How to Make 2D image to 3D in 3 MINUTES ! – After Effects & Volumax TUTORIAL

How to Make 2D image to 3D in 3 MINUTES ! – After Effects & Volumax TUTORIAL


Hello! In this video I’m going to show you how to achieve these nice 3d animations in After Effects especially on portraits in this video and for this I’m using a template called Volumax photo animator. You can find it on Videohive or on the link at the bottom of this video in the description. Ok so I’m going to open my template VoluMax Pro in After Effects and I’m going to import a picture and start watching how long it
takes to animate it and you’re going to see it’s gonna be super fast. I’m going
to drag and drop it in the comp and make it match here and then I’m going to go
in the other comp called displacement map and using the new 3d portrait tool
in VoluMax. Here I’m going to match a wireframe of a face you can choose
almost any angle for a portrait going from side views, bottom and almost top
views okay so now I’m going to use the distortion tool You can see this is quite simple and fun to achieve. We are pushing the 3d mesh to match on the 3d portrait on the picture. So I’m moving
the ears the eyes the nose, mouth everything… You don’t need to be super
precise in this process because volumax is going to to work nicely even with maps not super sharp. So I’m going to take a smaller brush now to do a bit of details on the mouth. So once again this is not the complete tutorial you can find in the package. This is a fast overview of the 3d portrait tool included in VoluMax. Okay so we’re going to finish with the shoulders with some large brush here I’m going to do this super fast because it’s not very important, VoluMax is going to just know that there is a volume here okay so I’m going to finish this wire
distortion and I’m going to show you the black and white depth map. I am taking off the wire mode and the depth map is showing the black and whites volume of the
object. I’m going in the main comp of VoluMax and I’m simply going to move the null object here and I’m going to see that the 3d effect is
working really nicely ! I’m gonna add some dirt so you can see some dirt here. Small adjustments on the relax and boost Once again you can see all this in the full tutorials included. I’m going to put a keyframe at the beginning and a keyframe at the end on a left right camera pan. And that’s it ! We did this in 3 minutes.
I’m going to take a look to the preview. Okay this is nice ! So it took 3 minutes to do this and you can see the final result with some text. Thank you for watching this very fast tutorial of the 3D Portrait Tool. You can take a look to my channel to see some other templates and some tutorials. Thank you, bye !

Mitsubishi DJ-1000: World’s Smallest Digital Camera (in 1997!)

Mitsubishi DJ-1000: World’s Smallest Digital Camera (in 1997!)


Greetings and welcome to an LGR camera thing! And this is the Mitsubishi DJ-1000 digital
still camera, costing $249 US dollars when it launched in the latter half of 1997. And yep, that is the same Mitsubishi that
you may know for their cars and trucks, although it’s not from the same division. Mitsubishi Electric was and is a massive company,
with dozens of branches, subdivisions, and business units. And of course one of those divisions made
digital cameras in the ‘90s, but it seems it was short-lived. The DJ-1000, or DJ-1 as it was sometimes called,
was Mitsubishi’s one and only consumer digital camera, one of the most unique of its kind
in 1997. It was by far the smallest and lightest-weight
digital camera in the world when it was announced at PC Expo ‘97 in New York, weighing in
at just 2.8 ounces or 80 grams. But it also didn’t receive widespread distribution,
initially sold exclusively through T-Zone stores in the US, of which there were only
two when the DJ-1000 hit the market. It also saw distribution in Mitsubishi’s
home country of Japan as you’d expect, and in Europe under the Umax brand where it was
known as the Umax PhotoRun. But yeah, these days you’d be hard-pressed
to find anyone that remembers the DJ-1000 at all, much less owned one, so I was more
than happy to find this one new, complete in box. Inside is a neatly-packed plastic bag full
of goodies, a cardboard tray with memory card stuff, and finally the camera encased in bubble
wrap. And man, I knew this thing was gonna be small,
but wow. It’s really small! It’s about the size of a deck of cards,
able to fit happily inside a shirt pocket. Compare this to the most popular digital camera
of 1997, the Sony FD Mavica, and the difference in size and weight is ridiculous. Granted the Mavica used 3.5” floppy disks,
so maybe comparing it to the something like the Fuji DS-7 is more appropriate, but still. Even against that the DJ-1000 remains miniscule,
which is extra impressive considering the Fuji uses SmartMedia cards and the Mitsubishi
uses CompactFlash. Yeah that’s right, the thinnest camera on
the market used the thickest memory card format on the market, go figure. It came with this two megabyte memory card
in the box, easily the lowest capacity CF card I’ve ever seen. This version of the package also came with
this PCMCIA card adapter, ideal for laptop users, though from what I’ve read Mitsubishi
also offered a desktop package with another adapter. As for the bag of goodies you get the photo
retrieval software for both Windows 3.1 and 95 in English and Japanese, a very blue soft-cover
carrying case that holds that camera quite snugly, a wrist strap that attaches to the
right-hand side of the camera, and several bits of documentation in both English and
Japanese. I especially dig this instruction booklet,
with its automobile service manual aesthetic and a message saying that it is important
to you. Although of all the cameras I’ve covered,
this is the ultimate in terms of simplicity, so almost all of this information pertains
to using the DJ-1000 software for Windows. And well, looking at the camera you can see
why. There’s almost nothing going on here, you
just turn it on, point, and shoot. That’s it! No settings to set, no adjustments to adjust,
nothing but a power switch and a shutter button. There’s not even a flash on the front, only
a passthrough window for the viewfinder and its tiny camera lens, a 5.8mm fixed focus
lens with an aperture of 2.8 and an auto shutter speed ranging from 1/60 to 1/15,000 of a second. On top is the shutter button and the power
