A journey through the Himalayas with a camera and printer in the bag

A journey through the Himalayas with a camera and printer in the bag


I’m Jerome Gence. I’m from Iranian island
which is a French oversee Department near Mauritius and Madagascar.
I decided to travel from France to the Himalayas and I took with me my camera,
it was 5d mark ii and I started my journey from France. At the beginning
I was really scared, I started to vomit and I was really nervous to leave my
comfortable life in France and to just discover the world and the people
and to approach the people, but thanks to the camera I managed with people to talk
with them, because most of the time I didn’t understand what people said to me, and thanks to the camera we could interact together. Finally after two years
I arrived in the Himalayas. When I started to take some photos about the
nomads I’ve been hosted by and it changed my life, honestly. I was
stuck in the earthquake in Nepal and with a camera I can bring people together.
We organized a small workshop – photography workshop – for the kids in the
remote places of the Himalayas . The project was to bring some solar panels,
a small cameras, small printer basically just simple gear, and we
had a donkey and some Nepalese friends. We traveled through the remote villages
and we offered the photos and we took some portraits of the families, of the kids,
and we gave those family the photos too. The purpose was to keep a printed souvenir of those families and because
the kids grew up in the Himalayas when the grandparents and the parents
die, they don’t have any souvenirs. By this small project, we printed out
2,000 small photos which was kind of challenging because we didn’t have
electricity there, and thanks to the sun we managed to print out those photos and
at least to try to make the kids to help the kids to face the
consequences of the earthquake. Today as a photographer I’m still a web analyst
and I work remotely for companies and I’m now producing another story
which focuses on how new technology and the internet impact today
the life of people and so I keep traveling all over the world to cover the story.
My next project is to make documentaries about
those photo stories I did before and to to start with the camera and how to make
documentaries because I think through documentaries we can also touch more and
more people.

Photography of Jessie Tarbox Beals

Photography of Jessie Tarbox Beals


ROBIN KELSEY: So it’s interesting with photography the extent to which some of the great photographers, particularly the great women photographers of the Victorian era, began just with taking the sort of photographs that someone would take of family members, and friends, and so forth. And it’s through that, becoming interested in more ambitious photography. And that’s the case with Beals. So it’s interesting to look through her photographs and to see the kinds of exchanges, the intimate exchanges that photography enabled, taking photographs of loved ones or friends, posing, performing for one another. And these kinds of exchanges within the homes of that era were a very important part of social life. What was unusual about Beals is she then took the next step, and she became a photojournalist, which is not something that very many people did, much less very many women did. And that’s rather extraordinary but one sees, even in her later work, there’s always an interest in the quotidian and the everyday, in what she can see in a gesture or an expression, much of which undoubtedly goes back to those early years of handling photography the way that many people did in middle class homes. So Beals had extraordinary range as a photographer. If you go through her photographs in the archives, you discover that she took many photographs of animals. She took photographs of people doing amateur theatrical performances. She took street photography. She took ethnographic photographs at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. She did architectural photography. That range is quite unusual. A number of photographers, including some great female photographers of the 19th century, were much more limited in their range. To take one example, Julia Margaret Cameron, by most accounts the greatest Victorian photographer, stuck to a very limited range of photographs. And she just went very deep in each of those genres. Whereas Beals had a much wider scope and looked into many different things to photograph, many of which we can relate to now. In our moment in which cat pictures abound on the internet, it’s wonderful to go through some of the photographs in the Schlesinger and see her remarkable capacity to take photographs of her feline friends. It’s inspiring, the extent to which one sees in the photography of Beals, her self-consciousness. There’s many photographs in the archive that are of her. And whether they were taken by someone else or whether she set up the apparatus and just had someone open and close the shutter, we don’t always know. But she clearly took herself and her performance in the world very seriously. One of my great interests in the history of photography is in its materiality, and in particular its openness to accident. This was understood by practitioners of photography from very early on, that here was a way of making pictures in which chance played a role, that was different than the role it played in drawing or painting or other more traditional media. So whenever I’m looking at photographs, I’m also thinking about how the practitioner in question handled chance and these issues of materiality. There are signs in the archive that Beals was actually very sensitive to these issues. There’s a rather marvelous picture that she took of a sitter named Leal Whitcomb Davis, who is sitting with ceramics tools in front of her on a table, before a window through which light streams. And she’s glazing a piece of pottery. And what I love about this photograph is the self-reflexivity of it, in so far as pottery and photography have some very significant commonalities. First of all, you have the play of the glazing of the pot and the glazing of the window through which the light streams, which is calling up the operation of photography, and the way that light streams into the camera. But also, in both photography and pottery, you apply this film to this object. You stick it in the dark, and then outcome something that was, to a certain extent, unpredictable. And every potter has experienced that, and every photographer has experienced that. And I think in this beautiful, quite exquisite photograph, She brings this dialogue to the fore. One of the aspects of Beals’ photography that I think is very important to register is her social conscience. And there’s one photograph in particular in the collection of this Schlesinger Library that really brings that home for me. It’s a photograph of a dim alleyway in Washington DC, with dilapidated homes on both sides. But as you look down this stretch of very unappealing roadway, you see at the end of it, rising up, the dome of the US capitol, all sparkling and white. And it’s that contrast between the lived reality, the material conditions of some of the more dilapidated quarters of Washington DC on the one hand, and then this symbol of national might on the other, that I think clearly speaks to a social conscience about the state of affairs in the world in which she was living.

