Product Feature | RX100 VII | Sony | Cyber-shot

Product Feature | RX100 VII | Sony | Cyber-shot


RX100 VII 24-200mm* high-zoom lens in a pocket-size body
*Angle of view (35mm format equivalent). 24-200mm* high-zoom lens in a pocket-size body
24mm / 70mm / 200mm
*Angle of view (35mm format equivalent). ZEISS® Vario-Sonnar T* 24-200mm* F2.8-4.5 zoom lens
*Angle of view (35mm format equivalent). ZEISS® Vario-Sonnar T* 24-200mm* F2.8-4.5 zoom lens
AA (advanced aspherical) lens
ED aspherical lens
Aspherical lens                      
*Angle of view (35mm format equivalent). Condensing the outstanding technology of α9 New 1.0-type stacked CMOS sensor The latest image processing engine Blackout-free Shooting*
Conventional camera / RX100 VII
*When using electronic shutter. Slower shutter speeds will reduce the refresh rate of the screen. 20fps* continuous shooting, using 60 times/sec.** AF/AE calculations
*When using the electronic shutter with “Continuous shooting mode: Hi”. Effective when the electronic shutter speed is 1/60 or above.
**When using the electronic shutter. Effective when the electronic shutter speed is 1/60 or above. Single Burst Shooting* at up to 90fps**
*Seven still images are shot per burst. Focus and exposure are fixed at the first shot.
**When Drive Mode set to “Single Burst Shooting: Hi”. Single Burst Shooting* at up to 90fps**
90fps (0.011sec.)
7photos
*Seven still images are shot per burst. Focus and exposure are fixed at the first shot.
**When Drive Mode set to “Single Burst Shooting: Hi”. 0.02 sec.* fast AF
*CIPA standard, internal measurement, at f=9.0mm (wide-end), EV6.6, Program Auto, Focus mode: AF-A, Focus area: Center. 357 phase-detection AF points 425 contrast-detection AF points Real-time Tracking for stills Real-time Tracking for movies Touch Tracking for stills and movies Real-time Eye AF for stills Real-time Eye AF for movies Real-time Eye AF for animals (stills only) 20.1MP* resolution and ISO100-12800 sensitivity
*Approximate effective megapixels. Excellent colour and texture reproduction 4.0-step* effective Optical SteadyShot™
OFF (Simulated) / ON
*CIPA standard, pitch/yaw directions, at 200mm (Angle of view, 35mm format equivalent). Interval Shooting* for time-lapse movies
*Wi-Fi is not operational during Interval Shooting. Post-editing is required. 4K HDR (HLG) video recording*
*3840 x 2160 pixels. When “Auto Power Off Temperature” is set to “Standard”, continuous shooting is possible for about 5 minutes. Connect this product to an HDR (HLG) compatible Sony TV via a USB cable to display HDR (HLG) movies. Picture Profile for creative expression
S-Log3/S-Gamut3 / After colour grading Optical SteadyShot™ Active mode for 4K movies*
Standard mode / Active mode
*3840 x 2160 pixels. When “Auto Power Off Temperature” is set to “Standard”, continuous shooting is possible for about 5 minutes. Microphone jack for high-quality sound Vertical-position data recording Tiltable LCD screen
Up to approx. 180 degrees
Down to approx. 90 degrees One-push Access EVF RX100 VII
Pro features in a to-go package Sony, Exmor RS, BIONZ X, SteadyShot and other marks are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sony Corporation.
All other company and product names mentioned herein are used for identification purposes only and may be the trademarks or registered tarademarks of their respective owners.
Product design, features, specifications are subject to change without notice.
Product availability varies depending on market.
Accessories are optional.
Screen displays and effects used to illustrate some functions are simulated.

What’s in my Camera Bag: Sony Cameras for Vlogging Setup

What’s in my Camera Bag: Sony Cameras for Vlogging Setup


Thessaloniki is my home city. Its waterfront is popular among cyclists,
runners and people who enjoy a walk by the sea. Most of them come to the promenade in the
evenings to witness majestic sunsets. I try visiting it when it’s not too crowded,
usually in the mornings. My favourite day of the week to do so is Sunday,
when it’s quieter as streets are empty and traffic noise is replaced by bird sounds. I used to come here when I had to clear my
mind, to think and to get some fresh air. Since I got a camera though, I can’t resist
taking pictures and shooting video here and there. I’m Jim makos, a web entrepreneur who has
recently discovered his creative side through a camera’s viewfinder. I have no background in arts and honestly,
I used to mock friends who would carry heavy gear to snap photos. Now, I have at least one dedicated camera
on me at all times, which I use to document my business and personal life, not to mention
tripods, 360 cameras, drones and other filmmaking gear! One of those Sundays I went for a morning
walk and I took two cameras with me. I also picked my smallest lenses for the most
compact setup, as I hate carrying a heavy backpack, especially when I’m expecting to
walk for at least an hour and creating content isn’t my purpose. I had a 55mm lens attached to the camera I
would primarily use for video and a 35mm lens attached to the camera that excels in taking
landscape pictures. Yet, I would use it to film myself from time
to time. These cameras are full frame cameras. They offer superb image quality but it usually
comes at a cost: the size. Full frame lenses are usually a lot bigger
than other systems. I myself considered moving to other camera
systems that offer smaller setups at one point, such as Fujifilm cameras. Yet, this lens combination lets me carry both
cameras in a small messenger bag and take advantage of other full frame benefits, such
as the shallow depth of field. Also, Sony cameras allow you to shoot in crop
mode, effectively doubling the lenses’ use. As a result, I can shoot in 35mm, 50mm, 55mm
and 80mm field of view in 4k with just two prime lenses that fit in an inconspicuous
bag. I often shoot video like taking pictures:
through the viewfinder. It results in less shaky footage due to the
third point of contact (your head) and people think of you as a photographer. Sometimes I check the recorded footage on
the viewfinder as well, but mostly I use the back monitor. I suppose this setup is ideal for street photographers
as well. Although I do enjoy photography, making videos
is what makes me happy, so I’ve found this camera and lens setup ideal for a walk-around,
everyday, light video-making system after years of trial and error. I’m sure there are more compact setups out
there, but this one works perfectly for me, when I need to quickly save a memory, document
everyday life in near perfect image quality without hurting my back at the same time! Hopefully, it will help you in your quest
of finding the perfect camera system – shhhhh, it doesn’t exist!

