Landscape Photo Editing Workflow Part 4 Special Effects in Photoshop

Landscape Photo Editing Workflow Part 4 Special Effects in Photoshop


hello I’m Robin Whalley welcome to Lenscraft and this fourth video in my mini-series
editing this image in the first video we went through an assessment of the image
in the things I wanted to change in that video I mentioned that the Heather was a
little bit too sharp for my liking and I wanted to soften that we’ll be dealing
with that in this video which concentrates on special effects and I’ll
show you how I’m going to use the Orton effect to soften the Heather in the
second video we actually looked at processing our image in capture one
which is how we ended up with the image that you can see on screen now in
Photoshop and in the third video we then looked at how to edit that image using
the Nik collection to emphasize some of the elements in the scene and this was
the image we produced now if you miss the first few videos of this series
don’t worry I’ve put the links in the video information below I’m going to
start now by creating a frequency separation and use that to create a
norton effect now if you haven’t seen this done before you can find
information in a video that i’ve published previously and again I’ll put
the link in the video information below now to do this rather than we create it
manually I’m going to be using an extension panel for Photoshop called
whoa frequency equalizer Pro and again I’ve reviewed that and you’ll find a
link to the video in the information below now in frequency equalizer Pro
there’s this option here to create a quick frequency separation and I’m going
to do that and it will decompose my image into two layers and I’m going to
set a pixel radius and this effectively controls the level of blur in the image
and I want something around 30 pixels given the size of this image as a rough
guide work on the number of megapixels in your image as this is a 24 megapixel
camera somewhere between 20 and 30 produces the right level of blur let’s close that down now and I’ll show
you what the frequency equalizer has done so we’ve got our image now
separated onto two layers we’ve got this low-frequency layer and a high-frequency
layer no the low-frequency layers got all the color information from the image
and as you can see it’s blurred and that’s what we’ll use to create our
artifact the high-frequency layer has all the detail and if I turn off the
low-frequency you can see what that does but together the two layers actually
just create the normal image there you can see I’ve turned off the separation
that’s being created if I turn it back on there’s no difference this is how I
create my Orton effect so I’ll go to the high frequency layer and I’ll reduce the
opacity down to something around 80% and as soon as I do that we get this lovely
blurring effect on the header and it may be too strong but you can see it’s
soften the header up very nicely unfortunately softened up all the
hillsides as well and the sky and I don’t really want that I’ll show you how
we tackle that in a minute on the low-frequency layer what I’m next
going to do is duplicate it so I’ll use command + J on my keyboard to create a
duplicate and I’ll rename that soft glow and I’m going to reduce the opacity of
that layer down to something around 20% to start with and now I change the
blending mode of that layer to be soft light and that creates this lovely
glowing effect that enhances the saturation at the same time so if I turn
that off you can see the original turn it on and you can see this lovely
glowing Orton effect now that we’ve got now the thing for me is the Orton effect
shouldn’t really be plied globally to every element of the image it starts to
get a little bit samey after that I really wanted it to deal with the
heather in the foreground and possibly soften up some of the clouds in the sky
what I need to do know that is add a layer mask so that I can hide the effect
so I’ll add my new layer mask I’ll invert it and that hides the artifact
from my image next I’m going to use a luminosity mask to select the Heather in
my image now I could use a saturation mask and that would work as well but I
think the luminosity mask will work best and I’m going to use this panel that
I’ve previously reviewed called interactive luminosity masks and it’s a
free panel that you can get again I’ll put the link to that video in the
information below and I’m going to create a luminosity mask and in there
I’ll create a zone mask though the areas you can see in white and the areas that
are being selected by my luminosity mask and I can move this left and right to
either select brighter tones or darker tones so I want to select something
