What Camera Should I Buy? – Mike Browne

What Camera Should I Buy? – Mike Browne


a few weeks ago whilst running my
Lanzarote workshop I managed to lose my beloved Fuji xt-1 so that means I gotta
go and buy a new camera but which camera should I buy this is probably the number
one question I get asked by beginners repeatedly which camera is best which
camera should I buy the thing is you got to remember that it’s you who takes
pictures which camera you use to take them with is by and large irrelevant
it’s like saying which pencil is best to draw a picture with it’s you who does
the drawing it’s you who makes the photo these are things to bear in mind now
there are occasions where a different camera will be of benefit to you so for
example if you like to hike up mountains and you’re quite a small person you
might not want a big heavy DSLR with great big heavy lenses maybe a
mirrorless would be better for you but which one is by and large kind of
irrelevant do you want to shoot sports or wildlife where you may want to crop
in quite heavily in which case you’re throwing away pictures you can want a
good quality image file now my lovely friends at London camera exchange are
going to lend me a Fuji XT one and an XT two so I can compare them side-by-side
to see if I need an upgrade or not now this isn’t a need and as in the pictures
will be more interesting vibrant exciting as I think you’ll see at the
end there won’t be any bloom in difference between the pictures this is
about what will make my life easier and it’s just the same for you I know that’s
a hard concept to get your head round at the beginning but trust me it is this is
not a tech spec review this is just me looking at what will work best for me
and I heard there will be questions you can ask yourself to help you find out
what will be best for you if you have any questions or comments please leave
them below the video we’d love to hear them if you come up with an interesting
question who knows we may make a video to address it if you’d like to sign up
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so let’s get off to Winchester to London camera exchange
and get stuck in in this thumb so I have just been to see my friends at London
camera exchange the squeakiest clean East most friendliest camera exchange in
the world and I really mean that they are these guys are old-school I really
love it they really know what they’re doing so it spent a little bit of time
with the xt2 talking to Ben in store here because he’s guided me through what
some of the controls are because there are some additional features you guys
know what a numpty I am with electronics is not my thing so it’s pointless going
out to have a play with the camera if I don’t know how to work it because I’m
not going to be able to get the best out of it
I’m going to suggest we go quickly sit in the Sun somewhere or grab a cup of
coffee unjustly talk you briefly through what some of these changes are as I’ve
said already this is not a spec tech review this is answering the question
which camera should I buy and I’m doing it for myself personally let’s go find
someone to sit and chat life’s always better with a cup of coffee isn’t it so
here we go I’ve got a little crib sheet down here which the lovely guys across a
London camera exchange did for me now I’m not one for tech spec as you know
but there’s a couple of things on here which are kind of useful that are kind
of interesting particularly for me for what I intend to do with my cameras one
of which is I’ve got 12,800 ISO to play with now I know many people are
terrified of a high ISO I don’t have a problem with it I’d rather have a bit of
noise a bit of grain use a high ISO and keep the characteristics of light in a
place then thumper flash in and kill it dead of course you can like something
with a flash if you take time and care I don’t want to I’m too noisy I want to
get on with it I’d rather pin the ISO up and work like that in exposure
compensation I’ve got plus five plus or minus five stops now one of the things
on love with these Mary is my little XT one my exposure compensation is I just
roll my thumb you know roll to the right make it bright roll to the left make it
dark good poem that’s how I remember but I don’t like going into menus you may
remember from when first talks about this camera is one of
the things I like the controls I want to use ISO shutter speed an exposure
compensation our buttons on the top same on the xt2 but I’ve got more exposure
compensation I’ve got higher ISO the other thing which has quite an impact
for me because I shoot little bits of video don’t I put these little insects
into my videos and if you’ve watched many of my films you would have heard me
swear often about how difficult it is for me to start and stop the video on
the xt-1 and that I can’t focus as I’m filming so if I change focal length I’m
often saying to you guys I know it’s gone all blurry and out of focus but is
nothing I can do about it for the minute suck it up princess
but the xt2 can focused whilst videoing and not only that I can lock the focus
where I want it let me see if I can do it for real while we’re sitting here at
the cafe so instead of a button on the top which is what I had on the xt-1 I
just flick this little thing around here and on the back I don’t if you can see
this bent can you see where my fingernail is there’s a little movie
camera icon erdan if you can get that sharp and zoom in this is a tough call
for bed viewers because he’s sitting opposite me hand holding the camera can
you see it Ben wait now it’s taking too long doesn’t matter
I’ll put an inset zoom back out right you turn this little dial and you get a
little movie camera and then that means that you’re into video mode but the cool
thing is your autofocus modes down on the front here they will work in the
video mode so if I have it on continuous mode let me just see if I can do this
you activate the video with a shutter button and you guys are in focus in the
shape of Ben now if I was to sort of focus on that this chap over here cuz
I’m doing a bit of close-up you know so to look easy setup focus on him you
might in doing some street photography where all the street videography now
you’re in focus look at that isn’t that quick isn’t that really useful no more
me swearing about it so for me that is incredibly useful I like the size of my
xt-1 that’s one of the reasons I fell in love with it it’s very small it fits in
my pocket you probably saw when I come out the shop budget and it wedged in the
top of my pocket I know it’s not very bloody what do you call it safe but who
cares they’re very similar sizes the only thing that is different and it’s an
improvement is on these control dials which I love so much the little X all of
these the exposure compensation the shutter speed and the ISO on the xt-1
the xt-1 has quite a short knob however the xt2 – it’s got a much bigger one now
so if you can see the difference if I put them next to each other this the the
shutter speed here and here so we’ve got a slightly more control dial which means
I can easily roll my finger on it it’s easier to use there’s also a little
locking button in the top which I like immensely it shoots 4k video not a
really of any value to me the thing which is most interesting is most of the
controls are the same that’s awesome I’ve got a higher ISO I can shoot 15
minute long exposures if I want to sort of shoot some stuff you know in
low-light Iceland I do that stuff you know moving clouds things like this I
like that that’s useful as opposed to manually doing it with the timer in the
back I’ve got histogram live in the viewfinder which is
so what I really really liked about these cameras so that’s the tech stuff
that interests me I’m not going to the spec but the things
I’ve just talked about they tell me that this is the right camera for me those
are plus points just thought of something if you remember when I first
kind of go with an XT one and I first talked about them something I swore
blind about and I’ve sworn about ever since is that on the back here the
little multifunction four-way button on the back where my finger is it’s kind of
fitted flush that makes it almost impossible to feel which one to press
whilst the camera is at my eye and I’m continuously poking the wrong one or
I’ve got to take it away and like that you know I don’t like that next xt2 again
I don’t know if you can see it but I’ll do a cutaway if you can’t there’s this
little raised edge here so it’s easier to feel it with your nerves and your
finger but also the autofocus where I move my single point autofocus I got a
little joystick up here so I can just wiggle that little thing around with my
thumb until the camera where I want to focus very impressed without those
things tell me that this potentially could be the right camera for me when
you’re going to buy your own camera what is the right camera for you you’ve got
to ask yourself these questions what am I going to do with it
what do I need from it yeah it’s got more megapixels in the XT-2 blah ah
who cares when I first started shooting professionally I had 8 megapixels I
could still make 40 inch prints and they looked awesome so don’t get hung up
about that stuff next thing is finish my coffee and then
I think we’re just going to take a few pictures and then we can have a look at
those see how they stack up here’s a shot that I love Ben quick down
there you see these two look the lady in pink and the guy you see they look
really cool back to me Ben so I’m going to just shoot this 55 millimeter lens
both cameras are set up the same I’m just going to shoot it because we have
quite a contrast each situation in both places and I just want to see oh that’s
a cracking shot except there’s someone’s head growing out the top of somebody
fair how you doing all right you look so nice walking up there I hope you don’t
mind I had to take a picture of it all backlit and romantic and looking lovely how much not to give it thank you have a
great day enjoy yourself so another thing see how
nice people are no need to be quite so afraid of them okay so we’ve got a kind
of backlit thing we’re gonna look at that when we get back to the office now
just so that you know both these cameras had their firmware upgraded this morning
so they’re both on the same firmware they’re both on the same thing that both
using the same lens they’re both on the same ISO I’m using the same settings
because I want to show you that there will probably be no difference
whatsoever in the pictures but I want to show you that don’t think if you upgrade
your camera you’ll get better pictures you won’t you just might get better
usability or a better end purpose I want to take something this really super high
contrast II so I’m gonna see what I can find okay here is a fairly contrast II
situation if you just look up there can you see we’ve got the Sun and we’ve got
the church towers I know it’s all burnt out for you in the video camera so don’t
linger Bay and it will be cool but we can do a couple of shots here so let’s
just compare those we’ll go some contrast II stuff I’m gonna let’s do a
little video a thing here with the X t2 we’ll put it into the frame and I’ll
show you the shot I’m thinking about 23 mil set on there both cameras are set on
zero compensation at 200 ISO so you know I’m not cheating or on to a favor
anything now if I focus on the church roof and press ah what have we done I’ve
got it on the wrong setting you see this is one of those things we’re learning I
had it on bracket instead of video so let’s now try again no I am rolling bit
right stop it start again I don’t know what I did
wrong good we’re rolling video now you can even see we’ve got an aeroplane up
there in the sky now that’s the shot I’m thinking something like that I might go
a little bit wider because we’ve got quite a lot of contrast there Hemingway
so I’m thinking of doing a shot something like that looking up at the
church and then maybe do something see if we can bring the Sun look at this you
see just over the edge there clip it on the ends and we’ll put a starburst in
there as well so there we go that’s what we’re going
to do let’s do it the hd2 first it’s gonna be just the same so there’s many
different them on 18 mil 200 so it’s a tricky exposure but nowhere near
impossible so so you’ve got to learn things I’ve got to take it back off
movie mode because it’s different and put it back to single shot that’s where
I want it that’s better focus at the top there what aperture who
cares it’s quite a long way away let’s go for a fake sits in the middle
check my histogram because I want to just kind of make sure I’m filling up
the data that’s pretty good there my histogram says I’ve got lots of data the
viewfinder is really nice shoot that one with the X t2 plus one exposure
compensation 200 iso same thing onto the X t1 and he was plus one 200 iso 18
millimeters yeah that’s looking pretty good now the histogram on the X t1 is
saying it’s a little bit brighter and it’s gonna back it off I’m gonna trust
the cameras histogram you may have a slightly different system okay so we’ve
got that one there cool I don’t think I took the starburst one yet so
now let’s take the aperture to about f-16 and just move to the side to pick
up our starburst and see what happens and go this one gonna go this way a bit
aren’t the Sun higher not really clear starburst or non-driving been that
Steven come over here if you want Ben if you hit anyone I’ll just laughs you’re
good there right have we got yeah we’ve got nice starburst that’s cool
what’s my exposure saying it says we’re still good to go so let’s just shoot
that bad boy do the same thing with the XT – we want f-16 there we go
I’m pretty sure that’s what we want isn’t it yeah just replicate the shot
awesome course we’ve got a couple of higher contrast shots to do now I think
we need to go and find something pretty here in the Sun you’ll follow me
wherever I’m being followed by a man with a beard viewers I’ll assume you’re
rolling been just about s right guys look at these all right both of you know
I’ve just met these guys we just what I thought look at these awesome beards
right we have kind of nicely trimmed and stylish and we have the rough man and a
cave low ready a bit like me so they just volunteered guys just turn you back
a little bit I just want to do a little portrait just to that’s cool just like
you are there you know I just want to shoot a pit I’ll send you one I promise
so first shot I’m going to do with the xt2 because I happen to have it in my
hand on a wide aperture that’s nice guys thank you
let me do one with this one right on the floor
we’ll just compare I guess it will be wide aperture zoom it in quick focus
make sure I’ve got an exposure compensation on that’s nice
dudes it’s cool man it’s cold there look at you anyway we’ve got a couple of
things I’ll grab your email address in a moment so I’ll see you somewhere dark
thanks guys we’re actually looking for some models
to be in a photo I don’t suppose you guys are up for it for 30 seconds are
you it’s a YouTube video you’ll be famous
I’m a you do really are you doing all right ah are you rolling are you rolling good
I’ve just been out here trying to find someone to be in a photo because here
behind me we’ve got an awesome tunnel tunnels are brilliant places because the
light qualities inside them are fantastic but the light level is low if
you want to shoot things like that then when you’re choosing the right camera
that’s something to bear in mind I do shoot in low light let’s just pop wonder
up here with me come with me now I can’t get a model I’ve just been asking people
nobody’s really up for it and of course there’s no passers-by coming through
here this place has got the best light so I’m going to shoot a couple of
pictures of I guess you as represented by Ben and the camera we’ll just have a
quick look Ben can you just come that side of me a bit world that’ll do
there’s a couple of texts is either sign of you I like so I’m just gonna use
those so with the xt-1 with its maximum ISO of 3000 no 6400 light level in here
isn’t massively low but it’s not great I can get a hundred and seventy of a
second I want to go that way a bit I want that texture to your left I like
that lovely light okay so let’s just have a little go we’re going to pimp
this on the HD 2 to full iso and just see what happens and duplicate the same
shot so on 12,000 I say let’s just see where we’re going and bang that off they
look ok but until we get them in the computer I don’t know for sure so let’s
head off for home go and check them out so I’ve got both little Fuji cameras
sitting here I’ve got the raw files meat into my hard drive and brought them into
Lightroom so we can have a little look to see what the difference between the
images is I have made virtual copies of each raw file and a very basic retouch
just to bring them to life a bit because remember RAW files look dead flat and
lifeless if you’re shooting JPEGs and thinking that you’re just getting it
right straight out of the camera and you’re not cheating thing is your camera
is doing the retouch for you based on its algorithms and things
can go be wrong because the camera doesn’t know how you want the picture to
look or how it looks at the time you took it so it can’t match anything up
let’s just go into Lightroom and take a look here are a couple walking down the
row of trees with the XT2 – and here is the light retouch as you can see I’ve
only played with tones I haven’t messed around with anything else let’s just
compare if we go first off let’s go into zoom that out the raw files so here we
have the raw from the XT1 – and the raw from the xt-1 very little to choose
between them the pictures certainly aren’t more interesting more vibrant or
exciting with the XT 2- in fact if anything is worse because the
photographer press the shutter a bad moment when someone’s head was growing
out there what about the high contrast when I see us have a look at the the
light retouch of the two they’ve had the same settings but on and so you know
again you can see there’s little or nothing to choose between them slightly
lighter on the xt2 – but you know this is you know this is this is so minimally
unimportant so what it’s probably because they’re in a different place
there’s a slight different content to the image and the light meter has
changed the exposure very very slightly let’s look at the high contrast because
that could be an area where there is a difference because there is a difference
in the sensor so here is the HD – who’s the xt-1 interesting look the xt-1 shot
is darker than the xt – but remember when i took it and i said the histogram
on the xt-1 wants me to fiddle about with it darken
it a little bit so why would it do that doesn’t mean the metering system is bad
wicked and wrong or something well no personally I think it’s because I’ve got
more sky in the xt-1 shot than I had in the XT – the compositions slightly
different there’s probably a brighter area around here and the camera has
thought always to bright and it’s tried to push that exposure down a little bit
I don’t know but either way you know these are RAW files it really doesn’t
matter a great deal that both pretty much the same if I just go into the
what’s a xt 2 this is the xt2 if I go to the
slight retouch on that same file and do the same with the xt-1 there we go you
can see there’s very little difference now this is probably a stop darker if I
were to increase that exposure by a stop which if I remember with what the camera
told me to decrease it my there you go we’re back to where we started not a
huge issue how about the guys with the beards so here is the xt-1 shot it’s the
X t2 these are the roars you’re looking at side by side next to no difference
let’s just get that out of the way so you got more space this is the X t2 and
the xt-1 slight retouch hmm nothing to choose between them really is there but
what about that high ISO that is something which could create a
difference let’s go take a look at those so this here is the xt-1 untouched raw
that will be the X t2 untouched raw we got 12,800 ISO versus 6400 just looking
at those roars they look okay they look usable they look pretty good let’s just
look at the light retouch so that’s the X t2 and that is the xt-1 retouch and
tonight you have the right one there yeah so there we go that’s the raw from
the XD one that’s the one with a slight retouch virtually no difference but what
about that grain that’s going underneath Ben’s finger now because an area of deep
shadow and flesh tone is probably a good place to look so here is our X t1 at
6400 if we enlarge the same place with the X t2 at 12,000 yes there is a lot
more noise in it but you know what it doesn’t look bad in fact yeah it’s noisy
but it’s nice and sharp it’s kind of well held together I think that looks
pretty good actually but another thing to bear in mind is this hasn’t had any
where is it that one there it hasn’t had any noise reduction done on it so let’s
just do that and see what happens if I make make sure I’m in the right one XT –
yes if I go into the to make another virtual copy and then in
this virtual copy I do a little bit of noise reduction I think it might make a
difference so I’m just gonna pimp up I’m just gonna put some masking in there so
it’s just sharpening the edges of things we want sharpen that it’s not touching
flat areas if I put in a little bit of luminance around 25 but I’m gonna go
above 10 luminance but I reckon that would have made a difference we look at
that full screen it doesn’t look bad does it in a 12000 I say though I’d say
it’s still very acceptable I’ve hardly done any retouching on this
let’s compare so if we compare the two we’ve got this is the one that’s had the
retouching and this is the one that hasn’t if we go back in underneath that
knuckle and see what happens we got a lot of grain there and well big
difference look same file XT 221 xt 221 this has had a little bit of noise
reduction and that one hasn’t you see it’s not a big deal I think that is
really really useful and interesting but I also think you should have seen that
the photos are virtually the same upgrading the camera will not give you
better vibrant more exciting more interesting images if you want to do
that you need to upgrade yourself you need to know what your camera controls
do to an image how to use them but the most important things are going to be
light composition where to stand when to click how much depth of field or
sharpness do you want do you want a blurry background or a sharp background
or blurry foreground all that good stuff that’s ultimate beginners course that’s
well III my ultimate beginners course that’s the one you need because that
will teach you that as you’ve seen upgrading the camera won’t make any
difference but which camera should I buy which one well for me we’ve got improved
video which is very very useful we’ve got an autofocus joystick so we can move
that around that is awesome we’ve got a four-way button the little thing on the
back he’s got raised edges so I can find them we’ve got a much bigger knob on the
X t2 so I can roll those dials more nicely and I’ve got that higher I
so for me yes I should buy the XT too but I can’t answer that question for you
only you can answer that question and the thing is generally speaking there is
no difference between the images that the camera takes there is only a
difference in your skill in how you use the camera hope that helped guys take
care and I’ll see you next time