Actor’s Tools for Self-Taping & Photography w/ Will Roberts

Actor’s Tools for Self-Taping & Photography w/ Will Roberts


Hey everybody, welcome to a new series we have called actors tools for self taping and photography. This one is number one
photo clamp. You see all these different tools like microphones lights tripods
and clamps are things that will help you make good self tapes and good
photography so let’s get started! Okay, so now we’re outside and it’s a beautiful day and we’re gonna talk about equipment okay before we actually get into how to
self tape and all that fun stuff and tips I can give you or just shooting
your own thing I don’t care what you want to shoot if you want to go viral or
you just want to shoot yourself in an audition or whatever it happens to be
your family members having the right equipment is absolutely imperative. Now
for many many years I’ve been doing this now I started off with CBS, Fox and PBS
with the thing called a Betacam SP which is about a hundred and fifty thousand
pounds and then going into an editing bay that was you know a million dollars
well nowadays just by using our phones man we can accomplish some great stuff
in 4k but first before we get through all that stuff let’s talk about the
equipment. By the way it’ll look at down here all these segments and where to get
the equipment it’s gonna be right on there so make sure you check it out like
it subscribe to it send it to a friend here we go. Okay so let’s talk about the
basic equipment before we get into shooting or doing anything over the
years of this technology we call smart phones I have had literally every piece
of equipment you can possibly imagine and quite honestly most of it has been
garbage, junk because it’s just you know something you get at the dollar store
and you’re like wow I could get a selfie stick and it’ll be great. Now, I love
selfie sticks we’ll get to that and how to shoot with them later on and this is
actually a pretty good one but we’re not gonna deal with that yet but see it’s
already kind of falling apart we’re going to talk about today is just the
clamp that holds the the phone the smartphone now you can probably put most
of my information to DSLRs and so on if you want to but in
this case I’m talking about smart phones and you know and shooting with those I
do recommend that you have like I have here is a 5s and I’ve got the most
memory on it I don’t recommend that you try to use a 15 gig smartphone and try
to do the light of your filming unless you are good at dumping a lot of that
stuff. So the first things first is the clamp to get it on there, now this is one
of the original ones I bought has a little screw you can put it on a tripod
just like this one this is what I first bought you know but unfortunately in
using something like this it’s just such a difficult thing and it’s slippery
it doesn’t stay a lot if you try to put on a selfie stick it you know lots of
things can happen it just doesn’t turn out well. So this is the first generation
I got then there was this one that had this neat little thing that was supposed
to be a light which worked for about a day and a half and it was on closed out
wonder why. So you know there are lots of different ones I got this and it had a
little client I don’t even know where that’s at it was just a piece of garbage
it stripped out every time I tried to tighten it it has this little thing
where you can clamp it around things I lost a leg so now this is a great toy
for my family my kids they’re young. Ah, then I came upon a really cool one I’m
going to show you this is pretty neat my glasses out here and this one is by 9
dot solutions and it is amazing ok see again you want to make sure that
whatever you have that you’re going to be holding your phone in place is not
going to be something that’s just going to be at the mercy of this cheap made in
China I’m not saying much about China but
anyway. Point is is that it’s, it’s on there but it’s slippery I put it on here
like this and this goes on my selfie stick right and crank it down and then
you basically try to do this or a tripod and cranking it down and then you can do
this you can aim it I have a whole thing I do with myself be sick and you can do
this and you know a lot of times getting this to get in there and stay in there I
mean it’s just like you know you try to adjust it and it’s all bull shop! Okay,
and that happens so having the right holder is essential and so is a good
phone replacement plan so anyway now that I have shown that this is so
important let’s talk about this one. This one is amazing it’s the rock star of
smartphone clamps it basically allows you to crank it down it’s got a little
adjustment knob and you can crank it all the way down and you know get it on
there and when you get it on there it’s just amazing because look seriously with
this one and let me uncrank it here cuz I got it on the the volume knob here
we go let’s go backwards here we go. I cranked it down and you know what, that
puppie’s on there it’s not going anywhere so again this whole episode is about
making sure you have the right equipment for the right job don’t get a wrench to
try to hammer something and in this case don’t get a piece of garbage that you
got from the dollar store, this is your investment! Now actors if you’re doing
this to self tape all this equipment is absolutely essential because look this
is what makes you look good and if you by the way don’t have good equipment
don’t have good sound don’t have good lighting you notice how
I’m well lit we’ll talk about the ring light I have maybe in one of the next
episodes but this right here look honestly this is not going anywhere
close-up view this is awesome this is a really great piece of a
equipment that has multiple areas where you can mount it which is another key
component this says one made out of plastic and a most likely strip like
a spider and this is the tripod that I had originally which is you know not bad
for cheap again this is a cheap tripod that you
can get and the cheap holder and you can put it in there and it may work but it’s
not very fluid because those are important things when you’re filming
stuff and you know it hits a wind or something and it’s… Ah man, again so anyway you know what right job. Right job, right equipment this is a great mount it’s a
great smartphone mount and has different settings I highly recommend it because
it clamps it in there and it doesn’t move because this is what it’s about
making sure you have the right stuff so that way when you start filming you can
feel very confident about what your product is going to be in the end result
and stuff. But you can see it all and if you want to check it out if you have any
questions you can go to acting up radio comm see the page devoted to this series
and make it happen do some good stuff good lighting huh we’ll talk about that
soon. See you next time!

Monochrome Is Great With Mirrorless Cameras! Using the Canon EOS M50

Monochrome Is Great With Mirrorless Cameras! Using the Canon EOS M50


Hey, this is Scott of Photography Banzai. Through most of my photography starting around
2002. I had done mostly color photography. At times I would edit photos to put them into
monochrome. However, these days I’m trying to specifically
make photos in monochrome. Now, the great thing about these mirrorless
cameras. The M50 specifically what I used for this
video… Is that you can switch it to monochrome profile. And then in the viewfinder you get the full
monochrome look. You get a good expectation of what you’ll
get in the end. That allows you to adjust things. Frame things with a monochrome perspective. Of course, you wouldn’t have gotten that in
the film days looking through a color viewfinder. Here’s the viewfinder of the M50 with the
monochrome profile enabled. You’ve got that nice monochrome look. It gives you a lot of options and ways to
understand how your photo will look after the fact. So I went out with this camera and I specifically
tried to take some photos in monochrome. Settings wise I had the camera in program
mode for the beginning. Just very simple. Trying to focus on composition and angling
photos. Trying to look at it in the monochrome perspective
with all of the tones of the different areas of the photo. That way I could potently get the best out
of that situation. Eventually I did switch to full manual mode,
but that was towards the end. And it was interesting because I thought maybe
this camera could not do full manual and still give me that monochrome perspective through
the viewfinder and everything… But it did and that was a pleasant surprise. One mistake that I made when taking these
photos is that I had the camera set to full RAW mode with the output and I did not have
JPEGs enabled. So basically that means I just had the RAW
files and those are in color of course in this situation. So what you can do… First you can expose or basically process
the photos inside the camera and you’ll still get that monochrome look that you were expecting
and taking at the time. I’m going to go into playback mode. In that case you want to also go into menu
and you’ve got some some options here. So we’re just going to go into RAW processing. Select images… er, actually select range. That way we can get all of them at once. Okay, we’ve got it. I’m just going to use the standard default
settings. You can adjust things in the camera if you
wanted to. At that point it’s going to go through every
single image in the camera and just make those JPEG files. But also depending on your photo editing software
you can get the monochrome through the RAWs. There’s probably some data that Canon puts
into the RAW files and it basically sets that picture profile in the RAW. So when you open it in the proper editor… In this case it only worked in Canon’s specific
software that you can download from them. And it’ll just basically have that setting
enabled by default. Let’s do a little comparison of the JPEGs
from the camera to RAWs that I edited… After my little mishap, I don’t think I would
want to only take JPEG photos. It is nice to have that RAW image that I can
do a lot more with after the fact. So that’s it for this video. Hope you enjoyed it on the monochrome photography. I’ve definitely going to try to do more of
that in the future. Anyways, if you did like this video please
consider subscribing. That helps me out a lot. Likes and shares help out a lot as well. Thanks again!

