View high quality photos on your digital camera with the RAW Image Extension

View high quality photos on your digital camera with the RAW Image Extension


[MUSIC]>>Do you love taking
high-quality pictures? If you have a collection of
images from digital cameras, and see some of your raw image files displayed in File Explorer like this. I am happy to announce that
we have a solution for you. With Windows 10 May 2019 Update, you now have access to the
Raw Image Extension that support viewing of raw images from most cameras in
the market today. Hi, I’m Kehinde Oladosu on
the Windows media team. Raw image formats are
produced by mid- to high-end digital cameras and by some high-end cell phones
on the market today. They are used by
photography professionals and enthusiasts to capture
the best picture quality from their digital cameras. There is no standardized
raw image file format and the set of raw format supported by camera manufacturers
changes over time. Apps rely on a raw image codec to decode and display the raw images
from a given camera. Without built-in support,
Windows users cannot view raw images from their cameras without relying on third-party tools. All Windows 10 versions currently has a built-in codec pack
for raw format. But we’ve received feedback that modern cameras released in the
last few years and not supported. With Windows 10 May 2019 Update, you now have access to the Raw Image Extension available
on the Microsoft Store. It provides comprehensive
support for raw files produced by most cameras
on the market today and will be updated to support
new raw formats introduced by new cameras released to
the market in the future. The extension provides; 1. Native viewing support for
raw images in Photos, and 2. Ability to
view thumbnails of raw files and
the camera properties used to take these pictures
right in File Explorer. As a bonus, the extension now enables the same comprehensive support for raw images stored on your OneDrive. With the OneDrive app, you don’t need to install the
extension to view your images. Now, let’s work through how you can install the extension on your device. First, make sure you’re running
a Windows version that is at least Windows 10 Version 1903. Also known as Windows
10 May 2019 Update. You can check your version
number by typing “About your PC” into Windows Search box. Next, open the Microsoft Store app
from the Taskbar, and search for “Raw Image Extension”. Select “Get” button to
acquire the extension. You should see the “Get” button changed to install after
downloading is complete. Select it to start
installing the extension. If you’re already own the extension, you will see an “Install”
button that you can use to start installation right away. After the extension is installed, selecting “Launch” button will open the Photos app which you can use to navigate to the raw image
collection on your device. Using the app, you can
view your raw images. You can also now easily organize your raw image collection directly in File Explorer by viewing thumbnails previews and
detailed cameras settings used to take each raw image. To summarize, the new Raw
Image Extension adds native view and support for images
captured in raw file formats. By installing the package, you will be able to view thumbnails and metadata of
supported raw file formats right in Windows File Explorer or
view images in the Photos app. Because the extension is
delivered to the Microsoft Store, we’re able to update
it faster to support new raw format and you get
the updated version automatically. We hope you found this video helpful. If you have any feedback,
or suggestion, please share with us
via Feedback Hub, by pressing “Windows key and F”. Thank you for watching
and have a great day. [MUSIC]

