How to Crop Images in Photoshop with the Crop Tool

How to Crop Images in Photoshop with the Crop Tool


Well hey everyone, Steve Patterson here
from PhotoshopEssentials com. In this video, I’ll show you how to crop images,
how to straighten images, and how to crop an image non-destructively with
Photoshop CC. We’ll start with the basics and learn how to crop images using the
Crop Tool. Then we’ll learn how to straighten an image with the Crop Tool.
And finally, we’ll look at a great feature first introduced in Photoshop
CS6 that lets you crop an image without losing any of the original pixels. We’ve
got a lot to cover so let’s get started! We’ll start with the basics. Here’s the
first image I’ll be using. I downloaded this one from Adobe Stock. To crop an
image in Photoshop, we use the Crop Tool. I’ll select it from the Toolbar. You can
also select the Crop Tool from your keyboard by pressing the letter C. As
soon as you select the Crop Tool, Photoshop places a cropping border
around the image. And if you’ve used the Crop Tool on a previous image, the border
will be set to that previous size. So before we go any further, let’s reset the
Crop Tool to its default settings. In the Options Bar, we see that I cropped my
last image as an 8 by 10. To clear the preview settings and restore the Crop
Tool to its defaults, right-click or Control-click on a Mac on the tool icon,
and then choose Reset Tool from the menu. This resets the aspect ratio to just
ratio and leaves the Width and Height boxes empty. The problem is that it
doesn’t reset the cropping border itself, which is still set to that previous 8 by
10 size. To reset the border, press the Esc key on your keyboard. Then, if you
can’t see the border, select a different tool from the Toolbar and then reselect
the Crop Tool. The cropping border now surrounds the entire image. Tf you look
around the border, you’ll see little handles. There’s one on the top, bottom,
left and right, and one in each corner. The easiest way to crop your image is to
click and drag the handles to reshape the border into any size you need, The
area inside the border is what you’ll be keeping, and the area outside it will be
cropped away. You can also click and drag inside the border to reposition the
image inside it. I’m going to cancel my crop so we can look at another way to
work. To cancel it, click the Cancel button in the
Options Bar. Instead of using the initial crop border that Photoshop places around
the image, you can also click anywhere inside the image and drag out your own
border. Then drag the handles to resize it, or click and drag inside the border
to reposition the image. To reset your crop rather than canceling out of it
completely, click the Reset button in the Options Bar. By default, Photoshop lets us
resize the crop border freely without caring about the aspect ratio. But if you
want to keep the original aspect ratio of your image, press and hold your Shift
key as you drag any of the corner handles. This locks the aspect ratio in
place. I’ll click the Reset button to reset my crop. If you want to resize the
border from its center, press and hold the Alt, or Option key on a Mac, as you
drag the handles. Again I’ll click the Reset button to
reset it. And to lock the aspect ratio and resize the border from its center,
hold Shift+Alt or Shift+Option on a Mac, as you drag the corner handles. So what
if there is a specific aspect ratio you need? Maybe you want to print the image
so that it fits within a certain frame size, like 5 by 7 or 8 by 10. In that case,
you can set the aspect ratio in the Options Bar. For standard aspect ratios
like 8 by 10, click the Aspect Ratio option and then
choose from a list of presets, like 1 to 1 for a square or 8 by 10, 4 by 6, and so
on. I’ll choose 8 by 10. Photoshop enters the aspect ratio into the Width and
Height boxes. It actually enters 4 by 5, which is the same as 8 by 10. And as soon
as I select it, my cropping boarder jumps to the 8 by 10 ratio. To swap the Width
and Height values, click the Swap icon, or the arrows, between them.This lets you
easily switch between portrait and landscape mode. If the aspect ratio you
need isn’t found in the presets, you can enter it manually. Let’s say I want to
crop my image as an 11 by 14, and I want it to be in landscape mode so that the
width is larger than the height. I would click inside the Width box and enter 14. And then I would press the Tab key on my keyboard to jump over to the Height and
I’d enter 11. Photoshop instantly resizes the crop border to the 11 by 14 ratio. I
can then resize the border by dragging the handles. Photoshop will automatically
lock the ratio as you drag, so there’s no need to hold Shift. But you can still
hold the Alt or Option key to resize the border from its center. If you know that
you’ll need to use the same aspect ratio again, you can save it as a custom preset.
Click the Aspect Ratio option in the Options Bar. And in the menu, choose New
Crop Preset. Give the preset a name. I’ll name mine “11 by 14 landscape”. Then click
OK to close the dialog box. The next time I need it, I can quickly
select it from the list. If you’ve entered a specific aspect ratio and want
to go back to resizing the crop border freely, clear the aspect ratio by
clicking the Clear button. You can then drag the handles independently. Well so far, we’ve been cropping to a
general aspect ratio or a general shape. But you can also use the Crop Tool to
crop your image to a specific size and resolution. To do that, open the Aspect
Ratio menu, and then choose “Width, Height and Resolution”. Well let’s say that
instead of cropping my image to an 11 by 14 aspect ratio, I want to crop it so
that it will print at a specific size of 11 by 14 inches. Since I want the width
to be larger than the height, I’ll click inside the Width field and I’ll enter 14.
But instead of just entering the number, I’ll also enter “in” for inches. Then I’ll
press the Tab key on my keyboard to jump to the Height field and I’ll enter “11
in” for the height. Notice that we now have a third box as well, and this is
where we enter a Resolution value. Since the industry standard resolution for
high quality printing is 300 pixels per inch, I’ll enter “300” into the box, and
I’ll make sure that the measurement type is set to pixels per inch.
With my settings entered, I’ll resize the crop border,
and then to crop the image, I’ll click the checkmark in the Options Bar. You can
also crop it by pressing Enter or Return on a Mac. Photoshop crops the image, and
if we check the size of the image by going up to the Image menu and choosing
the Image Size command, we see in the dialog box that Photoshop has cropped
the image to 14 by 11 inches at a resolution of 300 pixels per inch. We’ll
be learning all about image resizing in separate videos, so for now, I’ll click
Cancel to close the dialog box. To undo the crop, I’ll go up to the Edit menu and
I’ll choose Undo Crop. And this returns the image to its original size. Before we
move on to learning how to straighten an image, let’s look at one more handy
feature of the Crop Tool, and that’s the Crop Overlay. I’ll click on my image with
the Crop Tool to bring up the cropping border. And notice the 3 by 3 grid that
appears inside the border. This grid is known as the Rule of Thirds. The idea
with the Rule of Thirds is that you can create a more interesting composition by
placing your subject at or near one of the spots where the grid lines intersect.
While the Rule of Thirds overlay can be useful, it’s not the only one that’s
available to us. To view the others, click the Overlay icon in the Options Bar. Here
we can choose a different overlay, like Golden Ratio. The Golden Ratio is similar
to the Rule of Thirds but the intersection points are closer to the
center. Finally, one more way to crop your image is to just double-click inside the
crop border. And that’s the basics of how to crop an image with the Crop Tool.
Let’s look at a different image so we can learn how to straighten a photo.
Here’s an image I shot myself, and notice that the horizon line is crooked. To
straighten the image, I’ll select the Crop Tool from the Toolbar. And then in
the Options Bar, I’ll select the Straighten Tool. Look for something in
your image that should be straight, either vertically or horizontally. In my
case, it’s the horizon line. Click on one end with the Straighten Tool, keep your
mouse button held down, and drag over to the other end.
Photoshop draws a path between the two points, and it uses this path to set the
angle that the image will need to be rotated. Release your mouse button, and
Photoshop rotates the image to straighten it. And because rotating the
image added some transparent areas in the corners of the document, Photoshop
also resized the crop border to keep those transparent corners out of the
image. At this point, I can resize the crop border myself if I need to. And then
to accept it and crop the image, I’ll press Enter, or Return on a Mac. And
that’s how to straighten an image with the Crop Tool. And finally, let’s switch
over to a third image so we can look at a great feature in Photoshop that lets
us crop our images non-destructively. I downloaded this image from Adobe Stock.
Again I’ll select the Crop Tool from the Toolbar. In the Options Bar, I’ll choose
the 8 by 10 aspect ratio preset, and then I’ll resize my crop border by dragging
the top hand hold downward. To crop the image, I’ll press Enter, or Return on a
Mac. So far so good. But what if I decide at this point that
I want to change the crop? Maybe I want to change its orientation from portrait
to landscape. In that case, I’ll go up to the Options Bar and I’ll swap the aspect
ratio by clicking the Swap icon. Photoshop again places the crop border
around the image. I don’t want to be cropped in so close, so I’ll drag the
handles outward to bring back more of the image. But notice that when I release
my mouse button, Photoshop just fills the surrounding area with white. And that’s
because Photoshop deleted all of those surrounding pixels when I made my
original crop. It’s filling those missing areas with white because it’s using my
current Background color. And the reason that Photoshop deleted those cropped
pixels is because, if we look in the Options Bar, we see that the Delete
Cropped Pixels option is turned on, which it is by default. Let’s look at a better
way to work, one that’s not destructive. I’ll cancel the crop by clicking the
Cancel button in the Options Bar. And then I’ll revert the image back to its
original size by going up to the File menu and choosing Revert. I’ll swap the
aspect ratio back to portrait mode, and then I’ll drag the handles to resize the
border, just like I did before. Bbut this time, before I actually crop the image,
I’ll turn the Delete Cropped Pixels option off by deselecting it. Then I’ll
accept the crop by pressing Enter, or Return on a Mac. And so far everything
looks the same as it did before. But watch what happens if I try to resize
the crop. I’ll swap the aspect ratio back to landscape mode, and as soon as I do, we
see something very different. The entire image reappears as if it was never
cropped at all. And that’s because, when Delete Cropped Pixels is turned off,
Photoshop just hides the cropped area instead of deleting it. I’ll drag the
corner handles outward to resize the border to include more of the image. And
then with Delete Cropped Pixels still turned off, I’ll accept the crop by
pressing Enter, or Return on a Mac. Another benefit of cropping the image
non-destructively is that, since Photoshop is just hiding the cropped
area, we can actually move the image around to reposition it even after we’ve
cropped it. To do that, select the Move Tool from the Toolbar. And then click and
drag on the image to move it around inside the canvas until you’re happy
with the composition. And finally, if you’ve cropped your image with Delete
Cropped Pixels turned off and you’re still working in your Photoshop PSD file,
you can bring back the entire image at any time by going up to the Image menu
and choosing Reveal All. And there we have it! That’s how to crop images, how to
straighten images, and how to crop your photos non-destructively, in Photoshop! As
always, I hope you enjoyed this video. And if you did, please consider Liking it,
Sharing it and Subscribing to our channel. Visit our website, PhotoshopEssentials com, for more tutorials! Thanks for watching and I’ll see you
next time. I’m Steve Patterson from PhotoshopEssentials.com.

