F 8 now the camera will use its built-in light meter to set the shutter for a
proper exposure now for argument sake let’s say our shutter speed is one two
hundred and fiftieth a second for a proper exposure if we’ve
set our auto exposure bracketing to under and
overexposed by one stop here’s what will happen the
first correctly exposed photo will be made at
F 8 and 1/250 of a second the second
underexposed shot will be made at F 8 and 1/500 a second and the third overexposed shot will be made it F 8 and 1/125 of a second Our aperture is staying the
same but our shutter is changing to create
those under and overexposed images because our shutter can slow all
the way down to thirty seconds and speed up to 4,000th of a second and even on some cameras go all the way up to 8000th of a second we
have a lot of latitude when we’re exposure bracketing using aperture priority mode now in
shutter priority mode the exact opposite is happening our shutter is
staying the same but our aperture is opening and closing to
create the over and underexposed images and this is where we can run into
a lot of issues let’s say that we have and image where we
had a proper exposure up 160 of a second at f2.8 and we want to bracket by
one-stop that’s one image overexposed by one stop
and one image underexposed by one stop let’s also assume our lens
has a maximum aperture opening a F2.8 our first properly
exposed image will be made at 160th of a second at
f2.8 our second underexposed image will be
made at 160th of a second at F4 but will run into issues on our third overexposed image to over exposed by a full stop our
aperture would need to open to F2 but our lens isn’t able to do this so we just end up with an additional
properly exposed image shot f2.8 fix the issue you need to
increase your ISO by one stop so your aperture would have some room to breathe or you can adjust your shutter my
one-stop as well doesn’t matter which way you choose the
important thing to remember is that when you’re in shutter priority mode using
auto exposure bracketing you run into issues when the aperture is
fully open for the properly exposed image now what
about manual mode well in manuel mode there is no auto exposure
bracketing you do it everything manually you can either adjust the aperture to
over an underexposed or and change the shutter to do the trick
so in manual mode you just have to do it yourself now two additional notes about auto
exposure bracketing the first is when I’m using auto exposure
bracketing I most always use aperture priority mode
because in shutter priority mode when the aperture changes your dept of
field changes away as well and so that’s something I try to avoid
the second thing is bracketing isn’t just for exposure you can also bracket you’re white
balance you can bracket your ISO and you can even bracket your focus that these are topics
that will cover in future episodes exploring photography right here on
Adorama TV so don’t forget to subscribe to Adorama TV so you don’t miss a single
episode with all kinds of stuff that I’m doing but there’s all kinds of contributors as
well and you can check out the Adorama
Learning Center for all kinds of articles about the stuff that we’re
talking about today and you can see all in the past episodes
as well thanks again for joining me and I will
see you again in the next episode few great-looking print low-cost be sure
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Photography Self Assignments – Motivate Yourself to See Progress

Photography Self Assignments – Motivate Yourself to See Progress


Hello, I’m Helen Bradley. Welcome to
this video tutorial. Today I’m going to talk about photographic self-assignments. What is a self-assignment. Self-assignments are short self-assigned
photo projects that you shoot just for the sake of shooting. And typically they shouldn’t require you
to go out and buy anything special or to go anywhere special to do them. They are the sort of thing you could go and do
immediately after you’ve finished watching this video —
grab your camera and you’re ready to start. It’s a good idea to do self-assignments
regularly and when you are not under pressure to capture anything at all
worthwhile so you’d never undertake one when you
are the main photographer at a wedding for example. Self-assignments are generally quite short
so you can spend as little as a few minutes at a time on them — but of course they can consume a lot
more time if you have it available. Self-assignments technically have a
topic — you’re not just out to shoot, you’re out to shoot a something
or to practice something — you’re not aiming to shoot ‘keepers’ so
much as you are aiming to learn something. Self-assignment should take you out of
your comfort zone and help you see things or experiment
with techniques and your kit. Preparing for a self-assignment When you’re preparing for a self-
assignment, firstly you need to allocate the time to work on your self-assignment. Often you can find it by repurposing
time you already spend doing something such as walking to the bus
station — make this the time that you work on
your self-assignment. Or you could park a few blocks from your
office and walk there, walk at lunchtime or walk when you get
home at night and, as you walk, you can photograph for
your self-assignment. If you don’t get out a lot
then photograph inside your house or your backyard or spend the time waiting at an airport
or train station catching shots
for your current self-assignment. You will also need to take a camera with
you — everywhere. It doesn’t have to be your good camera
but it’s good if it is. It might seem strange to carry your
camera with you all the time but the more you do so, the less uncomfortable you will feel and
you’ll really notice it when you don’t have your camera handy.
Topics and subject matter Plan your self-assignment —
You’ll need a topic or a focus for your shooting. It should be something that challenges
you and forces you to learn something new or to look at the world a little
differently. Some topics which you might want to
pursue are: saturated colors, circles,
paint marks, streetlights, the color blue, doors,
shadows, repetition, food, street art, reflections, or alphabet which is a great one for the airport. Don’t expect to always nail the project on
day 1 — so if you’re shooting something like
circles — it’s worth going over the same territory a couple of days in a row —
notice how many more circles you see on day 2 than you did on day 1. Your assignment might also be
related to a piece of your kit — perhaps you have an unused or little
used lens in your case — unused because you really don’t know
how to use it — and because you can’t trust yourself to use
it for important situations the cycle becomes self-repeating so you
never use it. Set yourself a self-assignment to
shoot with the lens for a couple of weeks. By the end of the two weeks you’ll know a
lot more about the lens and how to use it. If you’re someone who always uses
the Auto mode on your camera now is a good time to start using Aperture
Priority or Shutter Priority mode and start learning what creative
possibilities they might offer. Determine the topic or focus of
your self-assignment and a timeframe to work in. Once you’re done with the first assignment
you’ll ready to start on the next but don’t be surprised if you continue to
shoot these self-assignment themes in other situations. Assess the results When you are working on a self-
assignment, download the images as often as you can and view the results. Assess how you’ve gone in your project. How easy was it for you to ‘see’ things
that matched your topic. Assess the technical aspect of your
shots — are they in focus, is the depth of field used appropriate for the subject matter — how would you improve the shot next
time and what will you do differently tomorrow? If you’re working on a self-assignment
to learn how to use a piece of kit, ask yourself what have you learned about
it. What worked and what did not work. Analyse the results in front of you to
determine what you’ll try that will be different tomorrow or the next day. What you’ll gain Self-assignments are creative learning
projects so approach them with a sense of wonder and enthusiasm for your topic — reward yourself when you see something
you wouldn’t have noticed if you hadn’t been doing your self-assignment. Self-assignments can help you see the
world different and they’re guaranteed to make you a better photographer. If you are a creative person who wishes
they could photograph more but have to juggle photography with
other commitments then self-assignments provide a creative
outlet that can be fit into even a few minutes of your spare time. I’m Helen Bradley. Thank you for joining
me for this video tutorial. I encourage you to subscribe to my YouTube channel and visit projectwoman.com for more
photography tips and tricks.

