Bayryam Bayryamali | BA (Hons) Photojournalism and Documentary Photography

Bayryam Bayryamali | BA (Hons) Photojournalism and Documentary Photography


My name is Bayryam Bayryamali and I’m a third year BA Photojournalism and Documentary Photography student. The project that
I’m showing in this degree show is related to the history of Bulgaria and
back in the communist regime and it is related to my family history and the
history of the Bulgarian Turkish community. I would love to do more
exhibitions, I’m actually planning to do an exhibition in Bulgaria and because my
project is called The Big Homecoming and creating an exhibition in a ghost town
and I’m working towards having history classes with high school students in
town. So having a degree show I think it’s a great opportunity because I got
to meet a lot of Industry people who are working actually in the photography
industry, and I think networking is a great opportunity for any kind of
creative professional, so I think LCC is doing a great job in just helping the
students to get ahead for networking.

Expanding the Circle: The Engaged Photographer

Expanding the Circle: The Engaged Photographer


It’s the challenge to move people and connect people and find ways that people can be, engage meaningfully. The expectations for a photograph are very great. And, it’s not just in the composition that a photographer might achieve all that they would hope for. It’s just the beginning point. It’s not just the single photograph it’s a multitude of photographs. It’s sequencing, it’s creating space for those photographs. I think we seek opportunities for people to respond to the photography. And then the question is, what do they do? What’s our hope for a photograph? How much can a photograph carry the meaning of what we’ve seen? I think photography has huge potential to expand the circle of knowledge. There’s a reality that we are all the more linked, globally, and we have to know about each other. I mean, photography gives us that opportunity. Can we really point to things that have actually changed because photographs were made? I mean this is always the, the dilemma and the challenge and the hope. The heart of it is we are focused, more aware, more able to act when the opportunities come. Having the little flame burning as a photographer, you have to have that little light that guides you. I don’t go into the field as an advocate. I go into the field to make a discovery. I don’t start with the mission I start with what is going, the question, what is going on? What can I see, what can I show and convey through the photographs? And then it’s, with whom can I partner if that seems appropriate for that work to have an additional life, which could be in a life of advocacy or life tied to an issue targeted in a very particular way, whether it’s to policy makers or to a public. You have to keep documenting at the same time asking those questions. And seeking, as I said, really opportunities to create possibilities for engagement. That’s where the understanding is key, if we’re going to be able to build bridges. And I do think photography is a lot about creating the bridge. People still have to walk over it. I think photographers are the people who perceive the bridge as a possibility, and it goes back to that hope that people will feel the connection. And that connectivity is, is the opening of the door.

Forest Photo Shoot Surprise with Barbie® National Geographic Dolls | Nat Geo Kids

Forest Photo Shoot Surprise with Barbie® National Geographic Dolls | Nat Geo Kids


Oh! [birds chirping] Look. [inaudible] [music playing] Hm. Hm. [monkey barking] Oh, oh! Yeah. [birds chirping] [monkey barking] [gasping] [gasping] [snapping] Oh, yeah. [snapping] [grunting] [snap] Hm. [snap] Huh? [snap] [sighing] [ticking] [yawning] [monkey barking] Oh, oh. [gasping] Hurry. [gasping] Oh, yeah. [snapping] Wow. [monkey barking] [gasping] [monkey barking] Wow. Oh. Wow. Aw. Yeah. [laughing] Yay. [laughing] [sighing]

Leica M10 – best Leica of all times for street photography ?

Leica M10 – best Leica of all times for street photography ?


hello youtubers it’s awesome to see your
smiling faces once again Cris here with the Cris photography channel I am back
with yet another video I haven’t been filming a lot lately I apologize for
that but I thank you guys for subscribing we’re now over 400 people
subscribed to this channel which is amazing I’m sharing and sharing as we
know is caring and today I want to share a little bit about this guy right here
this little puppy the Leica m10 I got this landed to me by a good friend
of mine I only have it for the weekend so I will do this sweet and short all
right let’s dive right into it Okay so Leica m10 beautiful beautiful beautiful
little beast for those that don’t know Leica is a very particular specific type of
camera that has a very specific public and clients and there’s a very selective
type of people that would use Leica the reason is that it is not necessarily a
technology type of camera it is more of a nostalgia type of camera in terms of
design they simplified it a little bit they made it a little bit simpler you don’t have the continuous single recording and so on here you just have
the start and stop so that’s way simpler you have the exposure time that you can
set or you can just put it in auto mode okay one cool thing they did is they
finally brought back the ISO dial back into the camera so now we can just lift
and twist the ISO dial it can be set to auto which is what I usually shoot with
but you can at least access a little bit like Fuji does you can access the
settings right away which makes it more enjoyable and obviously on the camera
it’s a rangefinder style camera so you choose the distance
through the viewfinder and that doesn’t change now in terms of viewfinder I have
to say I prefer this viewfinder I find it bigger I find it more precise
more neat and it’s also simpler to see what you’re shooting to focus on what
you want to focus I believe this camera is finally a
digital Leica that’s worth having because like I said the form factor it’s way
faster has a bigger screen it has a live view and all those are awesome features
that I do enjoy having on the Leica camera I’m going to go out I’m going to do a bunch
of testing and we’ll see how it performs I’m going to take photos I’m not going
to edit them and we will see how it looks so let’s dive right into it okay
here we are on the streets and let’s go we’re going to check out how this little
M10 performance this guy is like we all know a manual rangefinder style type
of camera it’s a Leica M so obviously there’s no autofocus I’m not here to
talk expert like I already told you I’m here to do a quick little on the street
type of shoot today we’re kind of lucky because there’s clouds but it’s not
raining yet have a Summilux 35 mm I’m going to do a bunch of tests now so come
with me let’s do it so on previous models like the m6 for
example which is by the way my favourites
Leica camera and the m3 we could see how Leica was so pure in their design and it
was still very compact and they would still use this you know the sleek type
of camera that Henri Cartier Bresson so and other big photographers were using and they
then went into the digital world with the m8 m9 m240 they were a little bit
too thick and they started to be a little bit too you know too big and that lost a
little bit at least to me lost a little bit of its you know Leica feel now
having the m10 in my hands just the feeling of it is a bit back to the m6 so
you have that feeling of compressed solid brass quality camera and the
photos that come out of it I have to say they’re really good 24mpx
and honestly very very very good quality I mean it’s Leica yeah let’s go take some
more shots – let’s do it see the beauty of Switzerland is that we
have amazing landscapes I mean check that out you know what I’m saying like now
we’re talking yeah yeah you guys don’t have this in America so you should be
jealous we’re an Orbe right now the big city of Orbe 5,000 people live in here I
mean 5,001 with me I don’t live here but still here I am. Back to the
Leica M10 so I added a little thumb holder here I’m gonna be roll this
because I have it also I’ll show you in a separate video that I did but this
little thumb holder right here instead of the viewfinder is actually very good
because I remember with my 240 I had to literally grip it here it’s fine our
hands have five fingers they’re supposed to you know be able to hold things you
know this movement like this but if you have a little thumb holder here it’s
more comfortable this camera has been landed graciously to me by Todakin
you guys can go check his Instagram I link it down below I haven’t had a lot
of time to use it yet because well I just got it for a little weekend so I’ve
been doing a little bit of testing here and there you’ll see some photos during
this video but overall it really is sturdy I really enjoy the the quality of
it very pure design of Leica which is black with the little red dots which I
personally would remove to go street photography because it’s a bit more
discreet oh yeah and then one thing how does this compare to other modern
cameras because obviously one thing people want to know is does this compare
to I don’t know let’s say a Sony or a Fuji xt3 or some other cameras because I
normally shoot Fuji film honestly body-wise it’s very similar
but we’re talking M series cameras so you’ll have the manual focus you will
have the manual wheel everything is basically manual, I mean you can
still go ISO Auto and you can go auto exposure and things like that but at the
end the result is the Leica feel I cannot stress that enough you I mean you
saw in the photos I did not process those I did not touch them up those are
the actual photos that I took with the camera and then that black and white is
the Leica feel black and white so how does it compare again it doesn’t compare
so if you guys want to buy a modern quick autofocus camera just go for you
know whatever you want to buy it like a Nikon Canon Fuji Sony or whatever you
like but this is more for people that want to take their time I already said
that in another video but what else you want to say about Leica is for people
that like the tradition of it’s for people that like the the feel the look
and yeah okay so we’re back from the streets I really hope this helped you a
little bit if you’re thinking to buy a like m10 and I will be putting more
photos at the end of this video some more samples so you can see by yourself
these are untouched I did not process them in any way shape or form so if
they’re a little bit dark a little bit under or overexposed I’m sorry about that
I’m going to go now and do some more shooting with this amazing camera I hope
you enjoyed this video if you have any question don’t hesitate to put it down
below in the comments I urge you to subscribe if you’re not subscribed yet
click on that bell that would be awesome smash the like button if you like this
video if you want to see more and I will be back soon so enjoy your day keep
smiling keep shooting and see you soon bye folks

How to Become a News Photographer

How to Become a News Photographer


How to Become a News Photographer. Learn the steps you need to take to become
a news photographer and tell a story using pictures. You will need Training A portfolio Experience
Business skills and equipment. Step 1. Develop a working knowledge of news photography
through self-education or photojournalism classes. Step 2. Create a portfolio. If you are a still photographer, put together
a collection of your best photographs with captions. If your goal is to work in television news,
make a video demo. Step 3. Receive real-world experience through internships
at newspapers, magazines, or television stations. Step 4. Get the story done even if people don’t
cooperate. Persist until you find people who will. The key to success is telling a story with
multimedia and digital tools. Step 5. Present your work in the original way it was
shot and avoid any manipulation. Distorting any facts will damage your credibility. Step 6. Learn about business issues such as contracts,
copyright law, and finance. Step 7. Understand new technologies and stay up to
date on equipment such as new cameras or hard drives. Step 8. Be passionate. Most photojournalists don’t become rich,
but still earn plenty to live on. Did you know Did you know? The term photography comes from the Greek
words “phos” meaning “light” and “graphos” meaning “writing.”