Ilvy Njiokiktjien at Visa pour l’Image

Ilvy Njiokiktjien at Visa pour l’Image


It’s important to explain to Editors
what the importance of the story is, so also the current importance. Try to
find a news angle or some angle that your story fits into. I think you
have to sometimes try to think as an Editor, so try in a way to to think; okay,
these Editors get so many stories sent to them every day, how do I stand out?
How do I find the news angle, which picture should I include in my email or in my
pitch PDF to make it stand out? And I think that’s the way to get a ‘yes’ ,you
have to look at the newspaper you are pitching to and really try to see
what is the stuff they usually publish and try to fit in
with what they’re looking for. I think that’s the best way to get a ‘yes’.
I think the storytelling part of your documentary work in the beginning is
actually more important than the technical quality, and the technical
quality will grow as you grow. I would say being very technical is lovely once
you’re in this business but when you’re starting out, forget the technical stuff,
it will only freak you out. I think that’s what it did to me at least. In
2011 I thought, okay, let’s try video as well and I never thought it would
become such a big part of me and my daily work because I feel more as a
photojournalist than a videographer, but clients just keep asking for video and I
just finished an hour-long documentary on Dutch television. Filmed it all by
myself and I think it gives a total different perspective to my job
and I really like it. Social media is hugely important, clients are even
picking by looking at your social profiles, stories are being more easily
shared. When I share a picture on Instagram, everyone
anywhere can see it. They can ask questions. I try to reply as good
I can, but I think on the other hand it’s also important to give images time.
When I see people looking through Instagram profiles it’s very
quickly it’s just ‘Oh a story’, tick tick tick and you look through it. I really
like it when people take their time to look at images, when you kind of
sit down to look at an online told story or in a magazine, and I think social
media sometimes can be too quick and that’s the good part
and the bad part in a way. I think exhibitions are hugely important and
they have to be right in that mix between social media, media and
exhibitions. I think when it all comes together in a good way, that’s the
perfect mix. I just finished my own exhibition about my South Africa work – my
‘Born Free’ exhibition and to see your work printed on large format it just
gives such a different vibe to your work. To see the details that you usually
don’t see because as a photojournalist you see your
work in magazines, newspapers, online, social media and it’s small – so when you
see your pictures being printed so big, you see your pictures in a different way,
and I think it’s a very important way to to show work to the world, and that’s why
Perpignan is such a perfect place to look at images and be inspired. So the thing that I look forward to the most this week is to meet with friends,
colleagues and Editors. I just finished a long term project about South Africa and
I’m really looking forward to show it to Editors and also to meet with colleagues
that you hardly ever see because we’re all traveling a lot. This is kind of the
place to meet.

Ivor Prickett at Visa pour l’Image

Ivor Prickett at Visa pour l’Image


The the most important thing when you’re
starting out and you’re a young photographer is to take time to work on
your own personal projects and come up with really interesting, quirky
stories that no one else is doing, rather than going and covering a big news event
like this, this is something I did very late in my career, let’s
say after 10 years or so. But in the beginning the best thing I could
to do was just find the weirdest story that no one else had done and that
would immediately set me apart from everyone else, so I think that’s
the single best bit of advice I could give to a young photographer coming up,
to come up with original ideas. When I was starting out, I wasn’t the most
technically gifted person by any means in my class, I was probably at the lower
end of the scale, but I was told that that’s something you can learn.
Your natural ability and your interpersonal skills and your work
ethic are not so much things you can kind of develop in
such an easy way like the technical side of things. Having a kind of natural ability to put people at ease,
to have a disarming manner to open doors, to be
kind of quiet in your approach and not be too forceful, that’s how I’ve a lot of what I’ve done by being
quite gentle in my approach to photographing people because, yeah,
ultimately it’s a huge ask to ask people to let you
photograph them, so to be mindful of that and humble about it. The first part of developing a good story is obviously doing your research and reading and
consuming as much material and information as possible, whether it’s in
the form of news or documentaries or books. I found ideas from all of
those those different places, so to just consume as much as you can and then when you’ve got a good idea to give yourself time to explore it
because not everything that looks great on paper is going to work as a
photo story, and it can be pretty crushing when you’ve spent
weeks thinking about an idea and researching an idea and then you go and
you try and photograph it and you realize that it’s not going work.
Try and establish a relationship with the editors that you want to pitch work to.
When you’ve got an idea so it’s really
important to meet these people face-to-face and that’s why it’s so good
to come to things like Visa and have portfolio reviews, so you meet
said editor you want to work for. Next time you send them an email
they know who it’s coming from and they’re much more likely to answer it.
I think targeting the people that you do you really want
to work for and focusing on specific magazines and newspapers and
institutions that you want to work for because not everyone is suited
to every publication or organization. We all have our kind of style and
specialities, so to work out where you fit in and then really go after that.