Headshots & Portrait Photography : Headshots & Portrait Photography: Setting Fill Lights

Headshots & Portrait Photography : Headshots & Portrait Photography: Setting Fill Lights


Now we have our main light, our key light
in position. Let’s add the fill light, and see what that does, and I’ll move this one
into position. The fill light we want to be soft. Its purpose is to soften the shadows,
make sure it’s not too hard on…on…on her features. And so, we’ll use a diffusion panel.
I’m lucky enough to have a real diffusion panel. A sheet will work just as well. A white
sheet. And let’s turn on the fill light. Notice that when I turn the fill light on, those
shadows automatically soften up. And in this particular case, as we move this around you
can see that the light’s softer, you notice that in this case I’m using the tungsten bulb,
the household floodlight. And one of the reasons for choosing that one is, I’ve got a quartz,
which is daylight up there as our main light, which is what the camera is going to be reading
it’s lights readings from. And I’m using a tungsten bulb, or household incandescent floodlight,
as my fill light. What that’s going to do is that’s going to add red into the shadows,
which is a very flattering look for human beings. So, getting this positioned in the
right place, moving it around, that is about as…about where I’d like it. I think I want
to move in a little closer to get rid of that hard edge on the edge of her…on her neck
line. So, let’s see if we can get this in a little bit closer. Now, if you get into
the physics of light, you’ll recognize that one of the things that happens is that light
intensity drops off inversely as distance increases. So if you move this unit two times
away from the subject, you will have one-fourth as much light getting to it. If you move it
six..four times away from the subject, from where it is, like instead of moving it from
one foot to four feet, it will have one-sixteenth as much light. And that is related to f-stops,
which has the same exact relationship. So every time you move one time on f-stop, it’s
the equivalent of moving the light unit twice as far away as before.