MUMBAI MERI JAAN – Aryan Lionking (OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO)

MUMBAI MERI JAAN – Aryan Lionking (OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO)


Shuru karte hai MUMBAI seh Yeh desh hai aapne aandar meh Chalti rehti har wakt and never really needs to take a break Subah saware raath ke andhere meh chalti rehti Mumbai local Nonstop yeh bhagti rehti sawari hai yeh karodo ki Dur dur tak pata chala hai MUMBAI hai takdeer ki gali Aate hai sab log yaha Yeh MUMBAI ki shaan hai yeh MUMBAI ka pyaar hai X3 MUMBAI MERI JAAN YEH MUMBAI MERI JAAN YEH MUMBAI MERI JAAN AAMCHI MUMBAI MERI JAAN X2 Udham machakar chalte hai log school office ki bhaag meh Aur time peh aane wale hai toh dabbe wale jaan hai Ha bhook lagi hai toh wadapav ka lo maza X2 Aur chaat nahi khaya toh tera MUMBAI aake hi kya faayeda Baarish ka lo maza Juhu, Worli, CST, Bandra X2 Aur garam chaai ki toh hai alag seh baath sab share karna ho sabke saath Taxi, Rickshaw, Bus yaha so what’s the need for a private car Nahi anjaan hai koi yaha Sabki hai ek hi pehchan Aate hai sab log yaha Yeh MUMBAI ki shaan hai yeh MUMBAI ka pyaar hai Yeh MUMBAI ki jaan hai yeh MUMBAI ka pyaar hai Yeh MUMBAI ki shaan MUMBAI MERI JAAN YEH MUMBAI MERI JAAN YEH MUMBAI MERI JAAN AAMCHI MUMBAI MERI JAAN X2 YEH MUMBAI MERI JAAN

Street Photography Part 1c

Street Photography Part 1c


I’ve got the wide angle lens on this body as i’m walking down the street. because i’m far more likely to see
something interesting and be able to grab it with the wide lens, than to faff around and zoom in with a a long lens. but here’s something which is usually
pretty interesting isn’t it we all kind of go for shots of colorful fruit and veg and stuff on the market. i quite like this stuff, i just need to ask the man if it’s okay. hi mate, do you mind if i take a few shots of your fruits and veg, is that alright? yeah. who’s the boss? are you the boss? yes, hello my dear, do you mind if we take a few shots of your fruits and veg and stuff, what is that for then? we run, and shoot little films teaching people to use there cameras and that sort of thing. everybody want’s to take nice pictures down the market. okay, well as long as when i get a few customers, don’t block them out, nah, nah i won’t get in your way of customers at all. that’s very kind of you. she’s a nice lady. well the first thing i like is, well isn’t it weird the first thing about market shops fruit and veg traders all have signs like that, i don’t know why, it doesn’t matter who you are or in which country anywhere in the world in any city or any town they always look like that, i don’t know why. i don’t know, it must be some kind of deep psychological thing. Look at that. we have the pink grapefruit cut in half. now i expect when it was first cut i half it looked lovely, i expect it was all, bright and vibrant and gorgeous, it’s not quite so good now but none the less i still think there’s a shot to be had here, with the grapefruit sign above it. wide lens again, i’m going for the, wide lens, i don’t know why, i don’t know i just am. because i wan’t to try and get close to the grapefruit, yeah that’s going to work i want to get very close to the fruit, i want the feeling that you’re almost in the box with the fruit. i like this halved grapefruit, because it i dunno kind of breaks up the grapefruit. i like the market trader sign. and i like the building in the background, and of the canopy, because this bit of canopy really really says market. also right now, we’ve got clouds in the sky if the sun was out and it was a bright sky, that would just burn into white, but at the moment i think they’ll be some detail in the sky too. so bright sunshine isn’t always the best let’s just get in close here, ow there’s even a strip of street light going on over there. so let’s get in close, and focus on the cut fruit, here we go. adjust and just squeeze that. i want to get a different angle on it. i’m going to zoom my lens only a bit. it’s not working, that’s better. so i’m focusing on the cut fruit. I’ve zoomed it in only very slightly, from ten to about thirteen millimeters. focus on the cut fruit, and and i’m tilting the camera slightly, and I’ve got the pink grapefruit three for one pound going on in the background. i quite like that. i think that’s okay, that’s cool. now then sorry i’m very tempted to say melons, aha can’t help myself i’m such a kid. but let’s have a look at your melons dear. now then. what does this look like at the moment I’ve got, ordinary people in my shot, have a look. there’s janey with the camera, now let’s see, janey can you go that way a bit. i’m going to have a look along the stall. That’s quite cool, melons one pound. people walking up the street. here we go, there’s a little bit of street photography going on. now look at that, now as i took that last shot, and i had to do it very quickly i focused on the melons I’ve just got a bit of the sign there, but not as much as i wanted the reason i did it quickly was i liked the two guys walking up the street. i wanted to put them i the opposite corner of the picture to the fruit. this is were you’ve gotta kind of have eyes everywhere, and you’ve gotta move quickly. this is why aperture priority semi-auto mode works so so well and you don’t want to have to be thinking about is my shutter speed going to be fast enough so use a faster ISO in the first place. so kind of worked. i really really like these kind of clementine oranges. and we’ve got a guy being served, that’s really cool. so i’m talking quietly because i don’t want the to over hear me. uh… look at that, look at that. large clementines. cool. really really nice isn’t it aw nice. ca i take a picture of your carrots my dear? you may take a picture of the carrots. thank you right, i like that, i do like that. sorry i’m going to use the wide angled lens. look at that. i love that. oh look. how much more market-y could this get? than that. i’m going to have another go, ow i knocked her stall there. look at that, let’s get real close. i want them i’m gonna get real close to
the carrots. ah, if i can just focus. it’s difficult to focus there we go we’ve got a focus. choice carrots. look at that. how market-y is that for a still life? it’s cool isn’t it? and it’s so easy, and how nice people are. it’s not like these are people who have met me loads of times. but if you come back each week to the market and talk to the traders, and get people used to seeing you, their going to be really really cool about letting you take some pictures. do you mind if i just go round the other side? no that’s fine you’re very kind, thank you. the labels will be the wrong way. but i’m being sneaky actually because i just like looking across them from this angle like that. because it’s a real market-y sort of a shot i like the colours too. let’s just tilt this that way, look at that. they’re nice. yeah, i quite like that you see, that’s quite a nice wide angle very much on the market shot. the preserves a really really strong in
the foreground leading it up to the guy in the corner. So let’s just analysis this composition, because i need to make sure i tell you things not just let you watch me do things. I set the shot up ten mill lens, very very wide i’m still working at, no i’m not i’m working at a four point five, i must have knocked it by accident, i was hoping i’d get a great depth of field. but with that lens it shouldn’t be an issue. very in close so the so that the left hand corner of the picture has got jams and preserves very very strong but i compose it by moving the camera very slowly so that the guy who runs the stall is in the right hand corner. so we’ve got a bit of a dynamic going on these jams and preserves going to the man in the corner. there’s quite a diagonal dynamic going on there. i’m still shooting aperture priority i’m letting the camera deal with the
exposure i’m keeping my iso high. Then hopefully, seeing what’s been going on here is giving you an insight into how easy it can be to do a bit of street photography. the big thing is you have to own, there’s a kind of thing in your head it’s a mental space you have to be happy to just talk to people, ask them things be up front be straight about it, if you start being sneaky and kind of going, like that and think oh my god there watching, then they’re going to think what’s that bloke up to. so there we go, we’re gonna come back again and we’re going to look at photographing with the traders rather more than photographing their products. Get out there with your camera, have a play with this, go and take some still life’s on some markets and post them to our Facebook page, we’d love to see them.