Match Image Size in Photoshop – Two Powerful Techniques That You (Probably) Don’t Know


In this tutorial I’m going to show you two
methods that you probably don’t know to match document sizes. Hey everyone, welcome to The Photoshop Training
Channel. My name is Jesus Ramirez and you can find
me on Instagram @JRfromPTC. In this Photoshop tutorial I’m going to show
you two methods that you probably don’t know to match document sizes. We’re going to use a method that uses the
Image Size and Canvas Size window, and the second method uses a Crop Tool. Don’t forget to tell me in the comments
down below if you knew these methods already. Okay, let’s get started. So we’re going to work with two documents. I have this document here and it’s a PSD
called large. And this document here is a PSD called small. This document is 1280×720. And this one here is 1920×1080. To make a document the same size as another
open document, go to the Image size or Canvas size dialogue boxes. So go into Image + Canvas Size, with the Canvas
size window open, go into Window, and at the very button of the drop down, you will see
the filenames of your currently open documents. I have two psd’s, large.psd and small.psd. Notice what happens when I select small.psd. The Width and Height will match this document,
1280×720. The same thing will happen if I go into Image
+ Image Size, with the Image Size window open, I’m going to go into Window and also select
small and you’ll see that the Width and Height will change to match the small.psd. I can press OK and the image will be resized
to match the size of the other open document. In the second method, I’m going to show
you how to use a Crop Tools Front Image feature so that you can take the dimensions of one
image and crop a second image to those same dimensions. And let me show you how it works. I’m going to go into this image and first,
I just want to make a selection so that you can see that this image is 1800 pixels wide
x 582 pixels tall. Then I’m going to go into a Crop Tool. And from this drop down, on the Options bar,
going to select Front Image. Then, I’m going to go into my first image
and notice that the crop tool is active and it has the dimensions of the previous image
up here in the Options bar. So if I adjust the crop and hit Enter / Return
on the Mac, I’m going to crop the image into those dimensions. If I make a selection, you’ll see that that
image is 1800 x 582 pixels. So no matter what I crop it will always be
that size. I’m going to undo that crop. I’m going to select the Crop Tool again
and the Front Image is still active, we can see the dimensions up here. And I’m just going to make a really small
crop, and you’ll see that the dimensions are about 300 pixels. But when I hit Enter / Return on the Mac to
commit the changes, Photoshop enlarges that crop to 1800 x 582 pixels. So no matter what we crop, it will always
be the same size as the Front Image that we set. And, again, let me know if these methods were
new to you. If you enjoyed this tutorial and you’re
new to The Photoshop Training Channel, then don’t forget to click on the subscribe button,
and also click on the bell to get notifications when new tutorials are published. If you’re already subscribed, you can also
click on that notification bell. And that’s it for this tutorial. I hope that these methods were new to you. If you have any comments or questions, leave
them down below. Thank you so much for watching and I will
talk to you again soon.

