What’s In My Camera Bag 2019 – Sony Vlogging Gear Setup

What’s In My Camera Bag 2019 – Sony Vlogging Gear Setup


– Are you as fascinated as I am with What’s In Your Camera Bag videos? In this video, I’m going to tell you what’s in my camera bag, 2019, and that video is coming up next. Hi, my name is Brian The Camera Guy. If you’re new to my channel, I review Sony gear along with accessories that go along with those cameras. If you’re new to my channel, consider clicking that subscribe button. And, on your way down there, don’t forget to hit that like button and also that bell notification so you don’t miss out on
any of my future videos. In today’s video, I’m going to be talking about what’s in my camera bag for 2019. If there’s anything in this video that you want to pick up for yourself, there will be links down
in the description below. So, let’s go ahead, unzip it, and let’s show you what’s inside. So, first thing is I do have a B camera. This is the Sony AX53. I just did a review on this on my channel. If you’re interested in seeing that video, I’ll link that up in the cards above. But, this is one heck of a camcorder. It gets great image quality, especially in sunlight. Can’t go wrong with this thing. But, I use this as a backup. It’s also got great image stabilization. As you can see there, it’s got some good optical
image stabilization. It also has the reverse flippy screen so, this way, if you want to, you can set yourself up
as a vlogging camera. Great camera. It’s got audio in points so
you can plug in a lav mic or a shotgun mic up here in the top. Highly recommend this camera. Great image quality, it’s 4k and it also shoots 1080p. It’s real nice quality. Has a ZEISS lens on it as well. Like I said, if you want to see more about this, check out the video I did up at the beach. That’s going to be up in the cards above. That is my B camera. Now, what I’m going to do is I am going to swap it out
right now for my A camera so I can show you what that is. All right, so I’m back. Now, I have the Sony
AX53 up on the sticks. It’s a solid camcorder. I can tell you how I can make the image quality a little bit better so stay tuned until the
end of the video for that. So, now let’s talk about my A camera. It’s the Sony a6400. I’ve been shooting with this now since about April of this year. This camera is really nice. It’s got great audio inputs. It does have this nice flippy screen so you can vlog with it. I’ll tell you what lens I’m
using when I am doing the vlogs. So, it does 4k, 24 frames,
30 frames per second. It also does 1080p and 24, 30, 60 and 120. I have a complete review of this camera, pros and cons, on my channel. I’ll put that up in the cards above. Solid camera. I don’t use it too much for photos, but I definitely use
it for a lot of video. Really, really like this camera. So, this is the A camera. Generally when I’m doing
talking head videos, I do use the Sigma 16mm f1.4. It’s a great lens. Really, really like using
this combo together. Especially in indoor settings. So, this is my A camera. I’m going to go ahead and
put these back on the sticks. Show you what else is in my camera bag. All right, so we’re back. So, I have the Sony a6400
along with the Sigma 16mm f1.4. Currently have it at a f2 setting. Usually put the ISO on auto. So, now that we’ve
talked about the A camera and the B camera, what other lenses am
I packing in this bag? So, if you’re going to be out
there using the Sony a6400, it does not have image stabilization so you do want to pick
up a lens that has that. My recommendation is just
get the standard kit lens. The 16-50mm kit lens. It does come with Sony’s OSS, the Optical Steady Shot, that is stabilization
as you shake this lens. You can feel it moving
around a little bit. That’s going to give a little
bit of a steadier shot. If there was one down
side to the Sony a6400, I wish it had the IBIS. Even a little bit would help out when you’re out there
walking, running, and gunning. The other thing I wish the Sony a6400 had was a bigger battery life. This thing does chew up a lot of batteries and I do go through them quick. Now, we’ll get to a lens
that I use sometimes if I’m trying to take portraits, but I don’t use it very often, which is the Sony 50mm f1.8. I don’t use this very often. It is actually the version I
have is for full frame cameras. It does not have any Optical Steady Shot. There is an Optical Steady Shot version, which is an ASPC version of this and it does have Optical Steady Shot. I’ll go ahead and link that
down in the cards below as well, but this is the Sony 50mm f1.8 and it’s good for portraits. Next up, I’m going to pull out a lens that is probably the least
used one in my whole entire bag and I’ll explain why. So, I have a very old Sigma 28-80 lens. This was originally for a film SLR camera. It does have auto focus and manual focus. It was for the Canon EF mounting system, but it is a Sigma lens, like I said, 28-80mm. Probably the most underused lens because I have the 16-50 kit lens. I also have the 50mm so a lot of the focal
length is covered in this and the next lens that
I’m about to show you. So, this does have a macro feature. So, it has a macro and a normal feature so you can get some nice
up close product shots. The downside with this is it does not have auto
focus when doing video so you would have to do some manual focus in order to get some good image quality, but with the Sony a6400, I generally throw it on the manual focus and I use the red setting so I can tell where my auto focus is. So, that is the Sigma 28-80. It’s an older lens, but it still works out really well. Next lens I have is the 70-300 from Sigma. Once again, this is an old lens from a film SLR camera that I used to use. This thing is an aperture of
four, all the way up to 5.6. It also does macro between two and 300 so you can get some
pretty close shots here. I got a couple pictures
here that I’ll show you. But, if you’re going to get any of these, you’re going to need to get an adapter. So, the adapter that
generally lives on this lens is the Sigma MC-11. So, this thing has no glass in it so it’s not a speed booster
or anything like that, but it does fit onto the
camera once you attach this on. This set up is very heavy. Eventually, I’d like
to upgrade to something that is going to be a little bit lighter, but this thing is a tank. It’s a beast. It’s pretty heavy, but you can’t beat the image quality that comes out of this thing. Once again, this one, you also have to do manual focus on, but for photos, this thing, the auto focus does work. It’s a little bit slower than
the a6400 with the adapter, but it’s a quality lens and
it’s a nice piece of glass. So, I got this thing maybe 15 years ago and it’s just been sitting around until I got the Sony a6400, but solid lens. Solid lens. Highly recommend it if you
got an old Canon camera. What else do I have in the bag here? I have, of course, a little tripod thing here. A little GorillaPod. This one pretty cheap. I think it was only like 20 bucks. I’ll link that down in
the description below. It’s just strong enough
to hold that Sony a6400. Would like to upgrade at some point to maybe one of those SwitchPods or a GorillaPod at some point. Of course, bag came with a rain cover. Got to have one of those. You never know what elements you might end up finding yourself in. Of course, I got an SD card holder. Stores all my SD cards. You got to have extra SD cards. Now I’m going to talk to you about some audio solutions
here that I have. Also, when I’m out there shooting video, I have my Rode VideoMicro. This thing does really
great on a really windy day. This dead cat. I mean, it’s huge. It’s big, but it does a really nice
job of cutting down the wind, producing some excellent audio quality. So, in my bag, I do have the Rode Wireless GO system. Nice little system if you’re out there just shooting some video and you don’t want a
giant dead cat on there, I’ll use the Rode Wireless GO system. Highly recommend that. I also did a video on that. I’ll link that up in the cards above. Right up here. If you want to check out that video, that was the Rode Wireless GO system. I also carry around
the Boya BY-M1 lav mic, like I’m using right now. You just never know
when you might need it. It did promise you a tip on how to get better image
quality out of the Sony AX53. It’s no secret if you watch
any of my videos before. I love ND filters. I have two of them. I have the K&F Concept ND filters. These are variable ND filters. I have the 3-7 stop, which is on the cameral right now, and then I have a 1-5 stop. I did buy the 82mm ND filters and that’s because the
bigger the ND filter, if you step it down, the less vignetting you’ll get. Now, these promise a no x-pattern, which is awesome. But, just go ahead and
attach that right on here. You can bring that aperture down. Get this camera to open up
and use that full aperture. So if you are going to
pick up the Sony AX53, I recommend picking up an ND filter. You don’t have to go as big as the 82mm, that is the biggest one they have. I believe they also come in 72 and a 67 so you can always do that, but then you’re going to
need a 55mm step-up ring. So, you’re going to want
a 55-67 step-up ring and that will help put this on here. Also carry around a
bunch of step-up rings. This one is built out. I got an 67 on here. Steps down to a 49 and then, eventually, to a 40.5 and that’s
because of the kit lens. The 16-50 kit lens is a 40.5mm thread. Of course, got to have one of these. Got a mirrorless camera? So you don’t want to
gain dust on that sensor, you need something to blow it out. Also, got some extra batteries. Definitely need those. So, this is all the stuff that I’m currently lugging
around with me everywhere I go. If, like I said, you’re interested in picking
up any of this stuff, there are links down in
the description below. They are affiliate links. They do help support my channel and I’ll really appreciate
it if you use those links. So, this is what’s in
my camera bag in 2019. If you want to see a full review of any of the products
listed here on the table, make sure you leave me
a comment down below or hit me up on Instagram
at BrianTheCameraGuy. If you like this video, click that like button down below. Subscribe to see more. Ring that bell notification so you don’t miss out on my future videos. I’ve been Brian The Camera Guy and this was What’s In
My Camera Bag, 2019. Thanks for watching. (upbeat music)

Are Camera Gimbals worth The Hassle?