Research Expanded | Dr. Jennifer Good

Research Expanded | Dr. Jennifer Good


I think the job of research is to stop
and think and unpack those opinions and ideas and effects that images have every
day without us even noticing. I’m Jennifer Good. I’m a Senior Lecturer in
the History and Theory of Photojournalism and Documentary
Photography here in the Photography Programme at London College of
Communication. I’m a writer and a researcher. I supervise PhDs.
I also am part of the Photography and the Archive Research Centre here. I
originally trained as an artist, specifically as a printmaker, I worked a
lot with printmaking and textiles. But, during that original degree I actually,
by the end of that degree found the reading and writing element of my course
which we called contextual studies, the most interesting and that aspect that
suited me the most. My PhD ended up having very little to do with art
history and everything to do with these photographic responses to the 9/11
attacks and so that work kind of went in a direction that I never imagined,
initially, and ended up placing me very much in terms of a subject specialism
having to do with photojournalism and documentary photography which is how I
ended up here at LCC. My research is predominantly cohered around ideas about
photography and violence, that’s really the main thread that runs through
everything that I’ve done in my research practice. So, not just photographs of
violent events but ideas about the sort of social uses of photography in the
aftermath of violent events, so, I’m really interested from a kind of a
social and even a psychoanalytical perspective in the role that photographs
play in the aftermath of violence. And what we use them for? And how we use them
for processes of commemoration and sense-making? Well, I’m currently kind
of moving from a focus on terrorism as a particular form of violence into a
consideration of more intimate forms of violence. So, domestic violence has been a
recent focus. I’m looking at the work of Donna Ferrato, who’s a photographer who
very famously photographed, at very close quarters, as an eyewitness, incidents of
domestic abuse. And so, I’ve been interested in the role that photography
plays in capturing that kind of an event and communicating ideas about that kind
of violence more socially. Well, I’m a member of PARC, the Photography and the Archive Research Centre. I’m also a member of the War and Conflict Research
Hub that is kind of a subgroup of that. There are a number of us, particularly
working within the area photojournalism and documentary photography, who have an
ongoing interest and in some cases a very high-profile interest and practice,
in relation to violence and terror and particularly, ideas of state violence and
how state violence becomes visible or invisible. Yeah, there is a second strand
to my research which has to do with teaching and learning and ideas about
learning and that has been quite an exciting and new development for me in
the past few years. Involving my students in research workshops and experiments
and finding ways of connecting what I learned from my students with how I
inform my practice going forward. So, that’s something that I’m still
developing and it’s really exciting to be working with my students, not just PhD
students, but also my BA students as part of my research practice. The kinds of
work that I write have a number of different audiences so I do write for
magazines and for other kinds of academic journal publications, for
example, but it’s really in the book format that I feel I can have much
more of a kind of in-depth engagement with subjects but also a more direct
kind of relationship with readers. So, for example, there’s a book project that I
recently published with my colleague Paul Lowe, who’s also in the
photography department, which is for students. It’s really an outcome of 10
years or so of the teaching practice that Paul and I have both been engaging
in in different ways and for me it’s been a really interesting way of
reflecting on my teaching but, also obviously, of communicating it. I
supervise 3 PhD students currently, I’m relatively new to PhD supervision,
but it’s been a fantastically rich and stimulating part of my practice as a
teacher and as a researcher. The 3 PhD students who I’m working with are
all in the areas of photography or lens- based media. Some have to do with looking
at the history of photobooks, for example. Others are looking at ideas
around the relationship between photographer and subject and the news
media and different aspects of those things. The PhD supervision relationship here
at UAL is very different from what I experienced when I was a PhD student. I
had one supervisor and it was a very isolated and intensive kind of singular
pursuit but here it’s much more open and much more connected. So, all of the PhD
students who I supervise have a team, I’m part of a team supervising them, which is
a really interesting and productive way of working. So, it’s really discursive,
it’s really based on conversations and the sharing of views. Sometimes
supervisors disagree. Sometimes that’s really interesting. Sometimes the
meeting consists of the student arguing for their position against what the
supervisors think and to me that’s really productive and exactly what a
supervision process should look like. I think the research culture at LCC is really
interesting and one of the reasons for that is because of the number of
practitioners and research students who are working in a practice-based way, in
relation to their research. And practice- based research, practice-based PhDs, is a
really wide open field and LCC, I think, strikes a really interesting balance in
supporting and supervising that kind of research. While also, leaving lots of
space around it for us as a collective, as a group of practitioners and
researchers to understand what practice- based research is and what it means. And
not just practice-based research but also how more traditional research like
mine, that takes a written form, relates to the practice that goes on around us
in this space every day.