20 How To Choose An Affordable Display For Your Tethered Photography Workflow

20 How To Choose An Affordable Display For Your Tethered Photography Workflow


(serene techno music) – Welcome to the monitor
or display section of this tutorial. We wanted to show you
some additional options if you want to a little bit further from your MacBook Pro or your laptop, to provide an additional monitor in your work flow setup. There are a lot of options out there, it can be overwhelming with all of the features that all of them have. The different types of screens, the different types of qualities, and the price point can
vary quite drastically. So in this part we’re gonna start on the lower end and we’re gonna cover something that is provided by Acer. So introducing our resident expert, Sinh Troung. Would you consider yourself an expert in the display category? – Of course, of course. – Of course. So he is going to be explaining a lot of the features that you wanna consider when purchasing a display, and what that’s gonna do for you on set. So, you went out and got
these two as an example of something that’s on the lower end. So let’s start with this one and kinda tell me, tell me about this one. – Sure. Just to be clear, Acer is not a bad brand these just happen to be some of the cheapest displays that we’re able to find. So on the right here we have, their both like around $100. This one’s a 23″ IPS, and then this is a 23″. It’s a newer, TN. And they’re both around $100. – So you said “IPS”. What is IPS? – In-plane switching. So it’s a type of technology. It’s basically the panel technology. So all monitors they have a panel, and that’s the screen that you look at. IPS is something that is preferred by most professionals. It has some inherent qualities that benefit photo editing. Where as TN has also great panels and they do make great TN panels as well, but it’s different strokes
for different folks. So if you game this may be the route that you take. If you do mostly photo
editing or video editing this could be the better option. – So correct me if I’m wrong but In-plane switching or IPS, is really a way to consider a monitor that you can see it from about 178 degrees from all the way around? – Yeah, it has better view angles so the colors do not shift when you go off axis. Where as a TN panel, there’s a sweet spot. So you kinda have to
look at from straight on. A lot of tvs are TN panels or MVA panels. So when you go off axis of an LED or LCD tv, you notice that it starts to fade. The colors aren’t as vibrant. – So that is actually a big thing to consider IPS. When you consider having a team of people looking at a monitor, obviously everyone can’t be 90 degrees on to that monitor. You’re gonna have a team of people trying to get their head in looking at that monitor, looking at their work. Whether that’s hair and makeup or a design team, or the creative agency, or client. So IPS is something you
really want to make sure your monitor has, when you pick one up. – Yeah, and luckily IPS technology has basically taken over as the preferred choice of displays. If you go to the store, most of the displays that
you see on the shelves are actually IPS displays. And they reserve pretty much TN panels just for the low-end or really good gaming monitors. So, most of what you’ll find are actually these guys. But not all IPS are created equal so that’s also important to know. – So what are some of the other features? We talked a little bit
about the screen itself. What about resolution? What about ports? What about how you connect it? These are the same price monitors and you also lose and gain something. So for example, even though this is an IPS display it doesn’t have an HDMI port. It only has a VGA and DVI port. So, you’re limited on connections here. – That’s like your grandma’s ports. Those are the two ports you’ll find on your grandma’s tv when you go to Nana’s house. – What’s actually funny is we try to find a DVI cable in the office but we couldn’t find it, so we actually can’t
hook this one up today. – Yeah. So there’s only two ports on there, so a lot of the newer monitors, especially like Apple monitors, those are gonna have the miniDV ports or the Thunderbolt ports. – Yeah, DisplayPort and HDMI are the main input and for Apple it’s Thunderbolt but it converts to like a DisplayPort for video connection. – So one thing to consider if you have, this is the 15″ MacBook Pro, this actually has an
HDMI port built in to it. Some of the computers
that you’ll get from Apple and also PCs might not have an HDMI port. So if you want to free up some of your Thunderbolt ports on your computer itself, let’s say you only have one and that has to go to a display, well then you can’t hook
up your external hard drive to that computer itself. So you’re actually going to be losing out quite a bit depending on
how many ports you have on the side of your computer, and also how many dongles that you want hanging off your computer if you need to go to
something like VGA or DVI. – Yeah, yeah. Fortunately though, DisplayPort is the new port that everybody is using, and actually on this computer you have the HDMI but that Thunderbolt could be adapted to work with just about any display. – And that’s actually going away. Now Apple’s gotten into the USB-C. So there’s only one port and it’s serious Dongle City. – Yeah, it’s pretty serious Dongle City but USB-C is very similar, it’s identical to the
Thunderbolt in the way you could hook up multiple displays. So the new MacBook Pro with the touchbar has four ports. You can use any of those four ports to convert and plug into a display. – So what is the resolution
of these two monitors? – They’re both Full HD, so 920×1080. So the same resolution. Some of the features that you’ll see here so I’ll show you. This one has a VESA mount right here. I think this is VESA 100. So you could attach it to an arm or you could attach it
to a different stand. – Right. We actually have, this is also made by Tether Tools itself. You can now really quickly right out of the box mount this, get rid of the stand itself, and if you want to create
an additional height to your digital workstation, which we’re actually
gonna show you later on in this tutorial with Clake Cook. It’s very to take something like this, lift it up off a table, and now you’re working in a mobile station with both your laptop, and also an additional monitor. So you can have like your Color palette on your laptop itself, and then a preview on
the display port on top or display up top. Then this one. – This one doesn’t. – This one doesn’t have it. – You’re limited to just the stand that it comes with. – So you’re not gonna be able to mount. So another thing to consider is, “Can I mount this? “Should I not want to put
it on the stand itself?” – There’s another huge difference between the two. You wanna turn that one around so we can show them? Other way. Alright. So the big difference obviously is the screen texture. So this is glossy, notice it’s very reflective. And this is, matte. Fortunately again, just about all the new displays are matte and if they’re not matte, they’re semi-gloss. Nothing is really as glossy as this. – Except Apple computers they’re all real glossy. – Except Apple computers, yeah. – Apple, what did you do to us? You used to make a matte screen. Remember the 30″ Apple display, we still use those here in the studio. – Cinema displays, yeah. – Cinema displays. They’re great. So, from here if this is something that maybe you have a little bit more budget where would we go from here? – Well, you could stay with the IPS you could actually get a decent one, Full HD, just a little bit more money. – What’s Full HD? – So same resolution as this, maybe bigger size and more ports, for a little bit more money. – How important is it so now that my files are 50 megapixels and they’re huge, should I really consider wanting to put that
preview on a 1080 display? Do I want to retouch on a 1080 display? – That’s a tough question, cause it really all boils down to personal preference, your budget, of course. And just know one thing is, your camera is always
gonna have more pixels than your display. Unless you’re shooting an old digital camera. For example, Full HD is 2 megapixels. There’s 2 million pixels on this screen. Most cameras are what? Like 24 megapixels? A 4K display is 8 million pixels. So you’re never going to be able to display, natively, what your camera outputs. That’s just how it works. – Seems to me though
that the kind of standard is at least a 2K display, right? – This is 2K. – Well if you consider 920×1080. – Yeah. – If you’re considering
that part of 2k display by the marketers. – Like 4K. – 4K, 2K, 2.7K. How many “K”s are there? – The most popular resolutions right now that you could buy are obviously Full HD. Then there’s QHD which is like 2560×1440, like the Thunderbolt displays from Apple. Or 2560×1600 which is a 16:10 ratio. Those are really popular, those are great displays, great resolutions. And then you go up to 4K which is 3840×2160 or something rather. – That’s the 2K display I’m talking about. That’s length and width. The width is what I’m talking about. – Then you got 5K and
there’s gonna be 6K displays. So the resolutions are getting wild. – It’s getting wild folks. – It’s also like, you can’t just plug in a 4K display and work for a lot of people out there. You have to make sure that your hardware is compatible. For example, 4K, requires certain output. So you have to have DisplayPort 1.2 or HDMI 2.0. – What about your graphics card? How important is your graphics card in your computer to support clear display? – Graphics card is incredible important because when you’re running
high resolution displays in order for you to run efficiently you need a lot of video RAM. Which is why so many computers now have like 4GB of video RAM, or 8GB, or more than that. Professional workstations, the sky’s the limit as far as what those graphics cards
will have in memory. – A lot of Apple computers
come standard with 2GB and you can’t upgrade it to 4GB. – Yeah, and it’s not that
you can’t upgrade it. – You have to upgrade it when you buy it. – Yeah. You have to buy it with that spec, and just because it’s capable of displaying to a 4K display, doesn’t mean that it will do it well. So a lot of machines, yeah you can hook up a 4K display to it, but how well will it work? Will your computer be able to keep up with that 4K? Cause it has to pump out, for a lot of displays they’re 60Hz, so it has to keep up
with what you’re doing at 60 frames per second. It requires a lot of power to do that. Probably a little bit
more with PCs than Mac. Just because Apple has really good scaling and a lot of times, for example, the 5K iMac. Even though that screen is a 5K screen, most of the time it’s
actually running on QHD, it’s scaling most of the time. So they kinda cheat that way. So that way you get the most out of the internal graphics. – So it’s actually not 5K sometimes. – Sometimes, sometimes. – Like web? When is it not 5K? – Yeah, if you have a regular laptop and you’re trying to run a 4K display, unless you’re doing just
spreadsheets on the web, that’s okay. If you gonna plan on doing video editing, or if you’re planning to do photoshop where it’s really straining your computer, where you’re moving the canvas around, you’re gonna notice maybe some tearing. – Tearing? – Tearing, yeah. – What’s tearing? That sounds scary. – Where the image on your screen basically breaks apart. A lot of the times it’s
because your hardware isn’t capable of keeping
up with your display. – So there’s a lot to consider here. If this isn’t confusing, and we know that it is
a little bit confusing. I think the best thing to do is first start with your computer itself. Look at the specs of
what that will support and then start there. Next, look at the actual hardware that you’re gonna need, the hookups that you’re gonna need that go to the ports on your computer, and then make a decision on that based on your budget. I would recommend going to somewhere with a really good return policy. Maybe getting one or two to start out, testing them both, look at the colors, calibrate them, and see if there’s any tearing or any sort of lagging that you experience in testing phase, and then choose the one
that’s right for you. Okay, so to recap, I know that’s a lot of
information coming at you. But the first thing that we really want you to consider is A, start with your computer. What do you have to work with? Also think down the road. Are you going to be
upgrading anytime soon? The second step, look at the hardware of
the displays themselves and also things like the IPS, matte screen, glossy. Again, the Acers
themselves is a good brand. They make a large variety of monitors from the very low-end
to the very high-end. Some monitors are more geared towards things like spreadsheets. While some are more geared towards things like graphics. So, this might not be
a solution for everyone but this could get you started out in the tethering market if your budget doesn’t allow for it. (serene techno music)