Desktop Publishing – Easy Cutout Images or Photos in Photoshop

Desktop Publishing – Easy Cutout Images or Photos in Photoshop


Okay! Welcome to a Photoshop cut-out
example.We’ll have a class that deals with this but for now I’m going to show
you a suggested method and this is probably my favorite and top method.
It’s the method I use on my YouTube channel for making the covers of my
thumbnails. This is one thumbnail that already exists and I was making a new
one so I thought I’d show you. The cutout that’s on the Left is kind
of a popular look for YouTube thumbnails this year and last, so it’s commonly used
very small. You can see when I make it a lot smaller it’s the fonts that matter
here but hey everyone wants to see a face so I have already taken a screen
cap just a plain old screen cap of a still image from my video any photo will
do you can see that I’ve got this arranged in layers so I’m clicking
through some of the layers to show you what’s on top and behind if you hide
things same as moving things you get an idea where things sit so my image had to
be on the very top level so we’re going to import a photo it’s placed embedded
so that it is a part of this file and not a linked image so it will become
part of this file entirely so I’m moving it up to the top after it’s being placed
and I’ve just placed it anywhere because we’re going to go in with a different
tool the pen tool and trace around it you don’t need to be any sort of artist
to do this having good vision or zooming in will help that’s for sure so you take
the pen tool and you click where you want to begin I find a beginning on the
right works for me after a couple cutouts you’ll develop techniques that
work for you if you hold down the shift key it doesn’t matter where you click
it’s gonna draw a straight line that is key to having a nice neat looking
finished product and depending on what magazine or newspaper you’re working on
they may require that so let’s just use the shift key to do the first one now on
subsequent clicks what we’re gonna do is click and drag so I click where I want
the next curve to be looking at the image you can sort of see
where all the little curves will be you click a new draw and drag along the
curve so where the curve changes you follow that trajectory on to the next
curve you saw me draw a little circle and
delete it commands that is your friend or command or control Z for undo it’s
very handy you can also use the arrow keys to adjust a spot if you don’t like
where you’ve clicked you can just tap the arrow key to the left or right to
move it around so I’m just clicking and dragging along the curves of the
shoulder and when you get to a corner you can click once and just continue on
so I’m clicking around the head I mean this looks gets tricky with curly hair
when you get into a spot if you ever a photo editor and you’re cutting out
curly hair you will wish everyone had this hairstyle this is exactly why I
have straight hair for cut outs right so I just click and drag down when I get to
this corner I’m going to just click once it will create a sharp turn the Bezier
curve this is what the pen tool is basically drawing as a Bezier curve you
can google that it was developed for making industrial designs of cars so you
can understand how these curves and sharp corners are really inherent in car
design not so much of people design but it does a really good job this is just
the first step in creating the selection for our cutout but the pen tool I find
is just one of the best techniques for getting a quick and easy cut out by
simply clicking and dragging along the line and you can try this with a pen or
like a tablet if you’d like and stylus I’m just using a mouse here and it’s
working just fine a stylus gives you a lot more control you can also hit the
caps lock key to give a crosshairs so there’s my cut out and what I’ve done
has gone into the paths layer so instead of layers you go into paths tab and it
shows you all the paths the pathname is automatically generated
as work path you can type in whatever path name you like but just double
clicking and hitting OK will automatically name it the next one in
series so this is the pen path what I want to do is make it a selection if you
click away you haven’t lost it it saves all these paths you can see all the
former paths different face shapes so we will right click and choose make
selection that this gives it what people call the marching ants or a selection
halo or a marquee and we’re going to refine this by and going to select will
find a mask of masks on select or whatever it is it depends on the
aversion of Creative Cloud or your old version of Adobe these are just some
different backgrounds I’m gonna look it on white because I typically bringing it
in on a light color if you need to do a cut out on a dark destination use dark
if you’re doing this cut out for green-screen
I suggest red but the white works fine the flow are the Oh what do we call this
here the feather will give you a fuzzy edge and so that hard edge or are really
bad feathered edge what we want is something like one or two it really just
gives enough of a haze so we can put it into a background and look a little more
realistic you guys shift the edge if you’ve done a
really bad job bring it in a little bit or if you’re dealing with something like
a like a light glare or someone has a colored light behind them you can easily
bring this in just a little bit or if you want to capture some of that
background because you bring it into a similar background you can do that we
didn’t okay job for this purpose here so I’ve only applied a little tiny bit of
everything a little goes a long way right so we just copied this by going to
add a copy or command C I prefer keyboard shortcuts all the time so
you’ve deselected this but since we’ve copied it we can just simply remove this
layer entirely you can hide it if you want to save it for later some people
save every step I’ve just gotten this down to a science so when we go to
paste this it’s just gonna paste the cutout that we’ve copied you can back up
and double check to see if you’ve missed anything here and see what key commands
I’ve used though if you’re following along this it’s pretty straightforward
you copied your selection you pasted it so now we’ve moved it we can change it
by doing command T or transform under the image transform or edit transform
and you can just resize that holding down shift will ensure that you don’t
make it any longer sort of skinny or fat or whatever so we’ve got this on a
particular layer if you were to move these layers around you could put it
under the text it depends on your application you’ve seen some magazines
where the cutout of the person goes over the name this is basically how they do
that or if you want some of the text overtop of the person it’s simply a
matter of moving what layers I mean that’s that’s a pretty good look that’s
an even better look I’m Shady Oh see ya later bye so anyway yeah this
is typically what I use for the YouTube thumbnails and it is as you’ve seen on
YouTube if you’ve ever been on YouTube you’ll see very similar kind of it’s
like this and of course people who put like a white outline you’ll learn that
eventually courses that’s pretty simple so we’re just saving it as a JPEG if you
click over to the right and pick up the name of another file it will take the
appendix as well so we’re just changing in format to the format we want and that
will automatically name your file dot jpg and that’s pretty much it looks very similar mm-hmm yep there we
are that is how we use a template basically to create very similar looking
images – so that’s cutouts and thank you very much for watching