Conservation photography | Wikipedia audio article

Conservation photography | Wikipedia audio article


Conservation photography is the active use
of the photographic process and its products, within the parameters of photojournalism,
to advocate for conservation outcomes. Conservation photography combines nature photography
with the proactive, issue-oriented approach of documentary photography as an agent for
protecting nature and improving the biosphere and natural environment. Conservation Photography furthers environmental
conservation, wildlife conservation, habitat conservation or cultural conservation by expanding
public awareness of issues and stimulating remedial action.==History==Photography has developed as a powerful medium
to empower conservation. Photography has served this role since the
1860s, although not widely acknowledged as such. A notable example are the powerful images
of Carleton Watkins which were successfully used to stimulate the establishment of Yosemite
National Park in 1864 and William Henry Jackson and Ansel Adams who advocated for expansion
and continued funding of the park. Renewed emphasis on photography-for-conservation
arose at the beginning of the 21st century, primarily in response to the human-caused
environmental crisis, recognizing that the global pattern of ecosystem degradation was
not sustainable. The modern field of conservation photography
was formalized in October 2005 with the founding of the International League of Conservation
Photographers by photographer Cristina Mittermeier, during the 8th World Wilderness Congress in
Anchorage, Alaska. Prior to 2005 “conservation photography” was
not widely recognized as a discipline.==Definition==Conservation and photography appear as two
distinct fields, but their combined impact can be profound. Simply put, conservation photography is photography
that empowers or enables conservation. According to the acclaimed photographer, Joel
Sartore, “the typical nature photograph shows a butterfly on a pretty flower. The conservation photograph shows the same
thing, but with a bulldozer coming at it in the background. This doesn’t mean there’s no room for
beautiful pictures, in fact we need beautiful images just as much as the issues. It does mean that the images exist for a reason;
to save the Earth while we still can.” The serious conservation photographer brings
to their work a deep empathy for the natural world. Proper use of the resulting images has the
power to bring about positive change. Conservation photographs fall into two broad
categories, both of which are equally valuable: The snapshot: upon seeing a striking scene
one pulls out a cell phone or point-and-shoot camera, and snaps some quick framed pictures
without expending too much time or effort. The carefully crafted image:: One sees the
same scene, but instead of quickly shooting it and moving on, they take a series of skillfully
crafted, high-quality images that tell the story in a more powerful way. Dramatic framing enhances the influence of
a picture.Such photographs have a stronger impact on the audience. One may also proactively seek opportunities
to take crafted conservation pictures. Determined effort can result in excellent
photo stories that can move people’s hearts and minds.==Applications==In order to create an impact, conservation
pictures should be put to work for specific causes. Though not every picture may find an immediate
use, a carefully catalogued archive of conservation pictures can help increase impact of conservation
related news stories, provide material for public awareness campaigns, including internet
activism and sometimes serve as Investigative journalism evidence in court proceedings. Images of habitat destruction, especially
in protected areas, can be important as legal evidence against the activity. Specialty fieldsSeveral specialty fields benefit
from their use of conservation photography, these include: Conservation movement, to protect animals,
fungi, plants and their habitats Conservation biology, the science of the protection
and management of biodiversity Conservation genetics – “an interdisciplinary
science that aims to apply genetic methods to the conservation and restoration of biodiversity.” Conservation (ethic), an ethic of resource
use, allocation, and protection, especially of the natural environment
Conservation organization typically an environmental organization
Conservationist, a person who advocates for conservation of animals, fungi, plants and
their habitats Energy conservation, the reduction of non-renewable
energy consumption Habitat conservation, a land management practice
that seeks to conserve, protect and restore, habitat areas for wild animals, fungi and
plants Water conservation, reducing the use of water
to protect the environment Wetland conservation, protecting wetlands
to conserve their ecological processes Wildlife management, multidisciplinary practices,
including conservation of species and their habitats
Conservation authority (Canada) Marine conservation, the protection and preservation
of ecosystems in oceans and seas Soil conservation, management strategies for
prevention of soil being eroded from the earth’s surface or becoming chemically altered
Conservation-restoration, the profession devoted to the preservation of cultural resources
Art conservation, protecting works of art Photograph conservation
Architectural conservationSubjectsSome subjects of conservation photography include: Destruction/construction activity inside a
protected area. Commercial activity in ecologically sensitive
zones (ESZs) – the areas immediately bordering national parks and reserves
Illegal logging or mining activity Habitat fragmentation or destruction, ranging
from individual tree felling to land clearing for a large hydroelectric project. Forest fires. Cattle / goats inside protected areas. New roads inside or near a protected area. Evidence of poaching or hunting, such as empty
gun shells, snares, jaw traps, skinned carcass etc. Road kills. Wildlife kept as pets. Tourism and its impacts. Harvest of forest produce. Public exhibitions or appearances of environmental
activists Human-wildlife conflict events or results==
Organizations==There are many environmental organizations
that effectively use conservation photography to help advocate their goals. Just a few are: ARKive is a global initiative with the mission
of “promoting the conservation of the world’s threatened species, through the power of wildlife
imagery”, which it does by locating and gathering films, photographs and audio recordings of
the world’s species into a centralised digital archive. Its current priority is the completion of
audio-visual profiles for the c. 17,000 species on the IUCN Red List of threatened species. Sanctuary Asia is India’s first and one of
its leading environmental news magazines. It was founded in 1981 to raise awareness
among Indian people of their disappearing natural heritage. The magazine is attractively packaged with
colored photographs. The Sanctuary Photo Library’ is a melting
pot of natural history visuals, information and resources used to produce some of the
finest wildlife and nature calendars, posters, slide shows, exhibitions and other products
available in India. Sierra club maintains a publishing imprint,
Sierra Club Books, publishing books on environmental issues, wilderness photographic essays, nature
guides, and other related subjects. They publish the Sierra Club Calendars, perennial
bestsellers, featuring photographs by well-known nature photographers such as Galen Rowell. The International League of Conservation Photographers
(iLCP) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to furthering environmental and cultural conservation
through ethical photography. A project-driven organization, it partners
with leading conservation groups, scientists, and policy makers worldwide in order to produce
high-quality documentary images that depict both the beauty of the natural world and the
challenges it faces