switch and along the bottom is where you insert the memory card. There is no tripod mount. And then there’s the back of the camera
which is covered in a surprising amount of text. Guess they didn’t have anywhere else to
put this stuff so why not, because there’s not much going on back here. Just the viewfinder, a spot to install two
triple-A batteries, and this pair of LEDs. Since there’s no LCD screen and no sound
from the shutter, these are your only indications that anything is going right or wrong with
the DJ-1000. The top red LED lets you know if there’s
card activity or the battery is low, and the bottom LED flashes green, red, or some combination
of the two to indicate memory card status. When you power it on the lights all light
up and then the bottom LED turns green if it’s ready to take a picture. Press the shutter and you’ll see the top
LED turn red. When you’re running low on memory the bottom
LED lights up green and red, then solid red for the final shot, and eventually it’ll
flash red when it’s full. The two megabyte card holds fifteen photos,
but it supports CompactFlash cards up to fifteen megabytes, which provides an image capacity
of 113. Interesting to note that one of these high-capacity
cards would’ve cost more than the camera itself back in ‘97, at around $260 apiece. And you really wanted a second card back then
because there is no way to delete photos from the camera, so it’s either swap cards or
transfer your images to a computer. Once you’ve taken some pictures it’s time
to develop them through a Windows PC. And yes I do mean develop, since this stores
images in a proprietary file format exclusive to this camera. So even though it uses a standard CF card
that’s readable on a modern PC, you still need the DJ-1000 Viewer software that it came
with. Otherwise all you’ll see is a folder with
a bunch of DAT files, so open up the Viewer application and run the Index command. It’ll then read the photos, generate thumbnails,
and from here you can convert them into standard bitmap images one by one. So let’s take a look at them! As usual with older cameras I enjoy taking
photos of things that would’ve been around when it was new, in this case the late 1990s. And yeah, for that purpose this camera fits
the bill wonderfully. There’s something about that early consumer
digital camera aesthetic that charms the pants off me no matter what. And the DJ-1000 in particular has a look to
it that made it really fun to play with over the past month or so. The image quality isn’t too bad, though
the saturation is always low and the color temperature skews to the cooler side. It also has this particular type of spotty
pixelation and dithering that becomes more apparent on vivid, solid colors, kinda looks
like an early FMV game. Take a look at this comparison to my phone’s
camera and you get an idea of how it’s affecting things. Makes it pretty exciting to take pictures
and get ‘em onto a PC so you can see what unpredictable weirdness you ended up with. Then there’s the way it handles specular
highlights and lighting of a certain range in brightness, check it out. You get these green streaks protruding downward
from anything bright enough, like reflecting sunlight and white or shiny surfaces. This alleyway shot in particular looks crazy,
it made it look like the building in the background was casting a shadow but it was actually just
freaking out at the bright blue sky up against the dark brick walls that turned purple. And this one is probably my favorite, it was
taken sideway and then rotated, and with the green trails from the reflecting light? It looks like this car was speeding by, even
though it was standing still at the time. I’ve seen similar things on other older
digital cameras without an infrared filter, but this particular style of strange on the
DJ-1000 is just fascinating to me. And yes I also tried it with a UV filter;
it made no difference! There are also an assortment of image adjustments
you can perform through the Viewer application, like color balance, contrast, and brightness. My favorite though is “sherpness.” Ermahgerd sherpness, it’s so sherp! Then there’s resolution, which is a distinctly
separate function from resizing. The DJ-1000 shoots using a 1/5-inch Sanyo
CCD that by default produces photos with a resolution of 320×240 pixels. But that’s just the “normal” resolution. If you choose “high” resolution from the
Viewer program, it’ll re-open the photo and output it at 504×378. That’s an increase of 57%! And yeah there’s a legit difference, it’s
not just upscaling the image. This is a picture at normal resolution, and
here’s the exact same picture reprocessed in high resolution. It’s still low-res by today’s standards,
but it’s notably cleaner and reveals more detail, and you even end up with an ever-so-slightly
higher field of view. There’s also a bit more of that green light
on the left-hand side, adding one more quirk to the unique visual quality of the DJ-1000. And finally, the last thing I want to mention
is the fact that deleting photos is a bit weird. Like, you’d think you’d be able to just
go into Windows Explorer and delete them that way, right? Nope! I learned this the hard way, but if you do
that then the camera will think the card is still full. Apparently this is due to some kind of conflict
with how Windows 9x and above handles deleted files and the indexing done through the camera
software. I thought I’d just be able to reformat the
card and it’d be fine but that didn’t work either, it just thought the card was
still full. I had to put the images back onto the card,
go into the camera software and delete them there, reindex the folder, and then it was
fine. What a pain. And that is the Mitsubishi DJ-1000 digital
camera from 1997. A somewhat annoying little thing but an absolutely
charming one nonetheless. This is one of those situations where I adore
a piece of retro tech so much precisely because it’s so confined in capabilities and finicky
in functionality. I really enjoy the weird, grainy, off-color
images it produces, and I absolutely love how it feels in the hands. Its thin, lightweight metal construction is
just a pleasure to hold, and the fact that it’s an obscure digital camera from 1997
makes it all the more fun. Shame that Mitsubishi never made a successor,
but oh well. At least we got the DJ-1000! And if you enjoyed this digicam retrospective
then might I recommend a couple more? You can also subscribe for more videos every
week here on LGR. And as always I thank you very much for watching!

