Your first travel camera and lens [Fuji x-t20 & 18-55mm f2.8-4 review]

Your first travel camera and lens [Fuji x-t20 & 18-55mm f2.8-4 review]


– Hey guys, in today’s episode I’m gonna take you
through two national parks and over 300 miles of motorcycling to bring you some photography captured specifically with some of my favorite gear for travel and adventure photography, the X-T20 and the 18-55
variable aperture zoom lens. But before we get into things I just wanted to remind everyone that next week we’ll be giving this guy, the X-T20, away, so it’s not too late to enter the drawing for that. So we’ll announce the winner to that early next week, as soon as we have our grubby paws on the new Fuji X-T3 to replace it. So anyway, look forward to that, and I hope you enjoy today’s episode. (“To the End” by Falls) Alright so you’ve got a trip planned, you’re super-excited about it, it’s something you’ve been planning for months and months. It’s gonna be special and maybe you’ve got an iPhone or a point-and-shoot of some kind but this time you think, because you want this
trip to be so special and have a special place
in those memory banks, you think maybe it’s time to invest in a camera that can really deliver something with a little bit more oomph, so you think maybe it’s
time to up your game. What camera do you choose? Well guys, the options really are endless and you’re going to get a lot of advice and opinions. But you’re here for my opinion and I definitely have opinions. I’ve done a lot of adventuring with a lot of different gear and my personal choice, right now anyway, which is end of summer, 2018, is this guy right here, the Fuji X-T20 with just one lens, the 18-55 F2.8 to F4 variable aperture image stabilized zoom lens. Now of course, Fuji is not the only manufacturer who makes a superb offering
in a small package. But for travel there are some specific reasons why I personally choose Fuji, and like all things these are all going to be controversial. Others will disagree with me and choose to leave nasty comments because, for many people, photography has become religion. To you people I say, “Watch less YouTube and take more photos.” For everybody else, let me explain why I love
Fuji for travel photography. But to do so I’m going to take you on a little photo adventure with me. I’ll give you a sampling of what this little guy can do and why I like it so much. So strap on a helmet and
let’s go take some photos. (“To the End” by Falls) So first let’s talk about why Fuji. There are several reasons why I like Fuji as a travel or adventure platform and the first and most obvious reason is the size and weight. To illustrate this I’m gonna draw in the sand here. On one hand you’ve got IQ, that’s image quality, right. And then you’ve got your continuum. And on this side we have size, I’m just gonna put S, size and weight. I guess I could put C. C for convenience. The X-T20 is right here. That’s why I love it. Over here we’ve got the GFX, or something like that, where the sensor is the size my hand. Over here we have a GoPro, a tiny tiny sensor that’s super-convenient. The X-T20’s right here where it’s pretty good image quality and really convenient. The second reason I love the X-T20 and the Fuji platform in general is the wonderful shooting experience. These are cameras that are as fun to look at as they are to shoot with. The buttons and dials provide a tactile experience that are nostalgic of a time when photography felt more pure and less processed. These cameras appeal to people who see their camera not just as a tool but also as a companion. The other the thing I really like about the X-T20 is it’s interval timer. I’m here at Canyon Overlook looking out over Zion and it’s the middle of the day. It’s not the the greatest
lighting in the world. On the other hand there is a lot of cloud movement. So that can be interesting. It can lend itself well to a time lapse where I’m not actually that interested in a photo, per se. So the X-T20 does a great job there as far as giving you a time lapse to remember your moment. The next reason love Fuji is maybe a reason that’s
a little less obvious and that is Fuji’s sublime color science. (blues music) As a brand with a strong legacy of superb film engineering, Fuji has put together not only a strong base color science but also some spectacular film-like color profiles for JPEG shooting that after years of shooting I personally feel can’t be rivaled. And I know this brings up a whole can of worms, this whole discussion on JPEG verses RAW which is the stupidest argument ever. Those us who don’t mind shooting in JPEG know when and why we do it. For me personally I love shooting in JPEG on Fuji when I’m traveling because those photos come out spectacular straight out of the camera with that filmic, documentary look I know I wanted before I hit that shutter button. Look, there’s nothing
wrong with shooting RAW and spending a lot of time poring over every hue and saturation value if that’s what you love doing, but for many people that’s not why we love photography. – You’re welcome. – Yeah, thank you so much.
– I’m Bill Spencer. – Alright Bill.
– Your name is? – Andrew. – Branch?
– Uh huh. – Okay.
– Yeah. – Glad to have met you and you’re always welcome. – Thank you, thank you. Bill was nice enough to let me meander about his car cemetery. I don’t know, he calls it his junk yard. I could spend all day here. Seriously, this is like my photographic heaven. Guys it’s the act of photographing and documenting a place-time that is most significant. It’s far more important than what RAW photo editor you use, and as far as color is concerned I don’t mind trusting that job to the hands of color scientists who’ve spent decades perfecting a pleasing set of defaults to work from. Fuji really has nailed it, and so many others, in
comparison, haven’t. With many other brands it feels like their attention to JPEG color profiles are an afterthought at best or gimmicky at worst. So I realize, at the end of the day, that color is going to be something that is personal. It comes down to personal preference. But again, you came to me, and I’m just gonna give
you my personal opinion. The third reason that I love shooting Fuji, third, fourth? I don’t remember what, I don’t know number we’re on. But, it’s the lenses. If you need a system that’s going to give you But the reason, but the reason I like Fuji lenses as opposed to all the others is that they’re small and Fuji’s invested heavily in trying to build sublime top quality glass in a small package, that APSC package. And they nailed it. The sharpness, the build quality, the color, the contrast, the ease of use. Fuji’s high-end APSC lenses are probably the most important reason why I don’t ever want to switch away no matter how many advances in camera body technology
Sony makes, for instance. It’s those small, spectacular Fuji lenses that keep me from selling it all and jumping ship like so many other people. This is beautiful, by the way, right here. But anyway, this lens is is no different. Maybe it’s not considered by some to be a pro lens, but I use it for pro level stuff as well as travel and I have no issues with it at all. (chill electronic music) Guys, this is Fuji’s kit zoom lens, and in the world of photography the kit lens typically has serious negative connotations. It implies low quality,
beginner photography. That stop-gap choice you pick up until you can afford the really good lenses, quote unquote. If you look back at the video where I first tried this lens, I wasn’t even sure at that point if I wanted to keep it or not. But a year has passed and I have to say this lens has been on my camera body as much as any of my pro lenses have. Some of my favorite photos came with this lens. There’s several really
good reasons for that but I’ll have to tell
you about those tomorrow because it’s after sunset and I don’t know where
I’m staying tonight. I need to find someplace to stay. So, talk to you tomorrow. 5:45 AM. The way I feel inside right now, this is why I could never be a full-time landscape photographer. But this morning I’m
doin’ it for you guys. So let’s go to Bryce Canyon. (motorcycle starting) As a lazy landscape photographer, the thing I really love about Bryce Canyon is that you can just drive up and get out and walk a few hundred feet and you’re there at
these spectacular vistas. None of this fussing about with hiking and, naw, none of that. Now last night I was talking about this lens. And I have a few things to say about it but first I wanna say that if you’re new to photography, for more general use I would strongly recommend actually sticking to a prime lens or two. Prime lenses are important for beginners. They teach you more about composition than you can ever hope to learn by zooming around with a zoom lens. But having said that, for travel, it’s really hard to have
the flexibility you need with a fixed focal length. There are people who are really attracted to the Fuji X100 series, for instance, that have these fixed
23 millimeter lenses. And in all fairness, those are very attractive and very small devices, but when I traveled with those guys I felt like I was missing a lot of shots, that reach that I needed, that a zoom lens can provide to really get what I was after. So, I mean, if you’re
doing a lot of travel I’d say don’t give in to the draw and the romance of the X100 series before you’ve tried this system. When your traveling you just never know what sort of scene you’re gonna want to capture, and this lens provides you with enough flexibility to capture it. (chill electronic music) Of course there are wider Fuji lenses and some will say these are better for
landscape photography, but for those times I find it works great to just a stitch several shots together into a panoramic. As long as you have a
tripod or steady hands there really is no need
for a super-wide lens. What I did not realize is we’re about, I don’t know if you can see that, you probably can’t. We are about half way from where I stayed the night and where I would like to go, and I did not realize this, but apparently, the pavement ends. (blues music) It looks like I’ve happened upon some sort of motorcycle
event or something. Might as well get some shots while I’m here, I guess. So I mean, it’s not a sports action camera and lens by any stretch of imagination, but, I mean, on the other hand, it did okay, you know. Continuous autofocus
on the XT20’s not bad. I just love the
versatility of this camera. It can do just about
anything you need it to, in a pinch. A lot of people will say, well it doesn’t have a
wide enough aperture, you can’t really get that strong bokeh. That’s definitely true. It’s not going to compete with the 1.4, or even 1.2, of other Fuji prime lenses as far as getting that blurred, out-of-focus background for that really nice subject separation. But on the other hand, in travel photography you rarely need that level of separation. In fact, often, you want everything to be a focus. But if you really want bokeh the trick is to zoom out fully to that 55 millimeter max focal length and they get as close as possible, keeping your subject in frame. This will maximize the bokeh ability of the lens and sensor. (“To the End” by Falls) The other thing I like about this lens is that it has image stabilization. That means that you can get sharper images at lower shutter speeds. It also makes this lens perfect for video. And when I travel it’s nice to be able
to capture video also. The other thing about
video and this platform, is it has this little auto mode that’s meant probably for beginners, which is nice if you
happen to be a beginner. You don’t want to fuss about with all the various dials and what not that are associated
with shooting manually. Since I’m a vlogger I like to be able to, if I’m shooting normally, I’ve got everything set up for video or for photo stills for cinematic settings, ideal for the the correct
frame rate and shutter speed. But if I want to pull that camera around and start videoing myself I don’t want to have to worry about getting the exposure wrong. And you know what, if I’m filming myself it’s not as important that those cinematic type
settings are in place. So I just flip it onto auto mode and turn it around and I can vlog and not have to worry so much about if my exposure is locked in just right because I can’t see this screen. So guys those are all the reasons that I can think of right now why I like this set up. I sort of like it, if you can’t tell, and I highly recommend it to you for your next vacation experience. If you’ve enjoyed coming along with me consider subscribing and definitely check out my other videos on my motorcycle photography adventure. In the meantime, remember: Kindness before cameras. We’ll talk to you again real soon.