Photoshop CC 3D Spaceship Orbiting the Earth Animation

Photoshop CC 3D Spaceship Orbiting the Earth Animation


Hello, this is Jeff at Magical Fruit Tuts. In this Photoshop CC tutorial I will show
you how to use Photoshop’s 3D features to create a video of a space ship revolving around
the Earth. The ship will be revolving in a different
direction than the Earth. Finally I will show you how to make the 3d
animation, loop friendly. This procedure will also work for other objects
such as a moon orbiting a planet. To begin, Open up the earth texture map image
in Photoshop the link is in the description area. Then choose 3D – New Mesh from Layer, Mesh
Preset, Sphere. Now to create a 16 by 9 ratio canvas, choose
file new and create a new canvas size 1920 by 1080 at 300 pixels per inch. Change the name from Untitled to ShipEarth. Click create. Now we will copy the earth object over to
the ShipEarth canvas. Select the Earth canvas to make it active. Drag the Earth layer onto the ShipEarth canvas,
then without letting go of the mouse, drag it back into the ShipEarth canvas. Next to center the Earth,press the hand tool
to leave 3d space then press control A to select everything. Press V to activate the move tool. Then in the Move tool settings select Align
vertical centers, then click align horizontal centers. De-Select the selection Close the Earth jpg file as you are done with
it. Rename the Background layer “Earth”
If you do not have the 3d panel or the properties panel showing. Turn them on using the windows menu. Choose windows-3d or windows – properties
as necessary To Create the Ship object I used a pre-made
model from Turbosquid, space-frigate-6 the link is in the description area. The link will bring you to the models page. Click the download button. You will need an account if you don’t already
have one. Its worth your time to set one up, as Turbosquid
is an excellent source for models. Many of them are free. Here’s a tip. If you are searching for free models, type
in what you are searching for in the search bar. Click the search icon. To find free spacecraft select the price criteria
and enter zero in the minimum price and zero in the maximum price. then press apply
you will then be taken to a page of all free spacecraft models. Also, if you are using the model in Photoshop. You should use a low poly model. Click the Poly Count category, then choose
the “Up to 10K” filter. I downloaded the space-frigate-6.rar file
which includes some materials for the ship. Uncompress the file and put all the files
in you working directory. Now to import the image choose 3d-New 3D layer
from file. Open the space-frigate-6 obj file. Press OK to accept
The ship will appear in front of the Earth object. to make things easier, rename the space-frigate
layer to “ship” also, rename the space-frigate-6 object in the 3d panel to Ship Object and
rename the associated material to Ship Mats At this point we will duplicate the ship to
provide a counter balance needed to adjust the access of rotation so it will be centered
inside the Earth. Choose the ship object in the layers panel
then right click and choose Duplicate layer. Name it “dummy”. Rename the Ship object to Dummy object
rename the Dummy material to dummy mats Select the Earth layer then in the 3D panel
rename Sphere to Earth Object and rename the associated materials to Earth
mats. Next we need to merge the 3d layers so they
can be worked with in the same 3d scene. In the layers panel select the Dummy layer,
then hold down command or control and select the Ship layer and the Earth layer. Then from the 3d menu, choose Merge 3d layers. All 3 objects will be centered in 3d space. So right now the ships are inside the earth. To make things easier to follow,
In the layers panel rename the newly merged object “Merged”. Next we will resize the ship. Set the current view to Top. Select the Ship Object. You can either hold down shift and use the
drag tool or use the Move on X-Axis control to move
the ship out to the left as demonstrated At this point we will scale the ship to the
size we want it to be in relation to the Earth. Use the Scale Uniformly control located near
the green axis of the ship and drag down as shown. Let go when satisfied. Then select the 3d scale tool and drag down
on an empty area of the scene to shrink the ship. Let go when you are satisfied. Check your dimensions for the ship object. I ended up with about 119.56, 34.58, and 126.16
Pixels in the 3rd column. Change your dimensions to agree with mine
The ship is quite big in relation the size of earth, however those space aliens are really
large aren’t they? While we are at it, to resize the Dummy ship,
select the dummy object,then in the Dummies Properties Dimensions, Change the values in
the 3rd column to those we just used for the ship object. i.e. 119.56,34.58, and 126.16 pixels. Now lets adjust the outer position of the
Ship and Dummy ship. It is important that we don’t move the earth
as it is centered in world space. Now to move the Ship object, choose the Ship
object. Choose the Slide icon to enable the slide
tool or use the move along x-axis and drag to the left as demonstrated
Choose the dimensions option in the properties panel and make note of the x value in the
first column this was minus 451.56 in this case. Now we want to move the Dummy the same distance
in the opposite direction. Select the Dummy object. In the Properties Dimensions area
change the x value to plus 451.56. The same value we used for the ship object
except Plus not Minus Now the Ship and the dummy ship are at equal
distances from earth and their axis of rotation will be at the center of the earth when we
group them later. Next to reorient the Ships position. Select the ship object in the 3D panel. In the properties panel coordinates change
the 2nd column y to 90 degrees. The front of the ship will now be facing the
direction it is moving. Next to texture the ship Turn off the eye
of the dummy object so we can see changes to the ship object better. Move to the Ship object (not the dummy object)
and the Ship Mats Material for the ship object in the 3d panel. Click the material icon next to the materials
to see the materials panel. Click the diffuse icon and select Replace
Texture. An Open File dialog appears –
If you don’t see your file at the browse location change the file type to all formats. then select the Space-frigate-6-color.png
file. To load the Specular Materials, Click the
specular icon then choose Load Texture, now choose the space-frigate-6-specular.png file. To load the Illumination Materials,
Click the Illumination icon then choose Load Texture
then choose the space-frigate-6-Illumination.png file. Finally to load the ship bump map, Click the
folder next to the bump maps settings then choose load texture. select the space-frigate-6-bump.gif Next we need to group the Ship Object and
the Dummy Object. Before you group save a backup of your work
so far. You may need to come back to this point to
resize or reorient something. In the 3D panel choose the Ship Object then
hold down command or control and select the Dummy object. Next, in the 3D menu choose Group Objects
A new group will be created named New Group. Select the dummy object. In the properties mesh panel check the Invisibility
check box, then uncheck the Catch Shadows and Cast shadows boxes. Next, to rotate the Earth. Choose Windows, Timeline to open up the timeline. then choose Create Video Timeline. To resize the viewport in order to have more
space available for the timeline. Click the zoom out icon 2 or 3 times to shorten
the timeline view. Then drag out the timeline to expand it to
16 seconds. While you are at it, click the timeline settings
control and make sure “Enable Timeline Shortcuts” is enabled. If not check it. Expand the timeline panel to get more room. Next we will animate the Earth’s rotation
Go to Current View and choose the top view. Twirl down the Merged Objects. Then twirl down the 3D meshes. In the 3d panel, select the Earth Object. Place the Playhead at the beginning of the
track. Select the Earth Object stopwatch. A yellow keyframe will appear. Choose the the coordinates icon in the properties
panel Notice that the middle column degrees is 0,0,0
that is our start position Now drag the playhead to the 4 second position
then choose the coordinates again in the properties panel
Change the Y degrees to minus 90 (so the middle degrees column will now be 0, minus 90, 0)
Remember to press Enter after every change in a dimensions column Now drag the playhead to the 8 second postion
then choose the coordinates again in the properties panel
Change all degrees in the degrees column to zero
Then change them to -180, 0, -180, if you end up with +180,0,+180 that’s ok too Now drag the playhead to the 12 second position
then choose the coordinates again in the properties panel
First change them to 0,0,0 Then change to 0, 90, 0 move the playhead to the end position
The track time indicator should be at 15 seconds and 29 frames. choose the coordinates icon in the properties
panel Change the middle degrees from 90 degrees
to 1 degree press enter then change it to 0 degrees Press Enter again