3 BEAUTIFUL PHOTO BOOKS FROM MOROCCO


[Music] I told you – you take that top down the rain will come so this is Texas this is North Texas and Fort Worth is like right in here yep yep Arlington, Dallas, Fort Worth what do you think so I think we’re going to stay inside and do some mail today [Music] this is fantastic this is a book that was sent and I’m going to mispronounce your name so apologies in advance this is Bastiaan Woudt – I think is how you say it anyway this is cool he writes hi Ted – As promised I hereby send you the book of my latest project Karawan shot in Morocco the book is written in Dutch and I included an english summary for you I hope you enjoy it I also included two of my little portfolio books which I make every year which are also outstanding these ones included are last year and 2015 keep up the good work on the channel it’s one of the few places on YouTube where there is a deeper understanding for photography love the talks on photo books and please visit more photographers in the artist series amazing job all the best thank you Bastiaan this is – I mean I am beside myself this is awesome this is from Pablo Contreras and he writes dear Ted my name is Pablo Contreras I’m from Buenos Aires Argentina currently living in Brazil I’m a pro photographer and video maker working mostly with industrial photography and fashion I’m also a youtuber my channel is about travel photography links are here you can see there and I have a small TV show and an educational channel regarding this mail every year I publish my own calendar this is a great gift for friends and also the best way I’ve found to be into my clients minds for an entire year smart move it’s actually cheaper than Google Adwords and facebook ads when you put it that way and also way more cool this year I chose the amazing city of Havana, Cuba I spent 10 days there and on the first three days every wasn’t even able to photograph it was a totally different world and talking to people about Cuban history and culture was way more interesting that immersion also helped me to be away from photo cliches so what was supposed to be a simple vacation trip became a book project that I am planning to develop during the next years by following changes on the island BF/AF Oh before and after Fidel this calendar is kind of a spoiler of what’s coming next Pablo thank you so much this is amazing and what a fabulous idea this is a book that comes from David Arnavat in Miami Florida who writes dear Ted Forbes I am writing you today to thank you for the content you provide on the YouTube channel, The Art of Photography I have been watching it for some time and I feel I’ve learned a lot your series entitled photography assignments was very interesting although I haven’t done assignments per se it did move me to take the project in a different direction what I have done is taken a sketchbook and drawn out some photoshoots that I would like to set up my drawings are a little bit crude though it has given me new photo projects and ideas further your videos have motivated me at times when I got into photography “downs” to continue making art – David this is amazing and you know what I think the cool thing is you know that was the whole idea with photo assignments it’s not a college course it’s what it is is it’s an activity that we can all participate in and the whole idea is to get us to think differently and do something new and get out of ruts and push ourselves creatively in our whole way of creative thinking and taking that in your own direction is awesome I’m glad you’ve gleaned something from that you should participate in Photo Assignments though they are pretty fun anyway thank you for the book David this is fantastic next up is a zine that comes to us from Jake Horne who writes Ted I’ve been wanting to self publish a book for a while and I thought a zine would be a perfect way to dip my toe in the water I don’t know if you see a lot of landscape inspired zines but I hope you enjoy mine all shots were captured on medium format film Ektar, Portra 400 and Adox CMS20 love the youtube channel Jake Jake this is fabulous you guys are doing some amazing work Jake thanks for sharing this this is awesome I hope you guys are finding this work as inspiring as I am I mean the crazy thing about all this is is I just put my address in the YouTube channel and people started sending me their work so I start featuring on the show and that led to more people sending work and I mean I couldn’t go hand pick this stuff if I tried this is amazing and today’s show just like really blew me away I mean this completely inspires me to go out and make something go put something together and go shoot and this is really cool and if you guys have sent something to me we are getting through the mail stack I promise I just haven’t gotten to it yet I will I promise I don’t exclude things that are sent to me so I will get to everything and so I’m really excited to see what else is in here anyway guys if you enjoyed this video please remember to like it share it subscribe to the Art of Photography for more videos I’m going to get out there and make something with the rest of the afternoon I am very inspired so I will see you guys in the next video until then later

The Truth Behind Instagram Pictures

The Truth Behind Instagram Pictures


(bell rings) (slow music) (camera clicks) – I’m just gonna take a nap first. (dramatic music) (bell rings) (dance music) – Woo hoo. Get a pic. Uh, you know what, this
really isn’t my aesthetic can I borrow your sunglasses? Okay, there. (camera clicks) Yes, perfect photo. – I’m done. (bell rings) (dramatic vocal music) (slow music) (bell rings) – Okay, okay, move the pillow. Move the pillow. Good.
Alright, don’t smile. Big eyes. Open your eyes,
but give me the eyes. Chin up. Okay, not that much up. Bring it down. Good. Okay, hair. Need more hair. Alright, I think we got it. – Okay. Oh, you know what, let’s
just take like 20 more, just 20 more. (bell rings) – Oh my God, shut up. Eww, these trash cans stink. That’ll look good on Instagram. (bell rings) (breathy music) – Oh shoot, I forgot to
post something today. – We’re gonna be late for dinner. – We’ll just take a
quick selfie. It’s fine. Actually, you take it. Okay, look like we’re really happy. (bell rings) (dance music) – This looks terrible. This isn’t gonna work. (silly music) (horn and bell music)