Telling stories through photographs: Herb Snitzer at TEDxTampaBay

Telling stories through photographs: Herb Snitzer at TEDxTampaBay


Translator: Tanya Cushman
Reviewer: Peter van de Ven Hello everyone. (Audience responds) I’m sorry. (Audience) Hello. You know, I was going to start by saying that when I walk into a classroom
of kindergarten children, and I say, “Good morning, children,” they jump up and down, they say, “Good morning, Mr. Snitzer.” Oh, they’re all very excited. When I walk into a graduate program,
and I say, “Good morning, everybody,” they write it down. (Laughter) Now, they don’t even do that. Right? I’m glad that you’re here because I want to speak about a man who I knew for the last
12 years of his life. He was considered a radical educator. How many of you know the name A.S. Neill? My goodness. Neill was the founder and headmaster
of the Summerhill School. This is a school based in freedom. Classes were voluntary, and the social-political structure
of the place was participatory democracy. Neill was a Scottish educator. He was born in 1883, October 17th, and died September 26, 1973, a period of almost 90 years. He was a friend and eventually a mentor. He advocated freedom for children; he felt that children
who were in tight … classrooms – quiet, not talking – eventually hated learning. The school is now 90 years old. Its students are all over the world, all of them – well, I shouldn’t say all – but the vast majority
successful at what they do. But what was more important
was that they loved learning. How many of you loved learning
when you were in school? (Audience responds) Not even half. Not even half. So, you can appreciate
what it must have been like for a 10-year-old to just not go to class. So what did he or she do? My goodness, not in class? What will become of this child? It’s great parent-anxiety training here, you know. Parents will say, “My son has to go to class; he has to learn.” Learn what? How educated will we be? How educated are we? Or are we more trained than educated? I always like to talk to teachers and say, “Are you training students,
or are you educating students?” Well, what does it mean
to train a student, and what does it mean
to educate a student? We have – in this country and many other countries
throughout the world – have what I call
“the factory model of education.” It goes like this: You take raw material, a child, you put him through
a pressure cooker called school, out of which comes a young person – highly articulate, highly intelligent, empathetic, sympathetic. It just doesn’t work that way. We have too many kids
that drop out of school. We have too many counselors and faculty who are not interested
in the emotional side of the child, but that’s the side
that Neill was interested in; it’s the side that I am interested in. An emotionally free child, for the most part, will love learning. Personally, I loved learning; I hated school. It was a dilemma that’s not mine alone. It was a school in Philadelphia, an all-boys high school. You went into classrooms,
memorizing material. I was not geared, I should say, to that kind of learning. Neill and Summerhill offered children a different way to be educated, a more humane way. Why Neill is not known today,
I just don’t know. During the 60s, when there was the free-school movement, Neill was everybody’s guide. It was his writings; he wrote 21 books on education. The one that appeared
in the United States more than any other was called “Summerhill:
A Radical Approach to Child Rearing,” not a radical approach
to educating, but to child-rearing because it was his belief, it was the belief
of Dr. Erich Fromm and others, that in order for children, who are naturally curious, I mean, you don’t really have to do
very much to get children to learn, but what is it that they learn? They learn a subject and no more. It’s amazing to me that as you progress
through the factory system, and you get into the university system, that you can go through
a four-year college course, four years, and not once step foot in a history class, not once step foot
in a comparative religion class. So, who and what are we teaching that enables young adults not to participate in the life process or in the political process
of the United States? I have a clipping that I use
on the Constitution of the United States, and it is amazing how many young people, how many older people, how many people here in this room really have never read
the Constitution of the United States. Are you with me? (Audience) Yes. Alright, so when I read the book, when I read Neill’s book, it just, for some reason, made me want to go and meet him. Now here I was, a young photojournalist, I had already had a major exhibition
at the Museum of the City of New York. I was photographing for Life magazine, and I just felt something in those pages. Now, to give you a little background, I was – my life was informed
by three major issues. The Great Depression – not the one that just passed but the real one, the big one – I was five and six years old. I still remember people
coming into my father’s grocery store asking for food, which he gave them, not wanting any money in return. For a five-year-old boy
of refugee parents, it was a frightening time. The Second World War. Equally a frightening time. And anti-Semitism, which was rampant in the United States
until it got guilty over the Holocaust. Those three areas informed my young life; they all occurred
before I was 14 years old. So, something in Neill’s book pulled me, pulled me to the point
where I got on a plane, I flew to England, I went to Leiston, Suffolk, which was where Summerhill
is located still, and I waited in his office
for him to finish a math class, and he would come,
and we would meet each other. I was sitting on a beat-up sofa, a cracked window was present, and I thought to myself,
“What am I getting myself into? Who is this man? Is he real? Or is it just words on a paper?” You know, a lot of people
write a lot of things, but who are they as a person? That’s Neill and his dog Biscuit. In walked this six-foot-two, slightly bowed, white-haired gentleman thrust his hand out to me and said, “Hello, I’m Neill. What can I do for you?” I grasped his hand, and at that moment,
something took place in me. It wasn’t that I could
define it at the time, it wasn’t that I knew that something
transformative had taken place, just that I felt his realness. It’s what I look for in people today – their realness. I continue to work on my own realness as to what is important in life. We chatted; he and I chatted
for a few moments – he had to get back to his class, and I wanted to walk around
because somewhere in the back of my mind I thought I could do a book,
a visual book. After all, I was a photojournalist. After all, there was a whole bunch
of kids running around, and so I asked Neill if it was possible for me to come back and live at the school and do this book. And they put it to the community. I mean, it was like they
were a living testimonial to everything he had written in his book. I had to come before the entire community, and I had to get a majority vote
that it was okay for me to return, to live with them for four months. I must tell you, nobody said, “No.” So, in September of 1962, I returned to England for four months, and many of the photographs
that you are looking at here were those that I made, and a book was published
by the MacMillan Company – they did give me enough money
to go over and live for four months – a book was published called
“Summerhill: A Loving World.” I saw children who were
kind to each other; I saw children who were
not kind to each other but were not loaded up
with guilt by telling them “No, you can’t do this;
you can’t do that.” Social issues were brought
before the community, out of which came resolutions which were accepted
by the entire community. It was really collegial –
we’ll use the word – but it was something more than that; it was children understanding
on an unconscious level that they could control their own lives, that they don’t have to be told
what to do all the time. I remember when I was at the school
that I helped co-found, a young boy came with his mother
for possibly coming into the school, and she was loaded down with questions. One question after another. And I looked at this kid, and I excused myself to the mother, and I turned to the boy and I said, “How about you? What would you
like to do when you’re here?” And he looked at me and he said,
“Do you have any rest periods?” (Laughter) My heart went out to this kid. Rest periods?! I told him “You could rest all day long,” and needless to say, it wasn’t the best thing
I should have said because she immediately
picked him up and off they went, and I never saw them again. So, I kind of have remembered this all these years. These photographs – This photograph was made at Summerhill. The affection between – now it’s happening too fast here;
I can’t talk about them this quickly – but anyway, you can see the joy
that exists in their faces, how open they are. And it wasn’t just momentary; this is what happened all the time. And here I was already an adult functioning in the New York
hot-house scene of photojournalism, and I go to this school
in Suffolk, England, and I’m blown away. Blown away by 50 children, because that’s how many
there were at the time, a staff, I think, of 15, living together, supporting each other. It was very powerful how education can be taught without the student feeling that he or she is on the brink of disaster if he or she doesn’t pass the test. You know, in England, which is where Neill
was conditioned by the English system, it was called the 11 pluses: At 11 years old,
you took a series of exams. If you passed the exams,
you were on the road to the university. If you flunked the exams – 11, 11 years old, 12 years old – if you flunked the exams, you were on your way
to becoming a tradesperson: a candlestick maker, a baker, a plumber. That’s how rigid a system
he was experiencing and experienced and rebelled against, and it was an exciting time
for us here in the United States when his book was published here because there was a great number of us willing to take the chance to bring a bit of humanity
into the lives of children. Obviously, it was a projection on my part, and I’m far enough away from it that I can say that
without feeling threatened. So, that’s my story. It’s one that I would hope
can be seen many times. A.S. Neill was a brilliant,
brave and wonderful man, someone that I, like I say,
I knew and I will never forget because at this point, I’m older
than he was when I first met him, and that is a bit unnerving
but nevertheless joyful. Thank you very much. (Applause)