23 Studio Shoot Introduction With Clay Cook | BTS of Shooting Tethered Photograhy

23 Studio Shoot Introduction With Clay Cook | BTS of Shooting Tethered Photograhy


(electronic music) – I’m Clay Cook, an editorial
and fashion portrait photographer based in Lowell, Kentucky. Today, we’re gonna walk
through step-by-step my workflow for tethering. Tethering is a process
that takes your image from your camera to your computer. And so, it’s a very
vital and important part of what we do on location and in the studio. Today we’ve set up a test
shoot with our model Kaylin and our hair and make-up artist Bethany and we’re gonna create a really
natural looking portrait. It’s gonna be shot on this
elephant background behind me and I’m gonna show you
step-by-step of how we tether in the studio today. Tethering is a vital asset
to how I work in the studio and so, right in front of me, I have all this tethering equipment. This is what we use in the studio and on location. I’m gonna walk through this step-by-step on how to build our tethering workstation and the tethering workstation
used in both the studio and on location. But before I build the set-up, I want to talk about why I tether. There’s a few reasons why. Number one, is a client preview. I like to have a client preview
because I work with teams. I work with hair, make-up,
stylists, art directors, creative directors, and my client. So it’s important that
I have a big preview, a big screen where all my clients and my entire team can
see what I’m shooting at the same time while I’m shooting. So, it gives the entire team the ability to check their own work. So I can check my composition, the hairstylist can check the hair, the make-up artist can check the make-up, so on and so forth. So, it’s a collaboration. Everything we do is with a team. So this tethering workflow
gives us the ability to collaborate and make sure that we have the greatest image possible. Another important facet
for having that preview on a big screen, is that my client is
standing there making sure that this photograph is within
those creative parameters that they first set out. So we wanna make sure that this photograph is something they initially envisioned. And that’s a very important
aspect of shooting tethered and why I shoot tethered. Also, you don’t want a
bunch of these people, your creative team, to be huddled around you staring into a 3.5 inch LCD screen on
the back of your camera. It can get very crowded, very hectic, and it’s just a very annoying process. So by having this tethering workstation, you can provide a nice, comfortable and creative environment for
your team and your client. The second and most
important facet of tethering and why I tether, is that it really slows me down. I think if you shoot with just a camera and you’re spraying and
praying all over the place, you’re gonna be shooting a
significant amount of images and it’s not nearly as precise
as if you were tethered to a laptop with a slowed down workflow and collaborating with a team. So obviously shooting
untethered without a cable is gonna allow some freedom. It’s gonna allow you to move around a lot and, you know, shoot all sorts
of different compositions. But the problem with that
is that you’re gonna shoot a significant amount more imagery. But when you’re tethered to a laptop, it’s gonna slow down that workflow. You’re gonna shoot less, which is gonna really
speed up your workflow and post so that you can
go through these images a lot more and they’re a lot more precise. They’re a lot more exact
to what that vision is so you don’t have to go
through all these random images of something that’s experimental. It’s a much more precise process. Also, when I shoot tethered, I’m using a program called Capture One Pro and that software allows
me to apply a color grade that’s gonna be very
close to the final vision and that’s something
my clients love to see. They love to see something that’s closer to that final product and so Capture One allows
me to apply a color grade which is gonna automatically
apply to every single image that I shoot that flows through
this tethering workstation. Another reason why I love
tethering is ’cause you don’t have to rely on one
single source of memory, a memory card. Instead, you’re backing up to a laptop, which is backing up to an
additional external hard drive. So you’re gonna keep your files organized, you’re gonna make sure
that you have a backup of all these files that
you’re importing as you shoot. And so, with Capture One
Pro, you can name these files and you’re gonna keep your files organized to go to any additional
software such as Lightroom, if you want, or you can go
ahead and start the post process with Capture One on site or on location. So that’s why I tether. So now I’m going to take
you step-by-step through all this equipment and how we build
this tethering workstation in the studio.

Photoshop 101 For Photographers | An Essentials Tutorial To Adobe Photoshop

Photoshop 101 For Photographers | An Essentials Tutorial To Adobe Photoshop


(smooth music) – My name is Pratik Naik, and I am an editorial and commercial retoucher. So, the type of work that I usually do is stuff like commercial projects, like advertising billboards, brands, editorials, fashion magazines. The reason why I worked on this
Photoshop For Photographers is at the moment, there’s nothing really out there that encompasses
what photographers wanna learn in a 101 Photoshop course. We wanted to make a tutorial
for the Photoshop beginners, something someone new to the software could pick up and learn. But in doing so, we
found that this content is valuable for experienced users as well. Understanding the
fundamentals of this program is something every user can benefit from. We were really intentional
with what we kept in this tutorial because
everything included is what you need as a photographer. With this tutorial, I actually made everything easy to understand. From the hardest principles and concepts, like the pen tool, to the
simplest things, like the layers, everything becomes easy to follow. The reason why this course is better than anything else you can get online because it has everything there for you from start to finish. There’s no hunting or seeking. You don’t have to go through and look up tutorials and
mine for specific tools, everything is there in categories for you. And because it’s in video,
if you ever forget something, you can always come back
and look at it again. This tutorial is for every
photographer out there. I feel like if you understand
the fundamentals of Photoshop, you can really take your
business to the next level. It’s easier to learn Photoshop today than it was ten years ago
because you have people, like me, who went
through the grind to find all this information, put it in a package, and allow students to learn in a way that becomes really sufficient. The fundamentals are really
important for photographers because you can learn a lot of techniques when it comes to Photoshop, but you need to understand the core basics in order to think outside the box. Because if you think about it, the people how are making amazing images already have a great
understanding of the fundamentals. Without understanding how Photoshop works, you can’t develop your own style. Even if you don’t intend
on being a photographer and you wanna get into retouching, this would be the first step
in order to master Photoshop. There’s over 20 sections in this tutorial, making it very easy for people to take it at their own pace. It doesn’t have to be frustrating anymore. I’ve taken the last 15 years of knowledge and put it together into one tutorial. The concepts are the core
of what this program does. The principles never change. With this tutorial, knowledge of Photoshop and its fundamentals
will finally allow you to take full advantage of the software and make the most of your images. (smooth music) This tutorial is available at RGGEDU.com.

Seeing the Bigger Picture

Seeing the Bigger Picture


Behind me is our mosaic. So the way it works is that we invited everyone in the world to take a photo and post it to Instagram or Twitter and use the hashtag #EndPovertyMosaic. We find it online and we print it right here. [ZACH BABIARZ, MOSAIC OPERATOR] The computer software here is designed to [ZACH BABIARZ, MOSAIC OPERATOR] specifically place these photos in the correct area on the bigger photo. Each picture has a place to go. The idea behind the mosaic is to bring together the World Bank community. It’s been fun, but also meaningful. It’s a symbol of what we want to accomplish, together. we want to end poverty because it is possible because it is just and because the world would be a better place for all

17 Software Troubleshooting In Tethered Photography Workflow

17 Software Troubleshooting In Tethered Photography Workflow


(calming music) – Okay, now we’ll cover some
software troubleshooting. The keep it simple, stupid, still applies. Sometimes you just need
to restart the program, sometimes you need to
restart the computer, sometimes you restart
the computer, not because it needs restarting but
because you’ve got Google and, Chrome, you got Chrome running
and you’ve got Safari running and it’s chewing your processor. Activity Monitor is a
fantastic application that’s built into the
Mac OS to look, to see where’s my processor, why it’s humming, I’m not doing anything. Oh, look at that, all
these things are open, I didn’t know that they were open, so let’s go ahead and, you
know, quit out the applications that we’re not using
because it has nothing to do with our shoot. That’s, you know, that’s foundational. So a fresh start on the computer,
running only Capture One, that’s a good start. Once you’re in Capture One,
if you go to Preferences and you go into General,
which is the first tab, sometimes depending on
the build of your machine, OpenCL, which is the
graphics acceleration, can be a problem if it’s,
if the graphics card in your machine actually isn’t
supported by Capture One. So it’s good to switch
these Display and Processing to Never, if you’re running into problems. Processing only has to do
with output processing. So, if you are trying to
output and it’s stalling, you don’t understand why, set that to Never, then
restart, you gotta restart the, you gotta restart
Capture One in order for that to take effect. Then, when you start
again, that batch might just start moving just fine. The other thing to look at
is under the Capture tab, whether your camera is connected, whether it’s been checked
that it can connect. Depending on whose computer you’re using, if you’re teching for
somebody and they’re using a different camera than they usually have, they might not have Nikon
and Sony even turned on in their Preferences. So you gotta make sure that
the camera can even connect by checking those boxes. Now, in Capture One 8, if you are looking at an older version, Capture One 8 was using the Canon SDK,
the development kit, so Phase One didn’t create
the math for interpreting the camera, it was delivered by Canon. That has changed in Capture One 9.2. Now it’s fully controlled by Capture, by Phase One, there’s no over, there was a problem in 8,
especially when the 5D, when the 5DS came out
and, if you are running Capture One 8.3.4, the most
recent version should be good. You had to click only the Canon box and de-check everything
else because there was a problem with the Canon
SDK not playing nicely with having other cameras enabled. That’s something that you could look for. In Capture One 9, it’s not a problem. So, if you’re having problems connecting, if you’re having problems tethering, try checking everything
off, except for the camera that you are connecting with. That will keep things simple. Especially when you’re
prepping for a shoot, you don’t wanna be an early adopter of new firmware, an
adopter of new software, an adopter of a new operating system, that little tab that pops
up, that window that pops up, and says “Hey just upgrade to El Cap”, you might not wanna do that
right before your shoot. If you’re gonna do that,
it’s safe to, you know, best practice is to clone
your entire hard drive to a secondary drive so
you’ve got an entire back-up of exactly the way that
operating system was set up. And then go ahead and
install that new one, if it’s not working right,
you got that other version that you can, if you copy it
right, if you use a program like Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper!, you get everything copied
across to that drive, you can boot from it, you
can use it in a pinch. Now, if you’re tethering,
then we know that causes another layer of potential
problem, if you’re trying to have your operating system
run off an external drive and you’re trying to tether
through that same connection, so, you know, careful with that. So, be a slow adopter, we test the software versions, we test the software versions in the different OS versions
at Capture Integration, that’s what we do, we
have a link on our website that people can check in
on to say have we blessed this software yet, have we
said that this was tested and confirmed this firmware is working. You know, because there’s only
so much that the developers can do to test it when they
don’t have as many set-ups as there are in the world of
shooters, using their equipment in the ways that they use it. So, we test it and then when we bless it, it’s still with the caveat
that should be good, we’ve tested it on,
you know, myriad backs, we’ve tested it on myriad situations but there’s still that asterisk,
there could be a problem. Have a back-up, have that
previous version ready to go so if you’re on a shoot day and things are acting squirrelly, you can
go back to what was working the last time and you’re
back up and running. Okay, so your operational
check-list when you’re, when you’re encountering problem, first, quit Capture One, relaunch. If that doesn’t solve it
right away, like right away, then restart the computer,
take that, you know, that, with a solid state
drive, restarting a computer isn’t what, you know, it used to be, they fire up really fast, really easy. To quit the applications
you’ve got running, restart the machine, that
way, when it restarts, you’re not relaunching
all of those applications that aren’t serving you right
now, you’re here to tether so let’s just open up Capture One and that be the only thing. So, first off, shut down those programs, restart the computer, just
have Capture One going, and see if you have success. At that point, then you start
stepping through the other, the other things, the
going into the Preferences, making sure your camera is selected, making sure Activity Monitor isn’t showing that there’s something
running in the background that you might have some malware or something going on that way. It’s always good to have some
kind of a drive utility tool that makes sure that
you’re, like a DiscWarrior, something that’s keeping the
catalog file organized along, that tracks all the rest of your files. It can be a hairy place
when you’ve got seven shoots on your computer and
there’s a lot of files. Corruption can start happening
and you don’t even notice it. There’s good, pro-active things
to do to keep your computer in fine, running shape when
this is your primary way of getting your, you know,
your very important shoot into a reliable hard
drive through the layers of software, firmware,
and operating system. That raps up software troubleshooting. Next, we’re gonna move into
setting up Capture Pilot. (calming music)