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Photography Tips: Composition – disassociation

Photography Tips: Composition – disassociation


I love nice clean simple looking images you
know something that’s sells the sizzle rather
than the sausage something which gives a hint a
feeling of a place now I was walking down this
very Street last week with a guy called Jason milner
who’s on my Lanzarote photo workshop we just been photographing a sunrise
round the corner which is a really spectacular little location when the
weather’s right you do your research afterwards we were walking through here
is looking for some pictures as a whole group and Jason set site to me which really
struck a course so I thought I’d make video I was showing him some of these shot which are just shown you
these nice clean simple two color graphic looking images and he was saying you never imagined that they were shot in this very Street
and he’s absolutely right he said it’s about learning how to
disassociate yourself from the surroundings and find the image
then and that really inspired me thank you Jason it thought it was such a call thought such a
great idea because it is completely true you need to look around cause if you can
see your camera is blind now disassociating
yourself from the surroundings just walking around here looking for
shots finding pictures so I thought I’d come out here and just
have a little look see what we can find another try and
replicate some of those shots for you Now this is gonna be difficult you’ve already seen the the Sun is
going in and out the lights changing this clouds in the
sky when I was down here with Jason the gang on the workshop it was a clear clear blue sky and that’s
how we got those first images wanna talk you through looking around
searching stuff out and finding things i wanna talk to you
about how I shot those images and I’m a shoot a couple
while we’re here let’s just wonder down this way a bit I’ll
show you to recognize it yeah exactly its up there isn’t it that’s where are
shot is how do we shoot it how would I go about shooting that now for first of all is about
seeing it’s about looking around we can from standing in the road here and it’s
very narrow it’s about seeing the image it’s about
looking around you all the time as you walking around so how would I isolate that from its surroundings well
is gonna be a long lens shot and to shoot a I’m gonna need be
standing against the wall over here so what focal length Am I gonna need to isolated
well it’s the one that works you know don’t get hung up about these numbers so
much it’s about looking through the camera
and then seeing if we can zoom in and out a
little bit and find what is going to work so if I hit the record button on here you are
now looking through my camera you can see so I’m zooming in and out finding what works looking for the composition where do we want a place
that house well I want it down low in the corner the composition I don’t
the camera landscape way because look it’s not a bad
picture and you can bring in the corner the other building but it’s another shot the
first one I want Matt empty empty kinda space
thing going on around the house so much for length actually 55
millimetres I’m using sort of standard focal length i want the camera this way up now where do I need to be I don’t want
quite so much clutter so i’m gonna move to my right and as I moved to my right you can
see things slightly re-aligning I wanna loose that little
black white whatever is edgewood or just to the right to the window with
shutters there we go so I’m in a place that down low like
that into the sky now we have got a clear blue sky like I had the other day but that’s going to be my shot see if i can
kill the video I’m and you shoot it so what’s it about the depth of the field I need well and a great deal I mean I’m gonna shoot it about F 11 I guess I got 400 of second that’s just bring the exposure down a
little bit because I don’t want to burn out my
highlights we got some very moody sky beyond on this just very different shot to the other
day but it’s still a nice shot so there we go we’re all lined up to 640 the
second f11 my composition is lined up and then is our picture and it’s really kind i nice Im shooting at 200 ISO
fifty five millimeters or crop sensor camera with isolated the shot there how about the other one the landscape
version well order to do really is turn the camera the other way up isnt it so we’ve gone from this composition here we’re now just kinda taking it this way aren’t we there’s no really much else to
do now can zoom in a little bit and just kinda see if that works are kinda
like that you know as a composition I kinda like that said
so that is gonna be my focal length: just there as opposed to just there just
little tiny tweak makes a world a difference and it sorta
found the scene towards those clouds that are going on
up there in the sky we’re going to focus well and a focus on the shutter there that white sorta shutter checkpoint exposure my histogram bright it up just tad one focal length at the end of the day