John Hoagland: Frontline Photographer

John Hoagland: Frontline Photographer


the CBS Evening News the night of March 16th 1984 four Americans one was killed another was kidnapped in El Salvador in a battle area 20 miles northeast of the capital John Hoagland of San Diego a photographer working for Newsweek magazine was shot dead in a firefight in Beirut William Buckley a political officer at the US Embassy was kidnapped at gunpoint our coverage begins in El Salvador with Richard Wagner who was with photographer Oakland when he was killed soldiers at the checkpoint on the road to su Chi todo said there was fighting ahead but journalists could pass at their own risk they cried about the fighting it was fierce and it was across the road the worst of situations for non-combatants suddenly our small group of eight journalists was caught in a crossfire John Hoagland was about 50 yards ahead of the CBS crew as all of a scramble for cover it seemed to up to 50 army troops were firing at John and two other photographers tragically we were right our tape recorder was running photographers been killed her but everyone was still pinned down by now the guerrillas this is what they look like had driven the army down the road shouted that we were reporters as they passed often pointing their weapons in our direction then they told us to come out the fighting had moved down the road Harry John’s body back to our cars still not certain the fighting was indeed down the road John Hoagland was a brilliant photographer who was drawn to events like the one that cost him his life this pictures from Central America had been seen in magazines around the world just last month he was shooting pictures for Newsweek in Beirut as a maker of pictures and as a man people who knew him will not forget him Richard Wagner CBS News back from the road to suci toto and even though your you know you see everything we’re gonna be playing you’re putting something in between you and what’s happening hi ever left false with the word objectivity because it’s really a Western idea is because I mean everybody has their opinions even we try to be objective we’re going to have subjective decisions I’m more likely to find it I won’t be a propagandist or anybody on both sides give you something right on the ticket if you do something wrong when we take the picture John Hoagland’s death was widely reported on network television in newspapers and magazines the 10th the journalist to die covering the war in El Salvador he was also the most experienced having spent over five years living and working in Central America in taking a close look at John’s life we hope to better understand some of the forces that made him what he was that led him to risk his life in order to record the critical moments fears and faces of people at war Hoagland was born and raised in a San Diego Navy family the son of a combat Air veteran the eldest of five children he attended helix high and the University of California at San Diego where he served studied photography and became active in the anti-vietnam war movement study with Mark kruzan of course and he knew Angela Davis and Fiona Davis and you know he would talk about them and you know his ideas changed up married in 68 neurosis born in 69 and he was still surfed in a lot then and it was a year after when your eros was about a year old that he became more interested in actively protesting versus passively and then he became a member of the del my degenerates as they called themselves surfer radical types that hung out in Del Mar and he was involved in local politics on campus and then when after Martin Luther King was assassinated he joined a group of students and professors and grad students called the Tuesday night committee the Chicano Mexican community and mainly in Los Angeles decided to stage a series of major demonstrations in East Los Angeles John went up the moratorium with a good friend who also they both had checked out video clipping from UCSD they were gonna film the demonstration that was happening up there and in the course of what became a riot the sheriff’s attacked a crowd shotguns were brought out immediately a lot of smoke a lot of tear gas and talents were flying to the air of course rocks were also flying through the air number of people went down and John and friend were out there right on the Main Street there right in the midst of it filming all this I left the whole situation there and found out hours later that John and his friend had got arrested with all the video equipment and and taken down to LA County Jail following college and the breakup of his marriage Hoagland moved to San Francisco where he worked as an iron worker and amateur photographer for five years he spent an additional year living in the Mojave Desert Mining turquoise his young son Eros lived with him during this time it made me a little a wooden submarine and I was so big yellow would be suffering and you would throw it out in the ocean I would say no don’t do that it’s you know it’s never gonna come back he’d say Oh it’ll come back and he’d just throw it throw it over and over and again I don’t know beside this remember that I decide about that yeah it always came back was there a separate he’d broken up with his girlfriend and there were a lot of things going on and he he told me as he put it I’m almost 30 and if I’m gonna do it I better do it now and that’s we decided to go south he’d always wanted to be in a revolution per se and I think Nicaragua for him was like you know all the things he thought about you know I mean it’s like he was real high off of it El Salvador was different I think but Nicaragua being his first experience I think was real I know the word for it Nicaragua really can’t be used for anything when it was a textbook case it will never happen again sometimes even true they said it was one man against us we was one country against one the others are at the airport which was mobbed with people trying to leave the country we hooked up with a young long-haired American cotton broker who offered to put us up we packed our stuff into his car and 5 minutes out of the airport were pulled over at gunpoint by a dozen National Guardsmen who thought we were terrorists I don’t know I wouldn’t say John went looking for trouble but trouble seemed to find its way to him a lot the Hollywood movie under fire it’s very familiar people talk a lot that Nick Nolte characters a lot like John the images that the Nick Nolte character takes are very similar to John’s which are very active combat oriented kinds of photography [Music] [Music] after the killing of ABC reporter Bill Stewart by General Somozas National Guard John was one of a handful of reporters who stayed on in Nicaragua to get the story out you want to get out no no see the picture well I needed somebody to work with me and since I hadn’t worked on video and John hadn’t work sound it seemed the ideal that would make a perfect team and we worked together for about two weeks on video before the final fall in Nicaragua [Applause] [Music] in salvador when the Archbishop’s funeral I think it’s the sort of the classic situation with John once the turmoil started in the plaza and the panic began to set in and I was very concerned about the possibility that there were there was going to be gunfire opening up on the Cathedral and that steps area was very vulnerable in the previous year they’ve been a massacre on the steps in which 24 John was the one who was virtually dragging me out on the steps to make sure that you know he was saying it’s ok it’s ok we can go out there the gunfire isn’t coming this way [Music] you were just kind of find out things about John like one day I suddenly knew that he had once been a bodyguard for Angela Davis John I’d never mentioned this but then it made sense because he was so good in situations of hazard he he knew how to spot snipers on rooftops he just knew and he just seemed to be able to walk into a situation and kind of like an animal for that all of his antennae know where all the exits and all the escape routes were he seemed to have a sixth sense about how to operate but he always wanted to be where the action was this was his mission in life I think was to be where the action was [Music] [Applause] [Music] following a year’s work as a television sound man John returned to still photography moving to San Salvador in the spring of 1980 just after the move he was working with reporter Ignacio Rodriguez from the Mexican newspaper uno mas uno when Rodriguez was shot and killed by a government sniper was so close close to and not sure was still behind in the car a shielded I was the only one that was our people knew that he was the so-called resident journalist in El Salvador people know that he was familiar with the situation some who knew him a little better knew that he had at times means of getting across to the guerillas during a rebel offensive in January of 1981 Hoagland photographer Susan Marsalis and cameraman Ian mates ran their car into a guerrilla mine all three were injured mates died a few hours later directional line I’m your allies doing trying to cover the situation was the fighting no fighting at all it was an ambush and you drove into it you’re in the cause of the time we were in the car driving very slowly and the next thing I was down reading a map in the backseat the next thing I know there was just this loud noise fuckin car with just four holes on the front right corner by a directional mind that took out they went all the windows and there’s quite some holes in the car and seem like the shrapnel was stones it wasn’t steel because a lot of it didn’t penetrate through the doors all the way the glass all the glass is blown out the inmates the only stay they’re working on him right now he’s in trauma I don’t know when I put everybody back in the car and walked away for help he was bleeding pretty bad and was acting strange when I got back I finally got back with an ambulance at Red Cross but I don’t know maybe an hour and a half he was uh he was unconscious until then in the Nicaraguan example there hadn’t been that type of ambushes the fighting a new insurrection is target located in the city and although there was the points you had with points in the entrance everybody both army and Negroes were basically stopping and looking first minds which they know whether there was many issued money Susan interrogative the third exception Terrace the only thing he ever said to me was several years ago when he was home he says mom I’m scared I see another Benton um and that’s all he ever said to us about it he really didn’t voice what he thought was going on down there maybe to protect us and it’s given me I used to say you keep giving me gray hair so much situation of tension down here you can see the crossing borders it’s becoming a very regionals but in the end with attentions especially with the tensions the economy in the world the tension between these little West right now become very close to the top two this is a year ago we whispered about possibilities for a Regional Conference [Music] no we’re talking about just impossibilities you can’t believe the whore I mean I call and I laughingly say his gruesome twosome pictures because so many em are really we have a whole closet full of them and and yet his best pictures are of the children and and of course they’re not the ones that get published is the children that are in the camps and hospitals and you know I mean they’re just they’re loving pictures I think was very painful for him to be down there they look to he’s to say I remember once we were talking I said we was talking about eating dinner and the bombs were going off you know and and they just keep eating nice well how can you do that he says he said when you’re down around it all the time he says you go through a period of just being numb and then yeah I really didn’t expect him to come home I mean I really thought that he never had said that he liked the people so well and he liked the climate I and he like in a way it was a slower pace of life and I think he liked that he said you have to go surfing in the morning and we may get away a little barrier that I serve Salvador maybe three spots once block well it’s a point where it can sandy who doesn’t have any real proof libraries and it’s it’s better than already put into the spots about was their concern here Tony favorite country actually liked us on the rest these are sentences people and get here basically honest as in cases here people dropped for office and stuff and people have chased him to get it back to see that when I went to his apartment the first time before going out with him I saw his search for it and I asked him if he served and I said well I’m not anymore I just brought it here but I mean it don’t feel like it I said come on and I had one too let’s go and when he saw me surfing he tried he almost killed himself a couple of times but he did pretty happy good job it took him in fact it took him about a week to ask him if I wanted to marry him he was so ash I couldn’t believe it he kept on telling me I have to tell you something I have to tell you something I said what is it I thought he was gonna tell me he was married he was lying to me whatever and then he said didn’t want to marry me he cut his face and that’s it yeah and he goes are you sure yeah you’re not lying he was so concerned about the difference of ages because he was almost 14 years older and me his name appeared on the death list of 35 journalists put out by the right wing in 1982 during the March elections later he was again confronted more directly by the death squads in 1983 a photograph of his appeared in the New York Times and it was mislabeled there was a confusion and the cut lines the army was very angry that a photo be taken of the Army had been labeled as a picture of the rebels when he started receiving death threats at his house he ignored them Newsweek asked him to leave the country but he refused they then started phoning him up and he’d pick up the phone to just be a shock they’d fired gun hang up on him he still wouldn’t leave the country he said if he left the country at that point he could never come back and because he lived in Salvador and because he he planned to stay on and continue to live in Salvador he couldn’t allow himself to be intimidated to be forced out of the country after threats against him after threats against John didn’t work they started calling up and they were threatening his son eros and his fiancee at that time and when those threats came in that’s when he got pissed and he went to the colonel he held responsible for the threats walked into his office threw him against the wall and threatened retaliation basically to his wife because of his business he had to not be he couldn’t voice what he felt he had to go down what do you say you walk the narrow line trying to not you can’t be political you have to shoot what both sides of the story and present it to the world he had contacts with the military with the guerrillas and I imagine also with ordinary people like he knew quite intimately from what I gather several nuns that later on were killed he did not go for a free being he sort of went all the way he was there he followed the situation and he helped a lot of colleagues in their work I mean it’s like when I used to bring girlfriend’s home in high school I thank God he’s good-looking you know nineties about it and he would turn red I mean he really didn’t consider himself in that light and he was real modest about other things and I know when he went to Beirut he was a little you know well El Salvador was comfortable you know you the ropes he could make it you know but the route was a whole different picture and being able to get that same kind of get his pictures publicized was it was like a test that he had to go through and I think that when he came back from Beirut his he had he had his confidence level had gone it because we’ve gotten the cup it’s you know right away you know that he could take pictures anywhere times it’s just so dense it’s damned impossible to really know what’s happening and I’ve been at the scene when it’s all gone down to the hold room and afterwards there days later find out something that’s changed the whole perspective that’s given you know as to what the actual you know scene was even knows about it’s just in the heat of an action certain things become print on your mind and certainly thank you completely miss unless somebody will stir a memory compactor I just sometimes I just got the old Newsweek magazines and look at pictures just look for his pictures I don’t know there now I like to say I share a lot of them to my friends friends of mine I really you know they interested in either photography or really what’s going on down in Central America and they really you know it’s fun show them and you know I’m proud of this stuff that I have that that says I like to learn a lot more about not necessarily just photography but journalism and can you know communications even at the hotel people used to say like she’s close friends there what do you have are you a drug for him or something because every time he saw me he was like relaxed that was nice I saw him the morning that he was killed we had breakfast together was the I think Lucy on that trip that was the first time we’d had a chance to sit down and talk and I don’t can’t remember remember being happier more content with what he was doing and also talking about you know the future and work situations I remember and he had I think was earlier on he had talked about when when Central America was over he’d go to the Philippines because that’s where the next one was going to be I think I think John would have I don’t know I wonder I wonder if he would have kept looking more conventional heavier weapons everybody find shelter in there and right here it’s all small arms with one guy trying to kitty yeah but you had to be the one guy who’s trying to kill I firstly have to go it’s much more dangerous approaching combat me than it is being in it and what she was one side or another that’s you know you take the normal risky but he else but their mom where you’re approaching a situation was already happiness John Hoagland was killed during a week of what was described as lights combats between the army and the rubbers as usual he was fifty yards ahead of most of the other reporters when he caught around through the lung from a us-made m60 machine gun he was taking photographs at the time of his death [Music] they coming communism yeah that’s a new is very obvious if you people have a lot of economic interest anyone support the supports and also the other thing they use all the time

Unity or Diversity? What is more important to you?

Unity or Diversity? What is more important to you?