Fujifilm X-A3 the best vlogging camera? Mirrorless digital camera REVIEW

Fujifilm X-A3 the best vlogging camera? Mirrorless digital camera REVIEW


Hi this is Phil from Make Tech Easier and
welcome to this review of the Fujifilm X-A3 digital mirrorless camera. Of course
many cameras don’t have mirrors in them using either an optical or LCD
viewfinder but the word mirrorless describes a certain class of cameras,
those which have a decent sensor, of the kind you would find in a DSLR, and
interchangeable lenses. Mirrorless cameras tend to be a lot smaller than
their DSLR counterparts and as such have found favor amongst street and travel
photographers where weight and size of equipment are a definite issue. Anyway
that’s enough preamble let’s get into it! Introducing the Fujifilm X-A3.
The Fuji film X-A3 is a capable little everyday carry camera, with quality glass
and enough megapixels to satisfy even the most picky specification nerd. It’s
easy to use right out of the box and simple to get started taking pictures
but it also has hidden depths that make it grow with the user from full auto to
full manual and also has a range of lightly concealed modern features to
ensure that you use it all the time and for a long time. Plus it’s really pretty,
smooth aluminium body with either black brown or pink leatherette. The initial
impression of the camera is of how small it is. If you’re used to handling a DSLR
it feels small but not tiny. Those of you with big hands might be afraid that a
compact camera no matter how professional and capable might be lost
in your hands. But you never get the feeling it’s tiny,
just small. This is brought about by the very well-placed grips on the body that
fit the fingers and thumb of your right hand as you grip the case. The perfectly
placed controls (especially the feature wheels that operate under and over
exposure and aperture and shutter speed) fall right under your fingers even when
you’re not looking at the camera and it doesn’t take long before you can even
find them without looking or even in the dark. As a photographer you want to
know for creative control that you can adjust the exposure a little under or over,
especially with the camera that runs mostly on automatic. The big silver wheel
on the top of the camera takes care of this allowing you to select a few stops
over and under when you’re shooting into or away from the light. This makes sure
that you can not only capture a well exposed shot but you can fine-tune it on
the fly to really bring out the lighting of the scene that you see with the naked
eye. This is what makes the difference between a snapshot camera and a
photographer’s camera. Then clearly this is intended as a camera from people who
love photography but don’t want to lug a lot of gear. The kit lens provided with
the camera is an X mount 16-50mm lens in a smooth silky silver
finish. This is in keeping with the retro styling of the camera which mimics the
look of gorgeous old vintage rangefinder cameras of the 20th century. Fujifilm
were very good at this. It’s a good all-round lens and copes well with
landscapes and portraits equally well. It also has a very nice macro focus as
close as 7cm in wide-angle mode which makes for some very intimate
and close-up shots. The wide-angle is suitably wide and the
telephoto zooms in quite far to help you frame shots. Obviously this is not meant
to be a one-size-fits-all lens and like all kit lenses compromises have to be
made. If you need to get closer or take advantage of the artistic benefits of
telephoto lenses like flattened perspective and shallow depth of focus you’ll have
to get a longer lens but for most workaday photography the kit lens is
fine! It’s a lovely sharp little lens and the autofocus snaps in really nice and
fast. Obviously in low-light you have some
issues with this not being an especially fast lens and by that we mean it’s
aperture range is f3.5-f5.6, about average for kit lenses. Low light
means longer exposures so you need to brace the camera on something or put it
on a tripod in low light. Again if you want better low-light
performance you’ll need to get a faster lens like an f1.4 prime (or non-zoom). For
more information about camera lenses check out our upcoming beginner’s guide
to photo lenses. So yes you should if you can afford it buy some prime lenses in
the Fujifilm x mount range to go with your lovely new X-A3.
But you can if cost is a problem buy X-mount adapters which enable you to fit
lenses from other makers onto the camera. Okay so the autofocus won’t work but if
you’re fitting classic lenses then you’re in the realm of manual
photography anyway and god bless you for that. There is also a built in interval
timer which is a fantastic feature to have. What this means is that you can
set up the camera on a tripod and tell it to take a photo every 3 seconds for a
total of say 150 frames. Then if you combine those frames to an animation you
have a gorgeous 24 megapixel time-lapse video. Obviously you’ll have to crush it
down to video resolutions but wow, what a great feature. What else?