Are Camera Gimbals worth The Hassle?


Are Camera Gimbals Worth The Hassle? To find out I tried out the FeiyuTech G6 plus to get stable footage you either need
good in-camera stabilization or an external gimbal for my videos I like to
have stable footage but getting stable footage can be a challenge particularly
when not using a tripod so in this video I compared the FeiyuTech G6 plus to the
internal stabilization provided within the cameras I’m using I tested out a small Canon DSLR, a Sony
compact camera and a tough compact Olympus camera first of all you have to
set the gimbal up and balance it for your specific camera If you change camera or you change lens
you’re gonna need to rebalance the gimbal it took me three and a half
minutes the first time I balance my canon 200D to me that’s too long packing away is also a hassle as you have to pack away the gimbal and if you want to
pack it away in the case it comes in you have to reset it so it fits in the
case in-camera stabilization is improving all
the time using electronic stabilization in your cameras you get a slight crop
the Sony hvx 90 has three levels of stabilization and you can see the crop
when you go to the most stable version For many of my videos I’ve been using a
GoPro Hero seven black to capture stable footage but the footage I get from my
GoPro Hero seven black does not look as nice as the footage I get from my
smaller cameras oy my dslr’s as you can see the gimbal is better than
the in-camera stabilization or no stabilization So what have I decided after using the Freya
tech g6 plus? I’ve actually decided it’s not worth it I have the Vlog pocket I
have a GoPro Hero seven black I can just put my smartphone in the vlog pocket
without needing to balance it I can just turn on my GoPro Hero seven black purely
because of the fiddly nature of the gimbal I don’t think it’s worth it you

Focal Length Explained 1 – Don’t just zoom – MOVE!

Focal Length Explained 1 – Don’t just zoom – MOVE!


Quite often when you go out shooting
with your camera you’ll probably see a scene that you think’s interesting; frame
it up a bit and then zoom around with your zoom to try and get the composition
that you want, but there is a much better way of doing things than this. If you
consider your zoom as a selection of prime lenses, by prime lenses I mean
lenses which can’t zoom, they have fixed focal lengths like 18, 40, 50, 90, 150 whatever it may be. If you use a prime lens you can’t zoom
so you have to move yourself backwards and forwards in order to frame the shot
that you want. When you start controlling your focal length you can control what
the picture looks like, what’s in it and what isn’t, but how do you know which
focal length you’re going to need for which shot that you’re going to take? I’m
going to show you but to do so I’m going to need a nice, friendly, helpful
assistant called Natasha. Hello Nat! This is Jane’s daughter Natasha and
she’s kind of… well I guess I’m your evil stepdad am I that bad?
– Ahhh I can put up with you Mike Ah she’s sweet! Right Nat, could you come and stand here for a moment, go that way
a little bit, there we go – perfect. supposing Natasha and I were standing in our own the garden or something rather than in the street which is a little odd,
I might just think ‘Ah there’s Nat, that would make a nice picture’ stand there and zoom
around and just sort of zoom in and out like that and take a picture and it’s
going to be okay, but I could get a better result if I chose the focal
length for the shot. I’m going to show you a little exercise here which I would
like you to repeat afterwards. What I’m going to do is take the same picture of
Natasha over and over again but at different focal lengths, so you can see
what happens to the environment around her. Now this is going to involve a bit of
lens changing and fiddling around so you may have to bear with me for a minute.
Nat can we go over here? The reason I’ve chosen in the middle of a street is
because you need somewhere which has got sides that go off into the distance and
that has an end behind. Now it’s really important when you compose your shot that you compose it exactly the same each time, so I’m going to give Natasha probably about
a hands width of sky above her head, that’s going to be the very top of the
picture and the bottom of the picture is going to be this seam at the top of
her dress – that will be at the bottom of the frame each time. So first off 10
millimeters, now I’ve got to get right into your personal space here Nat to get the
seam at the top of your dress and only a handful of sky there it is – oop no – there it is – perfect. Now zoom the lens, I’m going to double it to 20 millimeters and do the same thing.
Now that’s made Nat come closer so I’ve got to move back a bit and that’s
only subtle – there it is. All right now we’re going to a longer
lens, from 20 millimeters (camera straps drive me me on the bend)
let’s go to 35 millimeters. So frame the same shot, now I have to move back
because the lens has got longer – again handbreadth of sky, seam on the dress,
excellent. Let’s double that, let’s go out to 70 millimeters so again, she’s
really filling the frame now because it zoomed on to her, so I move back a
bit and very carefully line up – this is a great exercise – oh you blinked, don’t blink!
Right, there we go. Now we want to go out further. I’m gonna
have to change the lens because the next set of focal lengths go out a long way.
We’re going to go from 10 millimeters right out of 500 that means I’m going to
use a whopper of a lens. Even if you don’t have lenses this kind of focal
length, please go and repeat this exercise because it really will help you
understand what on earth it is I’m talking about. Now with the last one at
70 I’m to do the next one at 150, so I’ve set the zoom on the lens I’m not going to
zoom in and out I’m going to frame the shot up with Natasha. Oh look that wasn’t
a bad guess, I’m actually going to go a little bit closer, here we go… train your
eye to look around the viewfinder to line up these gaps like the the bottom
of the dress and the hand breadth of sky. Let’s zoom then on out to 250. Again
Natasha will have come closer in the lens so I’ve got to move back to get the
same shot. Here we go, line up the elements, the gap at the top
and the seam on the dress and then finally we’re going to go all the way out from
250 to 500 millimeters so I’m moving back again. The environment behind
Natasha is changing with each of these shots and this one I promise, you would
never know we were standing in a street… but there’s a lot of fiddling to
get this right – still too close – there it is Good stuff. Nat! Come and have a look So beginning at 10 millimeters, here we go.
Here you are at 10 millimeters. yeah you see how it’s pulled Natasha’s face forward? But look
I’ve got the bottom of the picture as the seam of the dress, the top of the
picture but a handbreadth of sky. As we move on from 10 to 20, see how it’s
changed? Natasha has got a more normal shape. Also look, the cars and
the houses jump forward as we flick between them. Moving on out from there I
think we went to 50 which is a much more normal looking Natasha.
As we move on through – oop we want the other camera as we’re now out to 100 or
so. You see how everything’s starting to take a step forward
each time we extend the focal length until now you don’t know you’re in a
street, and we get to the very last shot there’s no hint of a house or anything.
We’ve just got a clear grey background which is actually the tarmac of the
streets as it goes off up the hill in the distance. This is all you need to do, it
doesn’t matter what you practice this with. If you don’t have a Natasha to take
into the street just put your camera bag on a table in the park or something like
that and take the same shot over and over again, changing the focal length and
moving back so that you get the idea of what’s going on
to the environment and then look at all the pictures one after the other.
This isn’t just the realm of a digital SLR you could do the same thing with a
little compact camera anything that has a zoom on it. If you’re cycling along the sea wall you might not want to carry a monster like that.
Natasha would you mind? We’re going to do a very brief one. Here you go, over
there a bit. If I set the zoom to its widest take the same picture of Natasha getting
right into her personal space, good stuff Nat, and then zoom it to it’s
longest zoom, do the same thing move back. You know if you’re at a party and just got a little camera and you think ‘Oh I’ll take a picture…’ There we go, as you can see the
two are very, very different. Don’t just think I’m going to go and try this in
the morning. Once you start treating your zoom lens as a series of prime lenses
and moving yourself around not being lazy, you’ll really set loose the magic
of your camera and your photography. Don’t leave it, get out there right this
minute! Go and try this.

