Digital Camera Tips : Resolution Tips for Digital Cameras

Digital Camera Tips : Resolution Tips for Digital Cameras


So to put this in perspective for you, a lot
of the cameras out there are touting this has 12.5 megapixels but it’s $500 dollars.
Where this was a $200 dollar camera which I’m really impressed that it already has 7.1.
So to put this in perspective 2 megapixel camera can actually print a really decent
4×6 image. So if all you are ever going to print is a 4×6 image you don’t need to buy
anything more than a 2 megapixel camera. Now 3 megapixels you can make a pretty good 5×7,
6 to 8 megapixels will get you very good 8×10’s or if you really want to go all the way up
to 16×22 then you are going to need a 24 megapixel camera and that is definitely professional
level, none of the point and shoots have 24 megapixels yet. So the other reason that you
need to have high resolution is sometimes when you take that picture you’re going to
want to do some cropping, so maybe your subject isn’t in the right place or you want to really
just get into their head and their shoulders, so if you buy a camera like for instance this
one is 7.1 so I can easily do an 8×10 which means I could very easily crop out a very
small part of that picture and do a very good 4×6. So just keep that in mind when you’re
out there shopping, that more megapixels doesn’t necessarily mean better for you.

Top 10 Tips to Submitting a Children’s Picture Book Manuscript

Top 10 Tips to Submitting a Children’s Picture Book Manuscript


Hi my name is Kimara Nye and I am editor at Maverick Arts Publishing. Today I am going to talk through some of the top ten tips as to how become a published author. Tip 1. Title is king. Everyone needs a good title and it will be the first thing that the editor sees. Tip 2. Guidelines It is important to follow guidelines if a publisher gives them there is a reason. And one of the main guidelines that you will come across is word count. Other guidelines might include how to send your submission. It might be by email or by post and when you do that make sure you do check what the publisher wants you to do. Tip 3. Submit Legible Submissions. In might seem obvious but make sure your manuscript is easy to read. Some people will submit a manuscript where the font is in all different colours. It is best to just submit a manuscript as plain text with 1.5 or double line spacing. Tip 4. Try to be Original It is very difficult to be original nowadays. So just try to submit something, which is unusual or is going to grab the attention of the person reading it. Tip 5. Take your time Take your time and really think about what you are writing. Don’t rush into submitting something that you’ve only just written. You want to be able to see how you can improve it. One way of doing this is to join a critique group and to show it to other people and get their opinion. Tip 6. Know Your Audience It is important when writing to know who you are writing for. So is the language you are using too complicated? At Maverick our age range is from 3 to 7 years old. Tip 7. Rhyme or Prose One of the things I get asked about most when I am receiving submissions is whether we accept rhyme. At Maverick we do accept rhyme but a lot of publishers don’t. But when publishers are looking at prose and rhyme , if they have two strong texts and one is rhyme and one is prose they are more likely, probably, to go for the prose. Tip 8. Research! It is very important to research other children’s books. So the best thing is to know the children’s book market inside out. There are loads of different places you can find out about it and loads of different people you can talk to and maybe it might help when you submit your own manuscript. Tip 9. Know Your Publisher When you are submitting a text it is important to know who you are submitting it to. Traditional stories may be written beautifully but at the end of the day it is not exactly what we publish. So it is important to make sure that you know your publisher before you submit. Finally, tip 10. Be prepared to make changes. It is important when you have a manuscript that you are not precious about it. If you are an unpublished author then you’ve got to accept that you might need to make changes to your manuscript. A publisher might accept it but on the condition that they are able to work with you. So you’ve listened to this video and you’ve decided that you have the perfect manuscript for Maverick. That you are going to be the next big thing. Well, how do you submit? The best way is to go to our website, which is www.maverickbooks.co.uk I hope to read your submission soon. Thank you.