Which Sword Art Online Game Should You Get First?

Which Sword Art Online Game Should You Get First?


Hey everyone, welcome to my channel, it’s
me Gamerturk and today, I am going to answer a question that I have been asked many many
times as a Youtuber who focuses on Sword Art Online games and that question is
“Which Sword Art Online game should I get first?” For those of you who are not patient that
result in my Audience Retention to remain at 30%, the answer is either “Follow the Chronology
and start with Hollow Fragment”, which is the default answer for someone who just wants
to follow the story or a definitive “Hollow Realization” if you just want a good gaming
experience as a whole package. Now that the video is done for the impatient
ones, I would appreciate if you at least click that like button before you leave, because
now, I’m going to go more in depth with my reasoning with a lot of talking. Let me start by saying, this video has been
created in March 2018. As of today, there are 5 Console/PC Sword
Art Online games available, those being Hollow Fragment, Lost Song, Hollow Realization, Accel
World vs Sword Art Online and Fatal Bullet, in that chronological order. If you are watching this video in the future,
chances are, more games have been released, but me not being a fortune teller, those future
games are not included in this video. Now as I said at the beginning, if you are
here to follow the Gameverse story, after at least experiencing the Aincrad arc of the
main series, and don’t really care about the gameplay, my initial suggestion stands. You should start with Sword Art Online Hollow
Fragment, which starts at the Floor 75 duel between Kirito and Heathcliff, seperating
the Game continuity from the main canon by taking it a completely different direction. To follow the story after HF, you continue
with Lost Song, followed by Hollow Realization and eventually Fatal Bullet. Keep in mind that from all the information
we have so far, Accel World vs Sword Art Online, while seemingly taking place in the Gameverse
continuity on a surface level, is most probably a standalone game and is not actually a part
of the Gameverse canon, due to everlasting consequences that cannot be fixed being absolutely
non-existant in Fatal Bullet, as well as the game going above and beyond at being a total
nonsense on many aspects, including directly contradicting the events of previous games. As for those of you who are asking based on
the quality, the scope, the entertainment value, the ambition of the games, the answer
easily becomes Hollow Realization. HR, developed by Aquria, is still the golden
standard of an SAO game, from a storytelling perspective, including the characterization/portrayal
of individual characters, as well as offering a very ambitious and grand game, with over
a hundred hours of stuff to do and an intricate combat system that is fun, as well as including
things to grind for without boring you to hell. But to be more specific, let me talk about
the other games first and what they do wrong or at least do insufficiently. Hollow Fragment, the very first Sword Art
Online game, developed by Aquria, which is an extended remake of the PSP game Infinity
Moment, tells the story of what would happen, if the players had to clear all 100 Floors,
while the remake additional story, called the Hollow Story, is a parallel adventure
that takes place in a discarded area of Aincrad. While the Hollow Story is by far the best
story the game has to offer, with decent story pacing, enough mystery to keep you interested
and a fun structure, the same cannot be said about the Aincrad story. Sure, the players now have to clear the 100
Floors, but… There is literally nothing to do but clearing
those Floors. While playing through Aincrad, you will soon
realize the entire story is mostly inconsequencial and you are just in for a slogfest that requires
you to do the same objectives over and over with minimal rewards, that is clearing Floors. Writers tried shaping things up by also adapting
the Fairy Dance storyline, as well as an original story to the last Floors, but again, the journey
is so long that the barren story they are trying to convey here is stretched incredibly
thin, it makes you lose interest in what is going on. And the fact of the matter is, while it offers
a variety of sword skills, they all feel soo clunky and slow that you can’t really shake
off the feeling that you are just doing the same thing over and over, due to the adrenaline
just not being there. The next game, Lost Song, takes place a little
after HF and inside ALfheim Online. It is developed by Artdink and features a
completely different gameplay formula. I like to call Lost Song as “Calibur arc of
the Gameverse”, since there is absolutely no tension or barely anything to reach out
to your feelings in the story compared to every other game or arc. It is borderline inconsequential and the conflict
between Kirito and Seven, a newcomer to the series, is absolutely artificial and relies
on Kirito deciding to just be a dick, since the experiment Seven is conducting is not
illegal by any means and literally has no negative effect that would put it in a grey
area. It is no different than a game offering you
an optional survey to ask for your opinions. But Kirito decides it’s unethical, because
the game needs a conflict. The story is not something “you have to experience”
and to be frank, the gameplay is not either. While it is most certainly faster than what
Hollow Fragment offered, it feels incredibly stiff and scripted. Not in a “Quicktime events” kind of scripted,
but all your sword skills are scripted in such a way, that in the case of your enemy
moving an inch to the side, will result in your Sword Skills completely missing the target. To add to that, the skills do not feel powerful. I know I go a lot talking about the “feeling”
of things, but lets be honest, we play fantasy games to feel powerful. For all the negatives HF did, the spectacle
of a skill was not one of them. Every skill you used was grand thanks to the
effects used on your skill. Lost Song was missing that feeling. And that is the biggest mistake a game based
on the power fantasy can commit. Not feeling powerful. Hollow Realization came after Lost Song, once
again, switching back to the initial developers Aquria and Aquria sure as hell took this chance. HR is essentially an upgraded Hollow Fragment,
but damn aren’t these upgrades great. We have a much bigger, much more ambitious,
much more visually impressive game while we dive into this brand new adventure in the
gameverse, taking place in a game, imitating the world before Aincrad. You have all your Sword Skills with all the
weapon types and a whole lot more. You have the best characterization in the
gameverse, not relying too heavily on fanservice and still offering emotional/intimate moments
between the characters, much better than any other game so far. The gameplay feels fast, responsive and actually
fun thanks to the new mechanics. Despite being repetetive, you will never feel
like doing anything repetetive because the fast paced action is there to distract you. The skills are once again great showcases
of power and it’s a joy to use them, while the in game mechanics are much less limiting
than what caused Hollow Fragment gameplay to feel like a slog. While the story premise is somewhat similar
to the original Aincrad, the single twist takes the stakes away from the players and
put it on something they care about deeply and for those interested, the story actually
has a nice question for you to think about. Story pacing is much better than what was
present in HF, you will feel the story moving forward constantly, instead of going through
huge chunks of gameplay before you proc the next story advancement. There is fun grind involved with the amazing
post-game content that will reward you with even better and more impressive gear to equip. And then there is the DLC Episodes, which
I have to say, is actually worth it, for the side stories alone, let alone the main story. If I have to criticize one thing about Hollow
Realization, it’s that the main campaign ending literally incentives you to get the DLC, which
is not a practice I can get behind, but then again, the DLC is worth it, so I am not willing
to complain too much. Hollow Realization is by far the golden standard
for an SAO game at the moment. In a weird timeframe, Accel World vs Sword
Art Online came out, actually intervening with the release schedule of Hollow Realization
DLC’s and this was the point where I started getting the questions about the games as well. This game, effectively cannibalized the sales
of Hollow Realization and the release schedule and the effort that went into this game was
the proof that AWvsSAO was just a blatant cash crab. It is once again developed by Artdink, and
it is once again, Lost Song. In my First Impressions video, I gave the
game the benefit of the doubt for the minor improvements I saw in the early sections of
the game, hoping for more improvements in general but I was thoroughly disappointed. The entire game feels like a story expansion
for Lost Song, with the improvements between the two games being even less worthy than
what Hollow Realization offered as free gameplay improvement patches. This is topped off by the worst personality
portrayal of individual characters in the entire series, turning every side event into
a fanservice and the main story that does not explain integral story bits properly,
making you question your sanity during time travel parts, which is a huge shame, considering
this game actually had the best premise in the entire gameverse, having a very personal
and touching story for the main characters. And dont get me even started on the DLC, the
single DLC this game has, offers less content than a single DLC Chapter Hollow Realization
offered. I am actually quite glad, this game is not
considered a part of the Gameverse canon and am quite sad that it managed to be nothing
more than a blatant cash grab. Such an amazing premise could have been handled
in a much better way. Sadly, AWvsSAO is effectively filled with
events that are essentially what SAO haters think SAO is. Just a cashgrab in the form of fanservice. And last but not least, we got Sword Art Online
Fatal Bullet, the game that was teased back in Hollow Realization and finally took place
in Gun Gale Online. This one is developed by Dimps and is essentially
your Freedom Wars successor if you ever encountered that franchise. It is a third person looter shooter that is
completely different from the previous games. While I had incredibly high hopes for this
game, considering the success of Freedom Wars, but I was left slightly disappointed. Again, it’s a game with great premise, that
doesn’t quite live up to it. For the first time, you actually play as your
own character and you see and experience Kirito from a third person perspective, which is
a neat change. The problem is, the game was heavily advertised
as “Your choices will have effects on the world”, which turned out to be heavily false
advertising. You have dialogue choices in the game for
your own character, which results in miniscule changes in the sentece that follows yours,
which has absolutely no effect in the world. And the one meaningful choice you make at
the end of the game is bogged down by the game offering a third “True Ending”, which
leads to your choice, effectively not having any effect whatsoever in the world, considering
the canon result is already there. The story pacing is extremely off as well
and most characters don’t feel natural as to how they got so close to your character. 60% of the game, you will be collecting materials
without advancing the story anywhere, which feels a lot like playing Hollow Fragment. You just “do stuff” without any real payoff,
turning the majority of the story campaign into a slogfest. I have to mention the difficulty curve here
as well, the game forces you to grind outside of the story, because the story events alone
are not enough to carry you through the story. You will feel extremely powerless and fragile,
unless you do your own grinding. Overall, while I put this game in the second
spot for my best Gameverse game recommendation, it is disappointing that I expected this game
to actually top that chart by miles, considering the build up to it. But thats it from me today. If you want more in depth looks into these
games, I have my reviews available on my channel with a lot more information on the individual
games. For more videos, make sure to click on that
Subscribe button and hit that bell icon to enable notifications. If you enjoyed the video feel free to like
and share and you can also support my channel on patreon.com/gamerturk or by sponsoring
me here on Youtube Gaming and help me create content! You can also find me on facebook.com/gamerturk
and on twitter @Gamerturk95. I’ll see you guys in the next one, take care!