Sega Digio SJ-1: The 1996 Sega LCD Digital Camera

Sega Digio SJ-1: The 1996 Sega LCD Digital Camera


[piano-laden jazz music] Greetings and welcome to an LGR camera thing! And this time around we’ve got a delightful
little oddity from Sega. Yes, that
♪ Sega! ♫ Back in the mid-90s, they were experimenting
with all kinds of hardware beyond games, and 1996 saw the release of the Digio SJ-1, Sega’s first and only entry into the personal digital camera space. The SJ-1 sold for 29,800 yen, or roughly 300
US dollars, when it was first announced in the fall of 1996. A full two years before the Nintendo GameBoy
camera came out, by the way, another example of Sega doing what Nintendon’t. And the Digio wasn’t just a toy camera or
a game console add-on either, nope, this was a point and shoot digital camera with a better
set of specs and features than you might expect. Things like a 320×240 resolution image sensor,
manual focusing for both landscape and macro photography, and even a color LCD screen acting
as both a viewfinder and a playback device. And images were stored on state of the art
“Digital Film,” as Sega called it. Which in reality was a version of Toshiba’s
recently-released SmartMedia format. Yeah, I was honestly shocked when I first
found out about this thing! Not only was it an official Sega product from
the mid-90s that I’d never heard of, but it was a digital camera with some seriously
impressive specifications at a price that was entirely reasonable from the get-go. However, Sega never marketed the original
Digio SJ-1 for sale outside of Japan, and even there it seems it was largely advertised
to their existing customer base in periodicals like Sega Saturn Magazine. Which, on further inspection makes sense seeing
as the Digio was advertised to work in conjunction with the Sega Picture Magic and the Sega PriFun. The former of which was a graphics tablet
with a combination of Sega 32x and Mega Drive hardware inside, allowing for drawing on top
of and editing digital photos taken on the SJ-1. And the latter being a video printer designed
to work with the Sega Saturn and the Pico, letting users print 4×6 photos and sticker
sheets captured using the printer’s composite video input port. [Japanese PriFun advertisement plays] And yep, the Digio SJ-1 outputs using composite
video as well using a 2.5mm adapter cable, same kinda thing you saw on consumer camcorders
back then. So if you didn’t feel like squinting at
that tiny LCD screen, you could view saved photos or even a live feed from the camera
right on your TV. Dude, seriously, this is awesome for a three
hundred dollar camera from ‘96! Why weren’t these more popular? Sega did at least update the SJ-1 slightly
in 1997, bundling in a clip-on magnifier for the LCD screen and a larger memory card, along
with a couple of fresh new paint jobs like metallic pink and silver. 1997 is also when the Digio went on sale outside
of Japan, but from what I gather this was limited to Australia and was only marketed
there for less than a year. Yeah, this really is the perfect storm of
impressive yet obscure tech from a well-known company, I live for this stuff. So let’s take a look at the original HDC-0100
model from 1996, which I imported from Japan about a year ago now. It’s been a journey to get everything I
needed for this video, cuz yeah. Even though it came in the original packaging,
all that was in the box was the camera itself and the video cable for connecting it to a
TV. Oh, and the memory card, thank goodness, since
the Digio will only accept a particular type of early model SmartMedia card. This one for the Digio uses 5-volt power instead
of 3.3 volts that soon became the norm. Not only that, but this only has 5 megabits
of storage, equating to just 625 kilobytes. So not only is it bizarrely-specced, but I
had no way of getting the photos off the camera beyond hooking it up through fuzzy composite
video. Turns out that’s because, originally, Sega
only intended the Digio for use with their graphics tablet and printer, not a computer. It wasn’t until January of 1997 that they
started selling separate kits for connecting the Digio to a PC, for an additional cost
of 7,800 yen, nearly 80 dollars. That’s a lot for a floppy disk and a serial
cable. Anyway, we’ll sort out the computer stuff
later on, but for now let’s take a gander at the SJ-1 itself! It’s a solidly-built binoculars-style design,
a popular form factor on early to mid-90s digital cameras, weighing in at 11 ounces
with batteries installed. Which, by the way, are an absolute pain to
get in there. It takes four AA batteries and you have to
jam the bottom pair in past the top two spring contacts to get them to fit. [batteries shuffling] Seriously, who signed
off on this design? Another quirk of the Digio is that even with
the batteries installed, the camera will not power on at all without the memory card latch
in the upright locked position. I thought I’d received a dead camera when
I first got it, but nope, you just have to lock that tiny switch on front or nothing
happens. Also on front is a red LED indicator for the
self-timer feature, just above the opening for the lens, which is a 10 millimeter design
with an aperture of 1.9. And right above that on top is the aforementioned
manual focusing ring, something rather unusual for a compact digital camera in ‘96. It does a pretty darn good job too, especially
on the macro side of things, I’m impressed with the range of focus options. Along the bottom you’ve got a standard tripod
mount, on the left you’ve got nothing at all, and on the right is a little rubber door
covering the ports for video output, serial connectivity, and a place to plug in a 10-volt
DC power supply. Finally, there’s the standout feature of
the Sega Digio: the color LCD panel. Which, again, was an impressive feature in
1996, especially at its $300 price point. The LCD-equipped Casio QV-10A cost fifty percent
more by comparison, though it also had a screen twice the size. Anyway powering on the Digio boots up this
nifty splash screen, followed by a live feed acting as a viewfinder. Yep, there’s no optical viewfinder at all
on here, only an LCD. And a tiny one at that, the panel is only
about 0.7 inches, or 18 millimeters across. It is magnified a bit to try and make up for
that, but this also means that you have to move it away from your eyes in order to actually