Food Stylist Vs Arby’s Roast Beef Sandwich and Beef ‘n Cheddar | Fast Food Styling Revisited

Food Stylist Vs Arby’s Roast Beef Sandwich and Beef ‘n Cheddar | Fast Food Styling Revisited


– Did you know that the Arby’s A is actually supposed to
look like an oven mitt? A cowboy hat? I think it’s supposed to be an oven mitt. It’s a cowboy hat? Mother bananas. Well, then, there you go. Arby’s is from the prairie. I’m a food stylist. Consider me a makeup artist for food. I take boring, everyday, average food and make it look amazing. I’m gonna show you guys how a food stylist turns a
drive-through roast beef sandwich into an Arby’s Roast Beef
ready for a commercial. (upbeat music) But first, have you liked, commented, or subscribed to this show? If you are watching this on YouTube, have you clicked the bell? Are you up-to-date on
all the latest episodes of Food Stylist Versus? And if the answer to any
of those questions is no, what are you doing? Get on it. I’m gonna show you guys how I attempt to replicate an Arby’s
Roast Beef sandwich. What is the slogan? We’ve got the meats? We have meats. We have the meats. We have the meat sweats. Guys, what do we have? – [Man] We have the meats. – I’m swimming in roast beef over here. We’ve got a lotta options and I wanna talk to you about all of it. But first and foremost, let’s talk about fast food advertising, and more specifically Arby’s. I don’t know if you guys have seen the
latest Arby’s advertisements, whether a commercial or
even on their website, but everything’s looking
like top-notch these days. One thing is for certain. We, in the real world,
cannot get our hands on the same product that Arby’s
uses in their restaurant, and I’m pretty sure
that’s the exact product that the food team will
use on photo shoots. So everything that I have
in front of me today, well, most of everything, is store-bought, just from a normal grocery store. We went to Arby’s and picked
up a couple sandwiches while we were there. What you expect when you go
through the drive-through is not what you see on the
commercials or the advertisements. That’s just the nature of it, you guys. Here is a Beef and Cheddar. There’s some cheddar somewhere. A double Roast Beef. Oh, no, this is two Beef and Cheddars. Okay, we’re just going
to Beef and Cheddar town. One thing that I really liked recently from the new Arby’s advertisements
is the beautiful color of their Roast Beef sandwiches. It is really lovely and pink. It’s rare roast beef, which
is what you really wanna see. I’ll be honest with you. In order to maintain this sort of look on a sliced deli meat like that, it probably has a lot
of preservatives in it. I’m not saying that Arby’s meats have a lot of preservatives. I’m just saying, from a
food knowledge perspective, that meat that holds up really well and maintains its color has to have a lot of preservatives in it. So the product that we were able to find, which is just deli-sliced roast beef, does not maintain its color very well. That’s because roast beef
oxidizes really quickly, and so that red color that it might have when freshly sliced doesn’t
really hang around very long. I’m gonna show you guys a little trick that I just came up with
to make the deli meat that we got from the grocery story look like the Arby’s Roast Beef. I have taken grenadine,
which is a cocktail mixer or a drink mixer, and it’s bright red, kinda like maraschino cherry juice. And then I’ve also taken Kitchen Bouquet, which is a browning agent, and I’ve mixed the two together and come up with this little concoction, and I’m going to paint the meat. Both of these products
are completely edible. However, it will change the
taste of the meat itself. So I do not recommend doing
this for sheer enjoyment. But we are not doing
this for sheer enjoyment. We’re doing this for
your viewing pleasure. I really did try my best
to find real-life options that I would not have to fake, but sometimes, at the end of the day, to get the product that you want, it has to be doctored up a little bit. And so I painted that on, and in order to not let
there be any pools of liquid, I’m just gonna sort of
dab that up a little bit. And even when you look
at it, my paper towel, it kinda looks like roast beef juice, or blood, if you will.
(ominous music) That looks great and it’s gonna hold up. Kind of the biggest
deal when preparing food for food styling is that
your food has to hold, and sometimes food doesn’t hold. And in this case deli meat
is one of those things, but we are trying to conquer all of that. I was lucky enough to have one of our local Arby’s give us some of the actual buns that they used for the Roast Beef sandwiches, which is two thumbs up.
(cheering) Thank you for that. I’m just gonna show you a comparison of what we were able to
find in the grocery store, which is actually also a really nice bun, but it’s not quite the same. There’s definitely more sesame
seeds on the Arby’s bun. And then these, it has
the side where it’s like they were baked together in a row. This one is really wonderful
all the way around. It’s so even and cohesive. Good job on those buns, Arby’s. I also bought some onion rolls because that’s the type of bun that the Beef and Cheddar sandwich is on. So we also got the
onion rolls from Arby’s. This is a store-bought bun. The only reason I’m using this bun over the Arby’s bun is because it has more of that little onion topping on it. Also this bun is a little bit larger than the sesame seed bun. So these two actually are