The Advantages of Using a Single Lens — Documentary Photographer Daniel Milnor

The Advantages of Using a Single Lens — Documentary Photographer Daniel Milnor


hello everyone a funny thing happened on the way home from Albania which gave me reason to make this film it’s something I’ve been thinking about for quite a while historically when I did documentary projects always carried two bodies and two lenses most of the time in my career that mental like a rangefinder and m4 and and m6 with a 35 up tune of 50 f/2 pretty basic stuff these days however I shoot Fuji I still have two bodies but I now have four lenses two of which I rarely ever use they’re basically four specific lens specific projects that I run into from time to time my trip to Albania was specifically about photography I knew that I’d be shooting every day all day long so my second body which I’m using to record this film I loaned to my wife along with the 35 millimeter or 23 millimeter in Fuji speak I knew once I loaned it to her I would never get it back which meant that I was down to one camera body and two lenses now the second lens I never took out of my backpack over a two-week period I did the entire trip every single photograph I made I did with this which is a 50 millimeter weather-sealed f/2 it’s very small it’s very light it’s very unobtrusive this is what I want to talk about today I bought my first 50 millimeter in 1993 and I had absolutely no idea how to use it I was a full-time photographer I was shooting for a major daily newspaper I had a degree in photojournalism and I literally had absolutely no idea how to be a photographer that’s pretty par for the course at the time there was a huge shift happening in photography especially in the equipment arena with Canon ushering in autofocus and also the fixed to 8 zoom lenses so lenses like the 20 to 35 and the 70 to 200 to a those had become the absolute norm staple for every newspaper photographer I knew for the most part there were some rare birds out there shooting like shooting fixed lenses but for the most part everybody had transitioned to zooms including me however for some unknown reason I bought a Canon 50 millimeter 1.4 which was a complete piece of garbage within a matter of weeks could take the lens and I could shake it and it would go CAC CAC CAC CAC CAC CAC CAC because the elements inside were coming apart it was garbage but more importantly is I didn’t know how to use it I didn’t know how to frame with it I didn’t know how to use the aperture on a 50 and the other thing you have to realize is when you do photography long enough you have this ability you’ve gained the ability to anticipate images that will happen based on the environment that you’re in and you have to be in sync you have to be in tune I didn’t know how to use the 50 so I sold it a couple months goes by for whatever reason I bought a second one and I sold it and then a couple of months went by or maybe a year goes by about a third one and I sold it I never committed to the 15 I didn’t know how to use it until I bought a Leica m6 and a 50 millimeter f/2 and I don’t remember how I got it or why I got it but I started to commit to that combination and I would leave everything else at home and I would only use that camera and lens combo and I have to say that changed my life it probably is the most significant gear decision I’ve made in my entire life and it translates on to today so the entire time in Albania I never once had to think about my equipment I never once had to think about lens choice so there’s three reasons and I conveniently wrote them down three reasons why I think this is so important and the number one thing which is these are not in any kind of hierarchical order but the number one thing is you don’t when you’re carrying a single body in a single lens you don’t look like a photographer and the days of being a photographer and having that work to your benefit are numbered you know it’s harder and harder to do documentary work these days people are suspicious they see a professional level camera and they say okay you get away meanwhile the 50 people next to them who are recording in 4k on their iPhones those people are okay but cameras for whatever reason now signify people get nervous so this happened in a museum where we came I walked in with a camera they said oh no you can’t use that in here while there was literally a guy streaming himself live on his iPhone the entire time I was in the museum so it makes no sense so number one single body single camera makes you look a little bit less like a photographer number two and maybe the most important part is that using a single lens for the entire time provides consistency to the look of the work that you’re creating I don’t shoot single images I shoot stories so there needs to be a cohesiveness to those stories and when you’re shooting the same lens the entire time it’s very easy to get that consistency and secondly that translates over to the design so when I’m creating my publication from the trip which is critical to me I would never ever ever go on a trip and spend that much time making pictures and not put it into a publication if you’re a photographer who leaves everything in the digital space in my opinion you are dropping the ball on the last third of your career if you’re not going to print you’re not coming full circle with the projects that you’re doing print requires a very specific kind of commitment it requires editing skill sequencing skills designing skills etc so not only am I going to dist up into a magazine I’m doing it in real time while I’m still in the country every day at the end of the day I’m editing sequencing and laying out the publication that I’m gonna make so that when I get home all I’ve got to do is hit print and I’m done and a week later it shows up on my doorstep and I can start diving in so using the same lens all the time provides the consistency of the look that I’m after and the third point is when you only have one lens you spend all your time shooting and none of your time fumbling and I bring this up because I’ve taught workshops many workshops over the years and I can’t tell you how many students I’ve had I’ve looked over at them in the field and they’ve got multiple cameras and multiple lenses on those cameras and fanny packs and backpacks and they spend 40% of their time 50 percent of their time fumbling with their gear and it’s like what lens and what Cameron what combination and what card and I need a speedlight and I need multiple speed lights and I need strobes and all this stuff and all the while the world is moving in front of you and you’re missing it so if you ever have a question about whether you need a piece of equipment in the field you’ve already answered it you don’t need it so my recommendation to you is to choose a lens and a single body and a giant stack of batteries and go out in the field into those batteries are dead you