Vintage Minolta AF 70-210mm f4 “Beercan” lens review in photo and video. LEGENDARY.

Vintage Minolta AF 70-210mm f4 “Beercan” lens review in photo and video. LEGENDARY.


All video shot with the Beercan on Sony NEX 6. This sequence is with a cold adapter and manual focus. The Beercan was released in 1985. Nowadays You get one used over and under 100€. Heavy, durable and simple in design. Simple in coating also, which comes it’s only shortcoming. You get aberrations and fringing in all apertures. f8 seems to hit the sweet spot. Continuing with a cold adapter. With all that fringing earlier, pictures tell another story. Sharpness is more that adequate and colors reproduce nicely. 210mm has a “macro” labeling, which is quite close. Naturally with a telephoto You get background separation. Bokeh is silky smooth. Not a friend of harsh light, just to keep in mind. Add autofocus and shoot away? AF is indeed pretty snappy even with that adapter screw motor. And mostly accurate. Internet knew that EXIF data reads incorrect, 70mm reads as 75mm and so on. Only 210mm is 210mm. So what. AF in studio with speedlights, so minimal constant light for auto focus. I could barely see. Worked like a charm. Love, absolutely. A bit on the heavy side but You get keepers right from wide open. By the way, this is shot with AF. This lens delivers, especially for portraits. It is my go-to.

Feather Camera Crane Set Up Instructions

Feather Camera Crane Set Up Instructions


My name is Canyon Florey. I’m the designer of the Feather Camera Crane: a portable, lightweight adventure jib created for easy use in remote
places. Let’s go over the set up. Unwrap the bag and remove the tower and the
jib handle. Mount the tower to your tripod fluid head. Unzip the sleeve and remove the carbon fiber
boom. Extend the boom and remove the last two sections.
Insert the boom into the tower. Pop the zinc coated pin, and click the black
diamond carabiner to the control cable. Reattach the back section of the boom and
lock past the line. Insert the jib handle and pop the pin. The mounting screws secure in a track and
are compatible with 1/4 20 or 3/8 screws. It works great to use a ball head for more
creative options. So I attach your camera, and hang your counter
weight bag. Fill the bag with rocks, water bottles, snow
or sand until the system is balanced. You can also use standard weight plates as
counterbalance. You’ll find that the camera is self-leveling
as it goes up and down. You can also make adjustments to the front
head for versatile camera mounting, and visibility of the LCD screen. Attach the extension plate for larger cameras. Use the adjustment strap to change your composition,
and you can tilt your fluid head to bring in additional cool movements to your shot” The Feather Camera Crane offers smooth motion
to increase your production value.

Long-Lasting Camera Battery | BE ALPHA | The World is Waiting for Your Perspective

Long-Lasting Camera Battery | BE ALPHA | The World is Waiting for Your Perspective


This is for those that don’t know how to quit. From the early birds to the night owls. From the planets that take all night to show up to the stars that never seem to go away. This is for the all-in, all night, all dayers. Don’t worry. Alpha’s battery keeps its levels up as long
as you can. So level up. The world is waiting for your perspective. Be Alpha.

Ben McDowell 2019 Cinematography Reel

Ben McDowell 2019 Cinematography Reel


“Plié” (2019)
Narrative “Living With Anxiety” (2019)
Narrative “Plié” (2019)
Narrative Misc. Project (2018 “Rymo” (2017)
Documentary “My Hometown” (2019)
Experimental Documentary Misc. Footage (2019) “Hints of Summertime” (2019)
Experimental Documentary “Monterey Bay” (2015)
Experimental Documentary “Olympics” (2017)
Experimental Documentary Misc. Footage (2018) Misc. Footage (2019)

Sony RX100iii: Best VALUE compact / travel / pocket camera 2019?

Sony RX100iii: Best VALUE compact / travel / pocket camera 2019?