The ending position should be 0,0,0 (the same as the beginning, that way loops will be almost
smooth. More on this later. Go back to current view. Then press Home to go to the beginning of
the track. Press the space key to run the animation. I’ve sped this up a little to save time. The earth should appear to be spinning clock-wise
all through the animation Move the playhead to the beginning of the
timeline. Once you have the Earth animation working
correctly, I recommend that you make another backup, so you don’t have to redo your work
if you have problems with the ship animation If you have opened the project from a backup,
The grid settings are still there. You need to turn back on the Earth stopwatch
if it is not on to see the keyframes. Next we will animate the ship’s rotation around
the Earth Turn back on the eye of the dummy object. Even though it is still invisible, you may
see a ghost ship for a while. It will go away later. Go to Current View and choose the top view. select the dimensions icon to view the coordinates. Now select the New Group which is the Ship
Group Place the Playhead at the beginning of the
track.(press the Home Key) Select the New Group stopwatch
A yellow keyframe will appear across from the New Group. Notice that the middle column degrees is 0,0,0
that is our start position Now move the playhead to the 4 second position
In the 2nd column change the Y degrees to 90 and press enter. a keyframe should appear below the 4 second
mark across from New Group Press the left triangle icon alongside the
New Group Stopwatch this will bring you to the previous keyframe
(i.e. the Beginning keyframe)) Now press the right triangle icon alongside
the Group stopwatch to go back to the 4 second keyframe. Nothing has changed as the 4 second keyframe
is still at 0,90,0 Now drag the playhead to the 8 second position
In the 2nd column, first press the reset coordinates icon which will change all the values to zero. Then change the x,y,and z degree values to
180,0,180. They probably will change to minus 180, zero,
and minus 180 that’s ok. Press the left triangle icon alongside the
New Group Stopwatch this will bring you to the previous keyframe (i.e. the 4 second keyframe)
Now select the right triangle icon alongside the Group stopwatch to go back to the 8 second
keyframe. If it is not -180,0,-180, change it so it
is. Enter 180 in the x and z degrees. If you change it go back and forth to the
previous gridmark to make sure the change took. Photoshop may be confused because you are
using 180 degree angles while moving in counter-clockwise direction. When you go back to previous frames, Photoshop
may have changed them by a few tenths of a degree – for example 90 degrees may have been
changed to 89.9 degree ; that’s OK. Now drag the playhead to the 12 second position
In the 2nd column, first press the reset coordinates icon, which will change all the values to
zero. Then change the x,y,and z degree values to
0,-90,0 respectively. Now go back to the 8 second keyframe. Then move forward to the 12 second keyframe. Its 90 degrees not minus 90, so change the
middle y degrees to minus 90 degrees. Finally press the End key to go to the end
position In the 2nd column, press the reset coordinates
icon which will change all the values to zero. Now move back to the 12 second keyframe. Then move forward to the end keyframe. If it is not still 0,0,0 change it so it is. Now check all the keyframes starting at the
ending and working backword using the left triangle icon. Just to make sure everything is as it should
be. To check the rotation,
press home to go to the track beginning then press space to see that the ship is rotating
counter-clockwise around the Earth. Now to see it from a front perspective
Go back to current view. Change the view to Front. Toggle on the Perspective view. From this view the scene appears too small,
We want the Earth’s to diameter to be about half the height of the screen,
to fix, change by setting the FOV to about 54. click the hand tool to go back to normal space
Adjust the timeline panel for more space Zoom in to see better. Then press Home to go to the beginning of
the track. Press the space key to run the animation. I’ve sped this up a little to save time. The ship should appear to be orbiting counter-clockwise
around the Earth from a front view perspective. Next to add the starfield background. You can use the static Starfield image. A link is in the description area. Zoom out some to see the entire canvas. Press Home to move the playhead to the beginning. On the Merged layer, press the little up arrow
to hide the detail. Move to the Background Layer. Place embed the starfield background
Hold Down Alt or Option and Shift and drag on the corner of the Starfield to expand it
to cover the entire canvas as demonstrated. Press enter or the big checkmark to accept. Delete the Background layer as we no longer
need it. The Starfield will be placed at the bottom
of the timeline. Twirl up the Merged track to see things better. drag Starfield Track the end so it lines up
with the end of the Merged clips above it. Zoom back in on the canvas to see it better. then press the spacebar to see the animation
I’ve sped this up to save time. Finally a few more tweaks before rendering. We will adjust the lighting a bit. Make the Merged layer active. Choose Infinite light from the 3d panel. Change the light intensity to 93% and shadow
softness to 40% Click the Dimensions icon
To set Infinite Light to the same angles as mine
Enter 21.5, 30.4, and minus 45 in the middle degrees column. To rough up the earth texture a bit. Select the Earth object’s materials
change Roughness to 20% and Bump to 50%. Choose the Ship object. In the mesh properties turn off cast shadows. Also chose the Ship Object’s Ship Mats
then change Shine to 30%, Bump setting to 50%
and Reflection to 20% Finally we are ready to render the video. First, in order to determine a strategy to
make the video loop friendly, we will examine the tracks in terms of frames
To see current frame number Alt or Option Click the track time indicator. It should turn into a frame indicator. the indicator shows it is frame number 479. Choose the Earth Object in the 3d panel. In the properties panel, you will see that
the all the degrees settings in the degrees column are 0,0,0. Now choose the New Group object. In the properties panel, you will also see
that the all the degrees settings are 0,0,0. We already know all our starting degrees for
both tracks are 0,0,0. So what will happen if we loop these tracks,
is that the animation will seem to pause at the end before looping back to the beginning. As both the beginning and the end are set
to 0,0,0 degrees. The solution is to Not render the last frame
or to remove the last frame. To remove the last frame on both tracks,
press the left arrow key or the “move to previous frame” button, once to move the playhead to
frame 478. Now in the timeline settings choose move and
trim, trim end at playhead. Move to the Starfield Layer
in the timeline settings choose move and trim, trim end at playhead. The last frame has been removed from both
tracks. Finally, to make things more interesting
we will use the orbit tool to tilt the view so it appears to be looking slightly downward
onto the ship. Choose the Merged layer. Go back to the current view. If necessary, choose the move tool to open
3d space. Use the orbit tool to slightly tilt the view,
as demonstrated. Now, to render the animation, press the render
button. In the range area choose all frames
In the select folder area I usually use the working directory where my project files are
located. Here are the settings I used for this project. Press the render button to render. I’ve sped the video up to save time. It took about 30 seconds to render the video. Here is the resulting video. It should be noted that, if you are interested
in looping the animation, and you use other applications such as Windows
Media Player or Quicktime to view the track looped, you may get loop stutters. Your video is probably ok, and should work
well by placing the clip in a video editor program like Adobe Premier,IMovie,or VideoStudioPro
and then duplicating the track and placing it immediately after the original. Of course if you know beforehand how many
loops you want, you can duplicate the track on the Photoshop timeline before rendering. Shorten the track view with the zoom out icon
control. duplicate the merged layer. A merged copy track will appear as the top
track now drag the original Merged track up behind
the Merged copy track. Then lengthen the Starfield track to the same
clip length as the others. You now have a clip that will loop twice and
will be twice as long. This concludes the tutorial
I hope you’ve enjoyed it. render to end frame 478 one less than..
#################################################### ? soften shadow of ship on earth.Under infinite
light drag soften slider to 35% ? how to cut to a 16/9 size video *DONE*
? Procedure for loop ? Levels adjustment or others. ? layers – video layers – duplicate frame,
delete frame etc.. ? add haze to starfield? ? check turbosquid model to see if available
somewhere where dont have to sign in also check for alternative sound file free
link