so today we have with us in the studio old one alternate so Alvin is the outgoing photojournalist has worked in traditional media newspapers magazines TV and radio around Australia for about 30 years she was first interviewed by the media age 10 as a top australian junior table tennis player and went on to work in the media interviewing stars writing performing producing and educating and just for every foreign media imaginable on and off stage and in business so olvin let's say we were listening to someone give a talk will your primary interest being the person who is delivering the information or the information itself now that's a very good question well initially you know we tend to judge people immediately as we see them probably else whoever is watching this right now is probably judging me right now it's very hard to see someone and actually separate the person from the content so I think initially we tend to make a judgment about the person speaking and whether we like that person and if we like that person and the energy that they give off then we're more inclined to listen to what they have to say and be more interested in the content if we don't like what we see if we think the persons may be arrogant or we don't like the feel of the person then we would tend to switch off to the information so so when you say more important I think actually both of them both of them are important I think we need to feel when we see someone speak we need to feel that we connect with them somehow and and we can relate to what they have to say and they need to have some kind of credibility otherwise otherwise their content is pretty useful I think so so I think both are actually very important ok thank you next question is about unity and diversity so what is more important to you unity or diversity that's not a great question I actually think unity in diversity is very important I love diversity I love all the cultures particularly here in australia with so multicultural and i love the fact that we have so much diversity here in Australia and I think the challenge there is to have is to find unity within that diversity I know a lot of people are challenged by different cultures by you know different people are challenged by difference because it makes them feel uncomfortable with where they are often you know like people say all people coming from overseas and taking our jobs you know Australians farmer strains will say things like that and I think that's very small minded thinking I think really we need to celebrate the diversity on the planet and we need to look at ways that we can all work together to learn from each other and to grow as individuals because you know people that have never left their suburb or never left their city I think generally they're pretty boring people like I you know I want to hang out with people are open-minded have travelled have experience different cultures I mean look at the lovely food we have here imagine you know we'd be stuck with fish and chips if we only had I English people in Australia and all burgers you know thank God for diversities right food goes and culture and you know costumes and music and dance and you know the diversity is a wonderful thing and I think the challenges is to to find that unity and find a common ground amongst amongst the diversity okay so is there a downside to unity hmm downside to unity well I don't see a downside to unity I think if people are people are in unity and if they are peaceful I don't see how they can be a downside to that because I think general in life people choose either love or fear and unity to me is is an expression of love I think unity is as love and I think when you're in love and in your obscuring your pure expression of love I don't see how that can be negative for anyone so I don't see a downside to unity so is there a downside to diversity only if people see it as a challenge but I think it really is about people's perceptions so that I think diversity is actually a wonderful thing I think it's it's like the colors of the rainbow imagine a rainbow so with only one color it would seem pretty boring rainbow but a rainbow with multi colors is a beautiful thing in fact I saw a rainbow just yesterday an hour south of Sydney driving a semi or the most magnificent rainbow that will actually went the full length of the sky and it was a very rare like I saw all the colors of the Roma and it was just magnificent and you know that is what diversity is to me it's like the colors of the rainbow bringing all those colors together and for them to work in unity to create a rainbow is a beautiful thing and it actually you can create magic there so I think it's just your perception that can be a negative thing not the actual diversity itself okay so what does it say that birds of a feather flock together what does that mean to you well what that means is that people feel more comfortable in their own ethnic groups that's why I see a lot of Chinese people Indian people except you're sticking together with their groups because they feel more comfortable with people who look like them who speak like them who you know the same language who you know same the same culturally so people do generally feel more comfortable with their own race or with their own you know with people who are like of em people feel more comfortable that way generally so does it answer that question yes yeah okay great so should we allow our diversity in politics yes I think diversity in politics is a fantastic thing because it's good to have dif difference of opinions in politics and diversity with politics is having a difference of opinion I think we have a whole lot of politicians with the same idea is then you're not thinking outside the square so so I think that is a good thing I think it is good to challenge politicians and to challenge views around politics and to be open to looking at things in different ways to grow as a nation so should we allow diversity of viewpoints in schools and universities yeah absolutely yeah I think if we don't have diversity of opinions we don't have individuals so I think you know really we need to encourage individuality we need to encourage people to speak their truth from within and then within that if everyone was doing that you could also have unity doesn't necessarily mean that you've got diversity just because people are speaking their truth and everyone is individual right and we encourage people to to be the best they can be as individuals and not just a pawn of the system not just a you know a 945 worker who the system someone who thinks entrepreneurial someone who thinks outside the square I mean all great inventions started with an idea and if those ideas can come through which were diverse ideas if they didn't come through we wouldn't have the great initiatives we have today such as phones and such as camera equipment such as you know everything we have right right now around that's all came from an idea from an individual idea at one point so should we allow a diversity of viewpoints our topic even if some people are offended yes yes absolutely I believe diversity is a wonderful thing and I think the people that are offended up offended because whatever is happening goes against their ideals their values so I think really it's a matter of people need to look at how they look at things you know how they judge things and you know like they say people walk around with different colored glasses you know different rose-colored glasses and different viewpoints on life and when you see that you've got the glasses on you actually take the glasses away then you can see clearer so I think the big challenge is is coming to situations when you hear things when you see things actually coming with an open mind and seeing things like a blank canvas and being open to what people are presenting whether they sit with your current ideology or not and actually be open to to new ideas and to new experiences okay so the X questions about facts and feelings so what is more important feelings and emotions or facts and logic hmmm that's a good question as well interesting well where do facts and logic come from I mean if they actually think feelings and emotion are more important because I think we need to listen to our heart and that's that's where feelings cover we need to be true to ourselves listen to our heart and that there's nothing logical generally about what your heart is and what and what moves you in life it's not logical it's not factual I think when you look at what drives someone it needs to come from the heart and that's feeling based and at the same time it's important to be able to control your feelings so my dad you saw si anger is danger is so is there a context we're feelings and emotions would be more appropriate and a context where facts and logic should be more appropriate yeah yeah probably in some in some areas yeah i mean if i make what's right for example if you're looking to invest in real estate you would look at the facts you know the facts and figures around why that investment will be a good or not so good investment not just on the feelings like you like the property it could be in the middle of nowhere so you need to analyze is it going to be a good financial investment you know it with an area like that you need to look at facts and figures and website and like science yeah my clients I mean you know Deborah history yeah history yeah yeah I mean they say you know look at the past to see what's coming up in the future I mean there's people actually saying that the moon isn't real at the moment and I mean I might this is quite fascinating you know there's people there's people out there saying the moon is a hologram and and you know that's not actually real so I mean is probably a lot out there that we think is factual and we've been fed is factual you know like Captain Cook discovered Australia I mean they're aboriginals in Australia for for millions of years and you know it's like Captain Cook came in 200 years ago or so and we say captain cook the fellas Australia well you know like these are facts that we're fed as you know in our school days and I think a lot of facts and figures that we fared aren't necessarily true so I think you need to do your own research and not just believe facts and figures that we're fed in school what about the feelings and emotions do they need to be examined as well I think you need to check in with yourself sometimes yeah I think you need to check into there's a lot of people say what I don't know what they want to do in life and you know they could question their feelings so I think you do need quiet time meditation time even quiet time to really get get clear on why you're on the planet on what your purpose is on the planet and I often say to people if something moves you to tears if you see something in life like for me it was animal cruelty so you know animal cruelty it would always move me to tears I'd be so upset by it and I knew I had to do something in that area so I knew that was part of my calling to be an animal activists on the planet and which I've done there with my animal action events over 10 years now I've created event some encouraging action for animals and because that moves me and that that moved me to the core it hit my feelings and I expressed it and I acted on it so i think it's not just getting clear on what the feelings are but actually acting on your feelings is really important so having that courage to do that so are you responsible for the feelings of others mmm that's a good question too so I've done a lot of personal development work and you know a lot of different courses they say you need to be a hundred percent responsible for things in your life whether there's other people feeling things or whether it's you feeling things so that's a very interesting question so you can take on being a hundred percent responsible however at the end of the day or the feelings of others you could take it on as you are responsible which I know which doesn't make any logical sense right because people say people say well if someone doesn't understand you that's your fault not their fault if they didn't understand because you didn't express yourself in a way that they would understand you so that could lead to someone misinterpreting something that you wanted to say which happens all the time is miscommunication all the time and at the end of the day you can't control someone else's feelings as such but you could take a stand to say well I am responsible for that person getting the message that I want to portray in the way I want to portray it yeah so who is responsible for your feelings I am I responsible for much you from under percent responsible for my feelings yeah so is it more important for you to consider someone's feelings or you to discuss the fact I think you need to think of that because when people get emotional the facts go out the window I think I think it really comes down to I think it comes down to really actually getting present to how people are feeling if someone's angry about something they're not going to be thinking logically or about any facts or figures they will just trigger and get and get angry some people some people distress and some people run away right so there's different automatic you know fight-or-flight reactions that people have and when they're in those modes they don't think logically so I think and sometimes you need to give people space to go through that and then come back and redress whatever it is you were communicating so is it more important for you to feel good or for you to consider or Consequences well I am to feel good as much as possible I guess I think you actually made a bit of both I think you do need to think about potential consequence will excite of the situation yeah yeah and you could actually say what I want to do is it feel good right or you could go year but there are potential consequences so they factor you examine the consequences then you might go I can't do that that's scary make me feel really bad yeah and so then it's not well which one do you want you want to explore the consequences they feel bad or you want to come over here and just feel good yeah it was really fantastic actually to have both however whenever you step out of your comfort zone you're going to be uncomfortable and you're not going to feel good at some point but to grow in life you actually need to step out of your comfort zone and at times not feel good so that you can have the result you want so for example if you want to lose weight it might not be comfortable initially to go running or exercising or whatever you need to do to lose weight or to not eat all that chocolate you know it might not feel good not to do that however the consequences are if you really want that consequence and the end result then it's going to take feeling bad at times or feeling challenged to do that so to hold you I know what it's called fat movement what they do they expect people obese people is that if in front of the audience and they say you can be healthier anyway right and for me I look like that all they're doing is actually really say all I want to do is feel good I want to feel good right and they're not considering the consequences right right hazel all the right and it's very unhealthy to be fact isn't that known overweight and you know got your facts and that's a fact and such a large proportion of the population are overweight and there's another fact I don't know the exact figures however it's pretty huge particularly in Western society thanks for the spec feelings yet and there are those people who go to great effort to say to avoid the facts yes I think it'd be healthier anyway doesn't matter have you anyway you still healthy yes as I have their oxygen so so whatever yes that comes down to values how much do you value your health as opposed to feeling good yes so the next question is you think more important for others to be nice to you or for you to toughen up I think it's important to toughen up I think in that case definitely important to toughen up because you will never be able to control how other people feel about you and in fact the more successful you become in life more and more people will probably not like you for some reason because we do have a glass ceiling thing I believe in Australia particularly where people do not like to see other people successful they actually get very challenged by it they try to bring people down and so you will be attacked more and more than more successful you become and the more you even step into your flow in life people will try to tear that down because people don't generally like to see other people happy as awful as that sounds I'm talking in general now masses of the population if their vegetable they want to see other people miserable because that makes them feel good it makes them feel comfortable when other people are miserable like they are and so that's why it's important to hang out with people who are on the same wavelength of you people are encouraging you lifting you up in life so that you can you can grow together agree please take a moment to like and subscribe remembering to click on the bell then check the comments box below to join our team of patrons and crew and you can always find me on facebook at the peace mapping group the link is in the comments box and once again thanks and all the best tube