hi there this video is for you if you are in the market for and enthusiasts pocket camera like this one is Sony rx100 mark
3 but there are many others out there but I will just give you in this video
eighteen reasons why I think this is a really really good value deal in
terms of features and the price you pay for these features. There are many other
alternatives out there and of course you should choose whatever you want I’m not
a Sony sales person but I have used this camera for half a year and I want to
show you what my experience is after half a year of use. Towards the end of
this video I will also tell you about some things that are not so smart about
this camera because there are a few downsides and towards the end I will
give you my verdict as to this little one but I’ve spoiler alert I think it is
fantastic value but let’s dive right into it. You can see here I’ve compared
these two this is a traditional DSLR and this is the the Sony and the first
argument for buying this one is the size I think it is fantastic
compact. It fits if you have a fairly sized
pocket it will fit into your pocket. Some say this is a bit too big but I think in
terms of size this is very very good and I bring it with me every time I bicycle,
go to work whatever this one is with me and I managed to get a lot of shots
because for that reason alone so highly recommended that there that you shoot
with a camera this small because it really is with you the best camera is
the one that’s with you we heard them one all all of us but there is really
some truth to that statement. This is really a camera that is easy to bring
along that is perhaps more compact argument than it is for this model
specifically but I think it is a really really strong argument. Second argument,
same line of reasoning almost but that is this camera I call it the turtle
because it closes itself as you can see or the lens is contracts and then it
closes with these I don’t know what it is plastic pieces that that sort of
slide together and that means when you put this in the pocket or you can put it
in your bag or whatever and you can also grab the camera when you leave for home
without worrying about making the lens dirty or fingerprints or anything really
really a neat feature I don’t know if this is general but I really enjoy that
and it’s one of the things after you used it for a while you learn to
appreciate it. Then there is the lens in this camera which i think is absolutely
fantastic it is also very very fast as you can see here if the zoom works then
it goes down to 1.8 and I think that is really really a fast lens for such a
compact camera and the latest model the version 6 Sony brings these models out
in different versions I think there are now at number 6 which is has even more
features there they have a longer zoom range and the price that they paid for
that is that the lens is not so fast so if you want a fast lens stick with this
one number three four or five but number six you get more more zoom range and
speaking of zoom range that’s my fourth argument this one is equivalent of seven
24 to 70 which is a good all-round lens and I have that on my Nikon DSLR
with a classic vintage lens here and you can see this one is not exactly the same
it’s 28 to 85 but then it is in that range and it is a very classic all-round
lens but of course if you want to shoot things that are very far away then this
one is too short you may need to look into the to the mark 6 version of the of
the Sony rx100. Then there is the focus of this lens I think it focuses fast
they are probably some more experienced than me that will say it slow compared
to X Y Z. I think it focuses really really fast
that is my fifth argument for using this one the sixth is that it has a 20
megapixel sensor which is at level with this is my Nikon d7500 I think that
has one more 21 I believe if my memory serves me well but it is an amazing
amount of of pixels for such a small camera and I
have cropped pictures taken with this camera with no problems I have never
missed a having resolution with this sensor absolutely amazing I think also
they have managed to cram into this camera image stabilization normally on a
DSLR like the one over here I would never go below a hundredth of a second.
I would stay above that if I could. With this one I have taken shots down to a
quarter of a second at nighttime with no camera shake. The image stabilization I
find work really really well then there is the tilt screen it tells both upwards
and downwards and I especially enjoy the fact that it can go outwards like this
I’m gonna show this from the side so I don’t have to go down on my stomach if I
want to see what I’m doing when the lens is like sorry the screens like this and
also you can you can flip it all the way up so if you’re a blogger then you can
see what you’re doing absolutely if it’s not pivoting so you
can’t take it to the side but I I actually don’t miss that to be quite
honest but some mention that as a drawback. Then they have managed to put
a viewfinder into this small camera and as you see I have to pull it out
manually later model so that comes with a motor so but I think it’s amazing they
have managed to fit in a viewfinder into this little camera then this is not a
DSLR, it’s a mirrorless, so you get all the benefits of a mirrorless meaning
that what you see in the viewfinder is what you see on the back of the screen
meaning in the viewfinder you can have both your histogram here and you can
have especially the level information this one here as you see here that tells
you whether your picture is level or not I really enjoy that when shooting
landscapes so I can get it in level in camera so I don’t have to work with
that in post really really neat and then it can be very quiet and very discreet
it doesn’t say anything you know basically and then what you see is what
you get so if your picture
your settings give you a dark picture you will see that in the viewfinder and
the LCD right away really really nice but this is classic
features of of the mirrorless world but this is a mirrorless I’d I just want to
bring that up then reason number 11 this one gives 10 frames frames per second. I
don’t know really what you use that for because I think many frames per second
is especially if you’re shooting you know sports or wildlife and and the lens
is similar to long enough for that but I would just want to mention that it is
can really shoot a lot of pictures you can fill up the card really fast if
that’s your to your liking 10 frames per second later models I think go up to 24
frames per second so you can really really get fast with this one.
Consisten menu and controls: If you speak Sony if you have an a7 or
something like that then I think you will recognize that these buttons and
the setup is very much the same the button sits a little bit differently but
this can this wheel is the same the menu button here and the function button and
also the dial on top very very much the same and the menu system the horrible
menu system in it’s exactly the same or to as close to as it can get
we’re given that this has a little bit different features so very nice that
Sony seems to be consistent across their product range then number 13 is that I
think this camera starts very very quickly it gets really fast. I
find that the limiting factor in terms of getting ready to shoot it’s not the
camera that’s actually me trying to get this camera out of the bag – so really
nice that it’s both opens and closes very fast I really enjoy that then it
has a built-in ND filter! Believe that or not but of course you can’t add an ND
filter to to a fixed-length like this one it will give you three stops so
maybe not so many you know these pictures with butter
smooth waterfalls and all of that but at least when shooting into the Sun or very lit conditions that can give you some help
amazing they’re fitted that into this one. I was surprised to see
that in the spec list. I had this for a few months before they actually dawned on me, but ND filter there is! Then there is number 15 the smartphone integration
I come from an Nikon world so I’m used to this snap bridge which is is anything
but anything but user-friendly in my mind this one just works I don’t know
what show we won’t just want to tell you smartphone integration it works like a
charm you pictures to transfer from here so here very smoothly and you can select
whether you want to select the pictures here or here the the app is intuitive
and it it works! Then number 16 is that this one charges by USB meaning that if
you in your car or at work or ever have access to I believe this is mini USB Wow
don’t don’t don’t trust me on that one but at least it has external charger
that means you don’t have to have it the battery put in a charger separately and
that is really really nice mean if you want to charge it on the go or while
you’re at work or whatever so really really I could a good little feature
there that it’s also one of things you may be to not look for in a spec sheet
when you’re trying to select your camera but when you have selected it and start
using it you really appreciate such a such a feature then there is I just said
something not so nice about in general the user interface of this camera but I
think there is one thing they have done well and that is this big ring you have
on the front of the camera they can turn like this and here you can see that I’m
in aperture mode so as I’m turning this one if I hope you can see that but the
aperture changes as I’m turning the ring on the front and I think that is really
really good way of giving … of course when you’re in aperture mode you want to work
with the aperture … but they take the most important feature and put into this ring
and they they do that if you shoot in other mode so this the function of this
ring changes so I think that is really a smart way of
making the user interface better. There are some that complained that the
control ring should have clicks I’m not one of those but if that’s your to your
liking then be aware that it is there’s no no stops you can’t feel it
my last argument is maybe apart from size also the the strongest and that is
the price of this little one I think this is March 2019 it’s around 450 euros
and I think if you’re willing to go down model so this is number 3 I think number
2 can even get that for number 1 you can get there for even half the price and if
you go upwards then it becomes very very expensive I think this one number 3 is
the sweet spot at least compared to my decision criterias and personal
preferences – and that would be my general advice to you when you when you study
this camera or these cameras as it is this six of them, make sure that you have
a list of what’s important to you and match that against the the spec sheets
for these these cameras. What are the challenges? Or what is you don’t get with
this camera? well first of all it’s not weather
sealed and and two cents IKEA plastic back and help you a lot with that but
that means you have to be a little bit careful if it’s raining or whatever the
situation is mine has survived well it has served me well I’ve even as you can
maybe see here I dropped it on tarmac so it survived that it’s a little bit
bruised from that experience but I think in general I don’t I haven’t been
missing weather sealing but I just wanted to bring it up as it is a camera
you would typically bring with you for many different purposes. The zoom range
ends at 70 mm as I said. So you get twenty four to seventy – if you want two
hundred as I mentioned then you need to go to mark six … eh … I haven’t missed
anything in terms of zoom range I must admit typically I shoot I shoot street
photography, landscapes and friends and family with this one.
So I think the zoom range for that purpose is absolutely fine
this is not a touchscreen so when you come from your beloved smartphone where
you’re used to swiping and pinching and all of that you will be swiping and
pinching a lot on this one but nothing happens you can’t get used to it and
it’s not a biggie but I just wanted to mention that if you want a touchscreen
then this is not this model. Then there is the battery life: it sucks!
As it does with almost all mirror-less and this one is no excuse it’s a small
battery and so on and so forth but you can charge it externally I think that
mitigates that nuisance to some extent then there’s no external flash you have
this pop-up flash it’s very cute but I hate direct flashes like or on camera
flashes like this one! I always try to get it off camera and and so on but I
must say I shoot an ambient light with this one even friends and family and I
think the fact that the lens is so fast it goes down to 1.8, that’s enough – I mean
I have never missed the flesh or the hotshoe on this one. Then when, you get
the camera, there is no we’re dedicated charger so
you would have to buy one if you insist on having one and I think it’s because
Sony thinks you should go for the for the in-camera charging but of course if
you want to charge and use the camera at the same time then you either need a
long cable or you need to supply an external charger then the user
interface in general. Well if you know Sony you know the user interface and you
know that is designed more by an engineer than by a photographer to be
quite honest and yeah that’s the way it is you can live with it and I think we
are many of the struggle with it because technically the Sony cameras are
outstanding value for money in general I find but the user interface man they
need to work on that and speaking of the user interface some gets annoyed that
when you close down the the viewfinder here like this the camera shuts down. I
actually find that quite useful you can’t override this via software – maybe a
later software update will give you the option for that but as it is right now
my understanding is it is not possible that’s the way it is and then others
complain that as you saw this is a two-step process of pulling out the
viewfinder and I must admit when I haven’t used the camera for a while I
often find myself only doing the one step and then looking the viewfinder
thinking wow why is it not working then it’s because I’ve forgotten to do this I
only pulled it out half so if you find that annoying you need to go to one of
the higher models with the motor I find it works pretty well and when you shoot
often it’s it’s not a biggie last but not least I will mention that if you’re
a video shooter I’m not very experienced with video shooting on this one and in
general as you can maybe tell but but I find that it produces beautiful video
but 1080p – there’s no 4K in this one if you want 4k you need to go to a
higher mode so what’s my conclusion here my conclusion is that this is in terms
of value a fantastic camera that it gives you extraordinary value for money
that it competes with many entry-level DSLRs as I see it and of
course you have the limitation that you can’t change the lens and all of that
but I think the benefit you get is for first of all value for money and
secondly that you get a solution you can bring with you yeah I would say even if
you are runner I really believe it or not I’ve had this one out running! I will
say though that when you buy one of these Sony cameras you buy a piece of
engineering and engineering work but there’s no X Factor there’s no magic
there’s no undefined things or a little bit touch of something magical that
happens when you shoot if you’re a little bit lucky with some of these old
vintage lenses whether it’s can on our own I’m sorry Canon or Nikon doesn’t
really matter I mean some closer beep Pentax etc – you know – some of these older
lenses they have some sort of magic I can’t really define and maybe it’s
because it’s blurred in the corners or whatever it is so the color
retention is different this is just hardcore engineering and you get a lot
of value for money I highly recommend it but if you want a little bit of magic
you have to go down this route this one will only the
never good engineering only in in quotes because I think it is as I’ve said a few
times now very good value for money okay that’s it from me thank you for watching
as always happy shooting take care bye bye