Is the DJI Osmo Action worth buying?: Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace

Is the DJI Osmo Action worth buying?: Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace


Hi everybody, welcome to another episode of Exploring Photography right here on AdoramaTV. In this episode I’m going to be talking about this little guy it’s the new Osmo Action. It’s the pocket camera that has a front-facing screen, so you can see what you’re doing. Well let’s get right to it, what makes the Osmo action an awesome camera? There are tons of features in this camera that I’ve sort of put it through its paces. I’ve had this little action camera for about a month now, and I tried it in different scenarios… underwater in crazy rain on my motorcycle, walking, using it as a vlogging camera, using the internal audio. I just try to test everything to use it as you would normally use it in the real world. So let’s talk about some of the features that set this apart. The first one is… it has a front facing camera… so right on the front, there’s a full HD screen, and so you can actually see what you’re doing either from the back screen, or the front screen, and so if you’re using this as a vlogging camera, you need to sort of frame yourself up. You can do that just fine or you can use the back screen to see exactly what’s going on.. So you can just hit this little button on the side, it’ll flip that around, and now you can see what’s going on from the back. It’s really cool, the other thing that’s really nice about this camera is, there’s a button on the side here, that’s called the QS button… that’s the quick, quick, switch button, and what that allows you to do is, change between modes, and so if you just click it once, you go to video mode. Click it again, you go to HDR video, you go to slow-motion, hyperlapse, whatever, you can set that up and customize it. The cool thing about this button is, if you’re using gloves, so if you’re on a… snow, like snowboard, or you’re skiing.. or you’re a snowmobile, or you’re on a motorcycle, or you’re doing anything. You have gloves you can actually can control this camera switching modes, and doing things with gloves on, and I love that. The other thing this little side button does is – if you hold it for just a couple seconds it switches from the back camera, to the front camera, so that’s really easy, and it’s really really fast. All right now, let’s talk about some of the things that really matter. The first one is stabilization, this camera has something called rock steady, and it is incredibly good, and so just to give you a sense of how good this is. I walk down the pier here with the camera handheld, with just a normal setting, and you can see that it is all over the place, because I’m holding that with my hand. So then I went back and all I did was I turned on Rocksteady, and did the same exact walk, and you can see that now, this is smooth as butter. It is gimbal like, and so it is super smooth, in fact because it corrects all of the axes, it actually looks a little bit better walking than my Osmo Pocket, which I was very surprised about. So this is gimbalish… not a gimbal, but it’s so darn close. It’s really sort of crazy, now I’m using the front facing camera to frame up my shot to make sure I am actually in the frame. I also am using the built in audio so it’s not horrible… probably a external audio device works a little bit better, also face oriented exposure turned on, and so you can see that it does a pretty good job of making sure I’m exposed. But even with the bright background like this, you can see that I’m not exactly exposed correctly, but it does a pretty impressive job. We’re about… oh an hour or so, before Sun is going down. We’ve got a lot of clouds out there, so the contrast between my face in the background isn’t extreme, but it is enough. That would normally give a GoPro or other little camera some issues, so I’m really impressed with this camera. I’m impressed with how stable it is, it’s very similar to using a gimbal. It’s sort of wacky and crazy, The other thing that I think that is amazing about this camera that doesn’t get a lot of hype is… this front little screen here, it is water repellent, and so I was astonished, I was riding through heavy rain on my motorcycle and I was really loving the fact that even though this thing was just getting drenched in rain, it was just falling right off the front of that lens. Let’s talk about a couple other things, one of the things that I love about this, it just came out, it’s a new feature with the firmware update called Hyperlapse, now what Hyperlapse allows you to do is it’s sort of like time lapse, but the difference is this.. is for having your camera move and recording things over time, and so you can do things like zipping through the curves on your motorcycle, and you could speed that up, you can do a little walkthrough which I did. And there are different speeds, so you can do it 10 times as fast 15 times as fast, or 30 times as fast. So it really depends on what you’re doing. You get different effects using that, and it’s as simple as just choosing Hyperlapse… saying which speed you want, and off to the races you go. Another feature of this camera that I absolutely love is HD, our video you know what that allows you to do if you have a really high dynamic range scene, you can sort of compress those things, and get the highlights and the shadows in one shot in the camera without having to do a bunch of post-production… and so I tested that out on just behind me here last night when the Sun was going down, and here’s the scene that you can see. This is just normal video, and you can see that it’s got some problems with the highlights, things are being blown out, but then what I did was I just turned on HDR video, shot the same scene, and wow what a huge improvement. That really changes the way I see things. I also did some tests and some more dramatic scenarios when I was in a cave doing some swimming in Mexico, and you can see here the back is totally blown out. When I turn on HDR video it does a little bit better job, it still has some high-light problems, so it can’t solve every single HDR issue, but it does a really, really good job. Another feature of this camera that I love it’s called the DeWarp feature… now wide-angle lenses like this, are going to distort the scene and so on. This camera what you can do is, you can turn on something called DeWarp. What it will do is it will crop the frame, but it will straighten things out, and so here’s a couple of scenes I have… here is one with DeWarp turned off, and you can see it the edges, things are just wonky, they’re a little bit curvy they look round… turn on DeWarp, and you can see that now everything is flat and horizontal, and looks wonderful. DeWarp I love it! Another really cool feature of this camera is… if you want to shoot videos for Instagram and you need that vertical orientation, well you just turn it like this, and now you’re in portrait mode, and the videos are going to be saved in portrait mode, and so you can shoot things, and then post those straight to Instagram without having to do any kind of post-production rotation stuff. It’s really a time saver. This is DJI’s is a very first action camera, and it’s no surprise that it’s pretty awesome… because it’s from DJI but the question is are there any negatives… and the answer is yes so the first one that a lot of people are talking about is this does not do live streaming, and so that’s something that is not right now in this… but the cool thing is with the firmware update that could be enabled… So I wouldn’t be surprised if live streaming comes to this camera and before Christmas… so I don’t know don’t quote me on that, but I’d be surprised if live streaming doesn’t come around very, very soon. The second thing and this is one of the my gripes about this again, this is something that could be solved very easily. There’s no remote control other than a smartphone, and so the smartphone is amazing, because you’ve got the MIMO application… you can control everything on this little camera from the smartphone, but if you’re skydiving or zipping down a mountain on skis, or you’re on a motorcycle or snowmobile, or something… you have this mounted to a helmet or on your bike or somewhere else. You can’t use your smartphone… you need some kind of little thing you can put on your wrist to turn it on and off, or maybe on your handlebars that doesn’t exist yet, and so I hope DGI it creates that, and then one little persnickety thing that kept getting me over and over, is this little quick switch button on the side… it’s used for two things 1. switching modes and 2.switching between the front and rear camera. I love it cuz you can use it with gloves… it’s all the rage I love that, but the problem is if you don’t hold it quite long enough you can accidentally switch this camera into the wrong mode, and so now I have really learned to really be deliberate when I push that button, so I don’t accidentally change from video mode, to hyperlapse, or something else .. and shoot unintentional video. Now the question is Mark should I buy this camera? And my answer is …Absolutely! Yes. I absolutely love DJI equipment…. in fact I shot this entire video using nothing but my DJI Osmo pocket. Every single shot that you see either came from the Osmo action or the Osmo pocket.. 100%.. DJI gear. The thing that I love about this camera is it’s super easy to use it… shoots 4k 60 frames per second slow mo Hyperlapse. Time-lapse… it does Stills it does everything you could ever imagine out of an action camera. It’s got a front-facing camera, so you can use it for vlogging. You can use external USB C compatible adapters for external audio. It just does everything, so yeah, it’s a no-brainer and this is the camera… I think you should get if you want an action camera. Thank you so much for joining me for this episode of Exploring Photography… Don’t forget to subscribe to Adorama TV. It’s totally free… turn on the bell, so you get notifications, and also make sure you follow me on Instagram, because I’m always posting behind the scenes videos of me making videos for Adoramatv, and my travels around the road… around the world. Thanks again for joining me, and I will see you again next time!