The LCD angles outwards tilting both up and down for easy viewing at odd angles.
In fact it’s so clever it’s even articulated on little arms so it can
flip up right up to face front so that you can take selfies whilst looking at
the viewfinder. The camera also has a bang up-to-date
face and eye tracking so it will keep your face in focus as you film.
Wi-Fi comes as standard, so you can get your pictures off the camera into your
phone or tablet without plugging it in you can also print pictures wirelessly
to the Fujifilm Instax printer which also kind of makes it a retro instant
camera – how very sociable! Also there’s a carefully concealed built-in flash which
pops up when you put a lever at the side. Stowing it away involves gently pressing
it back into place, although you have to be super careful about not leaving it
out and bending the delicate arms which pop it out. The lever which releases the
flash is very hard to activate accidentally so as long as you remember
to stow it away after you use it it should last you a long
time. It’s surprising powerful for a little flash too. Another thoroughly modern
feature is the LCD is a touchscreen, meaning you can touch for focus, touch
to zoom and even touch to take a picture. Luckily you can set these modes
in the menus because having the touchscreen active all the time might
take a lot of accidental pictures which would be a bit of a pain. Also down in
menus there’s a film simulation mode giving you access to some gorgeous Fujifilm looks which mimic actual film. You can get classic film looks like print
film or reversal film and monochrome, but also monochrome with colored filters, a
classic real film technique for manipulating
tonal curves. All the looks are lovely and happen in real time so they show you
what you’re going to get right there in the viewfinder.
There are also some amazing special effects filters for toy camera (like
their classic plastic Chinese and Russian cameras), miniature (which makes
scenes look like tiny little models), dynamic tones and simulated fisheye lens
effect. There’s also a soft focus filter on what we’d call a starburst filter. But
best of all are the partial color filters which pick out a single color
and the rest of the picture is monochrome very cool. Conclusion. Okay
that’s about everything . . . well not everything but as much as we can cram
into this video anyway. So bottom line what do we think? The Fujifilm X-A3 is a
fabulous addition to the X-series, a gorgeously retro looking camera but with
smart 21st century features and materials. It has a great APS-C sensor, of
the kind you find in DSLRs, and 24 megapixels which gives you a huge
detailed image. The color rendition on the default settings is lovely and there
are lots of options as we say for you to tailor the image quality and color to
your liking. It’s easy to get into with the default feature set right out of the
box and yet it has plenty of deep features if you drop down into the menus.
The interval timer is a great feature for you YouTubers to get creative “b-roll”
footage and the reversible LCD and smooth stabilization makes it a perfect choice
for a vlogging camera. There aren’t many downsides to this camera as far as we
can see, only things you’d miss if your use for it was very specific.
For example the flash is quite sturdy and packs away quite
neatly but it is a little bit delicate looking. It’s not really an issue as
there is also a hot shoe (something missing from a lot of small cameras) so
you can add proper flash if you need it. There’s also no external mic input so
for video you have to go with onboard sound or use a separate recorder. In fact
in general we found the movie mode lacked a few features we’d really want
in a movie camera although it’s possible you could solve these problems
by setting everything manually. Here’s the thing though, this is not meant to be
a pro movie camera or a pro stills camera. It’s not a specific tool it’s a
really great general use camera with a lot of features; the still photos are
sparkling and detailed, the videos pretty steady and sharp and let’s face it . . . it’s
really pretty. 🙂 And unlike a lot of good-looking cameras which usually
sacrifice looks for features it’s really not just a pretty face. It’s a stylish
addition to anyone’s camera bag and if you’re a photographer, this would be the
one you take on holiday with you when all the more Pro gear gets left behind.
Ok that’s it! As always thanks for watching and if you liked this video
please feel free to like, subscribe and leave your comments and questions below.
See you next time!