Make a 3D CHROME TEXT Effect and Turn It Into a Rotating ANIMATED GIF – Photoshop Tutorial

Make a 3D CHROME TEXT Effect and Turn It Into a Rotating ANIMATED GIF – Photoshop Tutorial


In this Photoshop tutorial I’m going to
show you how to create a 3D Chrome Text Effect and how to make it into a rotating animated
GIF. Hey everyone, welcome to the Photoshop Training
Channel. My name is Jesus Ramirez and you can find
me on Instagram @JRfromPTC. In this tutorial I’m going to show you how
to easily create a 3D text chrome effect using Photoshop’s 3D features. Which means that you’ll only need at least
Photoshop CS6 Extended to follow along with this tutorial. And stick around to the end of the video because
I will also show you how to use Photoshop’s timeline to animate the text and export it
as an animated GIF. Okay, let’s get started. I’m working with a document, it’s 1920×1080. And the first thing that I’m going to do
is create a New Solid Color and this is going to be a dark grey. I’m going to press OK. You don’t have to delete the Layer Mask. But I’m going to, I just don’t like having
it there if I’m not going to need it. I’m going to click on the Background and
drag it into the trash icon to delete it. Next, I’m going to click on the Horizontal
Type Tool and I’m just going to type PTC and you can type whatever you like. I’m going to use a font called Proxima Nova
and use the Light version of it. And I’m just going to type PTC and I’m
using black as my text color. Then I’m going to click on the 3D icon to
create a 3D layer from this text. And I’m just going to click and drag on
this Orbit Camera Tool just to see the text, there it is. If I hover over the center cube, when it turns
yellow, I can click and drag and scale uniformly. And in the Properties Panel, under Coordinates,
I can click on Move to Ground. What I’m going to do now is rotate it 90°
in the X axis. So I’m going to type in 90, hit Enter. And I have my 3D text selected here in the
3D Panel and I’m going to click on this icon here, which is the Mesh. And there are shape presets that I can use. I’m going to click on the 5th one, which
is this one, right here. Then I’m going to into my Current View and
select Front, so I can see the front of the text. I’m going to click on the text. Hover over the cube, in the blue handle which
is the Scale Along Z axis, click and drag to scale it down. I don’t want it to be very thick at all,
maybe something like that. Also, when I rotate it in the Y axis, I don’t
want it hitting the ground plane. So I’m going to make sure that I’m in
90° and then push it up. So I’m going to go to Coordinates, type
in 90° here. Then hover over the red point, when it turns
yellow, click and drag up and just make sure it’s above the ground plane. Because the ground plane catches shadows and
when this is rotating I don’t want it to go into the ground plane. It will just look weird. Then I’m going to go back into the Properties
Panel and change the Z rotation to 0. So now when it rotates it won’t hit the
ground plane. Then I’m going to go into the Current View,
click on the Camera icon and select Top. Also, make sure you’re looking at this in
Perspective View, not Orthographic. You can see the shadow there on the ground
plane. What I’m going to do now is click on the
Infinite Light and click and drag on this handle to place the light right there, right
in the center. I’m also going to increase the Softness
so that we have a soft shadow. Now it’s time to work on the chrome effect. So I’m going to click on Environment and
under IBL, Image Base Light, I’m going to select New Texture and just press OK. Now that we’ve created our New IBL, Image
Base Light, I’m going to click on this icon and select Edit Texture. Then, I’m going to press Ctrl I/ Command
I on the Mac to Invert. I’m going to go into Layers Panel, Create
a New Layer, select the Rectangular Marquee Tool, make white, my Foreground color. And I’m going to start making rectangles
of different widths and lengths and fill that with white. Alt backspace/Option Delete on the Mac to
fill with the Foreground color and this is going to create the lighting in my scene. Then I’m going to Deselect by pressing Ctrl
D/Command D. I’m going to switch over into the Elliptical Marquee Tool and I’m going
to click and drag while holding Shift to create a perfect circle. I can move it around and place it accordingly. Then I’m going to fill with the Foreground,
which is white. So I’m going to press Alt Backspace/ Option
Backspace on the Mac. I’m going to right click on the selection,
select Transform Selection. Hold Shift Alt/ Shift Option on the Mac and
scale that selection down. Then hit Enter/Return and hit the Backspace
key/ Delete key on the Mac and now we have this white ring. I’m going to press Ctrl D/Command D to Deselect. And I’m going to make just a few more rectangular
marquee selections and fill them with white. Alt Backspace is how you fill with the Foreground
color once again. And I’m just making all these random shapes
so your shapes could look different, it really doesn’t matter. I’m going to close this tab, Tap Yes to
Save, then press OK. And you’ll notice the effect here. We can actually start seeing some of the chrome
effect. But we got to enhance it. So I’m going to double click on this 3D
layer to go into the 3D Panel, then I can select the top Material, hold Shift and click
on the bottom most Material then increase the Reflection pretty high. And you can see the reflection we have here. I can click on the Move Tool and we can click
and orbit around the text so that we could see what it looks like and it’s looking
pretty good. I’m going to go back into the Top View. And once again, make sure that we’re on
Perspective, not Orthographic. At this point we’re going to leave the text
as is, we can come in and adjust it later. Let’s now work on the animation so that
we can see what it’s looking like and then we can make better refinements. So I’m going to go into Window + Timeline. Then I’m going to click on Create Video
Timeline. If you don’t see it, click on this icon
and make sure that Create Video Timeline is checked. And we have these video layers. I’m going to click an arrow for this layer
that reads PTC which is my text. And if you type something else, the video
layers will be named something else, of course. I’m going to select 3D Meshes and click
on the stopwatch to create the first key frame. And I’m going to go into the very end of
this animation. Then I’m going to select my 3D Text from
the 3D Panel, click on Coordinates and under the Z axis, I’m going to type in the number
that gives me a full circle. Of course, 360 will be a full circle but if
we enter that, it’s going to go back to 0 because it didn’t really move. So we got to go one step backward and that
would be 359. But Photoshop is going to read it as -1, so
once I hit Enter, it would turn it into -1° and that’s okay. Now if you scroll through the Timeline, your
animation may start or it may not. In my case, it doesn’t. So what I need to do is go right into the
middle of the animation and force it to start spinning. And I’m going to do that by entering a different
number. So I’m going to go in here and just type
in 180 which is flipping the 3D text halfway. Now, if I scroll through the Timeline you
can see that our text is, in fact, spinning. I can click Play and that’s my text spinning. So now I can come back and refine the text. So I’m going to just move this down so I
could see it better. And with that PTC selected, that 3D layer,
I’m going to go into the Caps which is this icon here and I’m going to increase the
Width, Angle and maybe change the Contour to something else. I just want it to really pop. So for now that’s looks pretty good. And I’m going to hit the Play button once
again just so that we can see what it looks like. And I think that looks good. What I’m going to do now is zoom out just
so that we can see our canvas and the Background is looking a little boring. So I’m just going to add a little more interest
to it by double clicking on the Color Fill Layer, selecting Pattern Overlay and just
selecting any pattern that I think adds to the background. I have Multiply as my Blending Mode and I
can adjust the Opacity accordingly. And like I said, it really doesn’t matter
which one you use as long as it doesn’t look boring. So I’m going to use this one here. And by the way, I’m using the Artist Surfaces,
so I’m just going to press OK to replace it and I’m using this one here, which is
the 5th one from the left on the first row. Then I’m going to press OK. And now we have a background which is just
a little more interesting, it’s not a flat color and I think that looks a little better. If you hit the Play button, the text won’t
spin and that’s because we have Color Fill selected. But if we go back and select PTC here and
click the Play button, it will start spinning again. So I’m just giving you a heads up in case
you tap on the Play button and nothing happens. At this point I think we’re ready to export
this graphic. You can do it two ways, you can go into the
Render Video and render out of video. You have the Render Quality Options here. If you choose something like Ray Trace Final,
it will give you a high quality result but it may take you a really long time to render. So one of the easiest things to do is go into
File + Export + Save for Web (Legacy) and instead Export an animated GIF. I’m going to resize it, I think 1920 will
be huge for a GIF, so I’m going to type in 500 and that’s the size there. I’m viewing it at 100% so that’s what
it would look like. I can then click on this dropdown and select
GIF, it’s going to take a second. Photoshop is going to load it on to the Save
Web dialogue box. So we’ll give it a few seconds here while
it loads, and there it is. Looping Options, change that to Forever, then
hit the Play button and you’ll see your animated GIF. And that’s what it would look like. And I think it looks pretty good. We have clear reflections. There’s a shadow there in the background
that it’s barely noticeable but I like that. I don’t like my shadow to be too strong. And I think we’re ready to save so then
we just click on this Save button and save this animated GIF on to our Desktop. By the way, if this is your first time at
the Photoshop Training Channel, don’t forget to subscribe and to click on that bell to
get notifications when a new Photoshop tutorial comes out. If you’re already subscribed then click
on that bell now if you have it. And that’s it for this tutorial. I hope that these techniques were new to you. Let me know on the comments below if you would
like to see more 3D and animations tutorials. Thank you so much for watching and I will
talk to you again very soon.