more of the same size. I just like cohesiveness. Just the way it is. So you guys, I am going to
build the sandwich facing me. This is very similar to the episode where I built the club sandwich. Meat really looks best when
it’s sort of folded over itself and it gives it a really layered effect. One thing that I definitely notice is that the Arby’s deli meat in the photo is very, very thinly sliced, but it holds together very, very well. That is definitely a trick in itself. So when I used to eat Arby’s all the time, the Roast Beef sandwich
was not my favorite thing. I used to order the Italian sub. Well, you guys already know how extra I am anyway about things, but that was my favorite food. As I’m adding my folded meat, I kinda think about the
motion of the ocean. I know that sounds really cheesy, but it’s just sort of like the waves layer on top of each other. So basically the toothpicks
just act as a support and sort of a tack for the deli meat that I’ve layered onto the sandwich. And this little concoction that I came up with for the roast beef
looks super fantastic. I have to be honest. I know that it’s not 100% the real deal, but sometimes you gotta
think on your feet. So I have a couple pieces of scrap meat that just aren’t the dyed
meat that I’ve worked on, so I’m layering that in the back. She is meaty, isn’t she? So the only thing I kinda
see right now is right here. I can see it doesn’t fill that space, so I definitely need to go back and add some meat in the back. I stuck a toothpick in the middle to kinda give it some support, so I’m just sort of threading this meat onto this toothpick while also
sort of folding it in layers. Get this; I’m moistening my meat. How’d you like that? See, I can come up with my
own cringeworthy stuff every once in awhile. If you’ve seen my video where I style a roadside steakhouse plate, when I oiled the steak, it
makes it look more shiny and more moist and more delicious. But you can’t really
do that with deli meat. It kinda actually has the opposite effect. Right now, basically I’m just trying to make it look cohesive. I’d noticed that the
top slice of roast beef on the Arby’s picture is
flat up against the bun. It’s less distracting from
so many folds of meat. Y’all, this is so funny. I’m looking at this
sandwich, the meat folds, and to me it looks like
a stormtroooper mask. Too bad it’s not baby Yoda’s face. (angelic singing)
Look at this magical meat sandwich in all of its glory. All right, you guys. One down, one to go. One thing that’s pretty different about the Beef and Cheddar is that it has Arby’s Sauce on
the bottom of the bun. If you watch the Whopper video, then you know that condiments come last. Except I’m gonna add a
little bit of Arby’s Sauce, just to kinda give us
somewhere to start with. Make sure to comment below and let us know what your favorite Arby’s
sandwich of choice is. And if you have any similarly related Arby’s-themed fantasies, please let us know about that as well. Very interested to know about your Beef and Cheddar waterfalls or French Dip hot tubs
or whatever it may be. This looks great, and
it is actually edible. Even though we had to sort of doctor up the color a little bit, everything about these
sandwiches are completely edible. Except for the toothpicks. I wasn’t sure how I was going
to do the whole cheddar thing on the Beef and Cheddar, so
I definitely got a couple of sides of cheese from Arby’s itself. If you didn’t know that
you can order an extra side of cheese from Arby’s,
now you do and you should, because they never give you enough cheese. But then also you can dip
your Curly Fries in it. That’s just a little tip from me to you. You’re welcome. So what I was kind of going for, and in my head, the way I
thought about the cheddar on the Beef and Cheddar, was nacho cheese. It looks great. It actually is thick but also
loose, all at the same time. It kinda defies physics
with its cheese-sauciness. It’s pretty magical, I’d have to say, kinda like a unicorn, but cheese sauce. Obviously this is room
temperature cheese sauce, it is not hot, for the purposes of it not literally going everywhere. I am gonna wait to put the top bun back on the Beef and Cheddar ’cause I don’t wanna mess up my, it kinda looks like lava, we’re gonna go with cheddar
lava flow, on top of this sammy. But I love my little Arby’s
Sauce drips down here. That’s really cute. I’ll probably add a little
bit more Arby’s sauce once we get it on our photo set. Well, now that you have seen
me build these bad boys, we’re gonna swap it over to our Arby’s advertisement
photo set lookalike and finish it up for you. Okay, guys. We are now in our Arby’s
advertisement photo setup. To really set up the scene
like an Arby’s commercial, we’re gonna do just a couple other things. I wanna add a little bit more Arby’s Sauce to my Beef and Cheddar, and I’m just gonna get it
straight outta the packet. Now I’m gonna put my bun on. No Arby’s sandwich is
complete without Curly Fries. We picked these up from the frozen section of the grocery store and
cooked ’em ourselves. I’m obviously trying to pick
out the really curly ones. Arby’s Roast Beef sandwiches
and a ice-cold Coke. Okay, you guys. Food Stylist Versus Arby’s. I think it turned out pretty great. I was a little intimidated,
but looks really delicious, I have to say. Why don’t you comment below and let me know what
you thought about this. Tell me how I did. And while you’re at it,
make sure you’re subscribed to Well Done on YouTube
so you can stay up-to-date with all the latest episodes
of Food Stylist Versus.