Cheapest Digital Camera with Flip Screen for YouTube | $100 Digital Camera | Camera Product Review


hi everybody and welcome welcome welcome
to tasty mukbang tasty McBaine tasty mukbang tasty my thing
tasty mukbang eats y’all I am here today to do a review and a demonstration on
the digital camera that I bought off of Amazon for $100 $100 Wow this should be
in everybody’s budget I gave this camera away the other day in a secret giveaway
on my channel to a subscriber that has been supporting me for a while
commenting on my channel every day coming in multiple comments on each
video commenting on the comments of others and she is just a wonderful
awesome supporter she has done my challenges before so I gave this camera
away to 2006 I purchased this off of Amazon for $100
yes so before I ship this and mail this to her I want to talk about this camera
demonstrate this camera to you guys and show you the quality of the video and
show you what I’ve learned about the camera since I’ve been experimenting
experimenting with it I’ve never personally used this camera for my
personal use I just bought it for a review and kind of like a backup camera
if I ever needed it but like I said in my giveaway video I seen one of my
subscribers that could use this camera more than I can just keep it for backup
because I have another backup camera so this would basically be a backup to the
backup so at this moment I do not need it so I’m gonna ship ship this off to
somebody else who can use it and take advantage of it right now and today but
because this camera is so affordable only $100 if you have a child that is
starting YouTube if you yourself are starting YouTube and you don’t have a
huge budget and you can’t afford better quality
equipment right now but you want better quality than your current camera then I
think this would be a very good camera for you guys so I’m gonna go over some
of the features of this camera and show you why I think it is like a better
camera then you know most cameras for a hundred dollars like you spend $100 on
chips and sweets and the first thing that I like about this camera is that it
has a flip up screen typically I like my flip up screens to come out to the side
but because this camera is not going to require a microphone mount and it’s just
only $100 just to have the benefit of a flip out screen is an advantage so yeah
you’re getting that for $100 you guys like that within itself is worth it the
other thing that I do like about this camera is that I do have a mount for you
to put a mini tripod to vlog and I did receive I did get this tripod with one
of my kids my camera kid but I’m not using it so I will also be sending this
tripod to two fab six along with her camera so that way she could have
everything that she needs in order to start videoing better quality video so
this is just a little tripod for you to sit on the table the farther away you
put it of course and then you can adjust this and make it straight I don’t have it adjusted straight right
now but you can use this camera to vlog cheap inexpensive camera buy this for a
child for Christmas a teenager for Christmas a college student going away
to college a hundred dollars you guys you’re not sure if you spend nine
hundred to a thousand or more dollars on a camera for a teenager if they’re gonna
be seriously dedicated to or even a teenager if they’re gonna be seriously
dedicated to YouTube like they say they are even yourself so buy this camera for
$100 try it out for six months to a year you can’t go wrong you’re gonna get your
money back just just for that and then I always keep it for a backup camera just
in case your regular camera breaks and you still have something backed up so
like I say if one thing that I do like about this camera is that it does have a
flip up screen it has the attachment at the bottom to screw your tripod to vlog
and also sunk one camera that I did have that cost more with this one once I put
this tripod on the microphone was directly under it which muffled the
sound but another advantage to this camera is the even though I would have
preferred the microphone to be up at the top it’s not up at the top but it’s at
the bottom and it’s not going to be covered up by your tripod when you vlog
I do recommend that you always use the tripod when you vlog because if you get
used to carrying it with your hand then because the microphone is right here you
might cover up the microphone with your hand and then you’re gonna have really
bad audio quality on your camera so if for some reason or another you do want
to hold this camera with your hand and vlog then you want to make sure that
your gonna hold it on this side and not on this side because if you hold it on
this side then you’re definitely going to be covering
the microphone so that is the other thing that I like about this camera and
another thing the quality is not that bad you guys
it really is not that bad so I’m gonna get a close-up of the features of this
camera because I want to document this video before I ship this camera to 2006
so that way I can give her any information that I’ve learned about the
camera before she gets at home and she can watch this video over again instead
of trying to stroll and figure out some things
I’m so tired you guys when I get tired I start getting tongue-tied so when I
start signing a little crazy that’s because I’m tired so yeah so you guys I
am going to get a close-up of this camera and show you the features of the
camera closer up and show you how to operate this camera and I will also be
recording with this camera and show you some footage up to this point the
footage is with my canon t7 i i mean t said canon SL – i used to have a canon
t7 i so up to this point the video is with my canon it’s l2 and I will take
some video before the video is over wit and show you what this digital camera
looks like and this is just called a digital camera that’s what you search
for $100 digital camera on Amazon and this ship Appa that’s the name of it
digital camera and also I have my water bottle with me this sister Fifi Tyson
sent me she sent me some friend mail a gift and I’ve been drinking my water y’all I’m going the gallon the water challenge
a day and this really helps me to drink my water and have it handy and you could
take this with you wherever you go oh my goodness I love that
thank you sister Fifi Tyson so yeah let me get a close-up of this cuz I think
you guys if y’all don’t have anything to film with right now are you filming with
a phone or you want a camera but you cannot afford a camera you guys
everybody could afford $100 like save it borrow it
pick up cans ask somebody to give it to you for Valentine’s Day tell them this
is what you want it only cost $100 come on now you have birthday’s coming up ask