focus on the image and see it clearly. And taking a picture is simple and silent,
everything but the focusing happens automatically. [photographic silence] It does take about
five seconds to save an image, but once you have some you can switch over into playback
mode and manage pictures directly on the camera. It’s limited to simple stuff like locking
photos, deleting groups of them, and formatting the memory card, but this was still pretty
fresh stuff in ‘96! Many digital cameras up to that point didn’t
allow you to access pictures at all unless it was through a computer. Speaking of which, I tried several methods
of getting files off of here without the serial adapter, including putting the card in another
camera that uses similar SmartMedia cards, and trying multiple PCMCIA adapters that were
supposedly compatible with 5-volt memory cards. But man, no matter what I just couldn’t
get anything to recognize it. So I turned to Amazon Japan, as ya do, and
imported an HDC-3002 kit for 2,000 yen. And uh, welp! All it came with was the software, which I’d
already found an archive for online. What I really needed was the serial adapter,
so I put in a saved search on Yahoo Auctions Japan until I found a listing for both the
HDC-3002 and 3000 kits complete in box for a total of 3,100 yen.
Excellent. I didn’t need both of them but whatever,
I’ll take what I can get. The only real difference is that the 3000
is only for IBM PC-compatibles running Windows 95, and the 3002 also comes with software
for the NEC PC-9821. While I don’t have a PC-98, I do have an
NEC PC running the Japanese version of Windows 98 which really is the next best thing! [Windows 98 startup sound plays] Mm, my waves are now vapor. Right, so the HDC-3002 software here is completely
in Japanese, that’s a bit of a thing. There is an English version of the software
from its later Australian release, but ah well, functionality is standard enough for
mid-90s photo retrieval apps that I didn’t have a problem with it. With the Digio plugged in and powered on it’s able to download your photos in Sega’s proprietary SJ1 file format. From here you can select which images you
want to delete or keep, transferring the ones you like over into the editing window. From here you can do things like flip and
rotate images, adjust RGB color values, edit hue, saturation, and lightness, change brightness
and contrast, and both increase and decrease sharpness and mosaic pixelization. Once you’re happy with things, you can export
images to something more standardized, like Windows bitmap files, and there ya go. As for the images themselves, well, as mentioned
earlier they’re captured in 320×240 resolution, though if I had to guess it looks like it’s
automatically upscaled from 160×120. I should’ve expected as much since it holds around twenty pictures on that tiny memory card, so yeah. The resulting images are maybe a tad more
compressed and chunky than they otherwise could be. Not that I expected impeccable image quality,
but still, everything just looked so cool through that LCD screen! Ah, I mean well, sometimes. See, the digital viewfinder is useless during
the middle of the day due to its inherently reflective design and muted backlighting. Imagine having a Sega Game Gear screen that’s
less than an inch across and you’re looking at it through an oddly curved magnifying glass. Yeah. The screen is turned on here, I swear, but
even in the shade it’s hard to see anything if the sun is out. Not only that, but the battery life? Ha, what battery life! I only get enough juice from four AA’s to
fill the card once with pictures and just get them loaded onto a PC before it dies. I went back to count and it turns out I went
through two dozen batteries just to make this video. [dead batteries crash to the floor] Still, these kinds of quirks and caveats are
precisely why I enjoy using older digital cameras from time to time. I don’t do it for the ease of use, I do
it for the fun of it, for the retro challenge of the ordeal. I love taking pictures of things that wouldn’t
be out of place when the camera was manufactured. Old cars, buildings, trees and metalwork and stuff. And I love seeing how devices like the Digio
go about capturing various colors and light ranges, because you never get precisely what
you expect. Like the Mitsubishi DJ-1000 I reviewed, this
is another mid-90s digicam that produces these downward streaks of light on any parts of
the image that’s bright enough. It’s not always a desired effect, but when
you plan for it I think it’s pretty neat. And of course, I always take pictures of several
of the same scenes with each camera I cover so you can compare them to one another. Like this tiger and circus dude, which I always
photograph around the same time of day and compare it with a modern camera phone. Yeah, that’s about what I expected really,
the SJ-1 tends to go for over-exposure almost every time, it really isn’t good with bright
outdoor scenes under clear skies. Or dim indoor scenes under no skies, hehe. Yeah so I took this thing to E3 2019, because
why not. They have a Sega booth there and I thought
it’d be fun to take the Digio on a pilgrimage back to the homeland, so to speak. And yeah its lack of flash makes it bad for
bars, but it did pretty decently out on the show floor! Turns out it’s particularly well-equipped
to capture hues of blue, which, I mean it’s a Sega camera. If it didn’t do a good job at the color
blue then what would be the point? And yeah, that is the Sega Digio SJ-1 from
1996! A fun little camera that still amuses me for
the very fact that it exists. There’s something about consumer electronics
made by game companies that always fascinates me, but especially when it’s from a company
like Sega that by and large really isn’t associated with this kinda stuff. Sure it murders batteries, you can’t see
crap using it outside, and it was almost exclusively sold in Japan so good luck finding one.
But whatever! The fact that it’s so limited in availability
and usability is why I find it enjoyable at all. [retro synthwave beats] So concludes another LGR thing. If you enjoyed this thing then great! Old digital cameras, game-related stuff, and
retro tech in general is what I do, so maybe check out some of my other videos. And as always, thank you for watching!