Dixie Dixon Interview | PRO EDU in Brazil

Dixie Dixon Interview | PRO EDU in Brazil


(slow moody electronic awesome music) – So Dixie, we now come to one of my favorite parts of any tutorial, and that’s where we get to sit
down and talk a little bit, get to learn a little bit about your life so our viewers kinda know a
little bit more about you. ‘Cause frankly, we’ve had a
great time over this last week. – [Dixie] Yes. – We’ve made a ton of images, and traveled a long way together. (laughing) Everybody was living in a house, so you really definitely
get to know somebody. – Yes, it was a blast. – It has been a blast right?
– Total blast. – It’s been a blast. – I’m really grateful
for this opportunity. – [Interviewer] Good.
– Yeah. – Good, I can’t wait to see
all the images you made, ’cause when we’re
sitting here calling ’em, they’re looking fantastic,
– Oh good. – and I can’t wait to see what happens with Pratik on the retouching, and it’s some nice work in there. – Thank you. – You’re welcome. So, let’s have a little toast. – Awesome. – To an amazing week in Brazil, right? – Yay, absolutely. – So, let’s kinda back up a bit, and talk about your whole
life story, like how, your growing up and how
you got into photography. So let’s start from the beginning. – Okay. – Growing up as a kid,
you grew up in Texas. – Yeah, so I grew up in Houston, Texas. – [Interviewer] Yeah. – And, I was in every single
kind of different club. I was in band, I was in soccer. I’m definitely a band nerd,
played the saxa-ma-phone. – I know, we both did,
which is totally cool. – Yes, that is really cool. – Both soccer players,
both saxophone players. – Both studied abroad in London. – I know, went to the same school. – That’s crazy. – Which is amazing we found that out. – Yeah. – Alright, so you grew
up, starting soccer, let’s go back to that,
’cause that’s actually a pivotal point in your life, ’cause something happened
on that soccer field. – Mmhmm. – With a big name change.
– Yes. – Let’s talk about that. – So there were four Lindsays or five Lindsays on the soccer team. – Right.
– And– – Which, that’s your real name, Lindsay. – Yes, my real name’s Lindsay so, it was tricky calling
people on and off the field, so my best friend Courtney ended up nicknaming me Pixie Dixie at the time. (laughing) – Right. Pixie kinda fits. (laughing) – Eh, Pixie’s really cheesy, but, Dixie ended up sticking, so, that just, and people said that sorta
suited me better so– – [Interviewer] Yeah, Dixie makes sense. – Yeah, so I just went with Dixie. – So you became Dixie Dixon.
– Yes. – Right there on the soccer field. – Mmhmm – And it has really and
truly become your name. – It has. – Which is awesome. – Yeah. – It’s a great name, by the way. – Thank you. – Love it, it’s very cool. So did you stay in Houston the
whole time or when did you? – I did. I, and then I was um, so I
really hated marching band, so our band director was
really mean and he made me cry. – [Interviewer] Why? – ‘Cause I had a really hard time marching and playing the saxophone
at the same time. I could play really
well, I was first chair, but you add marching to the equation and I was just running into tubas and. (laughter) Just, was a bad, it was
a really bad (laughing). – I’m trying to picture you
running into a tuba, I like it. – Yep, that was brutal. – That’s funny. – So I quit band and I never quit things. Like once I do things, I go for it. – You’re committed. – I commit it. So, that was a huge deal
for me to stop doing band. I joined the yearbook
staff ’cause that was the only way to get out of doing marching and still be in the band. So I ended up joining yearbook staff and then I ended up falling in love, I had to take all these dark room classes to be in yearbook so I
spent my whole summer taking photography classes
to get into yearbook staff. And that ended up being my passion. So thanks to that band director that yelled at me on the field and made my cry. – Thanks to being clumsy
and running into tubas. – (Laughing) That too. Realizing what you are not good at. – That’s funny. – Yes. So my image ended up making the cover of the yearbook and so that’s. – What was the image? – It was an image, actually,
it’s kind of funny, it was a, it looked very candid. It was a picture of
two of the cheerleaders cheering at the game but
it was actually a game that they were losing and I
talked to all the cheerleaders. I said, “Okay I want you
guys to go out there, “I’m gonna make a really
cool picture of y’all. “Go out there and scream like you are “just kicking butt out there.” – Right, so you were
directing at an early age. – I directed it already, so I don’t know. Probably people don’t know that at the high school that
that was totally staged. But that’s okay. – I imagine this was a big high school. This is Houston. – Yes, 4,000. – 4,000 whew. So 1,000 in your class? – Yes. – That’s a lot of kids. – It was a lot of kids. – So there were a lot of photographers, you weren’t the only one? – Yeah, yeah. Their yearbook staff was quite a lot. – Cool. And then off to TCU. – Yeah, off to TCU. Majored in business, entrepreneurship. I went to TCU because they
were one of the first schools that had an entrepreneurship program. So I majored in business
and minored in art. – [Interviewer] Right on. – Yeah. I would have loved to majored
in photography but I realized I need to figure out the
business side of things. – You know what, I think
that’s a lot smarter. ‘Cause truthfully, there are a lot of great photographers that never make it because they can’t run a business. And if you can’t run a business, you’re not gonna be here in
five years, ten years, 20 years. So that’s a really
important skill to have. – Yeah and if you’re not good at business, you can always hire people or start working with people
that are good at business to maybe you guys can collaborate. – [Interviewer] Yeah, absolutely. – Yeah, so if you
weren’t a business major, it’s good to get to know,
maybe go to business classes just to learn the side of it and then work with people who are good at business. – Right. – Yeah, so there’s always a way. – Right, exactly. And how long were you in London? – I was in London for three months. – Okay so you did a semester abroad? – Yes. – That’s so crazy we
actually did the same school. – Yes! That is so weird. I Googled fashion photography study abroad and there was only one program and it was through Syracuse. – [Interviewer] Really? – Yeah. – Oh that’s cool. – They had the only program and I was the only Southerner in the program. It was all Northerners so they, I had a bigger accent then. – [Interviewer] Yeah, a little thicker. – So they got a kick out of that. – More y’alls back then? – Yes. – Right on. And they definitely didn’t have that program when I was there. – Huh? Interesting. – In fact, my favorite class though was London The History Through Architecture. Which was amazing.
– That’s cool. – ‘Cause we would just cruise
around the entire city. – Right? It’s beautiful. – Yeah, London is an amazing place. – Stunning city. – Amazing place. – [Dixie] Yeah. – So you come back, you
graduate then from TCU. What happens now, where are you off too? – So I was assisting a wedding
photographer at the time, all throughout college
and I ended up telling him that I needed to focus
on building my portfolio. I wasn’t passionate about weddings so I started doing test
shoots on the weekend, shooting portraits, paid portraits. All throughout my senior year I pretty much started my business. – You started your photo
business senior year in college? – [Dixie] Mmhmm, yes. – Wow, that’s pretty progressive. – [Dixie] Yeah. – People don’t really do that. – Yeah. I’ve always, I just
knew what I wanted to do and I was like, I was
just gonna go for it. – [Interviewer] Right on. – Yeah. – So what were your
first test shoots like? What were you doing initially? – I was just putting my
friends in my clothes and taking pictures of them. (laughs) No, I was putting friends
in cool, fashion-y looks. ‘Cause after I got back from London I saw the importance of
hair, makeup, wardrobe and I didn’t necessarily have
the models to work with yet. But it was great ’cause I got
to use my friends as practice. So I would set up concepts and shoot for little local magazines like, Parker County Today
magazine was my first cover. – Nice. Parker County Today? – Parker County Today. – Is that in Houston or Dallas? – It’s in Weatherford, Texas. – Weatherford, Texas. Where’s Weatherford? – Weatherford is about an
hour outside Fort Worth. – Alright. – Yeah and it was kind of
funny because the models wore, you know I did the styling,
hair and makeup and photography. (laughter) – [Interviewer] That’s a lot of work. – They had nothing, they didn’t have crew and I didn’t have an assistant. So, we got boots from this country store and they had leather soles
and the models walked around, they were just a bunch of college friends, they walked around on gravel. – [Interviewer] Destroyed the boots. – Destroyed the boots so I
ended up getting paid in boots. ‘Cause I destroyed the boots. – I hope they were your size. – No, they were men’s nines. (laughs) – So you couldn’t even do it anyway, you couldn’t wear em’ yourself. – Nope. But my ex-boyfriend has those now. (laughter) So, anyways. – It was a benefit for him I guess. – Yeah, they’re cool. – So what do you think was your first real break in photography? When you’re starting to
put your book together and you’re shooting friends, and you’re getting away from the wedding photographer that you worked with. What’s the first big break for you? – My first real big break, I mean, I would say it’s a bunch of baby steps. I ended up working with
people on Model Mayhem and I ended up shooting an
agency model on Model Mayehem and the agency liked the pictures. And so I ended up shooting
a bunch of their new faces. A lot of people don’t
know that you can actually go into an agency and ask if
you can shoot their new faces and if they like their work,
you can shoot em’ for free. – It’s a great proving
ground for photographers as well as the new faces. – Yes, exactly. – ‘Cause, everybody needs to get seasoned. And that’s a prime place to do it. – Exactly. – How long did you do that? – A couple years. – A couple years. – Yeah, just building a portfolio. – And that’s where you feel
like you really got your chops. – Mmhmm. And at the time, I mean
I had to figure out how to also make a living. So I was shooting weddings,
portraits, product. And I tried to do high end
portraits so I could charge more. So I would have them, send
them to the MAC makeup counter, get their makeup done
and I would help them style their wardrobe so I could sort of make it a higher price point than just your normal portraits. – [Interviewer] Did that work? – It did work, yeah. So I was charging like $1500
for a portrait session. – That’s good. – Yeah, so making decent
money to pay the bills so I could build my fashion portfolio. (laughter) – I think it’s interesting that you say it took a little bit of time to build this ’cause I feel like your career has been, it’s been a meteor ride, it’s been fast I think in many ways. You are a Nikon Ambassador
and I have to imagine you’re the youngest Nikon Ambassador. How did that whole
relationship come about? How did they notice you? – Yeah absolutely. I always had this goal since I graduated to work with Nikon ’cause I’ve been such a avid Nikon shooter my entire life. ‘Cause my dad gave me
my first Nikon camera and it’s just stuck ever since. So I, during college, I had a
great business teacher tell me that if you’re interested in
working in a certain industry, join a trade organization
associated with that industry. – Smart advice. – Yeah, so I went home, Googled photography trade organization, and there was a few that popped up, ASMP, APA, WPPI, PPI. So I joined all of the student versions and sort of, would get their emails, and one day I got an email
about a contest for WPPI. It was for emerging
photographers in college and so, of course I’m a procrastinator, I put together everything
and I FedEx’d overnighted, the portfolio for that
contest, it got there. And a couple months go
by and I got a call from the president of WPPI
and I won that contest. – [Interviewer] Awesome. – So that was cool. – [Interviewer] What was the image or what was the set of images? – It was a portfolio
of images that I shot, like personal work I shot during college. – [Interviewer] Oh right on. – Yeah, so, the presentation
I think was a big part of it. I had it put together really well in a nice portfolio and
resume and everything. So I ended up winning that
and that sort of allowed me, winning that contest enabled
me to go to WPPI for free. So they flew me out to Vegas and attended this whole trade organization and get to see other, these
amazing photographers speak about photography and
business and all these things and I also got to know all of
the people in the industry. Like the president of
Rangefinder magazine, who actually fast forward three years, he introduced me to the
marketing director at Nikon. So that was a really cool connection. The guy at Nikon said, “You
know we don’t really do “sponsorships or anything but
I’ll critique your portfolio.” So I said, “Absolutely!” – Wow that’s cool, yeah. – You know, so, I was just super excited to meet someone who worked for Nikon. – Did you ask him for a sponsorship or did that just come
out of a conversation? – No, no, he just kind of– – He just said, “Hey we
don’t really do this, “but I would love to take
a look at your work.” – Yes. – Wow, cool. – Yeah, he immediately said that actually. I was like, “That’s fine, I’m not like, “working, you know I’m not going for that, “I just would love to hear your opinion “since you work for this camera company “as a marketing director.” So I brought my book back the next day and we sat in the lounge at Nikon and he sort of looked through
my work and he sort of saying, “Oh my gosh, so you shot these images?” And I said, “Yeah, yeah
I shot these images.” He’s like, “Well keep me updated.” He was really curious and so I kept him updated through email
every two or three weeks for about a year and eventually, they hired me to shoot for one of their consumer level cameras, the Nikon S1. – [Interviewer] Oh cool, right. – So they gave me a
budget to go out and shoot for this camera for their ad images. And then they ended up
hiring me to speak about that at their booth at the
different trade shows. So that’s how it all started. – That’s cool. – Yeah. – So did you feel like you
were pestering him at all when you keep, ’cause you sent him images on a regular basis, which he asked for it. – Yes, he asked for it. – Which is cool. – He asked. Had he not asked, I don’t
know if I would have. – Right. – ‘Cause you don’t want to pester people. – [Interviewer] No you don’t. – I would just say in an email, “Hey just keeping you
updated on my new work. “Here’s this shot with this camera.” – [Interviewer] Wow that’s so cool. – Yeah. – What was the first campaign? – The Nikon 1J3. – What was the subject matter,