that’s picking up on the Heather and it’s probably slightly darker tones at
this stage and I can use these feather sliders to restrict or enlarge the range
that’s being selected now I don’t really want the effect to be seen in the
shadows I really want it to be seen more in the higher lives so I’m happy with
that and what I’m going to do now is create a selection from it I’ll hide
that panel and now I’ll hide the selected edges so that I don’t see them
anymore now over here I’m on my mask that’s attached to the entire group and
what I can do now is select a white paint brush so I’m using white with the
paintbrush and I’ve got the opacity set at about 50% I’ve got a soft edge to the
paint brush and the size is set suitable for this image I can adjust the size
using the bracket keys on my keyboard so the left bracket will reduce it the
right bracket increases it and now I’m going to just paint over the areas where
I want to see the artifact so the Heather here
is one of the areas where I want to see it and again the heather over here now
are painting the areas of the heather to start with just to create that softening
effect on the heather because that’s my priority and the thing you’ve got to
watch out for when you’re using this technique is that because I’m using a
soft blending mode here on the soft glow layer it will actually darken and
intensify the color so you may get a color shift involved here don’t worry if
you find that the whole thing makes it look too saturated we’ll deal with that
in a moment so let’s Oh turn it back on and you can see that
I’ve restricted my adjustment now just to the Heather if you look at the
maskers I’ve created you can see that it used the luminosity information that I
picked up in the luminosity panel now just soften the edges of the path as
well slightly I’m reasonably happy with that maybe we want to include a very
slight soft glow in the distance that looks reasonably good and now maybe just
on these clouds here to soften them up possibly
those clouds as well so let’s look that was the original and that’s my softened
image using my artifact so I just renamed that layer now if I think that
the image is looking a little bit too saturated now what I can do is add a hue
and saturation layer and just make sure that that’s outside of my Orton effect
on the layer stack now because I already had a hidden selection that I was
painting through it’s actually created that adjustment as a mask so I’m just
going to remove that mask and just add a new one in the human adjustment layer
we’ve got the master saturation and that will allow me to control the saturation
on the master layer which I probably don’t want to do too much and it would
also allow me to then pick a layer now in here we’ve got the magentas that are
in the heather and I can pick those and it’s actually saying that we’ve got them
as red now if I wanted to I could shift those and turn them into a different
color so maybe I do want to shift them very slightly
and I could also increase or reduce the saturation level depending on what I
felt was appropriate and I could actually change the lightness or
brightness of those now if I look back at my original image with that turned
off I’m actually happy with that so I’m not going to make any further
adjustments to this I’ll remove the hue and saturation lab and I’ll just accept
that I’m happy with that image now if you feel it’s a bit too light or too
dark I would suggest adding the curves layer
to it so that you can lighten it up or down it down I’m quite happy with that
now I think that looks like a good finished image I’ll just again make sure
that I’ve got that curves adjustment on the very top of the image and that’s me
complete now this has been the first mini-series that i’ve tried where i’ve
tried to demonstrate the end to end editing of an image right through from
assessment through raw conversion through enhancement using in this
instance the Nik collection and then onto special effects
now the first video a lot of people were very keen on this mini series now we’ve
finished it I’m hoping that you’ve enjoyed the series and thought it was
worthwhile if you did please leave me a comment below because I’m wondering
whether or not to do a number of other of these mini series where I demonstrate
different tools because I don’t always use the tools that I’ve demonstrated and
used in this series if you want to see something else another mini series with
another image and other tools please let me know in the comments below and I’ll
see what I can do in the future I’m Robin Whalley
you’ve been watching Lenscraft I’ll see you soon for another video