Truth or Justice? What is more important? (Political Values)

Truth or Justice? What is more important? (Political Values)



so should truth and facts be a defense in a court of law hmm a lawyer once said that you don't go to court looking for justice so uh yes well I mean you know facts should be however you know how do you know that the facts you've been presented with are actually true so you know truth and facts I mean ideally you know truth and facts should count in a court of law however often it's just whoever presents the best case you know it gets he gets there gets their way in court so it's unfortunate that there's many times that things have been twisted in court and justice is not prevailed because of the way facts have been presented all because certain things have been dismissed out of court for whatever you know small reasons or you know so yes it should be important however how do you really know what the truth is in court how do you know how do you know anyone is really telling the truth it's really to be honest I mean let you could put them on that day I'm lie detector expectancy I don't know how accurate the light of texts are but it would be great if we you know if all we saw was the truth in the world that the fact is we've done a lot of people do lie and a lot of people are out of integrity just incidentally I think there's two cases where judges or magistrates have actually said truth is no defense all right that's in a court right I know they got the guide swear on the Bible no I can just say he would tell the truth and nothing but the truth and nothing magistrate transformative truth is noticing wow that's insane that's crazy but it's a mad world out there in some areas that's yeah so old one what is more important full disclosure of the data and the facts or protecting someone's feelings in a court of law for disclosure of the facts but i respected in life full disclosure of the facts what is more important full disclosure of the data and the fact or protecting someone's feeling and i believe full disclosure full disclosure in that case I think you need to be completely honest with others and yourself because the fact is the truth always comes out in the end and I think you know for example you have a couple that are in a relationship okay one person cheats on it on the partner I now that person can go around pretending that they haven't used on that partner but eventually the truth will come out and it will be even worse than if that person had owned up in the first place and said they cheated on the partner so by hiding that they cheated on the partner to protect that person's feelings is actually just delaying something that's going to come out in the end anyway and like I do believe in karma and so you know really if you if you lie to people to protect their feelings it's a futile exercise it's just it's delaying something that's going to come out anyway and when it does come out will be even worse and the fact is you're living a lie and living a lie is very stressful on the body as well so there's facts around that is well out there but living a lie is is not a healthy powerful inspiring way to live life so we actually have a lower than strata 18-0 and says you cannot tell you cannot state the facts because it may hurt someone's feelings what I don't be crazy so okay so what is more important to you truth or freedom alright so if you discover some information that was counter to mainstream socio political beliefs would you keep it to yourself or would you share it even if that meant that you could face jail time mmm oh that's a good one well well look at Nelson Mandela true I look I stand for truth I'd the truth expose TV and I think if you've got information that that can really impact lives and and you know if there's any consequence of C so I think you should tell the truth I still think you should tell the truth so for me it's be honest tell the truth if you've been presented with information and yet we have laws in Australia 18c send you to jail if you tell the truth hmm well I think that is crazy and there's lots of things about the world that are insane and particularly around the red tape particularly around how governments run and how how courts run I think a lot of it is really corrupt actually and I think a lot of it just doesn't make sense you know it's just it's just rotten it's such a lot Memphis that's crazy crazy stuff that should be overturned I think okay so what is more important to you social justice or free speech hmm social justice feel free speech round well I think free speech is really important social justice I'm not going to say a little bit more about that what are some justice that seems to be where it's his life but there are these minority groups mm-hmm and we need to we need to we're responsible for their feelings so therefore we have to act and see things in a certain way so these people get to feel good uh-huh and so then what it does it limits our free speech to save the road right right and so some will say well you've got to be kind to people to take care of people be loving all that to the staff all right but to do that means you can't say certain words okay okay well I disagree with can't say certain words I think you should speak your truth I mean obviously you know don't say things that a racist or sexist or you know things like that I mean there's ways you can say things without being nasty so I think free speech and do it in a way that you know that that's not totally you know putting someone down do it in a way that's actually inclusive however speak your truth absolutely speak your truth and do it respectfully okay next questions on equality and gallet Arianism so at the society should we strive for equality of outcome or inequality of outcome equality of outcome that's that's a tricky question that's a really big equality of outcome inequality in what areas equality is this like and it's like supporting like communist communist I mean they're all seen as equal monday you know people soon as equal in the communist society equality equality of outcome you have a quality of opportunities everyone should have the opportunity to do is a universe room for example but their equality of outcome is when they say what everyone should get a degree everyone should be able to get to be CEO of that corporation no it should be across all races and cultures ethnicities genders etc etc mmm no I disagree with quality of outcome I think you know if you if you have what it takes to achieve those levels if you you know if you work hard if you you know if you apply yourself more than somebody else then you should achieve the outcomes and someone shouldn't just be granted the outcome just because they're doing the same course yeah okay so likely took control okay so how do you know if something is true or not oh well well I guess you don't really however there are things that people say you can pick up like for example someone looks down as they say something that apparently is a historical okay historically how do you well it's tough I mean I just a question everything do your own research don't necessarily believe what is presented in front of you I mean as a journalist he is you know that was that was my job was to present the truth as much as I call it and and to do that you know need to interview multiple sources generally on something so you need to do your research don't just believe the first thing you hear about something and I mean even then you don't really know that it's true like for example 911 okay 911 this footage on the on the internet that there were bombs going off inside the building for example and you know we've been fed I believe I believe we've been fed alive that there was a that there was a plane that went into that the towers after the research that I've seen now on the internet and and footage that was hidden from the general public and the mass media lies and so this can happen where you know the mass media pushes a certain agenda and we're only seeing one side of the story so I think often particularly if some news comes out overnight and shocking news whole war on terror started for other political monetary reasons selfish reasons then I think you need to you need to really question things so I actually think 911 was a setup and that's because I've done extra research so I'm not I don't know the truth on that however from my research I have devised my own opinion of that and I think everyone watching we should do the same so should people be allowed to question facts yeah absolutely yeah I think you should question facts because how do you know even though that there's facts is meant to be cut and stone is meant to be cement to be a definitive thing but how do you actually know it's a fact really unless you do your own research so but what happens when you question facts some people get offended mmhmm yeah and you're going to get that anyway I think the thing is in life don't worry about other people getting offended because people will get offended people get a sent people to live their life everything we have a chance there's lore in Australia excessively question to two things you got a job that's insane I think that alien see law needs to be thrown out with whoever made that law that is just unbelievable and I just can't believe one I've never heard of this a teensy law before but it's outrageous it should be definitely thrown out the window and it makes absolutely no sense whatsoever the world is run by sociopaths and psychopaths and they probably created a teensy law and I'd say the whole lot of them need to just go and you know finally marry weighed down a stream somewhere okay so we're still I locus of control at the beach right we live in a gold code here yeah it's a failure so when you go to the beach whose responsibility is it to keep you safe yours or the lifeguard you're definitely yours I mean the flags are there for a reason you know people are encouraging us ready to swim between the flags because it's seen as because you've got lifeguard sort of watching over you however you know they they are human beings and they may miss they may miss a point when you go under and and you know that they can't they can't be held responsible for you drowning because you either don't know how to swim I mean that something people can take personal responsibility for don't know how to deal with rips with rips you don't go against through it you go with the rip and go downstream there's a lot of things that people can be responsible for with their own safety and I think people need to be a hundred percent responsible for their own safety however being such a litigious society as it is particularly America and Australia people love to just get easy money and so they will sue people with Dell chip over on someone steps and and you know and there's all sorts of crazy stories that people you know people suing people when they're they're in the wrong and they've actually got money for I mean this is the crazy think about the system is that insurance companies are paying out money where you know like the guy that robbed the guy's house and hurt himself and then you know sued the owner because he heard himself you know giving in to Robert Robert house what the hell you know things like that crazy so would you write this is a long way would you rather live in a country where the government provides everything government provides food home job income health cover etc but you have no personal freedom to choose your occupation and the hours that you work and no choice of where you live or would you rather live in a country where nothing is provided for free you have to demonstrate initiative you have to work hard care money with no minimum wage and you accept the risk yes I'll take that one please absolutely because I want to be able to create a world that I want to live in I want to create the life of my dreams and I think if you work you should be rewarded for it and I think there's too many people like in Australia that are on the doll they get everything handed to them and you know and we've still got people living in the street I just came from Melbourne there's a whole lot of people still living in the street even though the government is giving them giving them the doll money I just don't get that because they're not they're not taught about financial management you know I think we need to teach people to be individuals and to work hard and to you know in and Liz their true purpose you know gets up their infinite consciousness as David Icke says and be the amazing people that they are not just have everything handed to them because they won't appreciate it anyway so there's welfare created dependence upon welfare yeah I think it does i think people do take advantage of it and they do tend to depend on it and they feel it will letter have to work anyway because the government's going to give them you know cheap housing cheap food cheap transport cheap living and so they don't really need to work you know it's like these women having four children to four different men I get fifteen hundred dollars a week because we have the what I call the TV bonus the baby bonus in Australia and so we're just saying well you know just go out and create a whole lot of num nums in the end on the world in the world don't know that's not a great word to say but I mean you know let's just it's just annoy me like I really want to see an educator planet but unfortunately people don't feel that they need to be educated because they can just come out of school go on the doll and they'll be provided for for the rest of their lives but who creates poverty well in some cases the government's do like in some collector example in Africa you know the government spending money on weapons etc and not and not providing food or the foods not you know with the AIDS that's come into Africa for example it's not going to the people that really need it so in some cases the poverty is created by the government and you know you've got things like genetically modified food now so you know a lot of farmers now can't even grow their own food because you've got the big big farmer coming in and a big companies coming in and controlling what for the food we can grow which is favorite and creates wealth well individuals create wealth with what they do and by the services they provide so you will receive money in exchange for us helping someone assisting someone with something so the more you can be a service in life the more wealth you will create okay please take a moment to like and subscribe remembering to click on the bell then check the comments box below to join our team of patrons and crew and you can always find me on facebook at the peace mapping group the link is in the comments box and once again thanks and all the best to you