Medium Format Digital vs. 35mm DSLR Cameras – Which is better?

Medium Format Digital vs. 35mm DSLR Cameras – Which is better?


Hello guys Josh Geiger here. Product
photographer from Atlanta and instructor at photigy.com. Today we’re going to talk
about two types of cameras, 35 millimeter DSLR and medium format DSLR I like most
of you started out on a 35-millimeter system and its really all we’ll ever
need for the majority of our work but sometimes we find ourselves in a
situation where we need to upgrade or we’re looking to upgrade down the road
and when you start talking about systems like this you’re looking at big money
and it’s a good idea to have a little bit more information before diving
straight in when I was looking around online for more information about medium
format systems I found the basic information kind of hard to find if you
root around deep enough you can find you know a whole bunch of technical
information but I was really just want to start at the beginning the basics and
that’s kind of what we’re going to do today we’re going to break down each
camera system to their main parts talk a little bit about them and then we’re
going to dive a little bit deeper and do a pros and cons comparison we’re going
to look at some of the benefits of each system some of the negatives of each
system obviously it cost comparison maybe a little bit of photo comparisons
and you might be surprised at what you don’t get for fifteen to thirty thousand
dollars let’s check these out first we’re going to start with the 35
millimeter system that we’re all pretty familiar with but for those of you who
don’t know everything about these and we’re not going to go over everything we
are going to dive a little bit deeper and break this down so let’s go ahead
and do that alright so here we have a nikon d700 this belongs to a buddy of
mine i’m currently using my d800 making this video so it still gets plenty of
use this is a 12.1 megapixel camera it shoots like five to eight frames per
second and it’s a full-frame camera meaning that it’s chip is the same size
as a full piece of 35 millimeter film but that’s not all there is to this
camera so let’s take a deeper look inside okay
so looking at the 35 millimeter DSLR it’s pretty simple we have two main
parts here the body and the lens I’ll remove this lens cap real quick and a
lens hood and we see our front element our rear element and inside of this lens
we have aperture blades that open and close to varying amounts allowing more
or less light in which is actually referred to as your f-stop obviously the
more that is closed down the less light will come in the more open it is more
light will obviously come in looking at the body you can see inside here there’s
a mirror that mirror actually reflects the image up into the viewfinder behind
that mirror is the shutter curtain and the sensor when you press the shutter
button the mirror flips up the curtain does its thing in the sensors exposed
looking at the back we have our LCD screen which on the majority of new
DSLRs is really great our regular controls for the different functions
which will of course vary depending on the body that you have whether it’s
Nikon or Canon or any other brand that’s pretty simple LCD on the top for just
viewing more information and that’s the basics this camera actually happens to
have a pop-up flash most do and of course slots for memory cards and here
our battery slot very simple hasn’t changed much in a pretty long time with
the exception of maybe you know software options
and that’s it moving on from this we’re going to take a look at the medium
format system okay so now that we’ve seen the 35 millimeter system we’re
going to do the same thing to this here we have a medium format DSLR the body is
a mamiya 645 DF they also make a DF + and you’ll notice too that you see
cameras that look just like this thats a phase one on them phase one I believe
purchased mamaya leaf and so they produce the same bodies with you know
the different name on them I think now they might actually all be phase one but
it’s the same camera here we have the digital bag this is a leaf aptus to 10
it’s 56 megapixels and the chip in this is a little bit wider format then is
typically found in other medium format digital bags also you’ll notice that the
battery on this is external on newer backs a lot of the batteries are
internal which is kind of nice and it also helps with some weather proofing
I’m not sure I think they have some weather proofing digital bags not
positive anyway that said let’s take a deeper look inside this what I’m going
to do first is just go ahead and break these pieces down and then we’ll talk
about them individually so getting started I have here a really right stuff
L bracket on here so I’ll remove that and then I’ll remove the battery so we
can just set this down flat make it easier to deal with if I can manage to
get this piece on here oh that would help wouldn’t it okay so first let’s
take off the lens it’s a little bit different than we’re used to on the 35
millimeter systems normally you’d have a button on either side of the lens that
you would press and rotate the lens off here the button is actually over here
which is actually kind of dangerous because I’m always afraid I’m going to
hit that which is partially do I keep that L bracket on here it kind
of blocks that but anyway moving on let’s take that off for a second and put
the cap on and then our body we will remove our digital back and I’m just
going to put the cap on that real quick while we talk about some other stuff I’m
just a little protective of that to keep the chip clean so looking at this body
obviously it’s bigger than the 35 millimeter body but the first thing we
notice is we can see straight through it it does still have a mirror in here and
actually a focusing screen but when you take off the back it automatically flips
up it really works just like a regular 35 millimeter DSLR the only real
difference is the chip comes off the back there is a shutter in here it just
so happens that this lens is a mamaya sec or d schneider leaf shutter lens and
what that means is is unlike the 35 millimeter lens this not only has
aperture blades it also has its own built-in shutter which has its own
blades they call Leafs and the benefit to this really is just that you get very
high sync speeds on this it actually sinks up to 116 hundredth of a second
which can be quite handy in a myriad of situations but setting that aside again
with the rest of this body we have our LCD screen our control knob
your regular array of scroll wheels and doodads for changing your different
options and then actually i’ll move this over here here we have our digital bag
this is pretty cool because it’s basically a little computer what we have
here is our normal LCD screen on the back which as I said we’ll talk more
about in the pros and cons it is a touchscreen LCD this particular back is
a firewire tethered support back some of them will do USB 3 even some of the
newer ones you’ll get Wi-Fi support for tethering which is really nice but we’re
moving that if we put the battery back on you can see we have an external
battery some of the new digital backs have the bit battery um built in which
is kind of nice it just reduces a little bit of the bulkiness and then let’s just
take a look at this chip for a second look at the size of that bad boy typically a full frame medium format
chip is going to be twice the size of a 35-millimeter chip and without getting
too specific into technicalities here basically what that means is larger
depth of field more sharpness and all-around image goodness but breaking
them down they’re really pretty similar to the 35 millimeter systems biggest
difference being this little computer pops off the back and is incredibly
expensive so I guess now we’ll get into the meat of this situation which would
be the pros and cons where’s one beat the other and let’s do that now okay so
now that we’ve broken down both of these systems and taking a look at their main
parts we’re going to do a little pros and cons comparison let’s start with the
35 millimeter system first it’s got an accurate auto focus it’s fast it’s
accurate there are tons of auto focus points on the majority of these DSLRs
and having the ability to fly around the viewfinder with your selection wheel and
just pick a specific thing that you want to focus on is a real big help
especially if you’re looking through the viewfinder it’s sometimes hard to see
and check focus visually so the electronic focus check is pretty much
imperative if you’re not tethered to something with live view also is OS in
these cameras because of the chip they use the iso range is incredible most of
them come around standard or native a hundred ISO and go upwards of you know
6400 and then ridiculous numbers above that high one high 2 & 2 just crazy
numbers I normally wouldn’t go above 1600 iso I just happen to like it’s
clean of images as possible I know some people like noise especially in black
and white photography but needless to say the ISO ranges in here
are great and you can get some really clean photos with iso s in the four six
eight hundred range and that’s real beneficial in low-light conditions also
the capture rate another benefit to the chips and knees is that they can capture
images faster like I said this camera i think will do five frames or so some of
the higher-end cameras will go upwards of 10 or 11 frames a second which is
just so fast rear displays on these cameras talking about our LCD they’re
great they’re bright they produce color nicely which leads us into the other
thing is that a lot of these you can do video and having a nice screen that’s
got a high resolution is good to have when you’re doing video work easy access
to controls there’s tons of buttons on these cameras everything’s pretty much
right at your fingertips that’s really nice not having to dive down into menus
and select around and find what you’re looking for and make your adjustment it
just speeds up the workflow quite a bit weatherproofing most DSLRs are going to
have some degree of weather proofing I wouldn’t soak them in a tub or anything
like that but I’ve seen plenty of instances where in a light drizzle or
something you don’t really have to worry about it I’ve seen other instances where
somebody left their camera outside in a storm and it was just soaking wet and it
survived I wouldn’t suggest that but I’ve seen it done and they’re not too
expensive for what you get you know you can get upwards of probably seven or
eight thousand dollars on a high-end DSLR body and 35 millimeter format but
really for somewhere between you know one and three thousand dollars you can
get a really nice camera it’ll do pretty much anything you needed
to do and there’s tons of lenses available form a lot of manufacturers a
lot of specialty lenses macro lenses tilt-shift lens is really that kind of
boils down to the markets just so much larger you know when there’s a lot of
people out there with these cameras that’s a lot more customers out there
for companies to create products for I guess that kind of brings us to the
negatives the downsides I don’t really consider it a downside but when you’re
comparing it to a medium format system you could say image quality nowadays the
images you get out of these 35 millimeter systems are incredible but
you do get a little bit more out of a medium format camera they’re difficult
to clean as we saw earlier when you break one of these down and you look
inside you know if you want to clean the sensor you got to lock the mirror up and