Scandaleuse Photography – About Us

Scandaleuse Photography – About Us


hi guys Anthony hi I’m Julia we are the co-founders of scandalous photography to make eight years ago in photographic career in Paris and we have been working together ever since our goal photography is without capturing everyone can succeed this is our only lead body and immobilizing it it’s not about shape or gender and go open to women men export whether your obsession for yourself always a partner you’re getting married only star rating the tendency or even reverse your fitness goals that’s always your first scandal a little attitude it’s about going to xml and being strong enough to go after watch for it’s challenging yourself and not caring about other people’s opinion it’s slamming the door when anything we spend so much time staying in the shadow in our everyday life but we only sell spotlight let us create a [Music] with Canada’s we’re bringing boudoir photography to the next level we want to make it accessible for everyone and here are offering high insertion in larger environments so want to redefine what sexy is and fights against today’s get offended we’re game if you are [Music]

what is shutter & shutter speed – photography Basics – II

what is shutter & shutter speed – photography Basics – II


Music Music Hi Guys In my last photography basic videos I explained one of major Pillar of photography Is Aperture , Now Today I will discuss another Pillar of photography is shutter And what is shutter speed & How it works Shutter speed is responsible For two particular things First changing the brightness of the subject And creating dramatic effects of freezing the action and blurring the motion This video of photography basics I will explain all about shutter & shutter speed That we need to know about it Let’s go and know more about it Before watching this video I love to like to subscribe my channel if you would like Click the SUBSCRIBE button & click on the bell You can also subscribe my channel by clicking the subscribe icon embedded on any of my video So will keep enjoying my latest video What is shutter? shutter speed exists because of something known as your camera which shutter simply put is a curtain in front of the camera sensor that stays closed until the camera fires. When the camera fires, the shutter opens and fully exposes the camera sensor to the light that has passed through your lens. After the sensor is done collecting the light, the shutter closes immediately, ,stopping the light from hitting the sensor. The button that fires the camera is also called “shutter” or “shutter button,” because it triggers the shutter to open and close. When it comes to a DSLR camera shutter there are 3 basic mechanisms: the mirrorbox, the bottom door, and the top door. When you look through a DSLR view finder you are essentially looking through a series of mirrors that get their light directly from the lens. When you click the shutter button that system of mirrors flips upwards to allow light to pass to the sensor. This is why the viewfinder goes black for a short amount of time when taking photos. Once the mirror is flipped upwards a small door will move from top to bottom exposing the sensor beneath. After that another door will fall down, covering up the entire sensor. This process can vary in time depending on the length of your shutter speed. Sometimes a shutter speed can be so fast that your camera sensor won’t be entirely exposed at any one time. After the second door closes your mirror will fall back into place. The doors will then reset to their original positions underneath. This entire process from mirror up to mirror down is known as an Actuation. It is typically very easy to find the shutter speed. On cameras that have a top panel, the shutter speed is typically located on the top left corner, as circled: If your camera does not have have a top LCD, like some entry-level DSLRs, you can look through the viewfinder, where you will see the shutter speed on the bottom Left side And if your camera has neither a top LCD nor a viewfinder, like many mirrorless cameras, you can see your shutter speed simply by looking on the back display screen. Shutter speed is a measurement of the time the shutter is open, shown in seconds or fractions of a second: 1 s, 1/2 s, 1/4 s … 1/250 s, 1/ 500 s, etc. The faster the shutter speed, shutter speed, the shorter the time the image sensor is exposed to light; the slower the shutter speed, the longer the time the image sensor is exposed to light. If you are photographing a subject that is in motion, you will get different effects at different shutter speeds. Fast shutter speeds will “freeze” motion, while slow shutter speeds introduce blur from two sources: camera movement (camera shake) and subject movement In other words, the faster the shutter speed the easier it is to photograph the subject without blur and “freeze” motion and the smaller the effects of camera shake. In contrast, slower shutter speeds are suited to suggesting the motion, such as that of flowing water or other moving subjects. Changing the shutter speed gives you control over whether to “freeze” or suggest motion. A darker picture is produced when the shutter moves very quickly and only allows light to touch the imaging sensor for a tiny fraction of a second. So a shutter speed of 1/2 of a second will allow more light light to touch the image sensor and will produce a brighter picture than a shutter speed of 1/200 of a second.

Capturing Movement With Continuous Shooting | I AM Different Tips ‘n Tricks

Capturing Movement With Continuous Shooting | I AM Different Tips ‘n Tricks


[Continuous shooting.] Hi, I’m Thomas from Nikon School. We’re here
on the set of the Blossom project and I will give you
some tips about photography. In order to capture
the moment you really want, especially when you take
some pictures of movement, the burst mode will help you to break down the movement
with many images. Especially if you have a moment
that will never happen again. You can use this burst mode
and secure your images. So about the D7200,
what makes it stand out is that there is a special burst mode
at 7 frames per second which is made by the crop mode. And then you’ll have
even more images to bring back
the right moment in your images. [Discover other inspiring ideas!
Explore more.]