Tricky Thursday: S Pen Air Action Camera

Tricky Thursday: S Pen Air Action Camera


আঁউ! What’s up, good people! It’s another beautiful Thursday and আবারো ১ মিনিটে আপনার Smartphone Usage Experience বদলে দিতে আমি ‘Z’ চলে এসেছি Tricky Thursday-তে মাঝে মাঝে মনে হয় না? ম্যাজিক ওয়ান্ড ঘুরিয়ে যদি দুনিয়াটাই কন্ট্রোল করতে পারতাম? Well, দুনিয়া কন্ট্রোল পারেন আর নাই পারেন, Samsung S Pen ঘুরিয়ে কিন্তু আরামসে কন্ট্রোল করতে পারবেন আপনার Samsung ক্যামেরা। শুরু করার আগে ১ মিনিট! আমাদের
সবগুলো Video’র গরম গরম Update পেতে
Subscribe করে বাজিয়ে দিন ঘন্টা। S Pen Air Action অ্যাক্টিভেট করতে প্রথমে S Pen বের করুন। ট্যাপ করুন ক্যামেরা এরপর বাটন চেপে ডানে-বামে Swipe করলে চেঞ্জ হবে ক্যামেরা মোড। Swipe up করে সুইচ করতে পারবেন Front কিংবা Back ক্যামেরা। Clockwise ঘোরালে Zoom in আর Counter Clockwise ঘোরালে Zoom Out Congratulations! এবার S Penটাই হয়ে গেলো আপনার ম্যাজিক ওয়ান্ড! That’s all from today’s episode! ভালো লাগলে hit Like (Thumbs Up with ‘Ting!’ Sound Effect) and Share! Until Next Time! Seeya!