REVIEW: Casey Neistat’s Camera Setup for Vlogging

REVIEW: Casey Neistat’s Camera Setup for Vlogging


Casey Neistat is
a YouTube vlogger that has been gaining
a lot of popularity lately because of his great
cinematography skills. And a lot of people
are wondering what type of camera
setup is he using to make his videos look so good. Well I’ve looked into it. And I’m going to do a
review of his setup. Plus suggest some of
my own modifications and my own little tweaks to it. So, put on my
glasses like Casey. Here we go. [MUSIC PLAYING] Hey guys! My name is Tim Schmoyer. And it’s Wednesday, which means
it’s time to give you guys some unique tips ideas,
suggestions, advice– like we do every week
here at Video Creators– to help you grow your YouTube
channels and your audiences. So the first thing
we’re going to do is run through the whole
camera setup– the gear– and then let’s dig into
some of the specifics about the things you
need to know about how to best use this setup. The camera body that
he uses is a Canon 70D. And the reason why
he chose this one is because it has autofocus
features built in, which are really
nice for getting a good crisp, clear shot. So autofocusing here. The lens that he’s using is the
Canon EF-S 10 to 22 millimeter. Also, the microphone at the top
is called a RODE VideoMic GO. And this is not the
one that he uses. He uses one a little bit
more similar to this one because this is battery-powered. And it gets a little
bit better audio. And you can boost
the signal that it’s sending into the camera. And you can cut
wind and stuff too. But the problem I was having
when I was using this mic is that quite frequently, I
would forget to turn it on. Or rather, I’d
turn it on and I’d have to carry around
the nine-volt battery it uses and then they would die
on me, or something like that. And so I would get these
shots when I was vlogging. I’ve been vlogging with this
camera actually for a few weeks now over at our family’s
vlogging channel. So that’s what I’m
basing all this on. And I would find that
I would just forget to turn this microphone on. So this one isn’t
battery-powered and there’s no on or off switch. It just plugs right into the
microphone port on the camera. And I love it so much better
because the sound quality is still very good. So very directional–
it picks up what’s in front of the camera,
in front of the microphone. And it eliminates a lot
of the background noise– which is awesome. But I don’t have to worry
about another battery and forgetting to turn it on
and then having no audio at all. And then this is
the JOBY tripod. And you can get it
in different sizes. This is the one for mobile. He has a bigger one than this. And it’s nice because these
legs are extremely flexible. You can wrap it around stuff. It makes it very portable. If you just want to get a
quick time-lapse like he does, you can just set the
legs out and set it down. Or you can do what he does
and that’s put them like this. And this gives it kind
of like a selfie stick. It’s very adjustable,
very sturdy. I love this JOBY tripod. And this is how he uses it. Keeps his arm out
of the shot too, rather than holding
it up like this and then having
this in the shot. By the way guys, the
links to all of this stuff is in the description below
this video here on YouTube. I highly recommend you pick
up your gear at B&H Photo. That’s where I get
all of my stuff. Mostly because they are
super, high professional. If you have any questions at
all, you can just call them. They’ll help you decide what you
really need for your project. And their prices are
either the lowest or they are the exact same
price as the lowest price that I can find anywhere on the
internet, including Amazon, or any other place like that. As far as a couple of settings
on the camera that I have found worked best for vlogging–
This is a touch screen. So that is nice. So you could have
this focus one. I found that the
multipoint one tends to keep the most amount
of things in focus while I’m shifting around. If I just want to
focus just on my face and I know my face
is going to be in the middle the whole
time, without moving, I’ll switch it to
that one sometimes. Most of the time, I use a
FlexiZone-Multi subject one there. As far as the audio is
concerned, if you go into here, I found just leaving it at
auto with this microphone works really well. As you can see, even though I’m
standing behind it right now, it’s still picking up
exactly at the right levels just because there’s no
other sound right now. But it does a fairly good job. Sometimes it will peek
into red even on auto. But I haven’t found it to be
enough to switch it to manual. You don’t want to disable
your audio, obviously. Also really important is if
you have the autofocus method on the tracking one. Remember we went through
these just a second. But if you have it on tracking–
if you want to have it automatically– you
can enable this. It will automatically
keep focusing on the faces that it detects– which it
actually does a really good job at keeping the faces. But as it says, “Using
an external microphone will reduce the amount of
lens noise that is recorded.” And I have found that even
with the external lens on top with the road, it
still picks it up. So if I switch back to this,
you can turn it on and off just by tapping this
while you’re recording, which makes it kind of nice. So you can use it when you want. But I have decided not to use
that because it does get to be a little bit too much noise. So I just keep this disabled. And I just keep
this on FlexiZone. The cool part about
using the FlexiZone though is that if you hold
and you hit this button right here– this AF focus on–
while you’re doing it, you can hold it while
you’re recording. And it doesn’t
give enough noise. See how it’s focusing in
these spots right here, now. So if I was to put my hand
right here and then pull this– see how it’ll all focus
over here on my hand. You couldn’t hear
it, but I could hear the lens make this noise. And the other thing
about this lens, you can see how wide it is
when you zoom out on this one. So you can see how
much of the room this lens is actually
picking up– this 10 to 22 millimeter– that’s on this one. So this is at 10. And if I was to zoom in,
it gives you just enough. You can go in about that far. That’s at 22 millimeters now. And I like it because I
have found for vlogging, wide is really good. And this is a crop
sensor, which means it zoomed in a little bit
more than you normally would have on a full sensor one. But it’s still really good. Just enough range where you
could zoom in, focus the eye on something that you
want to draw attention to, but then zoom back
and then have just yourself in the whole room. And you have lots of
empty space around you to pick up a lot
of the environment. Another thing to
consider with this is that it does weigh
maybe four pounds or so– which doesn’t
sound like a lot. But if you’re
holding it out trying to talk to it for
any period of time, it does start to
get pretty heavy. And the other
comment I would make is that vlogging with
this– although you have a lot of flexibility,
you get great sound quality, great image– you really
do you need to know how to use a DSLR camera. It’s not something
you can just pick up like a point-and-shoot,
or a GoPro, or your phone, or something like that. I’m not Casey. I can’t wear those
when I’m on video. So you do need to know
how to actually use a camera– a lot of
manual settings– in order to know how to use
it to its full potential when you’re vlogging with it. If you want to see
the vlogs that I’ve shot on this camera, and this
lens, and this microphone– to hear how it all sounds
and see a little bit more about it– I’ll put
a link to a playlist in the description
of this video that will contain all
the vlogs that I’ve shot using this exact setup. So you can get a
little bit more idea what it looks and sounds like. So while I do like
vlogging on the GoPro HERO4 Black– which is what
I’ve been using– because you can do 2K, 4K. It’s got time-lapsed
stuff built in. I can mount it anywhere. It’s much less inconspicuous. The audio on here– a problem. I did a full review on
vlogging with this one which I’ll make up around here. There are some problems with it. This definitely overcomes
almost all those problems. But it has other
problems of its own. It’s big. It’s far more
expensive than a GoPro. And you can’t just
throw it in your bag when you’re traveling
like you can with a GoPro. If you’ve been vlogging
with a rig like this, I’d love to hear from you
in the comments below. What you’ve learned, works best,
and what doesn’t, and any tips. Share those down there. And I will definitely
look forward to learning from you guys. And the rest of you
who are thinking about vlogging with
this, read the tips other people are saying
and other recommendations that you guys have
found work really well for your vlogging setup. And if this is your
first time here, I’d love to have you subscribe. Every week, we give you
guys YouTube tips just to help you with your YouTube
channels, grow your audience, and sometimes give you equipment
reviews like this, as well. So thanks for hanging out. And I will see you guys again
tomorrow for some YouTube Q&A. See you then. Bye.