Changing the conversation on immigration: Janet Jarman at TEDxSanMigueldeAllende

Changing the conversation on immigration: Janet Jarman at TEDxSanMigueldeAllende


Translator: Jenny Lam-Chowdhury
Reviewer: Denise RQ As a child growing up
in the south of the United States, I saw many social divisions
and contradictions. And this upset me. So, I started to explore my community,
my city, with my camera in order to try to make some sense
out of these contradictions. As I grew older, I saw photojournalism as a powerful means
to participate in society and to engage in important social issues
through images. Cross-border migration became
an important theme that I cared about deeply. Working in south Florida in the early 90s, I met hundreds of immigrants. It concerned me that they were often portrayed
in the media just as statistics, and not as individuals
simply trying to better their lives or build vibrant communities. I wanted to know more about them. I wanted to understand what motivated
their decisions to immigrate and how their lives really changed
once they came to the US. Thanks to a chance meeting
with one Mexican girl, 16 years ago, I’ve had the opportunity to document
one piece of the immigration puzzle. This is Marisol. I met her in the municipal dump
in Matamoros, Mexico, across the border from Brownsville,
Texas, in 1996. She was 8 years old. It was a scorching hot August afternoon. I was with a group
of radical activists nuns who wanted to show me
the most toxic places along the border. With thousands of flies,
and smoke from the burning garbage, we met Marison and her mother Eloisa. They’ve found hundreds
of dead animals in the dump. One day they found a human corpse
and a fetus in a jar. They invited me
to stay with them in their home. Eloisa told me how desperately she wanted a different life
for her children. She hated exposing them to the garbage. I returned several months later
to try to find them, to see how they were doing,
but they were gone. Their father, a legal US farm worker, had come home and decided
they should all move to Florida, where they can pick strawberries. I tracked them down and found them
on their first day of school in the US. They were all together at last. The children had more space to play, but they complained that their house
was infested with rats, and it was too small for a family of 12. Eloisa was miserable
and wanted to return to Mexico, but her husband said no. They decided to stay in Texas,
where Eloisa had sisters. At first glance,
their lives appear to be fine. But behind closed doors, Marisol and her sisters witness
the bitter divorce of their parents. My access to photograph at this time
became very difficult due to the high tension in the family. So, I decide to end the story
with this picture: of Marisol’s sister, Cristina. I thought it was a picture
of two girls making friends, despite their differences and despite the borders
that used to separate them, but Cristina later told me, “Oh, that’s Mary, her parents
won’t allow her to play in our yard because we are Mexicans.” In 2003, a German magazine called me and asked me if I can please
try to find Marisol again. I managed to find her in Texas. She had learned English,
and she wanted to be a lawyer, or an artist, or a computer teacher. She was determined to finish high school,
so she wouldn’t have to suffer the life her sister Sandra had
with many pregnancies and poverty. One of Sandra’s partner
was thrown in jail. After a long court battle, Child Protection Services revoked
Sandra’s parenting rights and took all of her children. Around the same time,
bankers evicted Eloisa and her daughters from the only place they knew as “home”. The American dream seemed
to be slipping away. Marisol pressed on, trying to make sense
out of being a teenager. At 16 she changed her attitude towards me. After this picture, she said
she no longer wanted me to take photos. After two years of thinking
whatever happened to Marisol, it began to [annoyed] me. So, I finally jumped on a plane and decided
to go look for her again in Texas. I thought she would reject me,
but instead she said, “Why didn’t you come sooner?” She said she didn’t want me to know
about her pregnancy. I was surprised to find her
and meet her two-year old son, Carlos. At 15, Marisol met
a young immigrant named Andres. Like so many immigrants
I’ve met and worked with, Andres sought not the American dream,
but instead a Mexican dream: To go back to his roots
and live with his family and try to make a decent living. But first he needed
to make more money in the US to build his house in Mexico. One night he spontaneously drove
in caravan with friends to New Mexico where they could obtain IDs. Two of the young men died
when a truck slid on the ice and crashed into their car. The funeral affected me
on a visceral level. I could fully understand the deep pain
that parents face not knowing if their immigrants sons and daughters
will return to Mexico dead or alive. In 2007, Andres tried to realize
his Mexican dream. He sent Marisol to his village
to meet his parents, so they can meet their grandson. Marisol had obtained
legal residency in the US, and she can move freely between countries,
going back and forth. She barely ate for three weeks. The village ladies decided
that she must be pregnant, and they were right. Several months, after returning to the US, Marisol gave birth to a daughter
named Anahi. Two years later, Andres wanted
to move his family permanently to Mexico in the house that he had built. The inaugurated the visit
by inviting the whole village to an exciting baptism ceremony. He hadn’t been home in seven years. Marisol didn’t know
about life in a small village and she threatened to leave. Andres begged her to stay but to no avail. The couple returned to the US
to have their third child, Luis. With three children
and unable to attend high school, Marisol decided to work
at the same truck wash with Andres. Although the acids burned her face, she enjoyed earning money
and loved having independence. They could afford this three-room trailer and they can have fun birthday parties,
from time to time. A US doctor donated his services so that Carlos could have the eye surgery
he had needed since birth. Occasionally, they splurge
at the local cinema, but usually entertainment meant
going to Sandra’s house to watch movies. Their biological father made
occasional appearances, but for the most part,
he remained estranged. Taking the three children to Mexico
on her own every summer became a ritual for Marisol. Carlos loved his grandparents and told everyone he prefered
Mexico over the US. Marisol remained very bored
in his village. “The last thing I want”, she said,
“is to become like my mother-in-law and have some men give me
a bunch of seeds and tell me to go plant them.” She remained torn and confused,
and didn’t know where she belonged. In August of this year,
Marisol called me in tears. She and Andres had decided to divorce,
and things were getting ugly. He sent the police to take the children and she was desperate to get them back. Her lawyers demanded $5,000 up front,
just to begin the case. She spent her life savings
and borrowed money from her brother just to cover the fees. Despite the break-up, she and Andres
had to work at the same truck wash. He eventually agreed
to give the children back. After the hearing, I visited Andres and I found a man shattered
by broken dreams. Marisol seemed relieved,
but bewildered, to start her life over, again at 24. Some people asked me, “Why do you keep
following the story for so long?” Especially when there’s hardly any funding
for long term projects about ordinary people. And I answered them,
“How could I’ve stopped?” Marisol gave me a gift by allowing me
to document her life over time. She allowed me to tell a story
about an important theme: immigration and all of its complexities. It’s not black and white, it’s very gray. She allowed me to tell this story
in a different way, through a micro approach
I can talk about a macro theme. It is overwhelming for us
to understand all sides of immigration, but the first step is to care. In-depth, long term projects
should define journalism, not sound bites,
that teach us very little. But there are many forces today
in journalism that discourage this process. Lack of budget in newspapers and magazines and a large part of society that craves celebrity gossips, sensationalism,
and instant gratification. If we allow their influence
to shape the media agenda, we will find ourselves
in an even more superficial place. How would we learn about our world,
and what we would learn about our world? There’s also rampant abuse
and inappropriate use of photographic images today. Photography has become just a commodity
in many people’s eyes. For example, last spring, I found that Marisol’s portrait has been
taken out of its context and used in a Mexico’s presidential
campaign advertisement. This devaluates our craft! Whether we are talking about immigration, discrimination, environmental
destruction, or injustice, it is easy for all of us
to put on blinders. We want life to look pretty,
easy, and fun, just like a filter on Instagram. Photojournalism forces us
to take these blinders off. Thoughtful photos help us notice,
reflect upon, and interpret our world. As for immigration, it is not a sexy topic
for a lot of our mainstream media. Perhaps that is why the topic
is so misunderstood and the facts, so easily manipulated. Many opinion leaders in the US
portrait illegal immigrants as a threat to society, and try to score cheap political points at the expense of people
they don’t even know. Throughout history, demagogs have always
tried to de-humanize the other, since this makes it easier
to attack them without felling guilt. Stirring out hatred becomes more difficult
when you see people’s faces, and that is one of my aims
for this project: to re-humanize and put a face
on the anonymous immigrant. I don’t pretend to have all the answers. I’m not a policy maker, I’m not an activist, I’m a story teller, adding
one perspective to the debate. Marisol’s experience is not
every immigrant’s experience. I have seen over the years
how hard she and Andres worked in their quest
for a better life and stability. I hope that by showing their reality
to a wider audience, this story can contribute
in some small way to changing the conversation
on Latino immigration in the US, from an impersonal, contentious debate to one that focuses on real human stories. Thank you. (Applause)