Digital Camera Tips : How to Use the Red Eye Feature in Digital Cameras

Digital Camera Tips : How to Use the Red Eye Feature in Digital Cameras


Today I’m going to tell you a little bit about
how the red-eye function works on your camera. I got my son Dylan here as a model, so we
will see how that goes. First I want to talk a little bit about what causes red eye. Now
we have more red-eye problems at night because our pupils are wide open and gives us more
of a reflective surface for the flash to reflect into. I also wanted to show you the main reason
why we get so much red-eye with the smaller cameras is because the location of the flash
on the camera is very close to the location of the lens. So the light as it flashes into
your eyes at the same angle and it’s much easier for the lens to capture that reflection.
Now our pupils are more dilated in dark areas or in the evening. So you get more red-eye
in the evening. Now most of these cameras have terrific built in red-eye functions.
Sometimes they flash multiple times, which works as a way to reduce the size of the pupil
right before the shot. Mine actually does not do that. I believe it is because it uses
a light to do the auto focusing when it’s darker, so that light shining in your eye
actually helps to reduce the red-eye, giving that the subject is looking at that light
when it’s flashing. It’s very simple to turn red-eye on and off, so on the fly you can
just go into the menu and then mine is just the fourth one down and I can choose red-eye
on or red-eye off. It’s very simple. I tend to just leave it on, just in case I’m in that
situation and it’s already all setup for me.