My Minidisc Recorders- Sony MZ-R900, MZ-N910; Panasonic SJ-MJ10 player; & MD discs

My Minidisc Recorders- Sony MZ-R900, MZ-N910; Panasonic SJ-MJ10 player; & MD discs


In honor of the Sony Walkman’s 40th anniversary
this year, 2019, I thought I’d make a video about my Minidisc Walkman. I have two. And one Panasonic Minidisc player. This video will NOT be a comprehensive technical
tutorial. I just want to show my collection and take
a trip down memory lane and introduce this format to people who aren’t familiar with
it. I am not an authority on this subject, just
a regular person who personally owned and loved this format back in the day. This is a very long video. There will be timestamps in the description
below this video if you want to skip ahead to the specific topic you want to see. The anniversary is for the very first Walkman,
whose medium is the cassette tape. Then came the CD Walkman years after, and
now the various digital mp3 players Sony is selling under the Walkman branding. Not many people have heard of the Minidisc
Walkman because it came of age at an awkward time. This was invented in ‘92 according to Wikipedia,
but it first gained widespread renown in the late ‘90s. By widespread I mean ads in popular magazines,
mainstream shops selling blank discs and recorders and players, not just specialty hi-fi shops. Mainstream enough for regular people to be
curious about and want to buy, not just your rich uncle who’s the first adopter of obscure
tech. At the time, though, regular people were pretty
happy with their CD Walkmans for portable use despite a few issues like skipping, the
latter day anti skip tech was decent enough. CD Walkmans from Sony and other non Walkman
branded portable CD players were mainstream enough during that era that prices were very
affordable, quality was good, and it was very easy to burn discs, and even MP3 CDs. The kind where the actual MP3 files are recorded
as data and you can have hundreds of tracks in one disc, and even read the titles on your
CD player, not just Track 01, Track 02, and so on. And for those who want a smaller and more
robust choice, the more primitive mp3 players were starting to come out in the market. Apple launched the very first click wheel
iPod in 2001. It was still a very primitive iPod back then. For starters, it only worked with Mac computers. But it was nicer than the other primitive
mp3 players because iTunes offered a neat way to organize your songs on the player,
into playlists and albums, not just a list of songs you play from start to finish or
at most shuffle. I got my first Minidisc Walkman that year. I didn’t have a Mac, so I didn’t even consider
buying that very first iPod. At that time, the iPod was just one portable
music device option out of many. Who knew it would be the de facto method of
consuming music on the go and totally dominate it for the succeeding decade, at least until
the rise of smartphones and internet connected portable devices and streaming. Anyway I paid just as much for this Sony MZR900
as the first iPod cost. Who would have known then though that this
kind of portable player, the kind that takes hardware media, whether discs or tape, was
already on its last legs? One benefit of the Minidisc format over the
dominant portable music format of the time, the CD, is that it’s smaller and it doesn’t
skip if you move around with it. But this costs a lot compared to CD players,
whose prices have stabilized and were very affordable by the late 90s/ early 00s. Blank discs too were very cheap by then. Another benefit is that the actual disc is
more robust, protected by hardshell plastic over the easily scratchable backs of CDs. Store bought minidisc albums were also hard
to come by, and were expensive. While CDs were plentiful, have nice art, and
were available in mainstream stores and were affordable. Lastly, portable CD players anti skip shock
proof technology have gotten pretty good by then that you could lug it around in a backpack
during your commute without much skipping. If you really wanted to jog or run or bike
with your music, these primitive gumstick format mp3 players or even the first iPod
or other primitive mp3 players were good enough and lightweight enough to bring along during
sports. Minidisc players weren’t just expensive because
Sony wanted to rip you off though. They were well engineered hardware marvels. And many weren’t simple players but also double
as recorders. For the simple reason I mentioned above, store
bought discs were hard to come by and the idea is you would be recording your own audio
collection into this anyway, kind of like a blank CD mp3 compilation or mp3 player alternative. A device that does double duty as a recorder
and player is necessarily going to be more complex than a simple player. Even during the cassette Walkman heyday, we
were talking about cassette players. Not recorders. You usually bought store bought tapes, or
if you wanted to record your own, you used a boom box or a tape deck. Usually only reporters had a portable cassette
player that does double duty as a recorder that has auxiliary-inputs and microphone inputs. Everything I said is from my personal observations
from living in that era and actually owning these devices. If you want more technical details and information
about its history, just check out its Wikipedia entry or Minidisc.org. Which brings me to the first player/ recorder
of this video. The Sony MZR900. This was introduced in the year 2000 and I
got it in third quarter 2001. This is the box, kind of yellowed now. I knew being a hoarder would come in handy
someday. It comes with an AC adapter brick, an in line
remote control to which you plug in your earphones, a rechargeable NI-MH battery, and the minidisc
recorder itself. The recorder/ player itself looks very nice,
even until now. The material feels very premium. Not cheap and plastic. It’s full of buttons, something we don’t see
in today’s glass slab world where everything is an app on a touchscreen. The build quality is excellent, it feels like
the type of device made to last a lifetime. Even if the tech is antiquated already, the
actual hardware is still a lovely piece of art. It’s got this silvery metallic finish that
feels smooth yet with just a bit of friction so it’s not slippery. The paint job is matte, not a gaudy shiny
metallic object. The only shiny bits are the little buttons. Speaking of the little buttons, it’s been
over a decade since I last used this, so I admit I had to re-read the user manual before
making this video. I lost the actual paper manual already but
thankfully I found a copy online on Manuals Library. I’ll link to it in the description below. The user manual is yet another throwback. You don’t see such thick explanation booklets
anymore nowadays for consumer tech – phones, even 2019 era audio players (and there’s a
mini revival even in the age of streaming, of audio players that play uncompressed digital
files, not just MP3s), standalone basic mp3 players, etc, they all just give you a thin
folded Quick Start Guide and a link to a website to download a program or an app. So many pages, and I read them all. And then I read the user manual for this blue
unit which I’ll talk about later. But back to this silver MZR900. You know when I said that it was meant to
last a lifetime, it probably could have. The battery isn’t entombed in the device unlike
modern devices. The gumstick rechargeable batteries have since
melted over the years but I was able to buy replacement ones on eBay. For the longest time it was hard for me to
find, that’s why I didn’t think of making this video until recently. Apparently many e-cigarettes share the same
rechargeable battery form factor. Thank God for the new trend of smoking USB
sticks instead of Marlboro. There are two things wrong with this MZR900. The battery door doesn’t lock in place anymore
and the open button mechanism is permanently recessed. I used this heavily for five years, it’s understandable
that there would be such wear and tear. It’s also not technically a difficult thing
to fix, it’s just a physical mechanical wear and tear. It’s not like fixing iPhone home buttons where
you have to open up the entire face, and who knows, end up damaging stuff inside. The thing is, this device is relatively unknown
nowadays, I wouldn’t know who to go to to fix it. Also the next two Minidisc players I have,
these two blue ones, fixed this issue by using a slider mechanism instead of a push button
one that ends up permanently recessed if you depress it too often, kind of like physical
home buttons on iPhones. So that’s the top of the device, the open
button that opens the MD player when pressed. You close it by simply snapping it shut. Next, the bottom of the device has the yellow