TimesTalks: Lynsey Addario

TimesTalks: Lynsey Addario



good evening everyone I'm Tom Kaluga executive creative director of the New York Times live conversation series times talks for 20 years times talks has paired New York Times journalists with the brightest and boldest creative minds from the fields of theater music art social justice politics film and literature I'm honored to introduce tonight's conversation with Pulitzer Prize winning New York Times photo journalist and best-selling author Lindsey Dario her new book of love and war to be published on October 23rd is a stunning collection of more than 200 of her photographs documenting life in Afghanistan under the Taliban the stark truth of sub-saharan Africa and the daily reality of women in the Middle East moderating tonight's event is New York Times foreign correspondent and 3-time Pulitzer Prize finalist rue Kamini kalamaki one of the top experts on the Islamic state and the focus of The Times's new caliphate podcasts please join me in giving a very warm welcome to our moderator Rumi Nikola machi and our special guest Lindsey ah Dario [Applause] welcome to the time center I'd like to begin with a video that I think sent some context to the type of risks that you take in your career high you were sexually assaulted on this trip you feared very much that you were going to be raped you did not know if you would get out of this situation alive I think a lot of people wonder why do you do this work I mean I started out the first trip I made to a conflict zone was Afghanistan when it was under the Taliban and I think it provides some pretty good context because I was 27 years old I couldn't get an assignment to save my life I saved my money and I decided to go photograph life under the Taliban and what life was like for women because I felt like that was a story that wasn't being told so I remember the night before I left I called my mother I was living in India and I was like mom I'm going to Afghanistan tomorrow and she was like have a good time honey this is before September 11 so no one was talking about Afghanistan so I went and I realized very quickly that my gender was an asset that I could go into women's homes I could see the way women were living because I was female and I went into sort of the women's hospitals this is a woman in labor this is what the hospital looked like under the Taliban so many of the doctors and medical professionals had left at that time because it was so dangerous and the existence there was so bad there were secret rural schools this was something that was very interesting to me because I had no idea what I would face there there were so many brave Afghans who opened up their families and their homes to teach young girls school because they were not allowed to go to school under the Taliban and much to my surprise there were weddings I had been working in a refugee camp a camp for displaced there was a very bad drought in 2001 and I was photographing it was the one time where I got permission to actually photograph living beings under the Taliban and my driver said madam I have to go early today because there's a wedding and I said we'll take me with you so he took me and we I remember when you walked on the streets under the Taliban it was silent because music was illegal TV was illegal all forms of entertainment were illegal under the Taliban and so we would walk down these very silent streets and you barely saw people and we walked into this compound a family home and descended down the stairs and the soundtrack for the Titanic was blasting and there were people unveiled dancing all together and there was a wedding and I thought this is incredible these are the things that we never see so for me it was really a matter of going to these places that maybe we hadn't we didn't know much about and starting to learn and so it was curiosity more than anything right after September 11th I went back I covered the fall of Conda haar for the New York Times it was really the first time where I was really scared because I remember we drove in we were some of the first journalists to drive in after the Taliban fell in Kandahar and we pulled up to the governor's mansion and this is out the car window this is right away and I remember thinking I can't get out of the car too scared and Ruth from sin who I was working with who's a photographer for the New York Times just jumped out and started shooting and I thought okay I'm gonna do whatever she does so that was yeah can you talk a little bit more about fear so you have clearly felt it how do you how do you handle it how do you work through it yeah I think a lot of people have this misconception that war photographers are fearless and that is not at all the case I am constantly scared I just have to figure out how to manage that fear where do I put it so when I went to cover the war in Iraq I was offered an embed position with the military and I didn't take it because I wasn't sure I'd be able to handle my fear and keep up with the military so I decided to go into the north we crossed illegally from Iraq from Iran into northern Iraq and we sort of waited for the humanitarian aspect of the war to happen up in the north but immediately there was combat there was this proxy war going on with Kurdish Peshmerga backed by American special forces fighting al ansar which was a terrorist group and so right away there were car bombs exploding next to me and on this particular day it was the first time we were photographing people flooding out of a village and the villagers were warning us saying get out of here it's dangerous and that's something very important that you have to take note of when you cover conflict as you listen to the locals and we by the time we got our stuff together I remember I got this feeling in the pit of my stomach and I ran back to the car and shut the door and a car bomb went off and the guy who was standing next to me died and everyone was scrambling and I was sort of paralyzed and I thought I don't want to do this I'm not cut out to do this kind of work and we all went to a school where they were bringing the injured and when we went there the a taxi driver pulled up and said is anyone here a journalist and I sort of thought okay this is my way to not have to handle my emotions and I went over and I said yes would you neon the journalist and he said I have the body of a journalist in my trunk can you come identify him and I remember I just looked at him and I ran to the back of the school and just started crying and I couldn't get out because we didn't have visas to go back into Iran and Saddam Hussein was still in power so I basically had to deal with staying there hmm I find it very interesting that you point out that it's so important to listen to your to your local partners when I was in Mosul over a year ago eastern Mosul had just been liberated and to the naked eye it looked like life had come back immediately we had been packing in our food you know power bars and tuna fish and not very tasty stuff and we passed one of the most famous restaurants and Mosel called my fair lady and it was bustling and I remember saying but look it looks fine let's go eat let's go eat and I pushed it I insisted we went inside we had our meal my colleagues were where unnerved they ended up posting somebody outside who stayed in the car and the driver had his food brought out to him and inside I was like oh this is great you know it's awesome we're having a great time the very next day a suicide bomber walked into that restaurant and blew it to smithereens and I remember just having to check myself and realize once again that that you have to listen to your local partners always and when you don't that's when things happen yeah did you imagine that this was the work that you were going to do no not at all I mean I grew up I was raised by hairdressers in the 70s in Connecticut and a very sort of eccentric upbringing and a lot of pool parties and no not at all but I think it was really curiosity that start got me started on this work and continued taking me all around the world how do you make sense of the risk now that you are married to somebody that you love very much and that you have a small child you know last week I was in Yemen I just came back and I think for me I will always be driven by telling these stories and particularly stories that haven't been told or are not being told enough so I don't go and just take sort of gratuitous risks I don't just go to every warzone that I see for me it's really about telling a story for example the war in Iraq it was important for me as a young American woman to be there because I felt like this is gonna be the war of our generation there were mass graves being on earth so many civilians had been killed and I was able to go with the military you know go on patrols in the middle of the night see them rounding up Iraqis putting bags on their heads zip ties on the wrists all of this work became work that added to our knowledge our comprehensive knowledge as a society as Americans as to what was going on in Iraq and I think that those are always things that really drive me and that I think it's really important to be there do you agree that there's a misconception that war photographers are out for some sort of adrenaline rush absolutely I mean it's the number one question I get is do you do it for the Adrian and I want to smack everyone who asked because it's not at all about the adrenaline it's about telling the story it's about being there it's about documenting history it's about bearing witness it's about giving a voice to all these people who don't have a voice and I think yes of course there's adrenaline involved I think that you know there was a point in my life in Iraq and Afghanistan and Darfur where I basically lived in war zones and so I was accustomed to a certain level of excitement and adrenaline but I think that was never what drove me to be there right can you talk about some of the instances where your work has truly made a difference both in both in that particular conflict and in the lives of specific individuals I think some of the work let me see if I can get there some of the work that made a difference probably some of the work on women's stories the work on maternal mortality I know that I did a story and I will get to the pictures sort of further down those were some pictures that Merck which is the pharmaceutical company one of their board members saw a body of work that I did from Sierra Leone and they that was one of the impetus for starting Merck for mothers and so they put aside five hundred million dollars to start Merck for mothers based on a body of work and so that to me is something that is you know really that makes me proud and really is one of the reasons why I do this work right I think that most people assume that being a woman in in a war zone or even being a woman in the Middle East is a disadvantage what's your take on that I disagree I think being a woman to me has always been a great advantage I think that maybe there's a process of proving ourselves that goes on longer for example I did many years of military imbed and this is a story I did for the New York Times Magazine on the Korengal Valley I did it with Elizabeth Rubin who was a great writer for the New York Times Magazine and she had this idea of trying to figure out why there were so many civilian casualties in Afghanistan when we had some of the best technology in the world and so we went to eastern Afghanistan and that was the place where the US military was dropping the most bombs in the country until we went to the public affairs officer and we said we'd like to go to the Korengal Valley and he sort of looked at us up and down and said it's not a place that's fit for women and we said well why not and he said well there's no place for you to sleep and no place for you to go to the bathroom and we said well where do the men sleep and where do the men go to the bathroom and he said well they sleep in bunkers and we said well we can do that so the next day he talked to the commander and they put us on Blackhawks and they flew us out and they started us in the Tactical Operations Center so the command center which for photographers really boring because everything is classified and and there was a battle going on on the screens and we were able to see these command centers are incredible because you can see you know drone feeds heat sensor feeds you could see troops and combat everything on the screen and so we saw this battle unfolding on the screens and we asked to go to that place where the battle had been and so the next morning they flew us right into the heart of the Korengal Valley and we stayed almost two months and so for two months you know the first few weeks we really had to prove ourselves as women and as journalists and as people that could keep up and we did six seven hour a day patrols every single day we were under fire a lot we spent long hours doing nothing just sitting and basically waiting to get attacked or to go on patrols and at the end of it we went on this operation rock avalanche where we had to jump out of Blackhawks in the middle of the night all with night-vision goggles and literally jump into the heart of the Taliban territory and walk for six days with everything we owned on our backs and keep up and this is where we slept for the first three nights in this ditch and there were I think eleven of us and it was so cold it was October it was 7,000 feet in the mountains and so we were literally just spooning all of us because we were freezing and then we got ambushed on the sixth day and so we ended up getting ambushed and this is all you know these are images that I don't think I could have made had we just parachuted and you know these are images that when a soldier dies and soldiers get get shot in front of you they're very protective they don't necessarily want journalists around so these are images where you know in this case they're carrying the body of Sergeant Rugal and I was crying because I had spent so much time with him and so they they can see that we had sort of gotten to a point where these pictures were okay there was a major controversy when I was up the Associated Press about a photograph of a dying soldier that was that was published did you have any pushback with these kind of images from the military yes there are so the rule in the military is that if you photograph a soldier dying and his face is visible or any identifying marks so tattoos anything that his family can identify him you need permission from the next of kin and so in those pictures of Rugal he was in a body bag so I did not need permission but there is another series that I did of a soldier who was dying and I have many many pictures of him throughout that process he had stepped on an ID he lost nine pints of blood he was essentially dead when they brought him into the field hospital where I was and I photographed the whole process of them these incredible Navy doctors and nurses trying to save his life and massaging his heart blood transfusions everything and he passed away and I photographed the entire thing and the prayer that they said and put a flag over his body and the minute the whole thing finished the public affairs officers with the Marines came right to me and said you need permission before you can send those pictures out and so then I got in – like a like a relationship with his father that I'm still friends with his father to this day and this was 2009 so I had to call the father actually you're not allowed to call the family they have to call you so I had to give my phone number to the Marines and wait for the father to call to see if I can use these pictures and it was probably December 17th 2009 so it was more than two weeks after his son had died right before Christmas and he called me and he said I don't know anything about my son's death all I know is that he was killed in combat operations in Afghanistan can you tell me everything you know because I want to be with him every moment until he died and he asked me every single thing every question you can imagine a parent would want to know about their child and we developed this this relationship and in the end he discussed it with his ex-wife and they've thought that the other siblings of the boy wouldn't be able to handle seeing the pictures so they asked us not to publish so the only picture that could be published as one with the flag over his body Wow so to this day you have not published this day I recently gave a talk and it was close to Florida where he lives and I asked him if I could show the pictures on screen and he gave me permission to show the full edit Wow Wow but that's almost 10 years later right right so when you were with these soldiers and you were trying to prove yourself so part of the hurdle is physical just just showing that as a woman that you can actually keep up absolutely and that you're not going to get queasy at the blood you get queasy at the conflict can you talk about other ways that you've had to prove yourself as a female war correspondent so I think the the thing is there are so many ways to do this job and you know sometimes I'm trying to be tough and to be able to get like sort of act like one of the guys and some I'm posing as someone's wife so you know for example when Dexter Filkins and I did batalov honest on story for the New York Times Magazine we Dexter spent about a month trying to line up access with one of the Taliban commanders in the tribal area in Pakistan and finally he got the access and he called me said okay ready to come in so I flew in and we were in Peshawar in Pakistan near the tribal area and the night before we were supposed to leave the commander said okay you are welcome to come tomorrow but the one thing you cannot do is bring a woman and of course Dexter and I were like well we're going together we're team you know and so Halim who was our we had two local journalists who were working with us and Halim was sort of sympathetic to the Taliban and he said oh I don't know what to do no women what do we do miss Lindsay can't you give mr. Dexter your camera and I was like no Willie and figure it out so he was like I know you are mr. Dexter's wife and no Taliban would leave his wife alone in a strange village so you have to come I was like great I'll be his wife I don't care so we went as husband and wife and it's so fun I don't know who in this room knows Dexter Filkins but he doesn't have that much attacked when it comes to it so we walk into this tiny room of Taliban fighters probably like definitely not as big as the stage and I'm like the elephant in the room because I am women don't leave their house in this part of the world so I'm fully veiled you can't see any of my skin I walk into this room sort of like fumbling I have my cameras a bag and I sit down behind Dexter and he's like hey Hadji Nnamdi are you know thanks for letting my wife come and you know my wife has a camera do you mind if she takes some pictures I was like there's no way and I pull out like the most massive Nikon camera I look like there's no way they're gonna believe it and of course room I bail so my eyes aren't even on bill like shooting and then I dropped one of my lenses and I was like forget it I'm just gonna open this little slit for my eyes that I'm trying to shoot there and so then at one point and this is you know this part of the world the irony of course is that this part of the world is one of the most hospitable places in the world if they invite you in they have to give you tea and they have to serve you and so we're sitting in this room full of Taliban fighters and like 15 minutes into the interview everyone in the room was getting really fidgety and I was like oh of course this is where they kill us I mean what are we thinking like we're Americans meeting with the Taliban and so we sit there and this guy comes a racist madam we would like to serve you tea but we don't know how you can drink the tea through your veil please madam please stand in the corner lift the veil face the wall drink your tea and then you can come back and I was like I cannot believe the Taliban is freaking out about how to give me tea in Mosul I actually covered a story about about the dress code that women had to endure and at first it was it was a rope all the way down to the floor then it was the face covering veil then it was an extra flap over the eyes so that so that there was no eye contact at all then it was gloves and in stockings so you were basically women just became this black black blob and I interviewed this grandmother who had gone to a picnic with her family and she was an older woman she wasn't young and her crime was that she had lifted up her veil to take a spoonful of the food that they were having at this picnic and they caught her I mean basically it was not even a nanosecond of seeing her mouth and she actually an undressed in front of me and showed me the scars on her back of