Music Festival Tips What Gear to Pack: Out of the Darkroom with Ruth Medjber

Music Festival Tips What Gear to Pack: Out of the Darkroom with Ruth Medjber


Welcome to Out of the Darkroom on AdoramaTV. This is the first part of a very special series of episodes where I’m going to share some trade secrets with you, all about how to shoot music festivals; what to bring, who to shoot and where to share the photos. So for those of you who don’t know me, my name is Ruth Medjbur and I’m a professional music photographer. All the tips that I’m about to share with you come from my own personal experience. However, it’s important to note that there’s no steadfast rules in this business. I’m just sharing what works for me. For the last 15 years I’ve been shooting music festivals. I shoot about 10 to 15 per year, mostly in Ireland where I’m based, but sometimes across Europe too. I’ve shot for magazines, newspapers, commercial clients and for the festivals themselves. In this episode I will talk you through a full list of the essentials, every lens to cover every stage indoors and outdoors. As well as a run-through of the extra bits I’ve learned to pack over the years. All the points I’m going to mention here can only really apply once you’ve secured your press accreditation in advance with the festival organizers. If you turn up at the gate with all of this stuff packed in your bag and no pass you’ll be turned away. So have your email confirmation printed out, or on your phone so that you can show the gate staff that you’re legitimately picking up a pass and are allowed to have your gear on site. First things first, obviously you need your camera but don’t get hung up about the overall speck of your body. If you’ve been booked to shoot a music festival just go with what you have. It’s a good idea to bring a second body if you have one, but you should definitely have spare batteries for your body. You’ll be out shooting for hours each day and coming across power supplies can be tricky. So invest in a good spare battery. When I’m buying spares I always go for the genuine model instead of the third-party brand as I’ve had a bit of bad experience with them running low really quickly. Do your own research and read reviews before you buy. Memory cards are also something you need spares of. I end up shooting about 90 to 120 gigs a day on the D4S. I split that over various cards so that I can leave one importing in the media tent and then I can go out and shoot more shots. It’s also a good idea to have cards with a fast write speed. If something incredible is happening in front of you, like the lead singer has stage dived into the crowd and you need to be shooting furiously, the last thing you want to do is suffer a writing lag on your cards. One of the reasons I chose the D4S is for the FPS rate, the frames per second. I tend to find this pretty crucial when shooting live music so that I can get the burst of shots needed to capture live action shots. Lenses, really you should be bringing your entire arsenal of lenses with you. Shooting a music festival these days means shooting everything. Doing crowd portraits, shooting the food, the merchandise stands. You’ll want to get super wide to get the entire crowd in some of the shots. Then you’ll also need to be on a Telephoto. When your main stage is over 10 feet tall and you need that extra reach. What I bring is the following; a super-wide Sigma a Nikon 24-70mm which are mainly used when wandering around the festival grounds looking for good atmosphere shots. I can also use it on some of the medium or smaller stages. I’ll switch it up to a 70-200mm, when I want to get either some candid crowd shots from afar like in spy mode, or I’ve hit one of the big stages. I’ll use the nifty 50mm as well when we’re shooting tiny stages with no lights, or I want to do some f/1.4 work with some of the products, food or the merchandise Now flash. So you all know that you’re not allowed to use it in the pit but at night-time when you’re wandering around the arena or the campsite some off camera flash makes for some pretty interesting light, so pack it anyway, and have your triggers with you and maybe also one of your friends can hold it, or just pack a light stand. Business cards; This might seem a bit nuts in a gear list but you’ll be surprised at the amount of people that you meet down there. Some of them might just be music fans looking for copies of their photos but there’s still another Instagram follower so share those cards. A rain jacket for your camera. I know most pro bodies are weather sealed but they’re not waterproof. There is a difference. If you’re in a wet and windy part of the world, like I am sometimes, that rain can come down in buckets and come at you from all angles. The band might be due on stage at nine o’clock you’re in place in the rain from ten to nine. If they don’t walk on until 9:30pm, that’s 40 minutes of getting soaked. It’s best not to have your camera exposed to all of this. Invest in a rain jacket, you can pick up cheap baggies if you don’t shoot a lot, or you can get a reusable one if you’re a seasoned pro. Here’s the other thing, you’ll be at this music festival for three, maybe four days you need to look after yourself too. So get waterproof boots, jackets, hats, it doesn’t matter how stupid you look. When it’s lashing rain or freezing cold you’ll be glad of it. If you do get soaked keep some silicon gel packs in your lens cases and at the end of your bag as they’ll absorb the moisture and save from potentially cloudy or moldy lenses. It’s also a good idea to have dry cloths up your sleeve, so you can quickly wipe the raindrops from your lens when you’re shooting in the rain. I’ve seen photographers being turned away from the pit as they were wearing open-toe sandals. This is a working pit with lots od gear flying around. Have some sense, wear work boots or you’ll lose your toe. Don’t forget the laptop if you need to be filing images throughout the weekend make sure you have something to do it on. I’ve seen newbie photographers rock up to the media tent expecting there to be a row of free computers to use. Bring everything you need to be self-sustaining; chargers, hard drive, spare transfer cables and mark your name on everything. Believe me you won’t be the only Canon charger plugged into the socket panel. There might be a hundred photographers in and out of there all weekend. Sometimes you’re lucky enough that they have lockers to rent, so you can dump your gear between drop-offs, otherwise you might be running back and forth to your car. You can check this in advance with your media contact. If you’re vertically challenged like me, you just can’t cope with the weight of all of this gear, then invest in some new methods of carrying your gear. Last year I shifted the weight from my shoulders to my waist. I put my lenses, flash, other bits like my phone and my wallets in this and I’m good to just run around the festival for errors. If you’re shooting on two bodies instead of one, to save time changing lenses in the pit then grab a double strap. Personally, I only work on one body at a time as I’m consciously trying to slow down my shooting style. So a comfy strap works just as well for me. Earplugs; Do you know how loud main stages get? Imagine standing there for hours a day. Best thing I ever bought was a pair of molded earplugs. They can be a little bit pricey but they are worth every penny. They’ll also help you get some much-needed shut-eye in your tent at night. Speaking of tents, don’t be silly and buy one that costs 10 quid. You don’t want your gear, your clothes and you to wake up drenched every morning. Get a decent pop-up tent. Sometimes you could be doing these festivals completely on your own. So make sure you can put it up and take it down all by yourself. Another thing I’m going to recommend that your bring is a tripod. Now, don’t attempt to put this up in the pit! If looks could kill then each other photographer will have you dead in a second. I’m recommending bringing it for the nighttime ambient shots, when you want to do something quirky like long exposures of the carousel. You can keep it in the car until you actually need it but just make sure it’s lightweight. That’s all from me for this episode. Join me again next time where I’m going to talk you through exactly what to shoot while you’re at the music festival. Subscribe to AdoramaTV for more videos and don’t forget to check out the Adorama Learning Center for more great tips and tricks. Thanks and I’ll see you again soon.