then get a light so you can see what you’re doing down there and you know
special tools and there’s oil in there for the mirror to flip up and stuff and
you don’t want to touch anything and smear oil inside and it’s just really
kind of a hassle to get in there and most people actually suggest you just
have them done professionally I’d call that a downside and I guess probably
least of the worries is if you’re dealing with high-end clients or
something like that they’re just not that impressive you know a camera’s a
camera is a camera but if you’re dealing with a client it’s used to walking in
and seeing somebody using you know either large-format cameras or medium
format DSLRs and they come in and they see a 35-millimeter DSLR it doesn’t mean
you can’t do the job right or produce images they want necessarily but it
might make them feel not as comfortable as they were when they originally hired
you for the job but I wouldn’t let that hold you back that’s not reason enough
to upgrade to a medium format system that said I think that’s probably all
the cons that I could come up with on these things they’re just great little
cameras wonderful and I guess we’ll move on to
breaking down the medium format let’s go okay so now we’re going to do the same
thing with the medium format DSLR first the pros I would think that the first
pro that I have with this is if you’re going to work a system like this you
have to have a digital back and by having the digital back you have more
versatility because one thing that we know is you can take the digital back
off and put it on a technical camera that just opens up you know the
possibilities of what you can actually do with the equipment and that’s just
amazing of course the image quality you’re dealing with a sensor that’s
twice a size as a 35-millimeter sensor and that’s going to produce shallower
depth of field it’s going to capture more light it’s going to be sharper and
of course that’s all the stuff we’re going for but what it also does is
provides more color information more accurate color representation larger
dynamic ranges you know from the blacks to the whites you know you’re looking at
12 14 stops of dynamic range and easy to clean you know when you take that back
off that chip sitting right there you just get your swab wipe it clean it up
brand new of course you know it’s impressive that’s just kind of a little
ego driven thing there I guess and you have great lenses available on these
things now you don’t have the range of lenses like you do in here which will go
in the con list but the lenses you do have available for these are superb
they’re sharp they’re crisp you have the leaf shutter options in some of the
lenses they’re just magnificent and of course another thing that’s not
necessarily a benefit of the camera itself but when you get into a system
like this is the customer service you get from the company that you purchase
from I don’t know about all of the you know different companies and plans
available and stuff like that but I know that if something goes wrong with this
camera I can have it taken to the shop I’ll get something to use in exchange
for it it’ll be taken care of in no time and ship back to me I’ve heard some
horror stories of course on both sides and you can’t win them all all the time
but I have heard a lot of bad things about new models and cameras that come
out in the 35 millimeter world my d800 when it first came out had some issues
and luckily I ended up with a model that came out after those issues were taken
care of but I haven’t heard of that many issues out of medium format systems I
would think that’s mostly because when you have a customer forking out that
kind of money the last thing you want is for them to be angry with you because
you didn’t give them a functioning product that said I’m only saying that
because I personally haven’t heard of any of those issues and then I guess
we’ll get to the cons the bad sides and you might be surprised at some of these
a they’re super expensive no kidding no surprise the lenses super expensive
maybe a little bit of a surprise but um I guess it should have been expected
right working with these you have a single focal point unlike these where
you look through the viewfinder and you have a ton of little boxes and a ray to
choose from and you can flick it around in there and get whatever you need in
here you have one circle in the middle of the frame that’s your focusing point
you do have the ability to kind of decide where it’s going to weigh you
know where it’s focusing so I’m like the edges of the focusing circle or the
center of the focusing circle but you can’t move it around the frame and when
you’re shooting something like this with a shallower depth of field that becomes
even more difficult because if you have to say focus and recompose
you got to be really careful doing that because the slight change in your
recomposition can completely blow your focus so it’s not the easiest thing in
the world to deal with of course again if you’re shooting tethered and you have
a live view saying capture one or some other similar program and becomes less
of an issue I so capabilities basically I wouldn’t use this camera on anything
over its native iso 100 if I have to I might put it on 200 but like I said I
like clean images but these things produce a lot of noise I think it might
go up to 800 iso and that’s just completely unusable so you’re not going
to be using these for sporting events low-light situations you know and some
soccer in a field at night of your family you’re definitely not going to be
getting photos with this guy you’re going to want to take something like
this with the long wide aperture lens and just have a blast and capture rate
you know on these we were talking about five frames a second upwards of 10 or 11
frames a second something like this you’re looking at one frame a second
maybe one point zero five frames per second something like that but uh
they’re slow and I think a lot of that has to do is just how long it takes to
process such a large image image file it’s it’s not really that big of a deal
for the kind of work I do if your still life photographer or something like that
but you know if you’re shooting say hi fashion or something and you’ve got a
model that’s there’s just a whole bunch of energy and she’s going through these
tons of poses and you want to be able to capture as much of that as possible this
you’re not really going to be able to do that with you know it’s going to be
click click click and that’s about as fast as it’s going to get the LCD screen
on the back of these cameras I’m not going to say this about the new ones
because some of the newer ones the Krytos and the IQ to
forties or two 80s or 2 60’s or whatever they are probably have really nice
screens on them I haven’t had my hands on one yet but I do know that the older
digital backs or even some of the newer versions of older models like the Aptus
series from leaf the screens just aren’t very good you get a lot of banding and
gradients and stuff like that for color representation and it’s just kind of
difficult to deal with the touchscreen is nice but you end up with fingerprints
all over the screen and I find myself having to wipe it constantly and no
built-in live view some of the newer ones do like I said the sum of the
Krytos and the IQ series from phase have live view built in and I can tell you
that would definitely be at the top of the pro list if I had one of those but
as of right now it’s got to sit on my con list because it’s in the majority of
the older more affordable digital backs that you find the lower quality screens
and accessing some of the controls you know if you take a look at this you
don’t have all the buttons that you had on this I mean it’s just buttons
everywhere on this thing here you’ve got a knob you know your dial of three or
four buttons here and a button here you know what I mean the rest of it is in
your digital back so if you want to change your white balance or your ISO or
any of that kind of stuff you have to go in here route into your menu or whatever
it is go to wherever it is and you can set up a favorites folder that has your
most accessed options and that’s pretty convenient but still it’s not really as
easy as just pressing the button scroll to where it is and you’re good to go I
find with this I don’t have to really look at what I’m doing when I’m making
changes with this I do and complicated custom settings you know over here it’s
pretty easy to set up custom menus and settings but over here when you get into
the customizations nothing’s really named
intuitively it’s like c1 c2 c3 and then there’s all these just different
categories that don’t have even abbreviations that make sense so you
kind of to keep a little cheat sheet with you or something that tells you
what they all mean if you play with that kind of stuff a lot I find myself not
doing that I tend to just keep it in manual hundred iso and then I’m just
messing with you know shutter speed and aperture and even shutter speed not that
often because I’m using you know strobes and I typically keep it a it max ink so
that would be that talking about the lenses again you know I said that with
medium format the lenses that are available are incredible but where you
have a problem is there aren’t that many available at least not in comparison to
35 millimeter there are a couple tilt shift lens available a couple of macro
lenses available but really the choices are fairly limited good news is the
choices that are there are superb they’re also incredibly expensive I
think I say like a 85 millimeter tilt shift lens from Schneider or well let’s
go with Nikon which is pretty much just as good it’s 90 millimeters from
schneider i believe the 85 millimeter tilt shift lens from nikon is going to
run you a couple thousand dollars and that’s expensive but it’s a great lens
and it will do what you needed to do however on medium format the 90
millimeter Schneider tilt shift I’m sorry 120 millimeter Schneider tilt
shift lens is depending on where you get it going to run you somewhere between
five thousand and six and a half thousand dollars that’s pretty expensive
likewise just regular you know leaf shutter macro lenses 120 millimeter from
the same company you’re looking at four grand ish four or five thousand dollars
so it’s very expensive but you do get the quality out of that and that pretty
much wraps up for this pros and cons when I only
had my d800 system when I was dreaming about having a medium format system I
kind of expected that if i was going to fork out that kind of money everything
would just be better that this all the options that you had in this would
transfer to this and it would just do the job better maybe even provide me
some new trickier options that weren’t previously available in this kind of
system that turned out not to be the case actually a lot of the things that
are available here are not available here and when they are available here in
a handful of instances they actually don’t perform as well as they do in the
35 millimeter system so as I said at the beginning of this you might be really
surprised at what fifteen to thirty thousand dollars won’t buy you in a
future part of this series we are going to compare a medium format DSLR system
with this digital back on a cambo Ultima monorail camera and we’re just going to
compare the pros and cons of using both of those systems obviously using the
large format system is going to slow things down a bit but it might get us
some really nice results that we don’t expect to we’ll see I’ve been Josh
Geiger with photo gcom and we’ll talk to you later