How To Make an Anaglyph 3D Image in Photoshop That Really Works!

How To Make an Anaglyph 3D Image in Photoshop That Really Works!


Hello
everyone this is Chris from Spoon Graphics back with another video tutorial for Adobe
Photoshop. Today we’re going to have some fun creating
a retro 3D effect that really works. If you cast your mind back to the 3D movies, comics
and posters from your childhood, you’ll remember those comedic glasses with red and blue lenses
that bring the effect to life. Stereoscopy is the scientific term behind how these images
work. By overlapping two images using the red and blue channels, it produces an anaglyph
3D image that jumps out from the screen when viewed with colour filtered specs. But before we get started, a big thank you
to Envato Elements for sponsoring this video… In order to follow along with today’s tutorial
and to actually see the result, you’re going to need a pair of red and blue 3D glasses
yourself. You can pick up these cardboard framed 3D glasses from eBay pretty cheap. By the way, if you like the tash I’m currently
rocking for Movember, give this video a thumbs up and I’ll match the number of likes in a
donation to Prostate Cancer UK at the end of the month. In this tutorial I’ll show you two techniques
you can use to create your anaglyph 3D image. The first method uses two separate images
taken from offset cameras, the second is a Photoshop process that allows you to manually
create the effect from a single image. The first technique for creating a retro anaglyph
3D image is to use a stereo pair of photographs. These pictures are produced by 2 cameras strapped
together at a set distance apart, or a single camera moved sideways on a tripod. What you
get is two images from different angles, much like how our eyes work to perceive depth.
If you focus on something, then close one eye, you’ll see the scene appears to shift. You can find some ready-made stereo pairs
like this picture of “A scene of Verona, Italy” from Shutterstock, or produce your own by
capturing two offset photographs. The images in this stereo pair picture are
merged into one file. Turn on Snap from the View menu to place a guide in the centre,
then make a selection of the first image with the marquee tool. Press CMD, or CTRL on Windows, and X to Cut,
then use the Crop tool to trim the canvas down to size. Press CMD+V to Paste the two
images one on top of the other. If you toggle the layer on and off you can
see the difference in the angle of the shot. Rename the layers to Left and Right. Double click the Left layer to begin converting
the image into a 3D anaglyph. Uncheck the Red channel, then click ok. Double click the Right layer and uncheck both
the Green and Blue channels. Now it’s time to put on your 3D specs to immediately
see the effect come to life. These things aren’t exactly an every day fashion
accessory so hardly anyone watching this video for the first time will be able to see the
result, so be sure to order yourself some glasses and watch again soon! While wearing your specs, you can make some
minor tweaks to fix any double vision, or alter the focal point. Turn off Snap under
the View menu to give finer control. Press CMD+T to Transform then move the image
horizontally to find the spot where a certain part of the two images perfectly aligns. Once you’ve done so, there will be a strip
along the edge which will need Cropping out. The second technique allows you to produce
the 3D effect from just a single image. In order to create the offset version that makes
the 3D effect work, we’ll use the Displace filter to shift the image in our manually
defined areas. Choose an image with a scene full of elements
in both the foreground and background. Simple landscapes are great because the layers of
mountains are easy to trace. Create a new layer and select the Lasso, or
Pen tool. We’ll need to trace around all the elements of the scene according to their depth. The boat is the closest object in this photo,
so trace around its outline. Fill the selection with white by pressing the CMD+Backspace shortcut.
All subsequent objects will be filled with darker and darker shades until the parts of
the image in the far distance are filled with black. Activate the background layer and create a
new layer above it, and below the white filled layer. The next portion of this scene which is slightly
further away is the lake. Make a selection with the lasso tool. Edit the foreground colour and move the picker
downwards slightly to a light grey. Press ALT+Backspace to fill the selection with this
foreground colour. It’s also possible to make the depth gradually
change by applying a gradual change in shade. Select the Burn tool and set the Range to
Highlights at 50% and set the brush to a soft tip. Paint across the upper part of the lake’s
grey layer to change the fill from light to dark as it recedes into the distance. Create another new layer at the bottom of
the layer stack and draw a selection around the hills in the midground. Fill this selection
with a grey that’s slightly darker than the darkest grey in the lake’s gradient. The forest on the opposite side can be quickly
selected with the Magic Wand tool. Since this part of the scene is also in the midground,
fill the selection with the same shade of grey. Continue adding a new layer at the bottom
of the stack and make a selection of the next elements in the distance. Make the fill darker
each time in the colour picker. Finally the farthest part of the scene is
the sky that remains in the background. Fill this area with pure black to complete the
depth map. Use the shortcuts CMD+A to Select All, then
go to Edit>Copy Merged. Click the top layer, then paste in the merged copy of all the grayscale
layers. To make the displacement map smoothly distort
the image, add a gaussian blur filter of around 10px. Go to File>Save As and save a copy of this
grayscale file as a PSD with a recognisable name. All the grayscale layers can now be grouped
and hidden as they’re no longer required. To apply the depth map, begin by making a
duplicate of the image by dragging it onto the new layer icon. Next, go to Filter>Distort>Displace. In
the settings remove any Vertical Scaling so the image is only distorted horizontally.
Click OK and locate the recently saved PSD file. Toggle off the layer to see the slight differences
between the two layers, just like the stereo pair of images that were sourced from two
camera shots, the elements within this picture are now offset. Rename the layers to Left and Right, then
double click them to alter the channels settings. Disable the Red channel on the Left layer,
and disable the Green and Blue channels on the Right layer. Pop on your 3D glasses again to see the result.
Once again the top image can be nudged horizontally to help eliminate any double vision you might
be experiencing. The lighter the grey of the depth map, the
less the image is offset, whereas the darker areas are offset the most, which makes them
recede and appear far away within the 3D effect. As a final touch, you can make the image black
and white to give it more of a retro 3D anaglyph appearance as seen on old comics and posters.
With each layer selected in turn, go to Image>Adjustment>Desaturate. The final result is a magical 3D effect that
really works, as long as you have a pair of retro 3D specs. I used to have these kinds
of anaglyph dinosaur posters all over my wall as a kid, so it’s great fun being able to
reproduce the effect myself all these years later. If you enjoyed this video, be sure to subscribe
to the Spoon Graphics YouTube Channel to be the first to see my upcoming content. Head
over to my Spoon Graphics website to grab yourself some free goodies, otherwise thank
you very much for watching, and I’ll see you in the next one.