Nicole Tung on War Photography in Syria

Nicole Tung on War Photography in Syria


As a photojournalist trying to cover
Syria, much of what I was focusing on was the impact of the the conflict on
civilians; and the way that I went about covering it was mostly… I mean in Syria,
you really had no choice. You have to stay amongst the people in the
opposition areas, so I was always amongst civilians, and it was really about
telling their stories because many of them were trying to go about their daily
lives even amidst the violence. What I wanted to do is just
to portray their reality, what they were living through, the end of the power
cuts, and also trying to find food or even pay for food, and also
particularly the effect of the weapons being used in the war on children and
adult civilians. So I spent some time in a hospital that
was being run by doctors who had previously never seen war wounded and
having to very quickly adapt to the situation to become a surgeon
essentially; and so I thought that these transitions within the civilian
population we’re really important to show because it tried to
portray them as being really not just victims but trying to
make their own lives as normal as possible in this situation. It [Syria] has really changed since 2012 when I
initially went in, in the early months of 2012. We really
welcomed very warmly by the Syrians, and they really understood the value of
having foreign journalists there reporting on their situation. However it started to
change because, very understandably, they became more frustrated with the
international community and the inaction that was was taking place in terms of
humanitarian aid and also trying to end the war. So you know in a way, I think the foreign
journalists became the scapegoat for people’s frustrations, and they started
to not see the value of us anymore and became a little bit sometimes hostile
towards us and also very fearful for their own security because we
were often going up to them and taking their pictures, and they were worried
about where these images would be distributed and what effect that might
have on them and their families, especially if they were living in an
opposition neighborhood. Many times, the government would
just sweep into a house and make people disappear. Unfortunately with the news coverage
today of what’s going on in Syria, it’s lacking severely. There’s a lot of very great videos coming from Syrian activists and Syrian
journalists, but there has been such a dearth of foreign reporting on the
situation and therefore a lack of understanding of what’s going on on the
ground. So I think what the media has tended
towards doing is reporting on the most kind of sensational aspects of the
violence, which is ISIS, and almost ignoring what the Assad regime is doing
and also sometimes what atrocities the rebels and the opposition groups or the
Islamist groups are perpetrating against civilians and also the other side. So
it just becomes kind of… The war has become dumbed down for the public to
easily digest, and it’s kind of the big bad guys, and we
tend to leave out the the more significant details of what’s happening. I think that I would still go back –
you know, if I was allowed to go back into Syria today, I would cover something
similar to what I was doing before, which was the condition of the civilians, but
in particular the children because when I was there in 2012, a lot of the
children were foraging through garbage dumps, and previously
they had never… This was not something common in Syria
at all. People lived a relatively comfortable life, and yet here five years
on, they are thrust into the edge of poverty,
and the children really bear the brunt. They have lost years and years of
schooling and also have deep psychological wounds that aren’t going to
be recovered quickly at all, and I think that that is such an important aspect to
document of how these children are growing up in in this environment.