them to give it to you for your birthday somebody is willing to spend $100 on you
ask everybody to give you $10 a piece especially if you’re a child and you
want to start YouTube ask all your friends and family members to give you
$10 a piece for your birthday and get the camera okay let’s do the close-up
okay you guys so now I have a close-up of the digital camera and I just want to
show you guys a close-up and the different features of this camera so
right here is the power button right there you press that button to turn it
on which I’m going to do and then you see on the back a welcome sign comes on
and the camera lights up next up there is the pop-up screen and you’re able to
see what is in front of you with the pop-up screen
and that’s if you’re recording yourself in a video but if you just want to look
at it this way then you can see on the backside like that
and next up this is a it says it is a digital zoom lens four times four times
the zoom so when you actually want to zoom in on this camera if you want the
wider angle then you just press wide and when you want to zoom in you just go up
press the T to go up up up and you get closer and closer to the image that
you’re trying to get to so press the W to go out and press the T to go in when
you get ready to turn your camera on if you want to take a picture then that
little picture thing up at the top is for picture and then just press this
shutter button right here and that will take a picture if you want to do video
then press M and when you see that little video camera there then go ahead
and press the shutter button and then you’re ready to record your video so say
for instance right now I wanted to record this I am going to press record
I’m gonna push the shutter and in the store recording because I have it on the
camera and when that light is blinking like
that that means that it’s recording so whenever you want to stop it you press
that button down and hold it and it will stop and when you want to
start back press it I think you have to press the m again press M well if I want to play that back so now
I want to play back the video that I recorded so I think I pressed him and
now I play press that shutter button again so now it’s playing back the video that
I previously recorded and that was a very short video so if I
want to press Delete I click on it press Delete and here goes the other one I
want to play that one so I’m going to delete that and there’s
a delete button right down here underneath the M once you’re on the
image that you want to delete it says delete this video and you press yes make
it go up and then press M and it will delete it I have another video that I want to
delete and you guys this is previous video that
I recorded and I just want to show you that’s a pretty good quality there’s
pretty good quality so this was in an area where it wasn’t what I had my black screen so what I’m
gonna do is let me finish showing you the different features of this camera
right here is your shutter button you just press open and it should our opens
you can press down and it will close down and right here is where you open up
for your battery and it’s a little bitty thing right here you push that in and it
will release your battery and you just pull the battery out and in order to
release your SD card you have to take the battery out so once you take the
battery out you press on the SD card and it will come up install the SD card back
in and push it and once you hear click then you can put your battery back in
but you have to take the battery out in order to place the SD card in and you
have to take the battery out in order to release your SD card very simple and
easy one problem that I am finding with this camera which is to me it’s not a
minor it’s a minor problem for the price and the quality of the video this seems
to not be able to stay closed all the time so I just took one of the black ties that most women use for their
hair and put it around their to secure that but that’s like a mine or mine a
mine a problem because the quality of the camera is actually very dude this is
where you will put your selfie sticker you’re a mini tripod you put it in there
and you can walk around with this and vlog and your microphone it’s down at
the bottom right here that your holes for the microphone so you want to make
sure if you’re not going to have a tripod on here that you do not cover
this up with your hand whenever you’re holding your camera with your hand so I
would recommend that you do have a little tripod wait you don’t have to
worry about covering that microphone up with your hand so I think that’s it all
that I could show you about the camera this way let me show you what this
camera came with it did not come with an SD card but it does take a standard SD
card it came with a strap which I do not know
how to put this strap on here but it did come with the strap I’m sure I could
figure it out but I’m gonna lift the owner of the camera that I’m sending the
person gifting this camera to I’m gonna let them figure that out and it also
came with the USB card to charge your phone I can’t remember if it came with
this card with it or if I added it to it I can’t remember but I am going to give
this to her and so that way you can just take your SD card while the battery is
still inside the camera and you can plug this
up and charge your phone also if you want to you can get an extension card
and you can have this plugged in while you’re filming your camera that way your
camera is staying charged at all times and your battery does not exhaust itself
I think the camera will still be able to record while you’re charging your
battery so you guys that is it for this camera review I think this camera is
definitely worth a hundred dollars especially if you have a child that you
are buying this camera for and this is their first time getting a flip screen
camera and also if they’re new to YouTube and you don’t want to spend a
lot of money or if you yourself a you new to YouTube and you don’t want to
spend a lot of money on a camera but you and you’re not sure even if you’re gonna
continue with you to but this is a very good camera to just have so that way you
can start to YouTube and have some sort of a quality camera so there you have it
you guys I’m also going to insert some video of the footage taken from this
camera so you can see the quality video that you get from the camera make sure
you give this video a thumbs up make sure you leave lots of comments down
below make sure you press the subscribe button turn a little notification bill
and be sure to come back for another video thanks for watching right now and
I’ll have a link in the description box to this camera just in case you want to
take a look at it see how much it cost and consider purchasing it hi everybody