Kids React To Try Not To Get Scared Challenge

Kids React To Try Not To Get Scared Challenge


♪ (scary music) ♪ – Girl, you better run. – Oh, I’m getting stressed.
I’m worried. I’m worried. I’m worried. ♪ (playful intro) ♪ – (FBE) Well, today,
we’re going to be doing a challenge. – What? – What is it gonna be? – (FBE) This is a “try
not to get scared” challenge. – Oh, no! – I don’t like jump scares! – (FBE) Before we start,
we’re going to be showing you some scenes from
more a grown-up movie, but the scenes
will be kid appropriate. If you’re too scared at
any point during the challenge, it is totally okay.
Just let us know and we will immediately stop the video.
– I’m embarrassed. I’m nervous! – Oh, no! Is there going to be
a real person scaring me? – (FBE) Well, the rules are
you can’t show any sign of fear, so no jumping, no flinching,
no screaming, or else you’re out for that video,
but then you get to come back in for the next video.
– (sighing) Okay. – I don’t like this. – I hope this is
not like really scary. (snake hissing)
– It’s a snake. – No! Already out. Already out. I just heard a snake! Snakies are scary.
(buzzer) (snake hissing) – (cameraman) How are you doing today?
What seems to be the problem? – Why is he so close
to the snake? What? – That’s not smart.
That’s not smart. – Jump at it. Jump at it.
Come on, jump at it. – Please, don’t jump at the camera. – (moaning) – Jump! It’s gonna jump! Jump! – (gasping) Oh, my god.
(buzzer) – You’re so dumb.
Did I flinch? – (FBE) A little bit.
– (groaning) I knew it.
(buzzer) – (cameraman yelping)
– I moved. (buzzer) – Oh, I know what he’s– aah! I get scared for every little thing.
(buzzer) – What is– why are you–?
Oh, I got scared. Shoot! Why did that scare me?
I knew that was gonna happen! (buzzer) – That wasn’t that bad.
Spiders are more of an issue. – Aaaah! Not too confident anymore. ♪ (creepy music) ♪ – No, it’s It, isn’t it? – Oh, no! Not It! I’m not looking at it.
(buzzer) – (Georgie) No! Bill’s gonna kill me. – No! Don’t do it. Don’t do it, man. (water rushing) ♪ (jarring chord) ♪
– Oh, god. – (Pennywise) Hello, Georgie!
– H-Hi, Georgie. – (It) What a nice boat.
Do you want it back? – No! – (Pennywise) Do you want
a balloon too, Georgie? – Don’t talk to a creepy clown
that you find in the sewer. That’s not a good idea. – (Pennywise) Oh, well, I’m Pennywise
the Dancing Clown! – (giggling) – (Pennywise) Pennywise, yes… – What’s wrong with his eyeballs? – (Pennywise) Georgie,
meet Pennywise, yes. – (Georgie giggling)
– Don’t– no, why are you laughing? – Don’t, don’t,
don’t, don’t, don’t do it! – If you saw a clown like that,
why would you do that? – Jump scare! Do something!
Hurry up! (screeching) Do something! – Holy guacamole!
That’s some scary stuff. – (sighing) That scared me.
Not It. Nothing It. – That one was all good.
I’ve seen It a lot of times. I don’t like scary movies, though. – That wasn’t really scary
because it’s on the trailer, so everybody watches that. ♪ (eerie music) ♪ – Oh, no. – What movie is this from? – Well, this is a horror movie. ♪ (music grows intense) ♪ – Oh, is it a dead lady? – I’ve never seen this one,
so I’m just not gonna watch it. (buzzer) – I moved.
(buzzer) – Why is there a dead person–?
Okay, I’m not looking! (buzzer) – “Powder of life.” – Okay, okay, no, no, no, no, no. – (gasping) You woke her up!
– (woman moaning) ♪ (scary music) ♪ – I mean, that would be kind of scary. – (corpse shrieking)
– What the–? – I don’t like this one. – Girl, you better run. – What movie is this from?
I don’t want to know, actually. Never gonna watch this. – Okay, that one, I was on the verge
of getting scared. – This is nothing. I think the last video
was scarier than this. – That was creepy. This is why I can’t watch
horror things. – (FBE) Well, after watching
that clip, could you tell where the clip was from?
– No, where? – (FBE) So that was
actually from a Disney film that was the unofficial sequel
to The Wizard of Oz. – Really? – I didn’t know Wizard of Oz
was that dark. – (FBE) After watching that scene,
does it seem weird that this movie was made for kids? – Yeah, it does. If you’re trying to advertise it
to younger kids, that’s maybe not the best idea. – No, that is not kid appropriate. They needed to change that. (buzzer) – Okay, no, no, no, no, no.
That one was close. (buzzer) – What are those? – I hate when they have to do
something to the eye. – What the heck? – That’s really, really, really gross. – Oh, god! Ugh. (gagging) Oh, I can’t take this anymore.
(buzzer) – Are those worms? – Okay, now I’m just curious. – (sucking in air) (gagging) – Oh, I’m not eating noodles again.
Oh, my gosh! – I’m good.
I’m not scared. I’m good. (silence) (chair banging)
– This is not good. (chair scraping floor)
This is not good. (chair scraping floor)
– Okay, this is fake. – Fun fact: this ain’t real.
This can’t be real. – Something’s gonna pop up
at the camera. (silence) – I don’t want to focus in too much
because whenever I get really focused and paranoid,
that’s when I get scared. (silence)
– (slight grown) – I thought something
was gonna pop up. (buzzer) – (slight growl)
– What is that? – Oh, it’s the ghost. – (slight growl) – Oh, I’m getting stressed.
I’m worried. I’m worried. I’m worried. – (slight growl)
– Nope, nope, no thank you. I’m out. Bye!
(buzzer) – (growl becoming louder) – It sounds like someone belching. – Wait, what? That’s all? I thought something
was about to pop up. That wasn’t bad at all. ♪ (soft music) ♪ – (snorting) He’s just like, “What?” – (giggling) This is funny. – Fake alert! – This is not real, Sydney.
Do not be fooled by it. Use your brain. – (ghost shrieking)
– Oh, my god. I saw this coming. – (shrieking) OH, NO!
(buzzer) – Something’s gonna pop– (shrieking) Oh, my god!
(hyperventilating) That scared me!
(buzzer) – I told you there
was gonna be a jump scare in one of these
and that was sort of it. – I’m good with
the other previous stuff, but this is a whole
another level of creepy. – Oh, it’s another scene from It. – (Georgie) I lost it, Billie.
Don’t be mad. – The scariest place on earth,
the basement! – What is that?
Okay, you know what? Can I– can I just–
I might stop. (water splashing) – (Georgie) It just floated off. – I don’t like this movie.
I don’t like scary movies. – (Georgie) You’ll float too. – (Billie breathing shakily)
– (Georgie) You’ll float too! (giggling) You’ll float too! You’ll float too!
– (giggling anxiously) – (Georgie) You’ll float too!
– Oh, god. That’s– – (Georgie) You’ll float too!
You’ll float too! You’ll float too! – Oh, god! No! No! No!
(buzzer) – (Georgie) You’ll float too! – No, no. I looked away.
(buzzer) – I really don’t want to look.
I really don’t want to look. (moaning) I’m already scared.
I’m already acting scared. Like, why am I acting like
I’m not out already? (groaning) Why do you keep it going?! No, pass it.
(buzzer) – (Georgie) You’ll float too!
You’ll float too! – Okay, I made it. – Whoa, that was totally scary.
No, I’m fine. – (FBE) You did it! You won!
– Yay! – Woo. (gasping) I don’t know how to feel about this. – (FBE) So you got scared
at some of the videos. How do you feel you did overall? – I feel good!
I’m proud of myself. – (FBE) So, obviously,
this challenge did not go so great for you.
– Okay, I will admit it. It creeped me out like heck. – I did horrible.
I’m not even gonna lie. I did horrible. I am the biggest scaredy-cat ever. – Don’t do this at night. Don’t watch a thousand
scary movies in a row, and if you do, then kudos to you
because I’m never gonna do that in my life,
so (clapping)… – Thanks for watching
this episode of Kids React and shout-out to Kody Salazar. – Don’t be too scared! Make sure to hit the subscribe button. – Hey, guys, it’s Kacey. This is my last episode on Kids React. It’s been an incredible,
crazy journey, and I’m so glad that
I’m moving on to Teens React. I hope to see you guys there. Bye!

GoPro Fusion vs. SIX Top 360 Cameras- Best Overall Look?

GoPro Fusion vs. SIX Top 360 Cameras- Best Overall Look?