A Rare Look Into the Lives of North Koreans | Nat Geo Live

A Rare Look Into the Lives of North Koreans | Nat Geo Live


– It’s fair to say
that North Korea is one of the most isolated, least understood
places on Earth. Part of the reason that
it is so misunderstood and nothing is know about it, is there’s been
very few photographs that have ever been taken there. (applause) The Associated Press in 2011 came up with the idea to open
an office in North Korea, and I begged them to let me
be the Pyongyang photographer if it worked. And they did. I went there, and that
meant that I was the first western photographer to ever have regular access
to the country. And between then and now, I’ve made about 40 almost
50 trips to North Korea. It was a very difficult
place to work, unlike any other. You can’t just
move around freely and do whatever you want. A guide goes with
you everywhere, and they are sort of half
facilitator, half babysitter. They didn’t censor what I did, they didn’t put their
hand in front of my lens. But they did have a
very different idea of how I should be
portraying their country. In fact they had a
very different idea of what photojournalism
is completely. The word propagandist is not
a dirty word in North Korea, it’s what they do at
their news agency. But I went there, I
think, with an open mind, and a free mind,
and a point of view. This is their version of NASA. (laughing) On the week that
the North Koreans were going to test
fire a missile, the whole world
was condemning them and saying that it was a test of a
nuclear-capable rocket. The North Koreans
were saying no, this is a rocket we’re
gonna put into space to put a weather satellite. So they took us there, so that I could photograph it. This is the best
example what my job was while I was in North Korea. I was interpreting reality, trying to decide what was
real and what was not real. And I did that
through photography. Through the content
of photography, but also the composition, the humor, the whimsy. I wasn’t the (laughing)
senior most American diplomat in North Korea. It was this guy. Here he is smoking
a cigar in the gym, helping pick the
national basketball team. Dennis Rodman. I covered the spectacles
and the propaganda. This was a mass
synchronized swimming event for the birthday of the leader. They were swimming
or dancing to a song called We Will Defend Kim
Jong-un With our Very Lives. And this is the national
football stadium. They hold this thing that
they call mass games. It’s like a wonder of the world. 100,000 people in the stands, holding these books
with colored pages, and they flip them, and they
create these mass mosaics. They look like little pixels, but you with a long enough lens, you can see that they’re
actually human pixels, little faces peeking over
the tops of the books. Eggs with legs. (laughing) Sometimes you just
have to photograph whatever’s right
in front of you. (laughing) You don’t really
have to try so hard. That’s kind the way I
worked everywhere I went. You know if they took me to
a patriotic flag factory, or a school for performing arts, I just pretty much photographed
what was in front of me. I thought it was
revealing to show how the Koreans wanted
to present themselves and their country. And over time I got
further and further away from the spectacles and
away from the capital and out into places that
really no other foreigners had ever been. And certainly very few
photographers had ever seen. And maybe it was even
more important to me, that I found my way
into people’s homes and into people’s offices. Like this woman, who’s a secretary at the
Korean Central News Agency, with her little
aquarium full of fish. And I could look
into people’s eyes and feel like I actually could
make a connection to Koreans. I traveled with then Secretary
of State Madeleine Albright. As she met with then
leader Kim Jong-il. We stood in this Wizard
of Oz looking palace, and we were all alone waiting
for him to come in the room. And she looked at me and said, “what should I do,
where should I stand?” And I said, “I have no idea.” (laughing) We stood on these big flowers, and then the door
opened and he walked in. And it was like
I’d only seen this kind of fantasy
in a movie before. And it was like he just
stepped out of the screen into this room. It was the first time
that I understood how I connected to that country and how surreal and how I
connected as a photographer. But also it was the
first time I realized how important the work
that I could do there, if I could only invest my
time and commit to the place. Now it wasn’t easy
at the beginning. Everyone watches you there. And on my first trip
with Madeleine Albright, when I came out of the airport, they drew the
drapes on the bus. They put black plastic over
the windows of my hotel. I couldn’t see out. I felt like there was
nothing real out there, it was all just a facade. But over the years,
through photography, I could peek around out to the
other side of those curtains. And I came to understand
that there was real life in North Korea. And through my pictures, I tried to take everybody
else on that same journey. There was no better
place than North Korea to test the power
of photography. Photography carries
meaning and mood in ways that writing or
any other medium can’t. So when this pale pink
curtain comes down, just covers the eyes of
the people in Pyongyang, I can say something that
I couldn’t say in words. And photography has multiple
meanings and interpretations. This is kinda how
I survived there, the line that I walked. This was a vocational
school for children to teach them how to be farmers. The Koreans took me there, and they were very
proud to show me this very high-tech
tractor simulator. Of course for people outside,
they see it differently. We see their care and their
love for their children, but to us this is
a practice tractor with this sort of DOS-level
computer terminal on top. We had a lot of
very tough arguments about why did you
take that photograph? We saw that picture, that
doesn’t make us look good. But I could always fall
back on photography. I could hold it up and say, this is what I saw, I was there. This is what we saw. I used many different
camera formats, not just to be arty, but because of the cat and
mouse game I had to play when I worked. This is an old-fashioned
camera they don’t make anymore, a Hasselblad XPan,
a film camera. I wore it around my neck. I had a cable release so I
could just talk and smile and take pictures. And I had a little carpenter’s
level in the flash mount so I could make sure that my
horizons were all straight. And when I picked up my big
fancy National Geographic camera sometimes people were
a bit intimidated, and the guides certainly watched
me a little more closely. But when I used this one, they would say aw that’s just
David’s old-tiny camera. And I did the same
with my mobile phone. I took my mobile phone
into North Korea. Everybody by now is a
mobile phone photographer. We all are, even
the North Koreans take pictures with their
phones, believe it or not. And I was able to do
things that I couldn’t do with my big cameras. It was normal for them to see me with a mobile
phone taking pictures. And I would also
stop and photograph things that I wouldn’t
normally notice if I was working as
a photojournalist. Things that you rush
past on your way to telling the news, things that are simple
little still lives that make up the life around you and are pieces of the puzzle in explaining a country
like North Korea. But they didn’t
allow mobile phones into the country until 2013. Used to be I would
arrive at the country, and they would take it away
and lock it up in a box. 2013 they suddenly said, oh foreigners can bring their
phones into the country. Not only that, but they opened
a 3G Network, Koryolink. And you could do everything
that we do anywhere with our phones, right in
the streets of North Korea. Suddenly I was sending
pictures to the world, tens of thousands of
people following me, right from a village
or on the streets. And that way, sort
of everything became worthy of photography, worthy
of my attention I think, a piece in the puzzle. I started buying things,
collecting things, and photographing them, and putting them out on
my Instagram account. I started an artifacts series, North Korean artifact 101, 102. This was the first one, The
Great Teacher of Journalists, a book I bought in the bookshop. North Korean artifact 102,
Mountain Mushroom Moonshine. (laughing) Hangover Chaser Tea (laughing) I think this one
was made for export. Money that was no
longer in circulation, a debit card from the bank, sheet music for piano, a
cookbook from North Korea. Here’s a good one. The Intercontinental
Ballistic Missile Test Firing Commemorative Greeting Card. (laughing) And these were hedgehog
quill toothpicks. I photographed them all, and they became this sort of
popular like museum series on my Instagram account. So everyday I would
go out to some new and strange place. This was a flower festival
for their national flowers, the Kimjongilia
and the Kimilsungia. And I would go back to my hotel, and I would send
my pictures back to the newspapers and magazines, and I would post
these on Instagram. And I had nothing else to do. The only thing that I could do was watch state sponsored
propaganda on TV. So I would sit and read
the comments on Instagram. And people would
ask me questions. And I would answer them. And they would have
all these stereotypes, and I would get into arguments, and it was my form of
entertainment while I was there. They call them
followers on Instagram, but it felt like that, it
felt like they followed me out into the field, that they were with
me when I was there. They became interested
in North Korea, they became invested in
me and what I was doing. And it was a very
different experience than I’d ever had as
a photojournalist, instead of just publishing
at people. It was a more
dynamic conversation. And it wasn’t just Instagram. I was doing all social media
with my phone in North Korea. Instagram, I was Tweeting,
I started using Foursquare. I rated and did restaurant
reviews in Pyongyang. And I opened up
Google Maps one day, and I saw that it was
practically empty. And so through Foursquare I
started plotting red flags, naming streets, naming
intersections and buildings. Where else in the
world can you feel like in the 21st century, feel like a National
Geographic explorer from the 19th century? Besides North Korea,
with a mobile phone. All I really wanted
to do when I was there was just open a
window onto a country that people knew nothing about. To get past all the geopolitics and all the saber
rattling between countries and to show that some young
army conscript like that was a real person, to show that there was
something worth understanding and worth discovering there.