like who did you shoot? – Oh, yes, for the first
campaign it was all lifestyle. All lifestyle images. We shot some, there was
a lot of action shots ’cause they wanted to showcase the capabilities of the camera, that it could capture like, fast motion, like a few frames per second. This small mirror-less
camera could capture that. So we did biking, we did
skating, lots of action stuff. – So did they, effectively, they really and truly are a client. – Yes, absolutely. – And they’ll come to you
and they’ll give you a budget and say, “I want you to
feature this new camera.” And are you in charge of all the creative? – Yes. – Like you come up with everything, you know you have this dollar ammount? – Well they give me a
budget and then they give me what ethnicities, talents and
age group they’re looking for. – Okay so they give you the demographic? – Yes, they give me the demographic. They give me the number of shots. Maybe, ooh. – Spider monkey. – Sorry (laughs). They give me what they’re
looking for basically and then I go out and I
create it in my own style. – That’s so cool. – Yeah. – What a unique opportunity. – Yes, it’s very neat. – How often are you shooting for them? – Very often, actually (trails off). – Wow. – Oh my gosh. – Look how cute he is. – Oh. – Oh he wants to take it all. (laughter) He doesn’t know how. It’s okay buddy. Have as much as you want. – Oh he’s so hungry! (monkey squeaks) That’s amazing! – I know, it’s incredible. Honestly, this has been one
of the most unique trips. – This is amazing. – And unique experiences. – Oh, good job. – Wow! – Wow. That was awesome. – You know, the interview has always been one of my favorite parts of the tutorial ’cause it’s just great to
sit and talk with people. – Yeah. – Having spider monkeys come down and take melon off of– – Just takes it to another level. – Basically taking it off the set. Completely takes it to another level. Unbelievable. I know so many photographers
are really curious about the inner workings of being in a relationship with a camera company. And I’m sure a lot of
people don’t realize, in many ways, it’s not a sponsorship, but they are effectively a client. – [Dixie] Yes. – They’re actually hiring
you to feature their cameras. – [Dixie] Exactly. – So how much information
to they give you? When you know new cameras are coming out, how much do they share with you? How far in advance, ’cause I know other people are gonna want to know this. – Oh man, it is tough. – How far advance are you
getting your hands on stuff? – Well you know sometimes
I’m not working with, I’m working with gear that’s already out. Like as far as that first campaign, that camera had already been released. They needed new images for the ads. But with the D5 campaign
and the D5500 campaign, those hadn’t been released yet. So that’s actually through, when they’re releasing a new camera, that’s through Nikon Japan
and their agency K & L. So they approach me
separate from Nikon USA. – Do they get a lot of input from you, from all the ambassadors on the quality of the cameras,
what you guys want? – Yes, definitely. They have us go through meetings with the Nikon engineers,
talk about the gear and what we need as photographers
to keep it all current so they can really reach consumers and give consumers what
they’re looking for. So they’re very, I guess
the D5 was a few months before the camera released. – That’s pretty cool. – So I had to keep, you know quiet. – I’m sure you have to
sign a non-disclosure – Oh yes. – To keep everything nice and quiet. – Yes, they’re really, yes. – Sure, don’t want the competitors to know what they’re up to. – Absolutely. – That’s dangerous territory. – It is. – But it’s also a real privilege for you. – Yes, very grateful. – So obviously Nikon is
really and truly a client. Who are the other clients
that you work for? – I work, you know it’s funny ’cause I call myself a fashion
photographer but honestly, I think I’m more a commercial photographer ’cause I shoot a range. I shoot beauty, lifestyle, fashion, just anything advertising
commercial related is my passion. So I shoot for a shoe
company like Florsheim Shoes, (monkey squeaks) beauty companies like Macadamia Oil, which is a hair oil at Brovage, a pharmaceutical company called Oltherapy. – Wow somebody’s chattering behind me. – So cute. So I was saying Oltherapy which
is a pharmaceutical company, all kinds of different
lifestyle work, REI of India, which is Woodland Worldwide,
which is lifestyle. So really kind of a broad range. – Yeah you kind of have clients
from all over the world. I think you and I are also very
similar in our client bases in that we do very corporate direct work. A lot of photographers
are making images that they want and a lot of
photographers in this day and age are almost strictly social
media photographers. – [Dixie] Yeah that’s true. – Which can get you attention,
it can get you work, but it’s really the corporate jobs, one, that’s paying and gives
you longevity with your career. – [Dixie] Yes, absolutely. – So is that hard for you
to work with corporations and have to fit within their, ’cause I know for me personally, the images aren’t really for me. – Uh huh. – I’ve gotta nail it for the client. – Uh huh, right. – There are a lot of constraints that corporations put on you. – There are, absolutely. (monkeys chirp) Wow! That’s amazing. – There’s so much chatter. – Yes! It’s like a chorus out here. So working with corporations,
you have to be sure and capture exactly
what they’re looking for but with every shoot I try to capture my own style at the end of it. So once I’ve gotten what they want, I create something that
really inspires me at the end. – Right. Here comes that big one,
wow, look at his face. – Wow! (giggles) – So we were talking about clients and client structures
because it’s definitely different when you’re working
directly for corporations. You have to understand
the brand messaging. You have to understand
exactly what the clients want. – Exactly, yes. – With lifestyle imagery, how much freedom are they giving you to create the mood and still hit the mark? – You know it’s, with clients you really have to go with what their vision is but I try to bring my own flavor to it. – Right. – If that makes sense. So I’ll capture exactly
what they’re looking for and then I put my own spin on it ’cause ultimately, clients
are hiring me for your vision. – [Interviewer] Absolutely. – Not just their vision,
so they want you to put your own creative spin on it, bring something else to the table. So I try to do that in my images. – You get to travel quite a bit now. – Yes. – Where are some of the
places that you go to work? – Oh gosh, I’ve been all over. Miami, Puerto Rico,
Ibiza, Spain, Barcelona, Cannes, France, L.A., New York. – Everywhere. – Everywhere. It’s really cool about
being a photographer. – Yeah it’s a pretty remarkable career. When you hit the right beat, it’s a pretty remarkable career. – Absolutely. – We were talking earlier, you were talking about your parents. Which I know you are
really close with them. – Yes. – You’re an only? – Yes, I’m an only child. – Really tight with your folks. And your mom was pretty instrumental in helping you get your
business off the ground. – Absolutely, yes. – Tell me about her roll. What was she doing to help you and what was that relationship like to have your mother working with you? – Absolutely, she is extremely talented at branding and fashion and she was actually instrumental
in like this hat thing. I love wearing a hat when I shoot. And she was like, “You should, you know, “be unique and really express your style.” And so I started wearing hats. – It’s kind of your signature. – Kind of became a thing, yeah. – I think a monkey just grabbed an apple off the back of my chair. – I think he did! That’s amazing!
– That’s amazing. – And she uh, she did a lot of my portrait retouching, starting out. So I helped train her how to retouch ’cause I was so busy when
I was shooting weddings and there was so much volume. – [Interviewer] Really? – Yes. So she was doing a lot of my retouching. – Why did you chose to
work with your mother when she didn’t know retouching verses going to a retoucher? – Well I didn’t have a budget for a really experienced retoucher so she worked very minimally. – Cool mom! – Yeah, totally cool mom, she’s awesome. – Way to help you out, yeah, yeah. – So she was really talented at that. – Awesome, does she still work with you? – She’s great at idea
generation, really great. So we’ll collaborate on different things, with ideas and also just certain
select projects and things. So, she’s super talented. – Awesome. One of the things that you and I were talking about earlier
when we were on the set, the process of creating images. It’s completely different to work in the corporate structure where you’re creating a set of images
for a corporation. – Yes. – Verses doing them on your own. – Yes. – Creating images on your own
is hard when you’re a client. – Yes, it is. – What’s that process like for you? – Meaning when I’m creating personal work? – Yeah. – Yeah that’s really
tough, very indecisive. – Yeah. – Because you’re trying to really express your own vision and create new, interesting, unique work. – Right. – So it’s hard to make up your mind. It’s hard for me ’cause
I have so many concepts I wanna shoot, like personally, it’s hard for me to make up my mind on which one’s to shoot. So, hello. (giggles) – So quite honestly, this whole experience has been really amazing. – It has. – This has been one of
the most amazing trips I’ve ever been on in my life. – Me too. Such an incredible experience. The landscape here is just insane. The models are stunning. It’s just been such a dream. – Yeah I think this place has really had a lot to offer all of us. – Yes. – From your point of view
as the art director on this, as the image creator, what
has Brazil offered you that you couldn’t get in Dallas or in L.A. or anywhere in the states. What has this production brought to you? – Absolutely. I think just being able
to shoot so much volume of different imagery, all in a week. It would take me six months to do this amount of test shoots in one week. (laughs) You know? ‘Cause it’s a lot of production work. Figuring out the concepts,
the hair and makeup. It was almost like we
did a different shoot three times a day or twice a day. It was a really unique opportunity. – Yeah, it’s pretty incredible. I think that you are gonna have a completely new portfolio. I think that the landscape
here is so unique. – It’s beautiful. – That it’s really gonna bring something special to your images. – Yes and the models have a really international look about them. They don’t look like they’re from New York, L.A., Dallas,
they look very exotic and I mean, I would come
back here in a heartbeat to do a shoot production. – Let’s talk about the crew too ’cause we had an amazing crew. – Yes. – Oh my God, that guy,
his face was so cute. – That was awesome! – I looked down and saw this
little face stuffed with bread. (giggles) Unbelievable, I can’t wait
for my kids to do this. It’s gonna be fabulous. Let’s talk about the crew. – Yes. – Crew is so important. – Yes, it’s everything. – I mentioned you have
a pretty regular crew. I mean obviously we met Eric on this who is an amazing dude. – [Dixie] He is amazing. – He’s really your right hand. Tell me about the rest of your crew that you work with on a regular basis. – Yeah absolutely. I have an incredible producer, Nancy. She, took me a few years
to find someone that, she is just on it, I mean,
she makes things happen so quickly and like a lot of times I’ve worked with people before that, a client would ask for
something and be like, “No, we can’t do that,”
and they’d sort of, just weren’t like, I am
a can do personality. If a client wants something
and they have a budget for it, we’re gonna freaking make it happen. And Nancy has that mentality that I do to. So I love working with her
and I only surround myself with really positive, enthusiastic people. – You are one of the most positive and upbeat people I’ve ever met. – [Dixie] Thanks. – Which is great. I’m pretty much the same way. I feel very much like the
glass is always half full. – Yes, absolutely. – I would much rather go
through life that way. – Absolutely. – And you definitely bring that upbeat, positive attitude to everything. – Good! – So I think you’re surrounding yourself with people who match you in that sense. – Absolutely ’cause it took
me forever to find this crew. It took me a few years. I worked with tons of different people and some people would
bring drama to the set and I just can’t handle that. – How do you handle that? – I feel like you have
to take people aside and really talk with them about it. I had a makeup artist that was sort of belittling the models before. – Seriously? Yeah, before I was supposed to shoot them. And I was like, “Look, you can’t. “You either need to keep it positive “or we need to find a
different makeup artist.” Because that– – [Interviewer] That’s bad behavior. – Drains the model’s confidence right before I’m about to shoot them. And then I had a stylist
tell one of the models that the models weren’t
skinny enough or something. I’m like, just, I can’t. I never worked with them again. – [Interviewer] Yeah that’s bad. – I can’t do that. Gotta keep it positive and everything can be switched around to a positive. Things happen organically. – Right, like our getting washed out. – Yes, exactly. – We saw it as an opportunity
to make some changes, we fine tuned things and came back and got some amazing images. – Exactly. – I think our makeup artist was unreal. – Un, insane, unbelievable. – Amazing talent. – I was trying to say
unbelievable and insane and it came out like. (laughter) – That’s okay, it’s good to make up a word every once in a while, doesn’t mean to. – Yeah that’s okay. – Absolutely need to. – So, yeah, she was incredible. I really work hard when I travel and I’m not able to use a similar crew. I try to find people,
like I search on Facebook, Google, all these things to find the right person for the job. I don’t just let a producer handle it. I really like to be a part
of every part of production ’cause it enables me to create the images I’m looking for. – You’re big into research. – Yes. – It surprised me quite frankly. You’re really into researching. Is it a control issue for you? You feel like you gotta
control every aspect or why, where did you develop that? Did that happen in college or? – I think that’s my nature. I like to be over prepared so I can relax the day of the shoot and just be and let things happen. So the being a little bit control freak in the production stage allows me to be open to moments of serendipity
the day of the shoot. Like people walking
around with surfboards, oh we can use that surfboard. You know, not being so freaking out that, I’m relaxed ’cause I know the
production’s put together. – I think you surround yourself with good people too that are looking out, like Eric is looking out for your lighting and all the technical stuff. You can focus on what you want to focus on which is the composition. – [Dixie] Exactly. – Getting the model to