Sony charging port, and two pins connect to the included external charging accessory that
takes AA batteries. The middle part is a screw hole for locking
in the accessory. The left side has the battery door and a jog
lever knob. It is not a scroll wheel. You rock it up and down to run through menu
options then push inwards to enter/ select. The right side has the same lever that operates
the same way. While the one on the left runs through the
menu, this one on the right runs moves through tracks. Move it up to go to the next track as the
printed icon indicates, and you move it down to go back to the previous track. Pushing it in plays the selection, as the
universal triangle play icon indicates. The play icon isn’t printed but is an actual
silvery metal they put inside a recessed piece of the face. It’s not even just embossed. This triangle on the upper left is a hollow
carved out triangle pointing downwards indicating the direction you open the MD player. My latter model no longer has this over designed
feature, instead opting for a simple white painted indicator. This LCD screen displays the track name, play
time, and various other information. Just refer to the user manual screenshot for
details. These are the volume buttons. I’ll skip the next two for now. This is the slider that triggers recording. This pauses both playback and recording. This stops and also begins charging your rechargeable
battery. Now for this button. With regular cassette tapes, when you record
audio into it, then stop recording, you can pick up where you left off the next time you
want to record. The tape just stops at the spot where you
stopped recording. But with MDs, you won’t know where the “end”
of the last recording is. This button, “end search” goes to the very
end of the Minidisc, allowing you to record audio with the peace of mind that you’re not
overwriting a previous track. Of course if you want to overwrite something,
then you can just “rewind” to that spot and then overwrite it. REC Mode allows you to choose whether you
want to record near-CD quality audio into the MD. It doesn’t care if your source is compressed
or not, whether your source is an MP3 or a compressed streaming song or the radio. The compressed part is in the destination,
this minidisc. That’s the first option, near-CD quality standard
format. It also allows you to record into the MDLP
format, LP stands for long play. It compresses the audio in the Minidisc. The “less compressed” MDLP mode fits about
two CDs worth of songs into one MD (called LP2) and the “even more compressed” MDLP mode
(called LP4) fits about four CDs worth of songs into one MD, as you can see in the little
sticker here. The Sony is in raised lettering, and there
are other words that are engraved into the device too. Like here on the right. The labels for earphone/ line out, mic input,
and Line in. You don’t see this kind of attention to
detail anymore in consumer tech. The earphone/ line out looks unusual because
you can also opt to plug the bundled in-line remote there, and then plug your earphone
into the in-line remote. You can also plug your speakers into this,
as long as it has a 3.5mm jack. The microphone input can take any mini microphone
that’s self powered, as the label says. It also has a dedicated line input for recording
from external audio sources, as long as you have the 3.5 mm jack to plug into the MD recorder,
and whatever is on the other end of the cable that goes into your source, whether a radio,
TV, boom box, computer line-out, phone, another MD, cassette deck, etc. The in-line remote mirrors nearly all the
same functions of the controls on the device, so you can keep the MD player tucked into
your pocket or bag and just use the in line remote to choose songs, read track titles,
and so on. You can also use this in line remote to name
and rename tracks you recorded if you want, so you’re not just reading Track 01, Track
02, and so on. You rotate this little jog wheel to select
letters. It’s a tedious process. Just read the screenshot for the details. I can’t do a live demo as my unit doesn’t
turn on anymore. Seeing song titles and artist names is important
to me, so I remember tediously labeling tracks with this little jog wheel for hours on end
back in the day. This has something called CD Joint text function,
as the box says, where if you use an optical digital audio cable connected to a Sony Discman
that supports CD Joint text, AND Play a CD that has CD Joint text where the artist name
and song titles are labeled with that technology, the titles will get transferred automatically
into the MD without any manual relabeling effort on your part needed. But you heard what I said right? It required all these things that were very
uncommon. You record into this player in real time basically. You sit and wait while your source plays out
the audio, and the recorder records the audio as it’s being played. If you activate RECORD SYNCHRO, it will only
start recording once your source starts producing sound. That’s nice because it’s not like cassette
tape days when you have to simultaneously press PLAY on the source audio and destination
cassette recorder. The manual speaks of a “digital” input if
you use an optical cable, but that’s not “digital” in the way you think of like moving files
using a USB cable. It’s “digital” in the sense of sending digital
signals the way say, on TVs, HDMI sends digital signals versus RCA cables. If you use a regular analogue 3.5mm audio
cable to record, it can auto detect gaps of silence in between tracks in your source audio
and make the succeeding audio a separate track on the MD. That way, during playback, you can skip to
the next track with one click the way you do on a CD, instead of tediously fast forwarding,
playing to see if that’s the right song, then fast forwarding a bit more, to go to the next
track you want, and repeating it when you want to rewind. Although in some latter higher end car cassette
players I noticed they can also auto detect gaps of silence in store bought cassette tapes
and “fast forward” to the next track. But that wasn’t very common. Sometimes it doesn’t auto detect the gap between
songs though, because sometimes there’s a hiss or something in the source. When you use the digital optical cable and
record from a digital source like a CD, it can auto detect the gap better and make tracks
with less error, although it’s still not foolproof. That’s where this last button on the device
comes in, the T Mark button. You click it to manually place track marks
between songs. As I mentioned, you can skip to the next song,
skip back to the previous song without “rewinding” and waiting, if your track marks are all set
up, whether manually with this T MARK button or the auto detection the recorder did. You can fast forward or rewind also if you
don’t have track marks set up or you just want to move ahead or go back to a specific
point in an audio track. There are also some more playback options
I won’t go into, you can just see the manual for that, like 2x speed playback or slowed
down playback, and you can also program a specific sequence (kind of like a playlist). You can also bookmark parts of the audio to
go back to. I have never used these options but it’s popular
among language learners who use these devices. You can save specific settings into each disc. Like this disc, you can program a specific
sequence, or want it to repeat, or want it to shuffle at random, you can save specific
preferences into each disc. This blue one is my second MD recorder/ player. It’s a Sony MZ-N910, released in 2003. I got it around 2005 or 2006. It is slightly heavier than the silver one,
but has the same built to last build quality, the same very premium feel, the same satiny
matte feel with slight friction for a good grip on it. The paint job may be blue, but it’s not cheap
looking or plastic or glossy. I got this secondhand in Taiwan. It retailed for a similar price as the MZR900,
which cost around the same price as the original iPod. The recording functionality is similar to
the first unit, you also can “seek” the end of the last recorded track with this “End
Search” button. It also has a T Mark button for manually segmenting
a piece of recorded audio into separate tracks. You can also bookmark parts of the audio to
go back to, just like the first device. Just like the MZR-900, you also get to choose
between Standard Play (near CD quality), and two levels of compression of Long Play (LP2
and LP4 modes using MDLP). The more compressed, the more tracks you can
fit into an MD. Just watch the first part for more detailed
explanations of these buttons. Just like the first, you also get an in line
remote which mirrors the functionality of the device, allowing you to keep it out of