and welcome welcome welcome to tasty tasty methane tasty McBaine tasty one
thing tasty McBain eats y’all this is tasty McBain eatin I am currently
filming on my hundred dollar camera that I bought off of Amazon it is a digital
camera let me get the box so I could show you guys and it only costs $100 so
I wanted to do a review on this camera and tell you guys what I thought about
the camera and whether or not I think it’s worth the hundred dollars and
actually yeah I do think it’s worth the hundred dollars especially for a
Christmas gift for a child especially for a new beginner on youtuber who
doesn’t know whether or not they are going to continue with you two but they
want a better quality than a low budget wireless phone and it also has a flip
screen on top and you can see yourself and the audio is placed in a place where
you can put it on a tripod and it won’t be muffled I think the placement of the
of the microphone is pretty good even though it’s at the bottom of the tripod
it’s still not in the area where it will be covered up if you put it on top of a
stick like this so when you’re holding the camera with your hand though you
might want to be careful because you can’t put your fingers over the mic but
that’s why I would suggest a stick like this or to put the camera on that way
you can ensure that you’re not gonna be covering the mic up with your fingers so
you guys when I upload this video this will show you this will be the video
quality of this camera the I’m currently filming with the camera now the digital
camera from Amazon that’s a hundred dollars and it’s also the audio it does
not have an external mic jack you guys so it is what
it’s what you see is what you get so with this particular camera this is
going to be what you see is what you get and I hope this review helps anyone that
was considering purchasing this camera for $100 and I do think for a beginner
and for someone who just wants to do like vlogging outside or something for a
young child or a teenager you don’t want to spend a lot of money on just a lot of
money in something and you don’t even know if they’re going to be dedicated to
it so I think it’s an excellent buy for $100 when you waste a hundred dollars on
something worse you bought $100 worth of candy and
cookies I’m probably sure per month so go ahead and get the camera I’m gonna
leave a link to the camera in the description bar below just in case you
want to check it out on Amazon and I don’t think that you can go wrong for
$100 you guys and it’s a beginner camera to teach you how to start editing it
does take SD card it does have a flip up screen so it has more pros to me than
cons it has a flip up screen it takes a SD card you can recharge the battery
with the portable SD card with the portable charger and the mic isn’t a
good place for when you have it on a tripod like this and I think the quality
of the video is pretty good so that’s gonna be it you guys thank you so much
for watching and tuning in today and I will talk to you guys later bye now okay
you guys so this is the camera and I’m just focusing on different stuff in the
room to show you guys how this camera looks hi everybody and welcome welcome welcome
to tasty mukbang tasty McBaine tasty mukbang tasty mukbang tasty mukbang eats
y’all this is tasty mukbang eats I am here today and I am filming today in my
other room with the hundred dollar digital camera that I got from Amazon
and I just wanted to show you guys what the video quality is on this camera yes
this camera costs $100 on Amazon you guys the video that you’re seeing right
now was filmed with $100 camera I am using the camera right now as we speak
so this is the quality of the camera with the current lighting that I have in
my house so I think that the camera is definitely worth $100 even with the one
complaint that I do have about the camera other than that it’s worth it and
I think it would be a great budget friendly camera for a new beginner
youtuber for you to up your quality of your videos for a very inexpensive price
so I do give this camera two thumbs up because I think it’s worth the money and
I think if you’re on a budget and you only have a little bit to spend I think
a hundred dollars is worth a while all you have to do is get the get your SD
card and get the camera for $100 and you’re good to go
and the bigger the SD card the more footage you will hold on it so I
recommend anywhere from a 32 to 64 to 120 GB by SD card 64 at least at least
up to 64 but 32 to 64 is good if you want more and more and more and more
room then of course get 128 like me so you guys that’s gonna be it I’ll be
sending this camera to 2006 she was my secret
giveaway winner for the camera and you guys make sure you are continuing to
watch all of my videos comment on every single one of my videos leave lots of
comments in the comment bar of every single one of my videos and definitely
come back for more videos so I will talk to you guys later thanks for watching
bye now

Music Festival Tips What Gear to Pack: Out of the Darkroom with Ruth Medjber

Music Festival Tips What Gear to Pack: Out of the Darkroom with Ruth Medjber


Welcome to Out of the Darkroom on AdoramaTV. This is the first part of a very special series of episodes where I’m going to share some trade secrets with you, all about how to shoot music festivals; what to bring, who to shoot and where to share the photos. So for those of you who don’t know me, my name is Ruth Medjbur and I’m a professional music photographer. All the tips that I’m about to share with you come from my own personal experience. However, it’s important to note that there’s no steadfast rules in this business. I’m just sharing what works for me. For the last 15 years I’ve been shooting music festivals. I shoot about 10 to 15 per year, mostly in Ireland where I’m based, but sometimes across Europe too. I’ve shot for magazines, newspapers, commercial clients and for the festivals themselves. In this episode I will talk you through a full list of the essentials, every lens to cover every stage indoors and outdoors. As well as a run-through of the extra bits I’ve learned to pack over the years. All the points I’m going to mention here can only really apply once you’ve secured your press accreditation in advance with the festival organizers. If you turn up at the gate with all of this stuff packed in your bag and no pass you’ll be turned away. So have your email confirmation printed out, or on your phone so that you can show the gate staff that you’re legitimately picking up a pass and are allowed to have your gear on site. First things first, obviously you need your camera but don’t get hung up about the overall speck of your body. If you’ve been booked to shoot a music festival just go with what