he’s just below 70 millimetres on a crop sensor and focus where I want it I want to bring the composition down the
bottom there and squeeze the shot now looking at the street you wouldn’t certainly imagine that this is where those shots were
taken you do have to disassociate yourself thanks Jason just can’t have a look for couple more look at the shadows on that building up in the corner up there you see right up in the corner of the
frame there’s those shadows now they can make
great abstracts we’ve also got shadow the chimney which
is right up on the top there and it’s against the wall so let’s see if
I can execute this some to go in so what do i need to do well let’s just have
a little look through the camera so there’s a little chimney stack on the
top and there’s it shadow and well as gorgeous little diagonal lines
going on so what focal length do we need to know what’s the bright focal length: the one that works so
looks for your viewfinder and change it let’s just start is a zoom in now I don’t
wanna see the chimney itself I just want the abstract pattern the blue
upright and those lines on the wall bring that
back a little more where do we wanna guy I think it’s
somewhere around their I kinda like so that’s why
I’m gonna shoot kill the video mode that have a look at
it so we’re gonna focus is quite a long way away so you can focus on the wall be careful shooting things like this
because you camera will under exposes it so I’ll increase my
exposure by mmm full stop actually to make sure I’m goal nice bright whites I can always dark and it’ll be in
post-production if i need to so focus on the wall I’m sitting at F11
I’ve got 900 for the second using a two hundred
millimeter lens 200 ISO and I some are you wanna know
that stuff to sneak up for focal length and no more focus on the wall and line up our shot
movement to the right a bit and there’s our image I think that looks really cool I really
do like it and is another shot going on straight up
here let me show it to you there is my focus and this little video button look to the
right to those doors look at that window look at that window just there and that diagonal line coming across the
top of bit got a cloud in the sky which is a shame because I’d much rather have clear blue sky
however there’s still a shot to be had there so how
would I do this well I need to just love line my camera up
with all you know what I kinda like actually now let me show you I just seen because
you couldn’t say what I was doing then should hit my video button and wait for this truck to go sort of dangerous call to be doing this hey ho! you know I but I get run over there’s not too
much traffic right let’s get my video camera rocking and rolling so what
i’m looking at is this up here now kinda like that almost is the easy looking through the camera
but look if I just bring this in a little tighter I kinda rather like it like that I like
the blue coming down to the left you know on that pipe and I like the window
with the diagonal line above it and I like this or text is in the white
wall said that will be a shot I’m going to do
and not don’t even mind the grey clouds above I’ve rather blue sky but there you go so let’s
kill the video mode because you just saw me
composed the shot in the camera Im in about ninety millimeters
on a crop sensor so have to sneak up a little close to
you im might be out of focus to make it lined up nicely so here we go
here he is just get all lined up and there and and squeeze the shot what we got so shooting at 400 the second f11 focused on the window that is all peachy
dandy I have no problems with that at all take another one dont think I had my camera
quite level we also might look quite nice return the camera the other way up we check it and see I yea that’s pretty cool too so me show
you the difference so that’s roughly what our last
composition was so as i turn the camera the other way up
you see there’s another composition there very simple one fact I think I prefer
that one I like the like in the shade and I like the simplicity of it was just
zoom in a little more no maybe give it a bit more spice
always see how would bring in shadows this are tiny movements of focal length:
that is to make it work so let’s just see if I can bring in one
shadow like that there back i think is roughly the
composition that I want like that so let’s come out
of video mode if i can there we go to even get a shot
try not to get run over the same time you can hear it coming can’t you groovy dobby fun okay so so now we got high light and shades so im gonna use my histogram too make sure the exposure is go all the data I’m gonna
need I don’t want whites to burn out just get that
composition right cause I accidentally moved the focal length: very slightly
and that 400 F11 and take the
shot see what a simple easy little shot that is but the key to
all the sort some shots is looking around you being aware of your
surroundings and jason said disassociating yourself from those
surroundings subscribe to our YouTube channel to be
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photography videos well for more great photo tips workshops and training come in us on our website photographycourses.biz