the way while clipping the remote to your shirt for easy access. You can plug in either earphones or speakers
into it, as long as it has a 3.5mm jack. And just like the first, you can also manually
label and rename tracks with this jog wheel so you don’t have to scroll through Track
01, Track 02, and so on. You also record in real time, just like I
explained for the first MD recorder. But this model has a newer trick up its sleeve. The “N” in this model name of MZ-N910 stands
for “Net MD”, and it allows you to transfer digital files via a mini USB (note not, micro)
cable and Sony’s software, the way you can transfer digital audio files to an iPod with
iTunes. The “R” in the R900 model earlier denotes
it as being a “recorder” and “E” stands for playback only models (for example MZ-E909)
in the Sony MD lineup. The USB cable also has a ferrite bead or ferrite
choke that suppresses high frequency noise in electronic circuits. Yes, I read that from Wikipedia. I just thought it was noteworthy that Sony
cared enough about audio quality to include that in their cables. iPods just came with generic naked USB cables. That way you don’t have to sit in real time
for hours, manually clicking T Mark to make track spacings when it doesn’t auto detect
gaps of silence. The Sony software was a piece of crap though
and I always had issues with it. It’s called SonicStage and with all the hassle
it required to set up and get running, I might as well just sit and let my MD recorder record
in real time. I’m not getting into its details, you can
just try it out if you’re a masochist. I just wanted to give you an overview of the
features and what’s possible. The user manual has more detailed instructions
on the software and the transfer process. Of course during the times when it would work,
it was a godsend. I wouldn’t have to get carpal tunnel twisting
this little jog wheel for hours manually labeling tracks for one. And you can have a bunch of tracks ready to
go in a disc within half an hour or less, instead of sitting in real time for anywhere
from an hour to four. You can also make folders, known as “groups”,
to organize your songs, especially if you used the compressed recording modes of LP2
or LP4, there may be 50 or 100 songs in there. You can sort them into groups of your making,
by artist or whatever. It doesn’t auto sort by artist FYI, so you
have to be the one to organize the tracks the way you want to into folders. So that’s the recording part. Playback is also similar to the first device. Nothing new, standard stuff. Skip track, previous track, all there as long
as the track spacings are active. You can also manually fast forward and rewind. Play, pause, stop. Still has the arcane features like sped up
playing, slowed down playing, bookmarks, program a specific sequence (kind of like a playlist). Just see the manual for more. If you click the charge button, it charges
your rechargeable gumstick NI-MH, drawing power from the wall outlet. It also has this external charger accessory
that takes a double AA battery that extends its battery life. There is only a jog lever knob thing on one
side this time. You operate the menu with a four way directional
button, clicking the middle to select. My final MD player is also blue, a Panasonic
SJ MJ10. This was released in 2001 and I got it in
2005 or 2006. This is a much cheaper device, which I also
got secondhand in Taiwan like the MZ-N910. It’s a simple player, it doesn’t have a recorder
feature. I guess Panasonic figured that by the mid
00s, the format has sufficiently matured that you probably have a recorder or a deck that
you recorded audio into blanks to, or maybe even scored some store-bought MDs. Cause remember I mentioned in the earlier
days of this format, they didn’t really sell these cheaper playback-only devices, mostly
the more expensive recorder/ player combos, for the reasons I also explained already. The finish and build quality also feel cheaper
than the first two. It’s also lighter and the paint job looks
more cheap and shiny. But it’s OK, it’s cheap. The icons are standard and self explanatory,
play, pause, skip track, previous track, you can also fast forward or rewind to specific
points. Seeking tracks also work if you recorded track
marks correctly in your MD. This also comes with an in line remote, and
even with an interchangeable faceplate. You can plug in any earphone/ headphone/ speakers
that has a 3.5mm jack. It also uses the same style of removable and
rechargeable gumstick NI-MH battery as the first two I showed. In the late 2000s, Sony updated the Minidisc
format with the Hi-MD. It’s not backwards compatible with these MD
players. The Hi-MD disc has a similar physical appearance
and dimensions but it can contain a lot more data, and Hi-MD recorders are similar to Net-MD
in that you can directly transfer digital audio files to the HI-MD device with their
SonicStage software and a mini USB cable. There’s also a Type-R and Type-S segmentation
during the latter days, I don’t remember the difference anymore. I didn’t buy that one anymore because I was
over MDs and being a masochist by then. I had started using MP3 players. Now, let’s talk about the media. It looks like a shrunken down floppy disc
but with a sturdier case. The internal disc is optical media, like a
CD, not the black filmy material of floppy discs. Some can fit 74 minutes of songs and some
can fit 80 minutes of songs in Standard mode (that’s near- CD quality). You can fit more in LP2 and LP4 modes (I discussed
this earlier, check the timestamps to go back to that point). These are all my MDs. I made a lot of mixtapes on them. Or mix minidiscs to be precise. I still have a lot of unrecorded blanks here
because I kept thinking I needed to save blanks, since they weren’t as cheap as blank tapes. So sometimes I’d overwrite a previously recorded
mixtape MD. Little did I know that I wouldn’t even use
this format for 10 years hahaha. I bought all these blanks in Taiwan. MDs made bigger inroads there in the mid 2000s
than back home in the Philippines. Like these two sets that even came with vertical
holders. I also have these two MD carrying cases that
are made specifically with Minidisc dimensions in mind. Also this soft pouch that’s made for MD
players. These two players still work after I bought
these replacement batteries. The silver one, the very first one I had,
it doesn’t work anymore because the open button is already broken. These two use sliders, more durable. My first generation iPod Touch still works
fine, but its battery is nearly dead, it only lasts five minutes unplugged. Tsk Tsk. But it’s not easy to revive because its lithium
battery is entombed in the device. I know you can buy replacements and perform
surgery on the device, but you shouldn’t have to do that to keep a perfectly ok device working. Whereas these devices, they don’t become expensive
doorstops or electronic waste just because the battery diad, because they’re meant to
be interchangeable. They’re not disposable batteries either, since
they’re rechargeable. You can easily modernize these devices by
making them Bluetooth capable by plugging in a 3.5mm audio cable into their line out
port and connecting that to a Bluetooth transmitter. Your Bluetooth speaker can then play music
from your MD Player! My AC adapters seemed dead when I last tried
them a few years back, before I was able to buy the replacement NI-MH batteries. I also forgot that they run on the external
AA accessories (although battery life is much shorter) if you really can’t find replacement
rechargeable ones. But like I said, with the proliferation of
e-cigarettes and their usage of this battery format, it’s easy and cheap again to buy replacements. That’s why I was able to buy on eBay. I bought replacement AC adapters too. You can buy any generic one, just pick those
with multiple heads as Sony uses this tiny pin one, usually marked yellow, and Panasonic
has a different one. It doesn’t matter what maximum ampere you
buy, but you should reach at least the minimum amount listed on the original brick. The higher Amps, the more expensive. You should get the ones that let you switch
voltages. You can toggle them to match the voltage on
the original adapter like so. Here are some old minidisc photos of mine
from back in the day, and I’ll link to my Flickr album with these photos below. Most were taken 2005-2006. I also have a Minidisc group on Flickr, I’ll
link to it in the description, feel free to join and add your MD photos. Okay, hope you guys enjoyed this very long
video. What do you think of MDs? How do they compare to cassettes or CDs? Would you want to buy one? Which of my three Minidisc Players do you
like best? Please comment below. Thanks so much for watching, please give this
video a like if you enjoyed it. See you next video!