How to Import Images into Premiere Pro


mmm that’s real good Hi, this is Janet from Manhattan Edit
Workshop and today I’d like to talk about how to import stills into Premiere
Pro. First I want you to note in our preferences, general preferences there’s
an option called defaults scale to frame size. Note that that is currently turned
off. So I’m going to bring in this file with default scale to frame size turned
off and let’s see what that does. I’m just going to bring in this file here
and drop it on the timeline. You can tell by looking in the preview area that not
the entire image is showing up in the program monitor. If I look here this
tells me the size of this image 1680 wide by 1050 tall. But my timeline is 720 x 480. So what I’m seeing in my program monitor is the center part of the
photograph the outer parts are not visible. You’ll especially notice it if I
shrink this down and click you’ll see the wireframe here is representing the
full size of the original still and what we’re currently seeing through the
program monitor is what we would output. So this is great because it does allow
me to pan around the image while keeping the quality high. Now for comparison
let’s reinforce the image but this time I’m going to change the general setting
to turn on default scale to frame size. So I’m checking that saying okay and I’m
going to re-import it there we go so There we go. We’ll drag our re-imported image and you’ll notice first of all that we do see the entire image if I scale down
this time you can see it’s including all of the image in the wireframe and this
is what we would output. I could make this bigger by expanding the wireframe
but this is not the original image therefore I will be scaling up the
rasterized file and it just may not look good. When I have the default scale to frame size set. Premiere Pro creates a copy of
the still that’s at the same frame size as your sequence. So what I’m currently
working with here is the 720 x 480 and not the original size which was 1680 x
1050. Now if I want to change that I can always right-click on the clip and turn
off scale to frame size. Notice the wireframe changes I’m now looking at the
original so this would be fine to scale up or to do some pan and zoom
adjustments. So if you want your imported stills to match the frame size of your
sequence you should make sure that in the Preferences general settings your
default scale – frame size is checked. Otherwise if you want to be able to pan
around an image and to be able to adjust the scale of the original file you want
to make sure that default scales of frame size is deselected.

Finding Images

Finding Images


Whatever your discipline, you might find
images to be really useful resources for
research. Paintings, engravings, diagrams, and any
other visual representations of your subject
can help you better understand your topic. UVic subscribes to image databases like
ARTstor, Camio, and Oxford Art Online, which you can find in the Images subject
guide, or under the databases tab. You can find images on the web using an
image search engine like Google Images or
Picsearch, or by searching an image database such
as Wikimedia Commons or Flickr. Most of these resources will allow you to
limit your search to results that you can
use free of copyright. You can also find images in databases
such as Images Canada, the UNESCO Photobank, or the Earth
Science World Image Bank. Many libraries and museums have large
digital image collections, including the
Smithsonian Institute, the New York Public Library, the Library of
Congress, and the Virtual Museum of
Canada. Visit the individual Subject Guides for more
subject-specific image sources. There’s also a specific Subject Guide for
Images, and one for Medical Images. There are different ways to cite images,
according to different citation style guides
like MLA or APA. Consult the appropriate style guide for
more information. For instructions on citing online images,
check out the guide created by SFU
Library. The UVic History in Art Style Guide and the
UVic Department of History Style Guide If the image is a map or remote-sensing
image like a satellite image, include the term [map] after the title, and
the scale if available. You can also watch our video on Finding Maps. For more help, visit the subject guides, watch more videos, or meet with a librarian. Thanks for watching!