TOP 10 Facts About Charlize Theron & hot pictures

TOP 10 Facts About Charlize Theron & hot pictures


Fact 1
Charlize Theron was born and raised on a farm in South Africa. She is a mixture of French and German heritage. Fact 2
When Charlize was 15 years old, her mother shot and killed her father in an act of self-defense. Her mother was never charged with any crime related to her father’s death. She does not try to hide this truth, but prefers not to speak of it. Fact 3
As a child Charlie took classed in ballet dancers and attempted to pursue a career in ballet but an injury stopped this from being possible. Fact 4
She was once a cigarette smoker, but quit the habit with the help of hypnotherapy. She is very proud of quitting this habit. Fact 5
Charlize Theron owns and rides a Harley Davidson and has a tattoo of a flower on her right foot. Fact 6
This film star got her big break in Hollywood when she was discovered while yelling at a bank teller. Fact 7
She played the role of serial killer Aileen Wuornos in the highly acclaimed 2003 movie “Monster”. Her spectacular performance won here several awards for Best Actress including the Academy Award, the Golden Globe award, the Silver Bear award. Fact 8
Charlize also received several Golden Globe and Academy Award nominations for her role in the 2011 movie “Young Adult”. Fact 9
As a young lady she once made her living working as a model for a short period of time. She did not enjoy modeling and stopped to try and pursue her ballet career. Fact 10
Charlize admits that she learned to speak English by watching soap operas on television.

How To Size / Crop Images For Instagram Stories

How To Size / Crop Images For Instagram Stories


welcome to a tutorial on cropping your photos to be the right size for Instagram stories. please like the video if it helps you. Lets begin. first we need to download a photo editing app. my favourite is called pixelr. open the app store and search for pixelr. it is available for both IOS and android. download and install it. open it once its finished. select photos, and choose the photo you want to use. now select the tools button. it is the button that looks like two circles. in the tools menu, select crop from the preset photo options. choose 16:9 16:9 is the aspect ratio used by Instagram stories. if the 16:9 you chose is showing it in landscape mode, tap it again and it will convert to portrait mode. now you can drag your crop around to the position that looks best. when you have your desired crop, tap on the green tick at the bottom. to save your image, tap done. now tap Save Image, and the image will be saved to your camera roll. now open up instagram and we will post our new image to our story. as you can see the crop fits perfectly on Instagram stories. and that draws and end to this tutorial please give the video a like if it helped you , and subscribe to Foxy tech Tips for more social media tutorials!

Sony RX100 VI review: overpriced?

Sony RX100 VI review: overpriced?