move, the composition and really making it flow. – And I end up getting a lot more, ’cause I mean I for five years or so, I was doing all my own
lighting, everything, so I have a really good handle
on lighting and technical. I’m not an overly technical
person but I do know it and so it enables me to
help direct and collaborate with people that are even
more skilled than I am. – Right. And I think that’s an important
thing for people to realize. You don’t have to have every skill set. – [Dixie] No. – Play up your strengths and
if you’re not that technical, learn what you need to learn and also surround yourself with the people that are gonna take care of that for you. – Exactly, exactly. ‘Cause it took me a while
where I had a budget where I could hire a really
great assistant, you know? So, it’s good to get there. – It does take a little
while to get there. – [Dixie] Yes. – What do you think is your most favorite image to date
that you’ve ever captured? – I would have to say it was an image that I shot when I was working
for that reality TV show. – [Interviewer] Yeah. – For Get Out. That’s when I got to travel. That was a couple years out
of school I booked that gig. – Yeah let’s talk about that ’cause we really haven’t talked
about that period at all. – [Dixie] Okay, yeah. – This was a major, major break for you. – Yes. That was a huge break. So I ended up, I had a portfolio from after college and setting
up test shoots and things, it was all personal work,
so I had a really nice book. And it so happened that a video producer was looking for a photographer and I new an editor that
was editing for the TV show, a few TV shows for this producer and she knew he was looking for a photographer and she immediately thought of me and said, “Hey you guys should meet “and see if it’s a good fit.” And he looked through my book and really liked the work in there and he hired me to shoot for a TV show called Doheny Models which was in L.A. It was another model reality TV show. It was really funny. I’d never worked with reality or anything. It was really interesting. – What was it like? – I liked it! It was a blast. – Was it scripted? – Not really. – Really? – Yeah not really. – It was pretty real then? – I wouldn’t say it was real but it was not, I mean they
set up the situations and just sort of let things happen. But I got to be the photographer. So I got to test shoot
all the models on the show and I was on the show as well. So then that evening we went to dinner, I said, “You know this was a blast. “If you have any other shows
that you need photographers “for, for your advertising, let me know.” And he said, “Well
actually we could use you “in Miami next week for the show Get Out.” So I ended up shooting for that TV show and then they kept me on
the show for four years. – [Interviewer] Four years? – Yeah. – [Interviewer] Great run. – 21 seasons. – Wow. – Yeah. – Wow. – It’s a lot. – That’s a lot of work. – Yes. – So that had you rolling
around all over the place too? – Yes. – Where’d you get to go with that? – All over. We shot, it was funny,
to keep the budget low, we shot a lot in Miami
and then they would have their main host travel to
all the exotic locations and they would stage the photo shoots like they were in these other locations. So we shot a lot of them in Miami but we also went to
Puerto Rico, Ibiza, Spain. – That’s pretty scripted,
that’s pretty fake. – Yeah it is pretty fake. Scripted, I’m thinking like a script, like a set out script,
but yeah it was pretty. – Yeah. – Yeah so it was, I’d say, that’s why I started shooting swimsuit models. I never thought I would
love doing that but, really enjoyed it. – [Interviewer] Pays to be open. – Yeah, absolutely, open to adventure. – Alright so what was your favorite image? – Oh sorry! So it was an image shot
in Canada, in Toronto. A French model called,
her name was Geneveive and she just had something about her that I really loved and
she was very down to earth and created this amazing set of images. It was really cloudy out
that day, it was freezing. We had her in the water
at the Scarborough Bluffs and she had wet hair and
she’s sitting on this rock and it just looks so serene. I think that’s one of my favorites. – If you could redo your favorite image, what would you do to make it better? – Oh I would do a slightly
different composition. I was really tight and
the location was amazing. I think I would get more wide angle shots. But we were always, I
only had like five minutes to shoot each model so I
was really stuck on time. – [Interviewer] Wow that’s fast. But that’s great training. – Yes, so true. – I mean that, I would imagine, really pushed your eye fast. Make decisions fast. Which I think is kind of
interesting that you say in personal work you’re
a little bit indecisive. – Yes. – But you really had this proving ground that made you have, you had to make quick decisions in order to shoot. Five minutes with a model is nothing. – Is nothing, yeah. Cause they had to do video
and stills of each girl. So, it was good. – Are you surprised you are
where you are with your career? – I mean, yeah. I mean, I’m just grateful. – Yeah good. – I feel like I walk around just grateful. – That’s good. – Yeah. – Where do you wanna go with it? – Um. – That’s a hard question. Like, where do you go? If you’re gonna put stuff
out in the universe, like you wanna work for Nikon, like where do you wanna go
with this career of yours? – Yeah, so I’ve written
down Victoria’s Secret, Sports Illustrated on
my dream client list. Hopefully I’ll be shooting for them soon. – That would be amazing. – Yeah. I had a good meeting. – Oh you’ve met with them? Good. I’m sure it’ll happen. – I hope so. I would be really excited. (laughter) I’d be jumping up and down inside. – I’d be excited for you. You’ll have to call us and let us know. – Yes, absolutely. – What were some of your favorite images here at this tutorial,
cause you got a lot of portfolio work out of this, a ton of it. – Yes, absolutely. I really loved, gosh
when I was looking over at the Ford models page this one girl really stood out to me a lot, Natalie. She looks like a supermodel
and she was incredible. That was during the editorial shoot. So very ethereal,
there’s just some quality about her mood and the background that just really came together. – Yeah those shots are amazing, she is definitely something else. – Incredible. – Now that you’ve had a chance to experience putting this tutorial together, what do you want people
to take away from it? Like what are your hopes that people are gonna learn from seeing your process, seeing your work and just kind of seeing how you handle things? – Absolutely. I think what I want people to really take away from this is that you can do it. That you can really, like if you have something that you’re going for, an image that you’re going for, you can make it happen it’s just gonna be a lot of hard work but it is possible. Like I didn’t even know lighting when I graduated college but I’ve sort of forced myself to learn about strobes and all these different
types of light sources and there’s always a way. There’s always a way to create it and I don’t know all the answers. I’ve only been doing this
about six or seven years so I’m not been doing this 20 years so I’m still learning a lot too. And I think people
hopefully can relate to that and sort of create a framework. Like, they can make some amazing stuff and just start from what they have. Like, you don’t have to have all the best gear when you’re starting out. – Oh definitely not. – Yeah. Like the D5500 we created
some amazing images, beauty images of him with that camera and I’ll use those in my portfolio. – And this came with the, that little point and shoot mirror-less. – [Dixie] Yeah. – I mean you got a couple portfolio shots of him in the water. – Absolutely. – [Interviewer] Not expensive gear. – Yes, not expensive gear. I started out with one lens and one camera and as I’ve grown my business and made money from certain jobs, I’m always investing
it back in the business to buy gear or and I
always rent gear a lot. You can always rent,
keep your overhead low. Don’t spend a ton of money starting out on all the best equipment
’cause you don’t need it yet. I think that’s the main thing. I just want people to know that photography is approachable
and that now is like better time than ever to try
to do something in photography. – So other than watching
you randomly whistle at times during this tutorial, what are we gonna show our viewers? I think we put together a
pretty amazing tutorial. – [Dixie] Yes. – With you, covering a
lot of different things. Give me a little rundown of what the viewer is gonna expect to see out of this. – Okay, absolutely. The viewer will hopefully take
in how I work with a crew. How I get together hair, makeup, wardrobe, where I find these people. How I art direct all of these people and working with the team
and how I work on set, I think is really huge. And just learning how
these productions happen ’cause when I was starting out, I never knew how a production happened. I didn’t know that there
was so many people involved in the creation of these images. So I think hopefully
they’ll take home that and also a ton of lighting tips. How I work with lighting
and create this natural look and how to utilize all different
aspects of photography, camera settings, posing,
so many different things. – Yeah I think there’s a lot in it. We’re truly covering you
as a lifestyle photographer but we’re showing editorial,
the telling of a story, kind of how it comes
about and where it leads. We’re doing swimwear, which is
also very lifestyle oriented. There’s just a wide range
of different types of shots and I think that they will
see the way that you work and your work flow with that crew ’cause it’s so incredibly important. We’ve also shown then something
a little different this time where you and I sit down
and kind of call together, where we look through the
images and talk about them and see what we like
and what we don’t like. – [Dixie] What works and doesn’t work. – Yeah and it’s really
cool to go back and do that where you have an opportunity to look and see where the
composition is really strong and where it’s weak and
it’s a great opportunity to kind of study models and the way they move and the way they pose. – Yes, absolutely. – I think that’s gonna be one of the important things that
people take away from this. – Yeah and just for people to know that I don’t instantly go out there
and create an epic image. Like, it’s a process. – It is a process. – And think as a creative, you kind of can let it evolve and
let yourself experiment ’till you get a really amazing image. Like not every frame
that I shoot’s awesome. I shoot some really crappy images. And you get some amazing ones and that’s part of the process,
that’s part of the beauty of getting those one iconic shot, so. – But it’s not gonna stop at the shot because we’re gonna work with Pratik. – Exactly. – My favorite re-toucher. – To make em’ even better. – Yeah you work with Pratik a lot. – I love Pratik. – What’s your relationship like with him. – He is incredible. I outsource all of my
beauty retouching to him. And he is just very detailed. He sees things that I
don’t even think about. So he really creates a
beautiful finished product for my clients to go and then use that for ads, for editorial,
magazines, whatever it is. – He really has great understanding
what the client needs. – [Dixie] He does. – And he understands not
to push images too far, how to really bring them to life. – [Dixie] Exactly. – In fact we all kind of met at a workshop together a couple years ago. – [Dixie] Yes. – You, Pratik and I were
all teaching down there. – It’s really neat how
that comes together. – Yeah it’s kind of funny. – I love that. – Now we’re all working together on this project which is amazing. – Exactly. You have to find retouchers
that you can trust too because a lot of things
haven’t been released yet. You wanna make sure people aren’t out sharing stuff on Instagram and things. And he’s very careful. – That’s a really valid point. And particular when you’re
doing stuff for Nikon. – [Dixie] Yes. – And I run into that too with product that hasn’t been released yet. And I have to sign an NDA. – Yes. – And I have to make sure that. – Your retoucher does. – Absolutely. Because that stuff can’t leak. Yeah it’s interesting the different skill sets you have to find in people. – It is. – It’s not just that they
have to be a good retoucher, they have to be trustworthy
and professional. – Exactly, that’s very true. And actually, the Nikon image, they don’t really allow retouching much. Especially in Nikon Japan so
you have to shoot in camera. So I don’t really outsource those. – It all comes out of the camera? – Yeah. – Kind of RAW? – Yeah, RAW. – Are they putting curves
or anything on em’? Wow. – They use the JPGs out of the camera. – They use the JPGs? – Isn’t that crazy? – Yeah. – Yeah, it’s crazy, ’cause
they want truth in advertising. – Wow. That’s a directive. – Yes! – I would imagine that makes
it a lot harder for you. – Yes it does! – What do you think about then, if you’re working on images that you know you can’t do anything except shoot a JPG, what’s your thought process? How’s it different from knowing
you can go into retouching? – I think that it makes you more aware of really minute details. – [Interviewer] Yeah. – And think about the
lighting and everything. It just makes you even more anal. (laughter) – It’s one shot. – Yeah, one shot. – Which you don’t really
do much compositing at all, you really try to stay away from it as much as you can do in
camera, you do in camera. Your retouching then I would imagine consists mainly of just kind of like curves and color and skin. – Skin, curves, color, exactly. Black and white if we
want black and white. – How much of your images to
you create in black and white? Quite a few.
– Quite a few. – Yeah your portfolio’s
pretty loaded with em’. – I love black and whites
’cause I feel you get more to the soul of the person. And it creates this
beautiful, classic feel. – Yeah it’s definitely a classic. Well this has been an amazing week. – Oh my gosh, thank you. – Are you kidding, thank you, we loved it. – I’m so excited. – We enjoyed so much working with you and I can’t wait for everybody to have an opportunity
to look at this tutorial ’cause I think they’re
gonna be absolutely amazed by the work you create and the way in which you work the camera, the crew and the entire thing. – Yay, so excited. I’m excited to start editing. – Yeah, you got a lot
of work ahead of you. – Yes, you guys have been
so incredible to work with. Your whole crew has just
been a blast, so thank you. – We’re a little bonkers but thank you. Ah you’re welcome. – That’s good, that’s a good quality. – Glad you like working with us. – Yes. – For more information on
the Dixie Dixon tutorial, please go to rggedu.com (slow moody electronic pop music)