How to Remove Text from Image in Adobe Photoshop CC 2020


Today we learn how to remove text from image in Adobe photoshop cc 2020 Click to “Magic Wind Tool” Select every letter with “Magic Wind Selection” Tool Click to “Expand”. Adobe Photoshop CC 2020 Tutorials. Click to Fill or use SHIFT + F5 short code Contents should be “Content-Aware” Adobe Photoshop CC 2020 Tutorials watch only us Adobe Photoshop CC 2020 Tutorials you can find only us Adobe Photoshop CC 2020. How to remove text from an image Text is Black Color. We can use color range selection method. Adobe Photoshop CC 2020 Tutorials. Subscribe to our channel Adobe Photoshop CC 2020 Adobe Photoshop CC 2020 Tutorials Adobe Photoshop CC 2020 Tuts Adobe Photoshop CC 2020 Tutorials Deselect

Photoshop Tutorial: Steal the Color & Tone of an Image with Match Color  -HD-

Photoshop Tutorial: Steal the Color & Tone of an Image with Match Color -HD-


Hello and welcome back to another Photoshop
tutorial. Today I’m going to be showing you how you
can steal the color and tone of one image, and use it on another. So here I have two images that have a drastically
different color tone and feel. So what if we wanted this first image of this
path to look a lot more like the color and tone of the second image of the barn? Now your initial thought might be to spend
a decent chunk of time with a few different adjustment layers, or you could go ahead and
start by trying out the match color adjustment, which is what we’re going to be doing today. So I’m just going to flip back over to the
first image here, and then go up to “Image”, down to “Adjustments”, and then down to “Match
Color.” Now the first thing that we’re going to look
at in this dialog box is this option called “Source” down here under “Image Statistics.” Now this is where you’re actually going to
select your second image that you want to steal the color and tone from. So we’re going to select that image, and mine
is going to be that bottom image right here, another file that’s open. And you’ll immediately see that it pulls up
the picture here and starts to apply the effect to your image. Now some images will look good right off the
bat. This one is not one of those images, so we’re
going to need to use some of these image options to really refine this effect. So with these effects we have luminance here,
and luminance is going to control the perceived brightness of the image. The color intensity is going to control the
vibrance. And the fade is going to control how the color
is faded from the new image we brought over of the barn onto the original image of the
path. Now with all of these image options, when
we adjust these we’re actually adjusting the properties of the new image since we selected
a source. If we hadn’t selected a source, then these
image options would then apply to our old original image of the path, but since we do
have a source, then they’re going to apply to how the color is brought over and blended
from the image of the barn. So, lastly we have this “Neutralize” checkbox,
and this is going to neutralize the main color that is being cast by the selected photo,
which is the barn. So it’s going to neutralize any kind of major
color that’s being cast over that photo. So I’m just going to go ahead and set some
of these. So I’m just going to put this one at about
125. I’m going to put the color intensity at about
70, and I’m going to put the fade at about 45, and then I’m to go ahead and check the
neutralize color box. So if we then go up to the preview we can
see how this change has taken effect on our image. So you can see the before and after, and that’s
a pretty drastic change. So if we go ahead and click “ok” we can flip
between these images after its gone ahead and taken effect. And you can see that these images now seem
like they fit a lot better into the same kind of feel. It seems like they have the same tone to them,
and a lot of the same colors have been matched from the original image. So this is a great tool for stealing the tone
of an image. It’s not always going to be perfect, but you
can refine it and even use it as a huge head start before going ahead and diving into other
adjustment layers. So that’s my time, but as always, if you enjoyed
this tutorial, be sure to subscribe, rate, and comment for more.

How to Remove ANY thing in a Picture using Photoshop CC 2017/2018

How to Remove ANY thing in a Picture using Photoshop CC 2017/2018


In this video i’ll show you how to remove objects in photoshop now the good thing with Photoshop is there’s no one way of doing things. there’s a few different tools you can use and i’ll demonstrate some basic ones so yeah let’s get started so here’s a picture let’s say i want to remove myself the easiest way to do is select myself and once you have the selection are going to edit fill some of your content aware normal hundred percent and click ok and you guys could be for sure we’ll do the rest for you and now I’ll go back and show you another way of removing the same object for this example I’m going to use this part hearing too and i’m just going to take over what I want to remove an unfortunate that the rest for me now let’s look at another picture let’s say I want to remove this port right here and i decided to go with the spot healing tool all i’m going to do is click over what I want to move and you’ll see for the shop does the rest for me and for the most part it did a pretty good job for any imperfections i can go back and manually 67 now depending on the situation you might not be able to use every tool to get the fact you’re looking for so just play around until you find something that works for you as Louie you’ll be better able to just for the right tool now another tool we can use this the closed down tool lets do not remove this poor right here and all i’m going to do is I’m going to go in and i’m going to select an area that I want to replicate and i’m going to press option and i’m going to sample the area and now i’m just going to fill it in over here i’m just going to template from a few different areas just to blend things in and I usually try to keep my softness as low as i can and it will put everything in pretty good alright so here’s another situation let’s remove this pole right here but for some reason I don’t want to go anything about the concrete and if i try to remove it like that you’ll see it kind of messes up at the corner soul the way to fix that is going to make a selection and now once we have our collection whatever i do that will only apply within the collection and i’ll show you guys how that works that’s why sample this area and you’ll see the corners are done just within the area selected and i’m going to use this technique a little bit more in the next picture and you’ll see how it works so let’s look at the picture here’s something a little more complicated let’s do not remove myself the person in the back some of the buildings now you’ll see if I try to use the Spot Healing to lure the content of their tool it will really do the job so in a situation like this you need to manually workaround try to fill in things using your clone tool now for the rock I’ve made an outline and close the other side and then i use the Spot Healing tool to blend it all in and the necklace both sides of the grass mixing it all in using the controls for the most part i’m using the smooth brush it just works better blending in after that i selected the other rock and cloned it once again i decided to get rid of the black cross just because it would have needed more time getting the right and the picture looks just fine without it at this point i decided to switch back to spot healing tool just wanted to see what the software can do playing around with sides and hardness foremost party government of what I wanted but it didn’t make things a little underlined so to think that I’m going to use the clone stamp tool for a little more detail i made a solution and use the paint tool to blend things in all of good i’m just going to blend into concrete using the Spot Healing to once again next up I’m going to remove this guy and all this can be done using the spot healing tool so i just made a selection of what i wanted to move as Photoshop that the rest for me and again for a little imperfection I could use the Spot Healing to once again to moving the manual alright so we’re almost done for removing the buildings i’m going to use the Spot Healing to display around the sides and hard managed to find a good spot I’m doing this very rough but you can spend as much time as you need to get it has the size that you want but I’m not going to focus on the bathroom to was just because the most imperfect shins is barely visible and yeah after playing around a little bit she is the end result so we started from this tutors and it looks pretty good if you like this video and want to see more videos like this let me know in a comment below and feel free to share this one