– I was going to shoot
this RX100 Mark VI review in downtown Brooklyn and it
was going to be beautiful a work of art, a masterpiece but mother nature had a
little bit of a different plan so it looks like it’s time for plan B. (jazzy music)
♪ You Suck ♪ – How’s that? So this is the Sony RX100 Mark VI When I’m shooting stills
I’m almost exclusively shooting on a 35 millimeter film camera but when I’m not I’m actually using one of these they’re super portable,
they’re really light lighter than DSLR and
most certainly lighter than my 35 millimeter
and the transfer speeds are incredible, I can
quickly put it on my phone and then up to Instagram and its video capabilities
are also amazing which obviously I can’t
do with my 35 millimeter. Now, Sony comes out
with a new one of these just about every year,
which is why we’re already at the mark VI when the
mark I came out in 2012. Now that’s great because
we’ve come a long way but it also means that now that we’re at the later generations,
how much is changing. So let’s figure out why
you probably won’t pay 1200 dollars for the mark VI. So just like its predecessor, the mark VI has a 20.1
megapixel one inch CMOS sensor with 4K video at 24 30 p and at the lower 1080 p resolution you have that HFR mode,
or high frame rate mode, that is capable of 960 frames per second. The ISO spans from 125 to 12800 so I find that it performs
better in the lower ISO range that’s like a 125 to 800 once you get to 1600
and especially at 3200 you’re going to see a
lot of noise and grain you just have to keep in mind that this is a point and
shoot camera after all and with that comes a small flash and small batteries that
can’t really handle hot days or long recording times. Be prepared to own a few batteries especially if you’re recording video. And also like last years model there’s the pop up OLED EVF. God bless the pop up EVF I love it so much, yes, yes! It’s one of the main
reasons I bought this camera and it’s so crisp and so clean there’s something really intimate about being able to look
through a view finder and take a photo. I mean no one else is behind you looking at what you’re getting, it’s just you and your camera and it makes you feel really professional. Now the big difference this year though, is that it’s a single action EVF. So it pops up and instead
of having to pull it out like you did on previous generations it just does that automatically then when you want to close it it’s one single push down. The photo burst modes and auto focus also got a refresh on this model the auto focus is fast and I mean really fast and its facial recognition is on point too even when the face is
super far in the frame or you’re really wide. Burst mode can also now capture 230 shots at 24 frames per second, which is almost a 100 shots more than the RX100 mark V 150 shots for making gifs or
capturing the perfect moment this is really great. For the vertically challenged among us and the foodies, you’re
really going to love the extended range on this screen in previous models you
had that 180 degree screen which it still does, this
is great for vlogging this is great for taking selfies but new this year, is
the 90 degrees tilt down. It typically only when to 45 but now you have that full 90 I really didn’t think this
was going to be super useful but when taking shots of food or at concerts, it actually came in handy. So you pair that with the
touch screen capabilities that are also new this year it’s kind of banging. You can finally touch the screen to focus and to take shots but I can’t navigate the menu or hit okay so in a world where touch
screens are so intuitive they’re on everything we use we didn’t we go one step further and make it completely usable via touch, we’re so close but speaking of close, hello’s eye is 24 to 200 millimeter lens. For tourists or festival
goers or bird watchers or a parent in a high school event this is really a great feature and it’s clean, it’s crisp and it actually flattens out the image and gives you depth of field much like the Canon 7200 millimeter would it made me feel like a great photographer even when I was just on the fly doing something really quick the problem is, we gave
up F 1.8 aperture lens and those built in NDs, which I use all the time I loved being able to get down to 1.8 especially at night and the ND was so easy
and quick to slap on it was much easier than
adjusting the shutter and when doing video the ND is like absolutely valuable so this might be the difference
between buying this model and a previous cheaper model that ND and F1.8 is a little bit more valuable to me. Overall the RX100 continues
to be a great camera with better video options and way more models than Canon’s G7 or Lumix LX line and with all these models have
come incredible improvements I mean this is a super
powerful point and shoot, it has great HDR features and with added S-Log 3 support, this model can even step
up as a V cam on shoots with an A7S, very comfortable. The real problem though is the total and complete lack of a mic input and the price. I mean for 1200 dollars there really should be a mic input especially for how many
vloggers use this camera. Just put it in! So if you had the money, go for it you’ll absolutely not be
disappointed by this camera, but if you’re looking
for bang for your buck you might want to look
at the RX100 Mark IV or V I had the IV and I bought
it on craigslist last year and it stills works really well and with that extra money, you could buy an external audio recorder. So thanks for watching if you like this video and you like watching
my hair slowly deflate be sure you like and subscribe also shout out to this camera that is currently doused in water, alright we’ll see you next time.