Photography tips – Steps to becoming a happy photographer

Photography tips – Steps to becoming a happy photographer


– What is up, guys. Welcome to my YouTube channel, where we talk all things photography. I’m up, right and breezy, this morning, We’re down by Tara Hill,
and I’m gonna shoot some cityscapes, to see how we get on. Hold on, this isn’t what
my YouTube channel’s about. I’ve been trying to force
the issue, this morning. It’s a kind of proven model. YouTuber, photographer,
B-roll, this and that’s that, but I don’t enjoy shooting cityscapes. I’m just kinda forcing myself to do something that I don’t enjoy,
because I see others do it. So on that note, let’s get into the video. (classy downtempo music) So this morning, I went
out to try and shoot some cityscapes, and
that’s normally what I do. I do what YouTubers who do that, and who have big
audiences, and I am trying to grow my YouTube channel, so I felt this pressure to go out
and try and recreate that. I live in London, there’s
some great buildings, the sun hadn’t risen, it
was a perfect opportunity. But the more I walked around, the more I felt this pressure on my shoulders, and it really reminded me of this pressure that I used to feel when I first took up photography, when I was in college, and they gave me a camera, and I had to go out and take
pictures around the street. I felt so self-conscious, this was almost before mobile phones had cameras on them, this was 10 years ago, so
no one was really using ’em, but I felt so self-conscious
with that camera. I had in my head this idea that, wherever I’m pointing the camera to, someone’s gonna stand
behind me and look at it, and just think, that’s a shit
photo, why are you doing that? That’s kind of rubbish, you’re
not a good photographer, so you’re wasting your time
(multiple voices talking). Now, this is when I just
picked up a camera in college. And actually, on that note, I didn’t pick up a camera again, ’til sort of midway through uni, which was three years later. So I started to feel
this pressure on myself, this morning, to do something, and I’ve not felt that in awhile. I shoot stuff out on
location all the time, whether that’s people
running through the streets, or any sort of fitness
thing, or in central London, or in cities, or outside, and
I do enjoy taking landscapes. But landscapes, not cityscapes. And yeah, I just started
to feel this real pressure on myself, to the point where I just put my camera away, and thought,
I’m not gonna do this. But what it did do was inspire me to make this video,
because there’s one thing that I want to cover a bit more of, on my video, and that’s the mindset of photography, as well as giving tips and tricks on how to use your camera, and how you use Photoshop,
and Capture One. I want this channel to bring
value in a different way. There’s plenty of other
channels, tutorial channels, out there, but I think, especially if you wanna be self-employed, especially if you wanna do photography, or anything art-based, freelance, as your own business, there’s a lot of pressures and stuff
that come with that, and I can only speak to
what I’ve experienced. But hopefully, it can
kinda reassure people who are going through the same thing, that they’re not alone, and
it can maybe warn people just beginning their adventure as a self-employed photographer, it can maybe kind of warn you
of the potential pitfalls, and stuff, that you might come across. Really, that’s something
that’s kind of dogged me for the whole time, since I’ve lived in London, really, the
last sort of six years. I’ve always felt pressure from myself, to the point, upon viewing others, that I need to be shooting certain things. And authenticity is what
people can relate to, so in the end, I put my camera away, and that kinda brings
me onto my first point, about caring about what
other people think. I’m not shooting photographs
for the sake of others. Really, you have to find something that is genuinely you, and then
it will become much easier. So something I’ve found,
in the last two years, is, I’m really honed in on,
is sport, and athletes, and the athletic lifestyles,
and storytelling. So whether that’s
getting across the effort that someone’s putting in, in a workout, or the process that it
takes to make a product. So really, my first point to becoming a happier photographer
would be, assess yourself. You can do that in a few, various ways. One of them would be
what I just said, there, make sure you’re shooting
stuff that you enjoy, that you are about, that
you’re enthusiastic about. Shoot stuff that you enjoy doing, and not stuff that you think
you should be shooting. And that’s really easy
to get caught up in that. I’ve got caught up in
that plenty times, myself. Yeah, you can get nice photographs, but is your heart really in it? That’s really what you
have to be questioning yourself about, and if