the lashing anything for your information older women are usually exempt from a lot of this sort of hijab necessities because they're not sexual anymore so older women technically they some of them show their faces and they don't have to be as cover yeah when I was in Afghanistan I had a similar a similar sort of bizarre experience where I have had a female translator with me so of course as a woman you have access to as you have said both of these worlds I'm going to get them in and you can go interview the women but no Afghan man can come into the room to interview a woman yes my female trans or hesitate for part of the trip then her husband called her she had to leave and I was left with only a male translator and there was a woman that I desperately wanted to interview in this village and so the way that we decided to do it is I and her were behind the door we were inside the house behind the door and my Afghan translator had to stand outside and scream the questions you know over the wall it was just it was like Twilight Zone exactly how did you get access to get to get in to see the telephone Dexter did it so sometimes you know I think something that a lot of people don't realize is that a lot of this work is collaborative so I can't do half the work I do without the journalists I work with and sometimes photographers give ideas to the writers and so I think it's really a collaborative process it's really you know in this case he stayed on the ground and worked all the contacts and I came in at the last minute yeah if there's knowing that this is the series that you want to Pulitzer for right yes this was part of a package that the whole New York Times won right you've spoken about how it's an advantage to be a woman we know that female captives that have been held by the Taliban have been raped yes can you talk about the fear of rape as as you go about your work and how how that is one thing that affects you specifically as a woman sure and I think we can speak to actually this is which is quite relevant given the Nobel Peace Prize today but this is a series from 2008 in the Democratic Republic of Congo on rape as a weapon of war and so for at least 10 years I've been photographing women victims of rape as a weapon of war all over DRC South Sudan I've been in Uganda I've been all over really interviewing women so one thing that sort of sits in the back of my mind always as a woman is will this happen to me and of course in Libya that was really exacerbated I mean it was the first thing that I thought about when we were taken and you know I thought about a lot of these women this is I oxi was raped in South Sudan she's a nine months pregnant with her perpetrators child you know for me it's really these women have shared their stories with me and they also got me through one of the hardest experiences of my own life because I remember there was a moment when we were in prison in Libya and we were tied up and we had endured three days already of being beaten up and threatened with execution and me being touched by every man basically we came across and I remember being in this prison cell and thinking of all the women that I had photographed over the years and how incredible they were and how resilient they were and how they had endured so much worse than I was enduring at that moment and I just thought I you know if they can do it I can do it and so they really became a source of inspiration for me one of the stories that we collaborated on was the terrible story of what happened together thee women which i think is very relevant today given that Nadia Murad has just won the Nobel Peace Prize pants can you talk about you've covered you've covered raping the Congo SMI and you covered the Yazidi rape story how do you compare the stories how do I compare stories I think look it's hard to it's hard to compare stories in such different parts of the world I think that all of these experiences are experiences that are very traumatic they're taking place in very different cultures I think the one thing they have in common is that when there is a war social norms break down and things are happening that generally would not happen and people go unpunished and so I think what's left are these women and men also who have years of trauma that they often can't express and so you then meet these incredible people like Nadia who want to share their stories and help other women in the future as a female who is photographing the most gendered experience that there is which is being raped do you think that that gives you an edge or it allows you to be closer to to the subject I mean it's hard because I I think in my experience it also depends on what part of the world you're working I think if it's a story in the Muslim world where people are very conservative and women are typically segregated from men women feel more comfortable talking to women I think that you know no one really feels comfortable talking about sexual assault but certainly these women share most of their intimate experiences with other women and so it's important to respect that culture and to go in there very sensitively and to keep whatever sort of socially generally happened keep that status quo so you don't make them more nervous than they are so I think you know my experience dealing with women in these situations is that it helps being a woman you know this is this image is a woman of mama si se she is this is the story that Merck for mothers was sort of they looked at this story and there's an accompanying video and I hung out with her for about an hour before she gave birth to the second of twins and she started hemorrhaging and I was photographing in videotaping and I kept saying to the midwives I think she's bleeding too much and they were sort of just mopping up the blood and saying no she's fine and finally I went and I actually went to find the one doctor in the whole province and he was in surgery and I went and I put on scrubs and I went into the surgical ward and I said I think there's a woman dying and he sort of looked at me and was like well I'm busy and so then I went back and I encouraged the midwives like maybe you should take our blood pressure maybe you should take her to the doctor so they picked her up and carried her over to the doctor and he came out of surgery and she died and it was it was to me it was so unbelievable because she was so alive and she gave birth and died like within the span of an hour and and I was so frustrated because there was no doctor I mean this is a this is in 2010 at that point there were three OBGYNs in the entire country and you know so to me it was just criminal that as a woman you die giving birth and one in eight women in Sierra Leone at that time had a risk of dying in childbirth and so you know that became with this story and with another story I had done in Afghanistan I really decided to try and focus on maternal death do at least one story a year where I go and focus on that and so some of these images are also from other women who had complications she had eclampsia so she had very high blood pressure when she gave birth and she had seizures and went into a coma and she ended up surviving this is the sister of a woman who hemorrhaged after childbirth and this is the moment the sister died the sister fainted and passed out so yeah for me it's really important to focus also on some women's issues we did finding home for Time magazine this is a story where we followed Syrian refugee mothers through the final months of their pregnancy and through the first year of their children's lives and you know we see a lot of images of refugees but it's very hard to relate to them and to sort of penetrate their lives and so the point of the story was to get in deeper right how did you metabolize the suffering that you sometimes witness you know I try to channel everything I see into the work and to try to just get it published and to to sort of try to change policy or affect policy or to get people motivated to do something this is the story I did with Denise Grady for the New York Times and it was on breast cancer in Uganda this is Mary numata she's a woman who had been living with these tumors for almost five years but she was too ashamed to do anything about it and so she finally she heard there were American doctors with Seattle from Seattle who were looking at cancer people who had cancer and so she showed up at this hospital and just took off her shirt and had these tumors and very luckily one of the doctors did a biopsy right there and suggested she go in and have a mastectomy right away and she lived but it's really about information it's about getting this out you know I think that she was one of the lucky ones what are some things that that you think people do not know about the preparation that goes into covering conflict zones like you do sure I think access is one of the hardest things to explain is how difficult it is people I don't know when you read the newspaper or a magazine and you see an image from a place that's far away you know what goes into getting access to those photos I started covering the war in Darfur in 2004 and at that point the Sudanese government did not want journalists there so the only way in was to fly to Chad and to literally walk through rivers across the desert for about a mile with everything over your head you know carrying my cameras and clothes and everything we water until we met up with rebels and literally drove around Darfur with them on the back of a pickup truck with about 15 16 other fighters for five days and there were skeletons across the desert there were this was the first time a woman ever admitted to me of being raped as a weapon of war and also assaulted in 2008 I was working with Lydia Pohl green for the times and we had heard that this village had been bombed by the government and it was very remote and we couldn't get access to it and the only way in was on a helicopter and WFP which is the World Food Program had the only helicopters because they had permission from the government to bring food in and so we went to the landing zone Lydia and I and we said like can we get on the helicopter we want a report on this story and they said no no there are eight seats and they're all four WFP staff and Lydia went ballistic don't you know the power of an image don't you understand that if you let at least my photographer on this helicopter your people will understand the conflict in Darfur she said I don't need to go just put her on and it was on the front page of the New York Times the next day and it's like you know she was right and she you know she was very selfless and let me take that seat because she understood that in that moment an image would be powerful right so a lot of this has to do with access it has to do with how you got there this is a case in 2009 I think this was 2006 where we had heard Sudanese government soldiers had been massacred in Darfur and President Bashir who's the President of Sudan went on TV and he said absolutely no government soldiers were killed that's just a lie and so Lydia and I were in Chad and we went to the border and we found a group of rebels and we said hey will you take us across the border did this really happen and they said yeah their bodies everywhere and so we said can you take us in and they said well you know their Antonov aircraft flying overhead and they're bombing people if they think and we said well it's the New York Times like we have to see it if we're gonna report on it and they were like okay come so we got in the back of the car and we drove in and then we got there and there were bodies clear across the desert and it was exactly you know this picture is really the power of photography it's like you cannot deny what had happened so then it was really important to sort of see that I was not at the times when when you and gatir we're doing your Darfur recording but I remember even for me as somebody who did not study this conflict this was the reporting that put it on the map this this was when I became aware in my own imagination that there was a place called r4 and that a genocide might be unfolding yeah and I mean that was a that was a case where having someone incredible like Lydia who was smart and tenacious and brave and you know I I couldn't have done half that work without her right you were pregnant and you and you continued working very late into your pregnancy that caused some controversy when when you ended up writing about it can you talk about that decision yeah I think you know I have been doing this work for 23 years and a lot of the women that I photograph are often pregnant and they are working and living in the places I photograph and guess what it's not so precious you know they're still chopping wood and doing their work and going about their daily lives and I think when people here she went to Afghanistan when she was pregnant I'm not like bullets aren't flying around me I'm going and I'm meeting with women in their homes and interviewing them and doing portraits or I did this story on the drought for example in Kenya and so you know really for me it was about listening to my body and not sort of overworking myself I was doing what I always did and I felt great and so for me I really didn't understand why suddenly people felt entitled to make decisions for me and my body when I felt very comfortable I didn't know you yet and I remember when when your article came out and The Times magazine that had that were you talked about being pregnant and and working and I got into a pretty vicious Facebook fight with with a friend of mine who not a friend of mine a colleague of mine who who you know just lay into you yeah and the thing that really got me is both you and I have traveled with male colleagues whose wives gave birth when they were on assignment had very small children at home who put themselves in enormous risk you know in the kind of risk that could leave a child without a father sure and yet there's never any criticism never and in fact when you know when I've had male colleagues who have been killed or who have died while working and they have children no one I've never heard one person say well what was he doing in a war zone right whereas if that were a woman with children you can be guaranteed that the first thing they would say is how irresponsible what was she doing in a war zone so I think there's still a pretty big double standard with this work right right you were very comfortable working as a pregnant woman and you kept on doing it very late into your pregnancy and I agree with you because I've lived in these countries and you know in Senegal women go women literally give birth after they harvest you know there yeah on the side of the field you know they work up until they were at the very last moment and there's nothing there's nothing unusual that's a lie yeah however you did hide that from all of your colleagues including your other editors I think until month six can you talk about that because I think that's a very interesting decision that you made yeah I think first of all I come from like a big Italian family where there are no secrets I mean like zero secrets and I hid it from my own parents until I was like more than four months pregnant so I didn't want anyone to know because I felt like my editors would start making decisions on my behalf as to what assignments they would give me where I could go what I can do and I didn't want that I wanted to talk to my doctor talk to my husband make those decisions myself and so I basically hit it until I really couldn't do any more and I was on assignment with Joe Klein and we were doing a road trip across America and I was about between five and six months and I just like in that two weeks my stomach just popped and I kept having to go buy clothes and I was like you know I'd shoot all day and then I'd run to like Target or wherever I couldn't try and get bigger pants and finally I was like he's gonna think I'm like binge eating at night so like I went I finally like woke up one morning and I went downstairs and I was like morning Joe and he's like having his omelet and I'm like I'm like in he's like morning and I'm like I'm almost six months pregnant and he's like what I just didn't want you to think that like you know I I wasn't gonna give you my all and then I'm not and he was like you are crazy it was like yeah I guess but I think you know unfortunately that's how I felt and I that's what I felt comfortable with so you were afraid that that editors might might restrict you might not give you the assignments that you wanted and and I completely relate to that sure link and I think they might have just because out of perhaps out of fear you know for are you can you describe what happened to you in Gaza sure so I was covering a prisoner exchange and I was 27 weeks pregnant and working for the times and it was there it wasn't there wasn't more going on at that time in Gaza it was literally in exchange of one prisoner for I think a thousand 28 Palestinians and so I any journalist going into Gaza has to stop at the Israeli press office and get credentialed and get so I went in and I got credentialed with the Israeli press office and then I went into Gaza and coming out at some point I thought okay I should leave because now it's it's almost twenty eight weeks and I should go so I was on my way out and I called the press office and I said Shalom oh it's Lindsey with the New York Times you facilitated me getting in and I'm coming out and I understand there are many x-ray machines and very intense searches on the way out and could you could you call ahead and let them know that I'm pregnant I'm 27 weeks pregnant and and he said yes no problem so I got there and the way air is crossing the way you get out of Gaza it's almost like an airport so they have everything is on the ground and the Israeli soldiers are up above through be behind bulletproof glass so I came in on the ground and you have to press a button like an intercom and say so I press the button I said I'm with the New York Times and Schlomo had called ahead and you know I prefer if it's possible can you do a hand search because I'm pregnant and then and the guy on the intercom comes back and he says well you can take all your clothes off and we strip search you or he's like or you can basically be here all day and so I turned to Steve Farrell who was living there at the time in Jerusalem and I said Steve what should I do and he said you know you should probably just go through the x-ray machine it's just once and it'll be fine but otherwise they're gonna really make give you a hard time and I said okay so I put all my bags through and I go through and it's one of those full-body scanners so I go and I'm in this thing and I do the full-body scan and the the glass goes around and the way it works is there's a red light and a green light so once the scanner goes there's a green light and you walk to the next part so the green light the red light turned green and then I was as I was about to walk it turned red and I looked up and they're all up above and they said whoops you moved and I said I didn't move and they said you moved do it again so they did it and three times they made me do the scan and they were laughing they were all just looking down laughing at me and so then after three times the light turned green and instead of going straight they made me go to the right and an AP photographer had said to me if you end up in a room with the greats you're being strip-searched and so they pushed me to the right and I look down and I'm in a room with the greats and I said it's not possible and it's pitch black and suddenly a light slips on and there's a woman behind bulletproof glass and she says take all your clothes off and at this point I was fuming and I said you're kidding and she said take her clothes off and I said sorry did the x-ray machine not work all three times and she said take your clothes off and I said so you know are all the man up there watching like I'm not really sure what's going on here and so basically I was strip-searched and then I was let through and I wrote of course the one thing that I can think of is this if this happens to a New York Times accredited journalists imagine the Palestinian women what happens to them and so I wrote a letter backed by The Times you know just a formal complaint saying this is unfair and and I think according to Nick Kristof I'm the only journalist ever to receive a public apology from the Israeli Ministry of Defense so that's my claim to fame how would you explain what happened did they think that you might can I mean or no I think that you know in that text they just weren't happy with journalists being in Gaza I mean I don't I can't get into what they were thinking because frankly it was evil but I you know that's what happened Facebook live questions that I'm gonna ask Lindsey and then afterwards we're going to have a Q&A with with everybody here two microphones one on