Hey guys welcome to the first of a
series of comparisons between 7 of the top 360 cameras of 2018 there’s so
much I could talk about with these cameras that it really is best that I
break it up into different episodes and focus on one specific thing per video in
this video I’m going to focus on the look what do the photos look like what
the videos look like how does the overall look of each camera compared to
the six others and which ultimately has the best most realistic and picturesque
look my name’s Ben by the way I’m the guy in the photo see the guy there yeah
that’s me nope not the guy in the background the
guy in the foreground yeah that guy so I want to start with photos and these
seven photos were taken on auto-exposure and these are taken straight out of the
camera no color correction has been done here is the natural look a lot of you
guys out there don’t include color correction as part of your workflow so
it’s important you’re able to choose a camera that has a good look straight out
of the camera so you can go straight from camera to social media I’m going to
put a link in the description to all 7 of these photos if you want to
download them and pixel peep them yourself you’re more than welcome to i’m
not displaying this as a 360 video because there’s just too many cameras
you need to be able to take a step back and look at all the nuances between the
7 cameras and from looking at it myself
it’s really really hard when it’s zoomed in so I’m gonna go through them 1 by
1 we’ll go from worst to best and we’re starting with the Yi 360 VR I’d
probably say it’s the worst of these photos look at the clearly overexposed a
bit however this was on auto exposure I’ve been experiencing a lot of
overexposure when using the Yi with both photo and video and it’s a completely
unreliable camera right now I’ve shot some okay images but this is not
something you can rely on just yet for photo with the VirB as you guys might
have seen in my review it’s an amazing 360 video camera not so good at photos
it’s looking quite flat and desaturated here and straight out of the camera this
is just not something you’d want to upload to your social media channels
next we have the Rylo and this is a camera that’s been much hyped about the
stabilization but not much else has been talked about looking at this photo here
it’s better than the previous photos however you’ll notice there’s a strong
orange cast over it almost like sepia and it is quite hard to color correct
I’ve noticed this with both photos and videos it’s just covered in orange and
don’t get me wrong I normally like orange in my photos
warm is always nice it makes the photo more inviting but here it just seems
kind of more brown the color of poo and that’s not the color that you want
people to associate to your photos look I’m sure they’re gonna fix this in the
future I’m just poking fun but at the moment it’s orangey Brown and that is
not a good color to have smeared all over your 360 photos next we have the
Theta V, Xiaomi Mi Sphere and Insta 360 One and they’re all doing a really good job
I’m not going to go into much detail here because I’ve already done a 20
minute in-depth photo comparison between these three check it out on my youtube
channel it’ll answer all of your questions but for now or say these are
really really good not perfect but extremely good next is the camera we’ve
all been waiting for it’s the GoPro Fusion look at this photo
it’s looking excellent all around I’m really really happy with this image the
dynamic range is good the sharpness is good I like the colors it’s pretty well
balanced when I uploaded these sample photos to the life–and 360 Facebook
page the GoPro Fusion was the most popular photo that I uploaded well it
was actually pretty close between the Fusion and the Mi Sphere those were by
far the two most popular photos of the photos you’ve just seen so straight out
of the camera I’m going to give first place the Fusion followed by the Mi
Sphere, Theta V comes in a close third Insta 360 one fourth Rylo fifth VirB
sixth Yi seventh but what happens when a master color corrector goes to work on
these 7 photos well they look exactly the same now I’m
just kidding but they do look a lot more similar don’t they I would say all of
these photos are now usable maybe other than the Yi but all six of the others
I’d be happy to post on my social media feeds so after color correction does the
order from before remain the same no it doesn’t firstly the Fusion Mi Sphere and
Theta V are still the best three images they have the best overall dynamic range
and this is exemplified by the highlight at the top of each image you can see it
captures the sky and the clouds harmoniously
there’s no overexposure there so good job to those three cameras the Theta V
is just a tad soft for it to move up the spot so it’s down to the Xiaomi and
the Fusion and they’re looking almost identical I can’t really pick these 2
apart so I’m going to award the Mi Sphere the number one place purely because it
has more resolution than me sphere is 6912 by 3456 whereas the fusion is only
5760 by 2880 good job Mi Sphere defying the odds yet again Theta V third
Insta 360 One fourth VirB fifth yes the VirB has gone up a place I’m noticing
significantly more detail in the VirBs image when you look at the opera house
and the detail in the sales it seems a bit blotchy on the Rylo whereas the VirB
it seems much crisper so VirB fifth Rylo sixth Yi seventh and you know what’s crazy the Yi image is actually super sharp it’s just the exposure that looks so bad this is
why I say it time and time again resolution isn’t everything you can have
all the resolution in the world but if your image is way overexposed then it’s
still unusable if we looked at these cameras purely in terms of resolution
the standings change just a little bit here are the numbers for both photo and
video no need to get your calculator out I’ve already done the maths combining
both photo and video the camera with the most amount of overall resolution is
[drumroll boom] the Yi 360 VR weighing in with 5.7 K video and 5.7 K photo
well-done Yi and although I say resolution doesn’t always matter in
terms of look it does matter a bit it’s not the number one factor but it is a
factor and the Yi has the highest out of the bunch perhaps it’s only redeeming
feature coming in second place for resolution we have a three-way tie
between the GoPro Fusion the Insta 360 One and the Xiaomi Mi Sphere yes that’s
right the Mi Sphere has been upgraded to 4k
recently and that brings it to the same combined overall resolution as the One
and the Fusion in third place we have the Rylo fourth is Garmin VirB and
bringing up the rear we have good old Faithful Theta V it’s great in lots of
areas but photo resolution isn’t really one of them taking it over to video now
and I was going for a walk and I found some dingy old bridge and I figured this
was the perfect lighting situation to test because you do have lots of shadows
and highlights in the same image and looking at these six here I’m seeing a
lot of the same things I talked about earlier with the photos.
-Hang on Mr. Benn did you say six there were seven cameras before what
happened to the the Yi 360 VR huh yeah about that unfortunately this footage
completely screwed up one big flaw of the camera right now is it locks in
exposure settings so each time we turn on your camera it will automatically
over expose even if you change the settings back and turn the camera off
it’ll over expose when your next turn the camera on so while I was sure this
was on auto exposure is still by default overexposed all the sample videos from
this point on making it unusable I will place more about the Yi in the future
but it would just be unfair of me to keep commenting on this camera when a
lot of these issues are going to be fixed eventually I think back to the
Harbour Bridge and all this footage is looking decent at first looking a little
closer some points of differentiation are the Theta V has the worst chromatic
aberration that means the purple bits around the palm tree there also the
Xiaomi is fringing a little bit the other four were doing pretty good in
this regard I noticed with both the Fusion and the One the top of the frame
is really bright it seems like their way of handling that extreme sun is to
overcompensate and make it too bright whereas all four others seem to get the
contrast just right if you haven’t gone into full screen yet I would suggest you
do so now because I want to talk about sharpness looking at the Harbour Bridge
the Fusion is clearly the sharpest of the six followed by the Theta V the rest
are quite hard to differentiate you could argue that any of the four is the
sharpest however I’ll say from personal experience that the Xiaomi and the VirB
have been better performers in terms of sharpness than the One and the Rylo the
One is absolutely not known for its sharpness most of the videos I’ve shot
with the One have ended up really soft when you zoom in even just a tad so I’m
gonna put the Mi Sphere and the VirB equal third the One fourth and Rylo goes fifth because of the limited colors it causes blotchiness you’ll see
that in the grass and just all over that image it’s looking blotchy like I said
don’t have you with all six images and really I’m just being picky here after
color correction this order doesn’t change Fusion one Theta V two Xiaomi and
VirB three with the One and the Rylo they’re actually much closer this time
you’ll notice that the Harbour Bridge is significantly sharper on the Rylo
whereas the grass in the foreground on the One
is sharper this tells me that the One is sharp at close distance and the Rylo is
sharp at far distance so I’ll give them equal fourth here we are at nighttime and
I tested the cameras for three things one how a subject looks to how a bright
light source looks and three how night time or darkness looks without
hesitation I’m instantly going to put One in last place because that extreme
noise is not good to look at and it’s not a camera you can use at night
without your footage being covered in a blanket of ugly grain the Rylo is not
great either it’s going straight into fifth with the remaining fall when we
look at the subject aka that big hairy ape do an Instagram live session the
Fusion comes first VirB second Theta V third and Mi Sphere fourth this one
was really obvious for me when you look at the sharpness around my face as well
as the sharpness of the tennis court at the bottom of frame looking at noise it
goes Fusion one Mi Sphere two Theta V three and VirB four these are all acceptable
levels of noise but there still is a big difference between the four finally with
the way they handled direct light sources again the Fusion wins Theta V
comes second Xiaomi comes third and look the Xiaomi and Theta V were really
close but I noticed a light source on the right-hand side of frame was seeping
its way in on the Mi Sphere whereas it wasn’t on the Theta V with the VirB you
can see all kinds of light distortions both lens flares and spots while it’s
decent it’s not as good as the other three so telling it up Fusion wins by a
country mile Theta V seconds Xiaomi third VirB fourth after color correction
there’s one change the VirB and the Xiaomi switch places the VirB as you guys
will know from my review is a camera that usually grades really well it’s
among the best cameras for color correction and I was able to bring it
back to life and help it overtake the Mi Sphere the Mi Sphere didn’t color
correct well at all and while it’s still acceptable the VirB clearly beats it
after color correction finally let’s see how they compare for stabilization and
the Theta V is looking pretty ordinary isn’t it yeah I wouldn’t really walk
around with this camera it’s not good for handheld shots no question it’s a
massive contender when you’re shooting video and the camera is stationary but
when it’s moving forget about it do not consider the Theta V if you like moving
around a lot with your 360 videos the Mi Sphere takes it to the next level and
you’ll notice this is much smoother it has six axis stabilization and it’s
doing a good job here the horizon is relatively stable however I still am
noticing micro shakes almost like there’s an earthquake not a big
earthquake but a small earthquake and while I’d happily use this footage if
this was a really long clip it would get irritating after a while I never thought
I’d say it but the Insta 360 One and Garmin VirB are surprisingly close they both
take it to the next level and this is almost gimbal like stabilization believe
it or not the One is actually doing a better job a camera half the price of
the VirB is looking silky smooth so much so that it draws attention to the
shakiness in the cloud area of the VirB video even a confused tourist bumping into me
does not faze the Insta 360 One Insta 360 have updated their firmware recently and
I can see they’re vastly improving their stabilization and I know for a fact
after the Rylo came out Insta 360 suddenly caught on and realized how good
stabilization could be so they’ve been upping their game really fast here’s the
order as I see it so far the question remained
who will take number one spot and who will take number two looking at the Rylo
and Fusion there they’re both looking worthy contenders of taking number one
spot and they are off [Ben talking super fast, describing a competition]
Rylo and Fusion Fusion and Rylo which camera will win
which will be smoother which be smoother Oooh Rylo is looking good Fusion is looking good I can’t really tell much
difference between them uh they’re looking pretty identical to me are
they’re basically mirror image Ooooh which one is gonna win I can’r tell, I cant tell. okay so clearly both these cameras
have outstanding stabilization no shake it all in the cloud area no shake on the
ground no shake on the horizon they’re both amazing cameras for sports and
action and moving the camera around a lot the only way to determine the winner
is to turn up the speed there we have it the Rylo is the winner
it’s noticeably smoother the Fusion does seem a little bit shaky especially in
the cloud area when sped up to 500% if you get excited by the idea of hyper
lapses which are moving time lapses and the Rylo was a camera that was made for
you so here we have the overall standings for stabilization for some
people this is going to make the world of difference if you’re into sports
documentary moving around a lot this factor alone could be what determines
you buying a camera or not if you consider yourself more of a photographer
and you couldn’t care less about moving around then this factor means Jack cool guys I hope this was helpful I know
I barely scratched the surface but I am planning on doing many more videos
comparing these cameras I’d be curious to know which was your winner these are
my thoughts but you might think I’m the entirely different leave a comment in
the box below and let me know here’s where you can find me on social media I
already have reviews of four of these seven cameras on my youtube channel so
go check them out and the remaining three are coming as soon as I can
possibly make them and by that I mean a few weeks until next time don’t forget
to capture your world in 360 this has been Ben Claremont and I will see you in
the next video