Photographer Barry Mackenzie Bio | PRO EDU Instructor

Photographer Barry Mackenzie Bio | PRO EDU Instructor


(slow music) – My mom was an amateur
photographer when I was a kid, and I remember just taking
her Minolta back in the day, and I was always just
sort of fascinated looking through the lens. I was super into skateboarding
and snowboarding, and I was able to talk my parents into starting a family-run business while I was in high school. So we opened a skateboard
and snowboard shop, and I managed it. From there, I got a job at
a window and door factory. I got better and better,
and I moved all the way up to where I was building
these custom entrance ways that were 50, 60 grand. (light music) During that time, my wife got pregnant, and I decided that I didn’t
want to be a lifer in a factory, and I spent about a year just kind of
doing some soul searching. The only thing I could picture
myself doing forever is taking photos. I just wanted to have
a camera in my hands. That sort of sparked
in my mind an interest that maybe this is something
I could do as a career. (light music) I started shooting abandoned
buildings in my spare time, these old, decaying churches and schools. That’s actually how I got my start. Say, you know, if I’m pretty good at
shooting these ugly buildings, I can probably shoot
something beautiful, as well. (light music) I announced I was going into business, and the only way to really
develop a style and to get better at this stuff is to try and
try and try and fail and try. I would see a really amazing kitchen, and I would make the set of photos I needed to
deliver the next day, and then I would ask for an extra hour, and I would try to light it differently or try to compose it a
little bit differently. Start shooting the stuff now
that you want to be shooting in a year or two from now. (light music) When I was actually just getting
started in this business, I used to go to the bookstore, and I would grab four or
five shelter magazines. I would look at these photos, and I would always wonder
what makes them different. I would try to reverse
engineer how they were lit, and that’s how I started
to develop my style, (light music) a style where it’s wide enough, and it’s showing an accurate
representation of the home, but it’s got more of a design type feel. Part of that came from just
studying these photographs. ♪ Let’s go ♪ One photographer, his
name is Brandon Barre. He’s based out of Toronto. His work, it really spoke to me, and as luck would have it, I
was shooting a home in Toronto. He happened to be shooting
the home next door, and I was able to meet him, and I reached out to him the next day. He replied and said, you know what, Barry. I had a look at your website. Awesome work. I really like your style. The big confidence boost for me was seeing that he’s doing the exact
same thing I’m doing. (light music) Deep down, I really like to help people. There’s been people that
have helped me along the way, and I think it’s really important. If you see that someone’s willing and able and if you can help them, I mean, it’s for the
greater good of everybody. I love doing online consulting. I love running workshops. I love the opportunity that I’ve been given to do this tutorial just so that I can help people get better. I really, truly, I love it. (light music)