either side of the room so we'd love to hear from you as well Isaac from facebook asks can you talk about the struggle between being an observer and physically intervening in a violent situation among subjects so I think the first thing that's important to realize is that I'm not a doctor so I often say I often can't help in ways that other people who are trained medical professionals can help I mean often as a journalist I can't really get involved the most that I can do is give someone a ride to the hospital and it can't be a combatant it can't be someone with a weapon it can't be someone in uniform it can't be you know it could be a child or a woman who's unarmed and I think it's very important to not get involved in that in that case so I think there was one situation where let's see I'll go back where I got involved and I decided actually to stop taking pictures because of that and it was a woman I was doing a story on maternal health in Afghanistan and there was a woman I had actually spent like two weeks in very remote areas of Afghanistan and on the way back I saw these two women on the side of the mountain and there was no man with them so we thought something might be wrong and so we stopped the car and me and dr. ziba who was my translator ran up and said what's wrong and she said the woman on the right was Noor Nisa and her water had just broken and her husband's first wife died in childbirth so he managed to get a car but the car broke down and so I said we'll just I'll take you to the hospital that's where we're going and I said well we need permission from the husband Oh God and so I turned to ziba and I said we'll look there's one road and the whole province so go find a husband and so she did she found him and brought him back and I took about maybe three to five frames of this entire scene just like this and at that point I piled the whole family in my car and I stopped shooting and I didn't shoot any more because I felt like it was more important to take her to the hospital and frankly it didn't really matter it wasn't you know but I could have continued shooting but I would have just put that in the caption that this is the only reason they made it to the schools because I took but this is a case where I shot a few pictures and then when I intervened I stopped shooting that is of course the journalistic principle that once you once you become involved in a situation then then you have to take a step back Ethan from Facebook has a has a similar question how do you balance journalistic integrity with getting close to your subjects when do you decide to not take a photo the only time I don't take a picture is when they tell me not to because I'll basically just shoot and shoot and shoot and I leave it up to the subject basically to put those boundaries for me I get very close to subjects I open up as much as they do and I'm very I sort of really throw myself into every story so I really let them give me the parameters of what they feel comfortable with in terms of photographs and and that's up to them right Gary from facebook asks can you talk about your point of view on how US intervention has affected Afghanistan especially the women there no I can't I you know it's a war that's gone way way too long you know it's it's hard I've tried to cover the war from both sides and I see you know both sides but it's hard to talk about because I've seen a lot of suffering of course I think we'll take questions from the audience now there are two microphones on either side I believe and we'd love to hear what you have to ask thank you so much for that chat um just to your question on you know how a female reporter current can interact abroad and then also your points on access I think it's really important to highlight that local women don't have the access that you have absolute so my family's from Yemen and there's things that I can never do to this day because it puts myself and my family on the line I think it's really important to call that out when you ask questions around how you know how you engage as a female reporter that being said my question to you then is given your role and your access and your privilege how can you support local women in Afghanistan in Yemen to become stronger reporters absolutely that's a great question I think look in an ideal world it would be locals photographing their own stories because I think you know they have the most intimate view of their own culture and they see parts of conflict that we will never access but I do think that repeating that we're talking about how as female journalists we're often seen as this sort of third sex where we can enter spaces where you know as a woman but also sort of just as a journalist where we're seen as something that is very foreign so we get access to things that typically women would not access and so I think that's the same for locals I think I've seen myself with local journalists I'm working with translators they're treated very differently from me just because I'm an outsider and so I don't know how we break that I don't know how that can change I think it has to change from the inside it's certainly not going to change from outside I think that we can support local journalists by teaching them showing them how to do the work working alongside them so that they have the tools and they can develop as photographers or as journalists and under and you know the rules of the trade I mean one thing that I see I've lived all over the world and I remember when I was living in India you know journalists just didn't have the integrity that that we have in the West because they were never taught so all the photographers were setting everything up telling people to do things over again moving people out of the way and I was mortified because here was me you know here I was the idiot who would actually stand somewhere for two hours waiting for something to happen and then the local Stavro come in and be like wait can you just do that again I missed that picture and I was like you can't do that so I think it also you know we have to teach people and and to show them what's okay and what's not okay I would add to that that there are of course some exceptions like for instance in Afghanistan there's a woman called for even OMA who is Afghan she was born in Afghanistan yes she spent a portion of her life in America so she had also an American citizenship but she speaks completely fluent Pashtun etc and when she's on the ground she's Afghan and I think that she is treated much like you and I are treated and that's because she has assumed this role you know she is not afraid to to to push through these boundaries that might be more difficult if you're if you're living full-time in that country thank you an inspiration to me and my question relates to Latin America Latin America seems to be kept off the radar and the level of violence and loss specifically related to Venezuela currently would you ever think about going and pulling pointing your lens you know you're talking about maternal mental health are not maternal mental health matter no mortality rates no 90% over the last three years have you ever thought about highlighting those stories yeah I actually started my career in Latin America so I was very very interested in working and living in Latin America and then September 11th happened was sort of it I mean I I used to go to Cuba starting in 97 I went every year I would stay with a family and photograph you know life in Cuba in the 90s and then moved to Argentina to learn Spanish and was working all over Latin America moved to Mexico in early 2001 and then September 11th happened and I was on the first plane out of Mexico and basically never went back I mean so I think now at this point it's a good time to sort of start looking back at Latin America because there are so many incredible and very important stories going on I've ironically been working a lot in America because I think it's a really interesting time to be working here right now there are a lot of very important stories to tell and I think that's been very interesting to me to also work here now I would also add that Meredith Kahoot who is based in Venezuela also a times a shooter has been doing just absolutely remarkable yeah remarkable event as well yeah thanks so much thank you for adjusting the microphone he never saw so much shorter um my question freeze you've witnessed firsthand so much human suffering are you optimistic about the state of the world and if you are why and how do you what do you see that gives you hope and how do you how do you balance that with what you see oh my gosh I covered the Islamic state so that should leave me quite depressed but I guess I'm just an optimist by nature the reason the reason I say that is you go to these places and and you see such dark cruelty and also such unbelievable human goodness in in Mosul last year Isis had overrun you know much of northern Iraq and they had taken over a village called Omar Khan Isis is a Sunni Muslim group and they considered Shia Muslims to be APUs tate's as much as Christians and Jews they were killing any she but they found and in that village there was a single mosque the mosque was run by an imam who happen to be sunni and he hid the Shias in his village in his mosque when Isis came he lied and he said that they were Sunnis he taught them the Sunni rituals so that they would pray in this anyway so that they would not make utterances that were that were non Sunni utterances he was taken to the Sharia tribunal by Isis multiple times questioned over and over again he thought he was going to be killed and yet he did it just you know in the way that people saved other people in the Holocaust right and I really take hope from that most of the people I photograph they haven't lost hope so how can we I mean they're really the ones bearing the brunt of what's happening I just want to say both of you guys are like my role models you're incredible and so as an aspiring photojournalist in like foreign correspondent I was wondering what piece of advice each of you had if you had like one main piece of advice paula is the same advice my parents gave me is don't think about money and just do what you love and you're gonna work your ass off to that I would add what an editor told me early on so I started my career at a very small newspaper in Chicago where my first assignments were literally Christmas tree lighting ceremonies the Christmas tree lighting ceremony in Streamwood Illinois I did a good job they gave me the Streamwood lighting ceremony in Hanover Park Illinois and then in Bartlett and then by a point I wanted to shoot myself but at this newspaper every most people that were ambitious understood that you kind of just have to put in your time and then you move on you know to bigger things and there was a divide in the newsroom between reporters who what as quickly as they could through these various assignments to try to get to kind of the big story the one where they were gonna shine and my editor sat me down and said every single assignment that comes across your desk do your very best because in doing that you are going to learn this that will serve you much later and that was so true i doand – Christmas tree lighting ceremonies in the way I jump into reporting on Mosel yeah and because because you hone your craft at the beginning of your career you're going to do a lot of really boring things a lot of really tedious things do them to the best of your ability because of them doing that you'll become better thank you hi so my question is do you find the the transition from your experiences or life in a conflict zone to life back in New York or ever and that may be challenging and and how do you cope with that if so I think I've been doing it for many years now so I've learned sort of techniques to be able to go between the two worlds and it's really important to do that because I think it's not fair to my husband and my son and people in my life if I come back from an assignment and I need two days or three days to sort of figure out where I am and because I often don't have that time I don't have the luxury of that I have to literally land and pick up my son from school and do his homework and you know take him to the park I mean I think that it's important for me personally to be very present no matter where I am I think probably the the one assignment that I had a very hard time transitioning out of was the Korengal Valley and that was because we were literally living on the side of a mountain in a bunker for two months and it was very intense and the final sort of week-long and like operation was terrifying and and really difficult and and so I had a hard time when I got home I just couldn't I couldn't process what I had been through and this was 2007 and I remember I kept breaking down and crying in the middle of conversations and my husband would introduce me this was when I was first started dating my boyfriend my husband who was that my boyfriend and he'd introduced me to people and I'd have to excuse myself and go to the bathroom and cry and it was really overwhelming I had never been through that and it was PTSD but it was something that I didn't really know how to handle but that was eventually it went away I mean it took you know good to three months to work through that but that was really the one time where I had a very hard time processing what I had been through I would take my self my my rock is my husband and he's he's the person I call in the morning when I get up and I call him when I'm stuck at a checkpoint and I call him at night before I go to sleep so that that creates this kind of connective tissue where my life at home and my life you know in the field are always connected back to advice the young woman who asked before I would say one other piece of advice and I think Lindsay and I have both gotten lucky in this category especially as a woman the partner that you choose is really going to make a very very crucial difference and whether you're able to do your your career properly I know so many women in this field that have ended up curtailing their own ambitions because they had partners that were lost and supportive hi you both seem just incredibly brave just so brave and you guys have done things that I just can't imagine how you would have been prepared for it how you would have been trained for it how you would have like done it and you must have been terrified so I wonder if you could and we've talked about this a little bit tonight but could you speak to personal bravery and cultivating that and how you've done that and whether you're still scared no I don't think of myself as brave no it's like the last thing I would say about myself but I think you know like I said before the first time that I had a near-death experience I couldn't stop crying and I like hid behind the school so I didn't feel very brave and then I realized I couldn't get out of the country so I had to just sort of buckle up and keep working and then I think the first time I was in an ambush I was I had been kidnapped in Iraq and then we made a decision not to leave the country because I wanted to sort of work through that fear and I didn't think that if I wanted to be a conflict photographer that the best technique would be to get on the first plane and leave so we decided to stay but then the next day like 30 people got kidnapped and so I thought okay this would be horrible if we got Reid kidnapped and so we went and embedded with the military and the military we went to a base near Fallujah which was close to where we got taken and we were waiting for a few days for them to give us our first sort of operation and they tried to send us into the village we had just been kidnapped in and the writer I was with was like yeah let's go and I was like are you crazy because we just lived because we convinced them we were journalists now you want to show up with the US military obviously like any other journalist is gonna get killed so we didn't do that but we ended up going somewhere close by and they put us in the back of a 7-ton pickup truck a 7-ton military truck which is open back and not armoured at 2:00 in the morning there were 17 Marines in the back of his truck and us and I had never been in an ambush before and I had just been kidnapped and I was like I remember saying to the reporter like I hate your guts it was the middle of a night and we roll into this village and watch the insurgents mountain ambush against us and the commander and I don't know if he did this because the New York Times was in the truck kept saying you can't fire upon until you've been fired upon first we were like can you just fire on them please it's so were literally like waiting to be ambushed and lo and behold a rocket goes like 2 feet above our heads and I freeze I'm like paralyzed with fear and all the Marines in the truck half the truck jumped out the back side as instructed as I was supposed to do but I was too scared to move and the other half were shooting back and I'm lying in the back of his truck and these hot bullet casings are just landing on my face and I'm thinking I have to get out of this truck because what if they hit the truck with a rocket but I don't want to move and I can't move my legs and so he literally picked up my own leg and was like move it and I'm like talking to myself out loud and then I jump on the back side of the truck I'm 5 feet tall those trucks were like 13 feet high I have a flak jacket helmet all my cameras I'm dangling off the back side of the truck and there is a full comet I still haven't taken one picture by the way it's like no I wasn't a very good war photographer and I was like thank you so much for your professionalism Lindsay my name is patty we have a mutual friend who's a marine and rescue firefighter at the FDNY where I work yes and so he and I often talk about leadership and you just talked about you know in times of great need you see the best and sometimes the worst in people what are some qualities of leaders that you've seen in in your experience I think that they stay calm and they look out for the people around them and they're really generous and I think Jason is a great example of that the person that she's talking about is a marine and I was embedded with him I think I did two or three embeds with him in southern Afghanistan and you know I think it's really important to just keep it together and to look out for the people around you and that was really something that you see in these in in these fights and in these patrols and and when things go wrong you see what how people conduct themselves so I would add leaders that respect their local partners because of course they act more about that training than we do absolutely and that don't that don't take unnecessary risks i earlier this year I had to cover the Benicia ambush that took four soldiers in Mesa last year and we were able to get access to people who had seen the investigation and it turned out that they had been in that village without any of the normal preparation that that you take to go in in that sort of area and having lived in Africa myself for seven years I know how easy it is to underestimate that terrain it looks safe until it's not and they made the mistake of thinking they had a handle and four people were killed I think we can take one more question yes right thank you so much I'm curious about your research process and how you go in with enough of an opinion to know what you're looking at and what questions to ask but also maintain an open mind to see what you might not have expected yeah I think it's really important to let the story take you rather than go into a place and say this is the story I'm going to tell before you've ever even been there and I think you know there's a huge amount of research that goes into every single one of these stories even as a photographer I think taking pictures is like 10 percent of what I do there's research there's making contacts talking to local journalists figuring out how to dress I put I included some pictures of me on assignment so you can see this is Fallujah this is us crossing into Darfur this is the Korengal Valley I'm the little one on the left this is Afghanistan this is South Sudan you know this is Somalia so it's like you know I'm constantly this is seven months pregnant in Gaza you know I think there's a lot of sort of doing your homework figuring out how to how to act what's culturally okay and yeah I would add that I've worked with all sorts of photographers and there's there's a division between those who expect the reporter to do everything and they're just there to shoot right there I won't name them right and then there are photographers like Lindsay who are true partners they are they are a journalist – they are there at reporting the story as you're reporting it and that to me has always been the most fruitful relationship because then you have two people that are digging into into the story [Applause]