How We First Saw the Earth From Space

How We First Saw the Earth From Space


It is perhaps the most famous photograph ever
taken. It came into being almost by accident, when on the morning of Christmas Eve 1968
one of the astronauts aboard the Apollo 8 spacecraft, Bill Anders, turned the camera
from the supposed object of their mission – the moon – towards a spherical, brightly
glowing, blue object rising above the lunar horizon. This was Earth, our irreplaceable
planetary home. Suddenly humankind was able to view its habitat with a gaze hitherto reserved
for the entity we have termed God. It was a moment that invited and continues to offer
us a fundamental change in perspective. Although the theory that the earth was a sphere had
been proposed by ancient Greek thinkers from Pythagoras onwards, such thinking remained
theoretical for hundreds more years, and still remains today, as we make our way laboriously
around our streets, mountains and seas, largely implausible. Though the Earth typically appears
inexhaustibly vast to us, suddenly it emerged as what it truly is: just another medium-sized
planet in one solar system, in one galaxy, in a mind-defyingly infinite universe. Though
it might seem far for an earth-dweller to journey from NY to Sydney, or from one pole
to another, these are, in the greater scheme, the trails of an ant. Earthrise allowed us
to feel a kind of care, even love, for the planet. Viewed from space, we see it protected
from terrific bombardments of meteorites and solar and cosmic rays, and made habitable,
only by an infinitesimally thin membrane – which it is now wholly in our remit to destroy.
Our oxygen rich atmosphere – the difference between a barren desert planet like Mars,
and our lush, abundant, breathable home – appears in the photo as the vaguest of halos. From
up here, it is possible to feel so much more generous towards the human project than we
normally do. We can smile gently at humanity and perhaps admire it a little too. Everyone’s
faults drop away against such majesty. We are tugged towards being more patient and
warm around our fellow ants spinning with us in endless darkness. We might like to tell
one or two of these ants in franker, more direct terms how fond we are of them. On the
planet, right now, babies are being born, adults are crying themselves to sleep, people
are on their knees hoping for redemption. There is struggle, error, folly and hope.
The photograph urges us towards a higher form of kindness and forgiveness. There is – probably
– no divine being to look down on us and help us: it’s only us responsible for ourselves
and our fragile home. We may have to adopt in and for ourselves some of the attitudes
we once projected onto divinities. If there were to be a new religion, one without a god,
a secular religion set up to remind us of our need to love, to be kind and to forgive,
then Earthrise might fittingly be its logo and its central image. But even without such
a fanciful though perhaps necessary creation, Earthrise deserves a place on the kitchen
wall, on our screen savers and in our minds, a constant reminder of our power, our vulnerability
and our deep responsibility to one another. The School of Life isn’t just a YouTube channel. It’s an actual school were you can go and take classes. We have branches in ten locations around the world. To find out more, click on the link on the screen now.