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV review summary by DPReview.com

Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 IV review summary by DPReview.com


Hi I’m Richard from DPRview and this is
the Sony RX100 IV, the latest in the company’s range of large sensor compact
cameras. Like its predecessor has a 24 to 70mm equivalent zoom. Usefully it has an F1.8 – 2.8 maximum aperture which makes it really useful in low light
despite its rather modest zoom range. But the big news for this latest model is
it’s fast sensor which allows features such as 4k video recording. The body is the same as the previous model’s meaning it’s small but perhaps a little
lacking in external controls. This is made worse by the limited control over the function of the dials however, the camera offers a lot of customization so it’s possible to tailor the function menu and several buttons to give quick
access to your favorite features. The faster sensor helps make the RX100 IV very responsive and also appears to significantly improve the autofocus
performance, both in terms of how decisive it feels, and how well it’ll focus in difficult, low-contrast conditions. Continuous autofocus is
surprisingly capable for a compact camera, too though don’t expect miracles:
general subject tracking can be somewhat inconsistent. On the other hand the camera’s EyeAF system, that attempts to track and focus on the subject eyes is
particularly impressive. The video is also significantly improved adding 4K capability and 1080p shooting at up to 120 frames per second. Together with very effective image
stabilisation you can get some compelling footage, and no line skipping
means it’s really detailed footage. There’s also a high frame rate mode that
shoots and up to 960 frames per second creating slow-mo video down as low as
1/40th of the original speed. The RX100 IV’s image quality isn’t significantly changed
compared to the Mark III The JPEGs feature more subtle noise reduction but other than that it’s pretty similar. This is no bad thing, though, since the RX100 series have the largest sensors available in a pocketable zoom compact. And the camera’s lens is consistently sharp across its whole zoom range, meaning you can use it to its full
capability. For us, the autofocus and in particular
the well-implemented Eye AF system, along with the video features, make the Mark IV a worthwhile upgrade over the Mark III though these capabilities do come at a cost. The user interface, for instance, is somewhat overwhelmed by the sheer number of features you might want access to. But, overall this is without doubt, the most capable compact ever made.