you have. It’s a good idea to bring a second body if you have one, but you should definitely have spare batteries for your body. You’ll be out shooting for hours each day and coming across power supplies can be tricky. So invest in a good spare battery. When I’m buying spares I always go for the genuine model instead of the third-party brand as I’ve had a bit of bad experience with them running low really quickly. Do your own research and read reviews before you buy. Memory cards are also something you need spares of. I end up shooting about 90 to 120 gigs a day on the D4S. I split that over various cards so that I can leave one importing in the media tent and then I can go out and shoot more shots. It’s also a good idea to have cards with a fast write speed. If something incredible is happening in front of you, like the lead singer has stage dived into the crowd and you need to be shooting furiously, the last thing you want to do is suffer a writing lag on your cards. One of the reasons I chose the D4S is for the FPS rate, the frames per second. I tend to find this pretty crucial when shooting live music so that I can get the burst of shots needed to capture live action shots. Lenses, really you should be bringing your entire arsenal of lenses with you. Shooting a music festival these days means shooting everything. Doing crowd portraits, shooting the food, the merchandise stands. You’ll want to get super wide to get the entire crowd in some of the shots. Then you’ll also need to be on a Telephoto. When your main stage is over 10 feet tall and you need that extra reach. What I bring is the following; a super-wide Sigma a Nikon 24-70mm which are mainly used when wandering around the festival grounds looking for good atmosphere shots. I can also use it on some of the medium or smaller stages. I’ll switch it up to a 70-200mm, when I want to get either some candid crowd shots from afar like in spy mode, or I’ve hit one of the big stages. I’ll use the nifty 50mm as well when we’re shooting tiny stages with no lights, or I want to do some f/1.4 work with some of the products, food or the merchandise Now flash. So you all know that you’re not allowed to use it in the pit but at night-time when you’re wandering around the arena or the campsite some off camera flash makes for some pretty interesting light, so pack it anyway, and have your triggers with you and maybe also one of your friends can hold it, or just pack a light stand. Business cards; This might seem a bit nuts in a gear list but you’ll be surprised at the amount of people that you meet down there. Some of them might just be music fans looking for copies of their photos but there’s still another Instagram follower so share those cards. A rain jacket for your camera. I know most pro bodies are weather sealed but they’re not waterproof. There is a difference. If you’re in a wet and windy part of the world, like I am sometimes, that rain can come down in buckets and come at you from all angles. The band might be due on stage at nine o’clock you’re in place in the rain from ten to nine. If they don’t walk on until 9:30pm, that’s 40 minutes of getting soaked. It’s best not to have your camera exposed to all of this. Invest in a rain jacket, you can pick up cheap baggies if you don’t shoot a lot, or you can get a reusable one if you’re a seasoned pro. Here’s the other thing, you’ll be at this music festival for three, maybe four days you need to look after yourself too. So get waterproof boots, jackets, hats, it doesn’t matter how stupid you look. When it’s lashing rain or freezing cold you’ll be glad of it. If you do get soaked keep some silicon gel packs in your lens cases and at the end of your bag as they’ll absorb the moisture and save from potentially cloudy or moldy lenses. It’s also a good idea to have dry cloths up your sleeve, so you can quickly wipe the raindrops from your lens when you’re shooting in the rain. I’ve seen photographers being turned away from the pit as they were wearing open-toe sandals. This is a working pit with lots od gear flying around. Have some sense, wear work boots or you’ll lose your toe. Don’t forget the laptop if you need to be filing images throughout the weekend make sure you have something to do it on. I’ve seen newbie photographers rock up to the media tent expecting there to be a row of free computers to use. Bring everything you need to be self-sustaining; chargers, hard drive, spare transfer cables and mark your name on everything. Believe me you won’t be the only Canon charger plugged into the socket panel. There might be a hundred photographers in and out of there all weekend. Sometimes you’re lucky enough that they have lockers to rent, so you can dump your gear between drop-offs, otherwise you might be running back and forth to your car. You can check this in advance with your media contact. If you’re vertically challenged like me, you just can’t cope with the weight of all of this gear, then invest in some new methods of carrying your gear. Last year I shifted the weight from my shoulders to my waist. I put my lenses, flash, other bits like my phone and my wallets in this and I’m good to just run around the festival for errors. If you’re shooting on two bodies instead of one, to save time changing lenses in the pit then grab a double strap. Personally, I only work on one body at a time as I’m consciously trying to slow down my shooting style. So a comfy strap works just as well for me. Earplugs; Do you know how loud main stages get? Imagine standing there for hours a day. Best thing I ever bought was a pair of molded earplugs. They can be a little bit pricey but they are worth every penny. They’ll also help you get some much-needed shut-eye in your tent at night. Speaking of tents, don’t be silly and buy one that costs 10 quid. You don’t want your gear, your clothes and you to wake up drenched every morning. Get a decent pop-up tent. Sometimes you could be doing these festivals completely on your own. So make sure you can put it up and take it down all by yourself. Another thing I’m going to recommend that your bring is a tripod. Now, don’t attempt to put this up in the pit! If looks could kill then each other photographer will have you dead in a second. I’m recommending bringing it for the nighttime ambient shots, when you want to do something quirky like long exposures of the carousel. You can keep it in the car until you actually need it but just make sure it’s lightweight. That’s all from me for this episode. Join me again next time where I’m going to talk you through exactly what to shoot while you’re at the music festival. Subscribe to AdoramaTV for more videos and don’t forget to check out the Adorama Learning Center for more great tips and tricks. Thanks and I’ll see you again soon.