Top 5 Camera Controls To Master – Mike Browne

Top 5 Camera Controls To Master – Mike Browne


the very very best bit about being a
photographer is still riding the motorcycle and what a wonderful day for
doing it too these are my top five camera controls
these are things which in my opinion you really do need to be able to master
because your camera isn’t infallible there are times it’s gonna get it
horribly wrong and you do need to be able to step in and take control these
are the things which I think you truly need to be able to do that everything
we’re going to talk about in this video is covered in depth in my five week
online ultimate beginners course click little thing popping out up here right
now if you want to go and check it out you can also go and click it at any time
during this video but first I need to show you my camera being a complete and
utter cock right stop looking at that and come and have a look at this because
this is where your camera is going to get it wrong that is just the sort of
thing that the camera will actually get perfect but when you go off piste a
little bit like you’re on a skiing holiday or you’re out on a frosty bright
morning or photographing anything really bright I bet you’ve had shots that come
out looking gray and dull and really rather lifeless and uninteresting
imagine these bricks are your bright shiny scene of snow-capped mountains if
you take a picture of them and I’m going to do this with video because I want you
to be able to see what goes on here we go they’re looking pretty gray aren’t
they they don’t look very white now if I move down here and I go into a coal mine
which is dark see how that just brightened it up let’s get back up to
the snow and it darkened it down your camera doesn’t know how much light is
falling on something it only knows how much light is being reflected by it
therefore it can’t make choices about what an exposure should be and getting
the exposure right is really really really crucial so therefore there are things
you need to know how to control this really isn’t rocket science but it
is very very important because if you don’t understand what your camera is
doing when it cocks it up like it did over there with the snowy mountain peaks
how are you going to step in and put it right big question mark
look manual exposure all you’ve got are three controls imagine light is
water if you’ve got a great big tap with a spigot like that tons of light is
gonna come gushing out of it isn’t it if you’ve got a little tiny one like that
Litttle eeny thing not so much is gonna come out
even though they’re at the same pressure that is your aperture how big or small
your spigot is now shutter speed that’s how long you turn the tap on for so if
you’ve got a big spigot and you turn it on for a long time you’ve got a flood
of light coming roaring out through your camera and if you just do a little like
that you’ve only got a little bit you’re just
dancing between those two now the third one that’s your ISO think of ISO as
being like skin – skin type for example I’m insensitive I can go and
stand in the Sun for ages and I don’t really get burned not for a very long
time Jilly who’s on camera at the moment she’s much fairer skinned if Jill goes
and stands in the Sun for even a fraction of that amount of time she will
get burnt Jill is a high ISO she is very very sensitive to light I’m a low ISO
I’m not I can take an awful lot more light before anything happens
so a low ISO means it needs more light before it records the image and a
high ISO means it leaves less that allows you to play around with the other
two for creative reasons that I’m not going into right this minute let’s make
a manual exposure I’ve got a shot set up over here but I’ve got my t-bird against
a nice sort of neutrally background so all the shiny shiny stands out now let’s
set up a shot and take it and I’m going to talk you through the exposure and the
settings let me line up a shot hope we don’t get run over out here in the
carpark because it’s getting a bit busy all right I think I want to be down here
somewhere so look we have got here the shutter speed here we have got the
aperture which is currently on 7.1 and here we’ve got the ISO for sensitivity
of the skin on the left is the light meter right now it is showing that this
shot is about just under two stops overexposed to get the correct exposure
what I have to do is adjust spiggott the length of time the taps open for and the
sensitivity until that little dot there is on the zero so simple isn’t it look
so I can either make the spigot smaller we’ve got a smaller tap we’ve got a
there we go look it’s now on the zero our exposure is perfect take the picture
right next what else could we do well we could it says it’s too bright
let’s make this tap on for less time let’s speed up so look my shutter speed
has now gone to one two five or two 50s – dark one to five is so places to not
be a problem and we just take the picture that you can also of course
control how bright or dark your image is with your ISO but changing the skin
sensitivity here I can make the picture brighter or darker all you have to do is
dance between those three but what if we go into a situation where the camera
might get it wrong well if we go back to those snowy pristine white alpine peaks
which you saw it make a mistake with what if we make a manual exposure over
there same scenario different mountain range
because there’s a car parked in front of the other one let’s make a manual
exposure look at the light meter on the left there it’s saying – two stops
underexposed what do we got to do we’ve got to do let’s just turn the tap on for
longer and move the little pointer up to the zero here it comes here we go we’re
on the zero camera says that’s the correct exposure
take it doesn’t look very white to me I don’t know about you – to make that white
what do we got to do? We got to make it brighter but the
has said that is the correct manual exposure the camera’s an idiot we’re
going to have to go brighter let’s go to full stops brighter the light meter
screaming you have overexposed this but it isn’t that’s correct that’s white and
if you’re doing the same thing with black it’s just in the other direction
what you’ve got to understand is that when you’re shooting a manual exposure
is not just putting that single little pointer on to the zero you’ve got to use
this thing and understand how the whole that whole concept works otherwise if
you just follow what the light meter says it’s the same as shooting on auto
only you are twiddling the knobs and dials instead of the camera twiddling
them for you but it’s the same thing you’ve got to understand how manual
exposures work and how the light meter works – and my next top five is really
going to help you do that A histogram isn’t really a camera control it’s a
feature but it’s probably the most useful feature they ever put on a camera
ever because by using your histogram you need never ever have a bad exposure
again look what we’ve got here we’ve got quite dark shadows on myself and the
t-bird but look at the sky really really bright what you’re looking at right now
is kind of a balance between the two but if you’re shooting stills particularly
if you’re shooting raw your histogram will tell you how much data you need in
your picture you need never ever have a bad exposure again so let’s take this
shot and I’m going to set a manual exposure but I’m going to do precisely
what the camera tells me I should do so here we go let’s line up the shot what is
my camera telling me I need to do? It’s telling me that I need – there we go it’s
about there – it’s telling me I want about a four thousandth of a second at f5 on
the 200 iso if i look at that histogram it’s kind of bunched over to the left a
bit isn’t it it’s a little bit dark we have got a bright sky so what do we need
to do we need to brighten it up a bit histogram will tell you how far to go if
I line up the shot again and then start to brighten the exposure I’m going to
take the shutter speed down a bit we’re down to about a two thousandth, we’ve now got more
information in our highlight in our shadows and we’ve still got pretty good
highlight let those guys go and there we go You see your histogram is just one of
the most useful things in the world learn to use your histogram all you’ve
got to do is keep it within either end it really doesn’t matter if things spike
off the top. Histogram one of my absolute top fives. Now you know why it’s so
important for you to be able to make a manual exposure and you understand that
awesome feature which will tell you when your exposures correct you never need
get a bad one it’s completely safe for you to start using semi auto modes
shutter priority aperture priority and indeed P mode I use them tons you don’t
have to shoot in manual all the time you just need to know manual so that you can