I BOUGHT A NEW CAMERA! Why I made the switch to Full Frame.

I BOUGHT A NEW CAMERA! Why I made the switch to Full Frame.


(slow drum beat) (mellow guitar playing) – I pinched my pennies,
I saved my allowance, I Scrooged my McDucks, and
I sold one of my kidneys, and I was able to make
what I’m considering a fairly substantial
upgrade to my camera kit. And I thought it would be
fun if we talked about it. (slow techno music) What is up people, Dunna here, and today we’re gonna
talk about these things that you see on the table before you. But, if you don’t already
know what they are, take a guess down in the comments below. I’d love to see what
you think I picked up. Now upgrading your camera gear can be kind of a nerveracking process, and it’s not to be taken
lightly, necessarily. Unless you just have,
like, unlimited money. But camera gear, as most people find out the further they get into
it, is really expensive. And there’s so much of it out there. And a lot of it is really good. So how do you make a choice
what you’re going to get next, or what you’re going to get first? And I thought it would be kinda cool to talk about why I made
the choices that I did. As you can see on the
table, I made three choices. I got a new camera, I got a new lens, and I got a new tripod. Let’s begin with the tripod. As far as a tripod, what
I typically am looking for is something that I can carry
around with me every day. I throw it in the side of my backpack, and it comes with me everywhere, even if I don’t use it, which
is like 80% of the time, it’s always there just in case. For the last six or seven months, I’ve been carrying around
the Vanguard VEO 265AB, which is an aluminum travel tripod. And it does a pretty good job, but there were a couple of things about it that I wasn’t a huge fan of, and the straw that broke the camel’s back is that the ball head started
to wiggle a little bit, and no matter how much
I would tighten down that top plate, it was still wiggling, so it was time to look into a new tripod. Now I reached out on Twitter, and you guys were really
helpful in making my decision. And a good handful of people told me to look into 3 Legged Thing. Now what we can see here is
the 3 Legged Thing Punks Brian. Now it’s a very similar concept to kind of any travel tripod, but it’s got a couple of things that
I’m really excited about. First and foremost,
with my Vanguard tripod, I always ran into the
issue that it was only 59 inches tall at its maximum height. Personally, I’m six foot
one, so that’s 73 inches. So if the camera is only up 59 inches, I’m always having to point it upwards when I’m filming myself. The 3 Legged Thing Brian
goes up to 75 inches. So if I really wanted to,
I could actually get shots looking down at me, without having to like put it up on a table or anything. It’s got twist locks, which
I actually kind of prefer. I know there’s a lotta debate
about that on the internet, but whatever, I like the
twist locks, they’re not bad. And these ones feel really good. It’s carbon fiber, so it’s super light. It’s only 16 inches when
it’s folded up like this, so it fits on the side of
my backpack really nicely. It comes with Slik ball head, and it comes with this cool little tool that, unfortunately,
when I opened the box, the tool was actually broken, so they’re sending me a
replacement right now, but I’m not too worried about that. It was just kind of a little extra. And they’re replacing it, so, no big deal. Now, this is the most money that I’ve ever spent on a tripod, so I was definitely a
little bit nervous about it. It’s funny how those important things, sometimes you don’t necessarily
wanna spend all the money, so up until now, I’ve
always kind of bought either cheap tripods, or ones that I found that were on a really good
sale, or something like that. So this guy, full price,
it was like $400 Canadian, so it’s not a cheap tripod, necessarily. I’m excited to use this. I’ll keep you guys posted
on how it’s working out. If you have any questions,
make sure to lemme know. Also, lemme know what tripod you’re using, if you have a good
travel tripod suggestion. I guess I have a return policy, so, maybe if you guys have
a better suggestion, I could switch it around. The next piece in my upgrades was the Sony ZEISS F4 16 to 35 lens. Now this one was a little
bit difficult for me, because I already have that range covered. I have a Sigma 16 millimeter
F1.4 that I really love, and then I have my 18 to 105 F4, that’s kind of my all around lens. But I wanted to get something that had a bit of a shorter zoom range, so that I could make quick adjustments, and were just kind of
to cover my wide angles. Being that it’s a Sony ZEISS lens, we’ve got that nice Sony ZEISS quality. It’s super sharp, I’m
really loving it so far. If you caught my video about
the FeiyuTech AK4500 Gimbal, I was using this lens to
shoot that entire video on my a6500 and a6400, and I
really love how it turned out. Even though it’s an F4 lens, it still did a really great job. And if you put enough light,
I’m not too worried about it. Now some of you might be thinking, “Dunna, this is a full-frame lens. “Why wouldn’t you get
something like the 10 to 18 “to cover your super-wide,
or why wouldn’t you get “the 18 to 35 Sigma with an adaptor?” The reason is because I knew
that it was probably inevitable that I would eventually go full-frame, and I wanted something that would work on both my APS-C system and
on my full-frame system, once I eventually got it. A little while ago, I did a live stream when Sony announced the a6100 and a6600, talking about my thoughts
about those cameras. And in that video, I
explained that I had been kind of waiting for that announcement to decide whether I was
going to go up to full-frame, or whether I was going to wait for whatever Sony put out next in APS-C. And, as I’m sure that you
can tell by this point, I’ve made that decision. It didn’t take me long after
getting the full-frame lens to get a full-frame camera,
and this is the a7 III. Now I’m pretty sure this camera is about a year old, at this point, and it took me that much time, basically, to make my decision on it,
watching all sorts of reviews and making sure that I was
making the right choice. Because, I am really
happy with the quality that comes out of my APS-C cameras. I’m currently shooting on the a6400 here, and the a6500 there. And they produce fantastic quality! There’s absolutely nothing wrong with it. There’re just a few advantages that come with going full-frame. And if Sony was to put out the camera that would’ve knocked
both the a6400 and a6500 out of the water, I might
have stayed full APS-C. But they made some upgrades
that are very exciting, and we’re gonna talk a little
bit more about that later. But it wasn’t the thing that
made me go that direction. So why did I choose to get the a7 III? There are a couple of reasons. But first, I need some coffee. It’s not part of my camera
kit, but I really like it. First and foremost, I thought it was time for an upgrade to my a6500. I’d been really, really loving
the a6400 that I have now, but the a6500, as much as
it’s a great camera and stuff, doesn’t have some of the same features, and it’s weird hopping between cameras if they don’t necessarily
have the same features. For example, the a6400
has the HLG profiles, but the 6500 does not. So, I try not to shoot in HLG because I know I won’t be able
to exactly match the footage. With the a7 III, it
has those HLG profiles, so now I can match HLG to HLG if I’m using two cameras on a setup. Right now, I’m shooting cine2 because both the 6400 and the 6500 have that. I know it doesn’t have a flip
screen like the a6400 does, but it’s got a lot of the same features. It’s got similar autofocus features. It doesn’t have the screen dimming like there is in the a6500. And so, I think it’s just gonna match up a lot better with my
experience on the a6400. That’s the squad now: a6400, a7 III. Now another reason for
getting the a7 III instead of, let’s say, waiting for the
a6600 is because of this lens. I went with a full-frame lens,
and I got the F4 version. Some of you may have wondered why I got the F4 instead of
getting the G Master F2.8. I shoot F4 and F2.8 a
lot on my APS-C cameras. And because the look changes
between APS-C and full-frame, I knew that by getting the F4 lens, I get to keep a similar
look to what I’m used to, but I get it at a
significantly cheaper price. ‘Cause that G Master is, it’s pricey. Beautiful, but pricey. Also with full-frame,
I can go a lot wider. It’s a little bit tough to
find good wide glass for APS-C. There’s the 10 to 18, and that’s about it. So by getting the 16 to 35 and then getting the full-frame camera, now I can go way wider, which I’m very excited to experiment with. I don’t personally like
it too much for vlogging, but we’ll see. In fact, I already filmed something, as soon as I got this
camera, in my studio, which is a fairly tight space, and it worked out really well. Another reason that I went to the a7 III instead of keeping with APS-C, is because of the low light performance. On the newer cameras, in the APS-C line, they didn’t really
improve the sensor at all. So I was hoping maybe they
had some crazy new technology that would basically make
it better in the low light, or something like that. But they didn’t, so full-frame made sense because I do end up shooting
in a lotta low light situations in my studio and in other places, and it’s just so handy to
be able to crank up the ISO and not have to worry as much about noise or degradation of the quality. And finally, the thing that
really really pushed me over the edge, is I really wanted to get the full-frame look. It does have a different look, like I was talking about
before with the F4 lenses. Immediately, I can see the difference. And I’m very excited to
be able to play with that, and to be able to choose when I want that, and when I want the APS-C
look, when I wanna crop in. So these were all the
things going through my head when I decided to upgrade my kit. I made three significant upgrades, and then a couple of little things, like, for example, I got the L bracket to go along with this, and I
got a couple extra batteries to go along with the camera. ‘Cause when you buy a new camera, you don’t just buy a new camera. You need all those little accessories and things that you’re used to. And so, of course, it
cost a little bit more than just the camera. But as always, I wanna hear from you. What do you think of the
upgrades that I made? And also, if you could upgrade your kit, what would you get? Lemme know in the comments below. I’ll leave links to all of this stuff, everything that I’ve purchased. All my gear links are
kinda always down there, but I’ll leave this stuff
kinda closer to the top, so you can check it out. So chances are, next time you see me, I’ll be filming a little
bit more with this. Thank you so much for watching, and I’ll see you next time. (beatboxing) Hey there, Mr. Lens. Hey, a7 III. (kissing noises) I don’t know what I’m doing with my life. (upbeat music)