16-80mm Lens Review – Fujifilm

16-80mm Lens Review – Fujifilm


(soft, upbeat electronic music) (wind howling) (soft, upbeat electronic music) (electricity buzzing)
(upbeat rock music) – Welcome to Pal2tech. Today we are going to review the brand new Fujifilm 16 to 80 millimeter zoom lens. I’ve had this lens with
me nonstop for 11 days now in a variety of shooting
situations and locations. I’m gonna tell you what I think about it, the things I like and
the things I don’t like. Before we get into it,
I wanna let you know that this video is not sponsored. I didn’t get a prereleased
version of this lens sent to me for free. This is the final version of the lens, the one that’s released to
you and I and everyone else. Fujifilm has no idea
I’m making this video. I paid for this lens myself. I ordered it from Samy’s
Camera in Los Angeles, and I paid $887.54 for this lens. (soft electronic music) There’s been a lot of
anticipation building up to the release of this lens. Its official name is Fujinon
XF 16 to 80 millimeter f/4 R OIS WR. And I think it it sort of fills the gap between the 18 to 55 millimeter and the 16 to 55 millimeter. What you have here is a
16 to 80 millimeter zoom with a constant f/4 aperture throughout the entire focal range. The glass itself contains
16 elements in 12 groups, and man, looking at it, (chuckles) you could really
see that beautiful glass. You’re getting the equivalent
of a 24 to 120 millimeter range in full frame format. The aperture range on
this lens is f/4 to f/22 in 1/3 stops. The front thread on the
lens is 72 millimeters. Now that’s really cool. So if you have already
filters on the 50 to 140 that are already 72 millimeters, you can share them with this new lens, it’s awesome for that. Like other Fujinon lenses,
it comes with a standard plastic lens hood, but here’s
the thing that’s interesting: this lens hood right here
is actually different, almost a redesign and it’s much better than the prior lens hoods
that Fujifilm released. With other lens hoods, plastic ones, sometimes you have to, you know, turn ’em like that,
they’re a little bit rough. This one is loose, it’s like really loose when you put it on. Once you turn it and you
get it all the way over, it clicks into place. It’s a really nice, smooth
click, and it’s firm. I like the lens hood. I still wish it were
made out of metal though, but that’s another story. I did notice that the
aperture ring is pretty tight, maybe a bit too tight for my liking. But, you know what, I’d rather have than a very loose aperture ring. Same with the zoom ring. This thing is secure. It is not one of those zoom lenses that you turn it upside and it, you know, doing, comes falling out. It’s not gonna happen with
this lens, it’s pretty tight. It’s weather resistant, and
it’s sealed in 10 locations, and you can go shooting
outside in temperatures as low as 14 degrees Fahrenheit, or minus 10 Celsius. Interesting, there’s this weird
little drawer-looking thing right here that says Weather Resistant. I don’t know if you can see that. It’s funny because I didn’t see that on any other Fuji lens,
and it looks like something where you put your fingernail in it and pull out a drawer where you put a gel or, like, (chuckles)
a filter or something. It’s kinda cool. This lens features six stops
of image stabilization, and this makes it great in low light despite its f/4 aperture. Image stabilization was
incredible on this lens for both stills and video. Check this out, okay,
the video on the left is shot without OIS, and
the video on the right is shot with OIS. Have a look at that, look at that! That’s incredible, it
almost looks like the camera is bolted to a tripod, but
I was holding it like this. Unbelievable, really nicely done. Ah, I love it. Let’s look at a still photo now. Okay, so I shot this one,
handholding the camera, at f/4, zoomed all the
way in to 80 millimeters. And as you can see, at 1/30 of a second, you can see the fabric;
it’s nice, it’s clean, no problems there. Here is 1/15 of a second,
and you can still see kinda the details in the fabric. It’s sharp, it’s reasonably
sharp for 1/15 of a second, handheld, and I’m not
the best hand-holder. I’m, ah, I’m not that good, so I’m a really good test for this. And now moving down,
you’ve got 1/8 of a second. And okay, so it starts to get
a little bit fuzzy here at, but this is 1/8 of a second, and it’s still a nice,
usable picture, you know, if you were forced to use
1/8 of a second handheld. So again, wow! Now there’s one interesting
thing about OIS: there’s no OIS on or off
switch anywhere on the lens. It’s very minimalist. When the lens is attached to the camera and the camera’s on the tripod, the lens adjusts OIS automatically. Now you can turn off
OIS, but you need to go into the camera’s menu to do so. This lens weighs just about
one pound, or 440 grams. And it feels great on the camera. Size and weight-wise,
this lens is incredible. You’re getting f/4 all the
way from 16 to 80 millimeters in a lens that’s just a
bit heavier and bulkier than the kit 18 to 55 millimeter. And compared to the 16 to 55 millimeter, this lens is as light as a feather. It is a great travel lens. In fact, a few days ago, I
flew to Maryland with it, right on Southwest Airlines. This lens went through
security and in those bins and on and off the plane, and you know, bumping up against the aircraft
windows taking pictures. Now I wanted to kind of have this lens in a real on-the-go
travel-type of environment to see how it handled. And my conclusion is that,
in traveling with this lens, it nails everything that I’d ever want in a single lens for get-up-and-go
one-lens-only photography with a minimum of hassle. You know what? I can get some glue and
glue this on, right? And just (grunts) glue it on the camera, throw it in the backpack
and go around the world and pretty much get most
of the shots I’d want with the focal range offered by this lens and the beautiful background isolation. For sheer versatility
balanced with autofocus speed for lightweight travel zoom shots, this is a really good lens for that. (soft rock music) Now let’s talk about focus and zoom. It utilizes an external
telescopic zoom design. That’s unlike the 50 to 140 where the– (camera clicking)
everything’s inside. With this lens, if you’re
doing street photography and you need to be kinda discreet, well (chuckles) this just screams out, I have a lens, I have a lens! It’s a little bit, whoa okay. But that’s exactly the extra range you get on this lens versus the 18 to 55 that makes such a major
difference when out traveling or doing street photography. You really notice it when
you’re trying to take shots of things that you can’t
quite walk up and get to. One thing I didn’t care
for was the zoom ring’s ergonomics with shooting video. I found it to be a little
rough and jerky like when zooming in for video shots; a little tight for my taste. This lens has a minimum,
are you sitting down? Has a minimum focusing
distance of 1.4 inches, that’s 35 centimeters, over the entire zoom range. This was so nice, and I was very impressed with the background and the results I was able to get with
it at such a close range. Autofocus: fast, fast, fast; very fast and quiet. I give it a great score on that. It works very well in AF-C Zone mode, quickly switching with
a minimum of lag time. Now if you don’t know what AF-C Zone is, then please be sure to
watch my focus modes of the X-T3 video and
I’ll have a link below. But let’s get through the
remainder of this video first. (soft rock music) A zoom lens is always about compromise, and I try to keep that in
mind when testing this lens, particularly because
I also happened to own the incredible 16 to 55. Here’s what I found in a nutshell. Starting wide open at 16 millimeter f/4, we have nice contrast and
sharpness in the center, no problems there. As you move toward 80
millimeter, keeping f/4, the corners start to improve a bit until you hit 50 millimeters, at which point there’s
really kind of a nice sharpness across the entire frame. However, once you hit
80 millimeter at f/4, the corners, I think, are blurry and weak. Have a look, here it is at f/4, there’s the center at f/4, not bad. Look at the corner, not so
good, not so good there. Just for the heck of it, I
compared f/4 on this lens with f/4 on the on the kit
18 to 55 millimeter lens, both fully zoomed in;
let’s take a look at that. So the photo on the left
is the 16 to 80 millimeter, and the photo on the right
is the 18 to 55 millimeter. And as I zoom all the way in,
I do like the center for sure. The center is much nicer
at the maximum focal length on the 16 to 80. However, the corner, interestingly enough, not so good, not so good. I prefer the kit lens, quite honestly. The best and sharpest place for this lens is at 50 millimeter, f/5.6. No surprise, no doubt there, where you pretty much
have sharpness everywhere. I also compared center sharpness with both this lens and the 18 to
55 fully extended at f/4, and the 16 to 80 is definitely
shaper at the center at the focal range. So here you can see
the picture on the left is the 16 to 80, and
the picture on the right is the 18 to 55. Clearly, clearly, the
center, fully zoomed in on the 16 to 80 is sharper. And I actually prefer the background of the 18 to 55 millimeter kit lens, but they’re so similar,
and the color rendering is a little bit, in my
opinion, more noticeable on the 18 to 55. Here’s the background here fully zoomed in at 80 millimeter f/4. Here we are at f/8, and here we are at f/16. And as you can see, they
change, look at that. And so here, on f/4, you have these really nice, pleasing, fadey-type of dreamy swirls. As we go here, they become
more defined at f/8. And all the way at
f/16, I still found them to be very pleasing. I like the background on this lens a lot. Here’s a shot kinda
taken at mid focal range at about 42, maybe 43 millimeters. And as you can see, the
background is very, very pleasant. Look at that; here’s 65
millimeters at f/4, not bad. And you can clearly see the
circular patterns there. Here we are fully zoomed in at f/4. (chuckles) I love this shot. Fully zoomed in at f/4,
and as you can see, nice, I kinda like this. Here’s the thing: it really comes down to personal preference in a lot of ways. But for me, personally, I definitely think the background rendering
and subject isolation on this lens is wonderful. I didn’t have to time to test
much on studio portraits, but I did get a quick informal shots. And one thing I noticed
was that eye tracking, face-eye autodetect with this lens, I found, didn’t do quite as
good a job as the 18 to 55. Take a look at this. Here’s a shot, this was
all face-eye autodetect, and this is fully zoomed
in at f/4, 80 millimeters. And it just looks a little
bit on the soft side to me, almost like it didn’t
quite nail the focus there. Here though, it did get a little bit more. But then, this one here, I was surprised. I thought that I would get more keepers with face-eye autodetect on this lens. Now I didn’t have time to really get and dig into this further, so please take what I’m saying
about face-eye autodetect and this lens with a grain of salt. I’m gonna be testing it more, but something that I did want
to at least mention to you that I noticed on the lens, not a deal breaker at all, but yeah. (soft instrumental music) However, the other problem
is a big problem for me, and it has to do with shooting video. Let me explain the setup to you. I’m in video mode, I am holding
the camera just like this. I have this set to manual focus. Everything on the camera is set manually, there’s no automatic anything. I then zoomed all the way in, and I manually focused, till it was sharp. And then while I was shooting,
all I did was I zoomed out. Then I zoomed in again, then I zoomed out. And I did this test with
both OIS on and OIS off. I had the same results. Have a look at this. Here we are, clear, sharp. Now I’m pulling out, look at that. Did you see that, did you you see that? Look at that. See that, can you believe it? So it’s wobbling, there’s this
focus wobble issue going on. I thought, okay, well
maybe that’s just how it is in all lenses and I’m
going nuts or something. So I tested the same
setup with the kit lens, the 18 to 55. So I’m pulling back,
and look at that, see? Not bad, there it is, it’s not doing that focus zoom problem. There it is, it’s just going in and out, like you’d think a lens would do. Then I thought, okay,
maybe I have a bad lens. Maybe I have a lemon, or maybe it’s yellow and it tastes bitter, I don’t know, but there’s probably a bad copy
of the lens that I received. And I almost sent it
back to Samy’s Camera. I thought, “Hey, you guys, you
know, get me a better lens.” However, I have gone on and
visited other discussion boards, and I have seen other
YouTubers have the same issues to the point that I
believe they’re very real and they need to be addressed. (soft rock music) I had really high
expectations for this lens. Some YouTube reviewers gave it
a perfect 10 out of 10 score. But for the focal range, the size, the autofocusing capability,
it seemed too good to be true. And for the most part, it
lives up to most of that. It is a great lens, but compared
to the 18 to 55 kit lens, the question of whether or
not you should spend $900 for the 16 to 80 is a more
difficult one to answer. If you already own the 18 to 55, I don’t think you should
get this lens yet. While having f/4 through the
entire focal range is great, and as is the extra zoom, I’d say hold off, and
let’s see if these issues I mentioned can be fixed
in a firmware update. Video is becoming more and more of a tool used by professional photographers, and I cannot recommend this lens right now because of this video issue. Zooming in and out, you know, that’s a big part of making video. There’s no rush to go out today and get this lens right away. Listen, let the dust settle a bit and see how Fujifilm responds to this. See what the other users are experiencing, and also take a look at
the RAW sample images shot with this lens, you can find online, and check out the YouTube video reviews that will undoubtedly be
coming out in the week to come. (sighs) You know, while
I’m glad that I purchased this lens, it’s now
become more for the fact that I’ve been able to report out to you what I found with it than the
stellar quality of this lens. And to that end, I hope
that I’ve been able to help. Now YouTube does not allow
us to edit our videos once we publish them,
so everything I’ve said and shown here today to you
will be permanent forevermore. In fact, somebody might be
watching this video right now and have had this lens for
three years and love it. That being said, if
Fujifilm does address this with a firmware update
and fixes that video zoom wobble problem that I mentioned, or if, say, it turns out
that only two or three other people on planet Earth have noticed the issues that I’ve raised, then I promise you I will
do another update video and let you know this. We’re not done with this lens quite yet. And I will be following
up as well as continuing to monitor the reviews and
the latest updates for it. In the meantime, thank
you so much for watching. I have some of the RAW
files I shot with this lens as well as comparison
ones with the 18 to 55, available for you to
download in the links below. Please let me know what
you think of this lens and in the comments, and I
will see you again real soon in the next video. So long for now. The best and sharpest
place for this lens– – [Siri] I’m not sure I understand. – The best and sharpest place– (dreamy 70’s rock music)