step in when those modes get things wrong like they did with the black and
the white there is a tool to help you with those too and I’m going to come to
that in a moment because that’s my next of my top 5 but shutter priority you set
a shutter speed the camera goes away finds an aperture to work with their
aperture priority you say an aperture the camera goes and finds a shutter
speed to work with it and P mode it kind of takes care of both but my next top
tool still gives you control over that as well
so if you’re in a semi auto mode the light is pretty even like it is here
it’s not at all like it was over there with the bike all you need to do and I’m
in aperture priority is concentrate on the cool gray sexy stuff like light and
Composition and where to stand and when to click the decisive moment that’s real
photography there you go semi auto modes they’re one of my
absolute top five because they take a pile of work away from you so now you understand why you’ve got to
be able to make a fully manual exposure and it’s not that difficult you’ve also
got tools to help you ensure that exposure is always perfect because you
can do that and you know about manual you can use semi or auto modes now let’s
start looking at an amazing little thing called exposure compensation that allows
you to use semi auto modes and still be able to control the exposure this isn’t
great when you have creative critical settings you want to work with such as a
specific shutter speed for movement control or a specific aperture for depth
of field control but where most times it’s not really that important you can
just use your exposure compensation most cameras it’s a little button with a plus
and a minus on it that looks like this on this one on my x-series Fuji it’s a
little dial which I can just roll with my thumb when it’s up to my eye I know
that all I have to do is roll to the right makes it bright roll to the left
makes it dark how simple is that? if I set up a shot here we’ve got very
very contrasty just like we had with the bike earlier now what’s going to happen
if the camera is left to its own devices? I reckon something like that loads the
sky cuz I kind of like that and let’s look at the histogram yeah as always the
camera wants to put it in the middle because that’s what cameras want to do
we know that this scene is brighter therefore we got a brilliant brain what
we have to do is to brighten the picture up now instead of having to think about
shutters and apertures and things what we’ve got to do is add some exposure so I’m just
gonna add what just over plus one stop because I’m guessing and also I’ve been
doing this for a long time so with my guesses I’m usually fairly accurate that will
be just right let’s have a look at the histogram and get in that’s not happens
we’ve been doing it for a long time so exposure compensation combined with a
histogram combined with a semi auto mode is a fantastic thing and it can save you
hours of pondering when you’re shooting in a fast-moving situation if you’re leaving your camera on full
auto focus by which I mean it knows a little sparkly flashes every time you
touch the shutter button it means you’re not in control of where your camera is
focusing your camera is choosing where to focus for example if I was to take
your picture as represented right this minute by Jilly with the video camera if
I took your picture now I can choose whether to have you in focus like that
or whether to let the background be in focus your camera hasn’t got a brain it
doesn’t know and there’s times when it’ll get it wrong I bet you’ve tried to
photograph things and then gone why is it that’s all blurry and out of focus
that’s what I want in focus your camera doesn’t know that you have to tell it
and there is a plethora of auto focus modes built into your camera my little
Fuji’s they don’t have many – but it’s fine and I’m not going in depth with all
of them now anyway they’re all in my course they’re all available online do a
search you can wade through it on your own or I can show you it’s up to you but
look if I have my camera on single point focus and I come back here again and I
want to take a picture of you guys as represented by Jilly with the video
camera if I come forward and I don’t change that focus what’s going to happen
she is gonna be or rather you are gonna be blurry yeah but let’s say you put it
onto a continuous focus mode because you’re photographing your friend who’s
running a marathon they’re running down the street towards you, you think what do
I want my composition to be? I want audience or whatever they’re called
standing there on the side of the road watching and I want my friend running up
the left-hand side what we’ve got to do is choose say a continuous mode and choose
your single point autofocus where you want to focus within the composition
which I’ve just done I’m just going to pop my camera onto video mode
I’m just going to show you what happens as I change the distance
if I put that dot on Gilly’s face and start rolling some video as I walk
towards you the camera will keep you nice and sharp the background will start
to go blurry you should see it starting to happen now it is there and as I come
in here the background is really blurry you’re really sharp imagine how useful
that would be if you are photographing your friend running a marathon go and
learn how to use your auto focus modes they will make sure all your pictures
are sharp well you’ve got to do is set them up and use them appropriately So those are my top 5 camera controls you really need to know how to use them but
I have a bonus for you focal length this bad boy focal length is just the most
amazing thing it dances and is completely in love with composition let
me show you I am going to roll some video I’m going to take a picture of you
again as represented by Gilly and the video camera there you are watch what
happens as I change the zoom as I change the focal length and move back as I
change my distance look what’s going on look at the background I know it’s a bit
wobbly but look at that black house look what it’s doing it’s going to disappear
in a minute look at those beach huts behind Jilly they’re sneaking out behind
her look at that look that is a very very different thing to what we had
earlier let’s come back in the other way if I just sneak that in look the house
come back the black house I know it’s wobbling I can’t help it
tough live with it deal with it look you see how that is completely changed I’ll
do a quick still just to prove it here we go here’s our shot quick still of Gilly on camera big long lens take the same shot hope
there’s no one behind me if there is they will be trodden on… So look what
an immense difference it made between those two focal length it’s just an
amazing thing it doesn’t just make far-off thing
come closer it’s a really really useful creative tool the thing is the most
important thing in all of photography is you and you are often overlooked in
favor of some gadget upgrade new lens some other doodad or gizmo the great
photographers of the past had three controls on their cameras they had a
shutter they had a focus ring and they had an aperture that’s all they had and
their pictures were blowing us away and they still are today so with your
whiz-bang DSLR why can’t you do it you need to take control of your camera then
you can concentrate on real photography the decisive moment when to click when
the light comes out from behind the cloud and lights up little cottage in
the valley where to stand how to align the elements of a
composition so they’re harmonious and they look great
this is the real photography you have to be able to control that thing with the
top five that I’ve just given you in order to do that you can’t concentrate
on everything at once so I hope you found that a value everything we’ve
talked about is in my ultimate beginners course if you haven’t clicked the little
thing above well you can go and have a look now try a free sample if you like
you can of course find all this out for free online what you’re paying for when
you buy a course is for me to be your guide to coach you to feed you the
information in the correct order so you don’t miss a bit out and then find it
doesn’t work later on so I hope you’ve enjoyed this and found it of value
please if you liked it like share it subscribe to the channel helps me make
more free videos if you didn’t like it you did a thumbs down that’s completely
cool but please tell me why I want to know what you didn’t like can’t please
all the people all the time but I can’t do anything about it you don’t tell me
what you didn’t like and it’s interesting to know so leave it in a
comment below if you’d like to see more of my work more of my images there’s a
load of links again below this video in the description section go and check
them out this and cool stuff there for you meanwhile take care I’ll see you
next time I’m off to go and play on my thunderbird