it’s not, don’t do it, and don’t worry about the interest, that may or may not be there,
in your chosen subject. If you really like shooting plants, or any ass random thing, then don’t worry. Just shoot it, because
ultimately, the happiness is your number one goal, and that’s
what you have to focus on. Just shoot in what you enjoy. Wow, that was a ramble, jeez. In assessing yourself, take real stock of what you’re consuming. I can’t remember what YouTube channel it was, or what I was
watching the other day, or who it was I was listening to, but they said, when
you’re scrolling through your Instagram, if an
account isn’t filling you with warmth, or
bringing something valuable to your life, then click Unfollow. And I am so guilty of this. I follow so many different photographers, and originally, I thought I
was getting into operation, the people, either in
the same field as me, or more successful than me, or, I would scroll through Instagram, and all you see is a
congregation, an aggregation, of everyone else’s work. So you scroll through Instagram, and it gives you this false impression that everyone is super busy, every day, shooting stuff, and if you’re freelance, and you’re not busy every day, it’s really easy to get dragged
down by that, being like, oh, hey, I’m not working enough. I’m not doing enough, look at
all these people doing work. Whereas actually, that
guy who just posted that, it’s the first thing
he’s posted in a month. He’s going through this, or she’s going through the same struggles as you, and be brutal, and don’t
worry about offending people, but really kind of have a bit
of a cull, on your Instagram, and really only follow
things that, follow accounts that are bringing you value, and making you feel good about yourself. So that would be my point,
just follow accounts that make you feel good,
and not the accounts that you maybe feel that you have to. I’m only speaking from experience. So for example, shooting sport, and being around athletes, makes me happy, but like I mentioned earlier, I felt like I needed to shoot fashion, because I was surrounded
by people in fashion when I was working at studios,
and for other photographers. So I felt like, ah, this
is the way it needs to go. I know I really love doing this stuff, but everyone else kinda says I should go this way, so I’ll go that way. So try and realize what it
is that makes you happy, what it is that makes you happy shooting, and don’t worry about
other people’s opinions, or whether you feel there’s
a market there, or not. There is always a market for something. Your happiness is your own responsibility, and once you take ownership of that, you start putting into place the actions which will bring about your own happiness, and others around you will
start to feel the benefits. So I guess what I’m trying
to say is, regardless of what you may or may not think you should or should not be shooting, if it makes you happy, just do it. And that might be simple advice, it might be a bit cliche,
but it’s the best thing that I’ve been trying to get through to my head in the last 12 to 24 months. This has been a really
difficult video for me to make. I hope it’s kinda got my point across, or they’re not points,
they’re just thoughts on things that I’ve encountered recently, chains of thoughts, ways of thinking, and the kinda mechanisms that I’ve tried to put in place, that
help you kinda navigate your way through life, as a photographer, or a freelancer, because it’s not easy. It’s difficult, especially without wanting to sound too cliche, but especially with the ever-apparent pressures of the Internet, whether
that’s social media, or otherwise, everyone else’s success and failures are kind
of put on a platform. And it’s very difficult to watch everyone else’s success,
even successes, even though everyone goes through the same struggles. And it also kind of makes
you wanna hide away, ’cause you don’t want
people to see your failures. But hopefully, with some of the things that I’ve explained, and gone through, and talked about, here,
in this video, you can at least find way of shooting
things that make you happy. And ultimately, if you’re shooting happy, you’re gonna shoot more,
and you’ve got more chance of successes, unlike my speech today. It’s been horrendous. That was a bit of a ramble, today. I hope it brought some value to you guys. I’m trying to implement more videos of this style into my YouTube. Ultimately, I want my
YouTube to be a reflection of what I think, and
go through, in my life, so whether that’s, say,
behind-the-scenes videos, photography tips or tricks, or methods of thinking, and
practices that you can put in place, to ultimately
help you be a better, but more importantly,
happier, photographer. Thanks for watching, guys, and
I’ll see you in the next one. (introspective music)

Part 2 of 7: Steve Thornton and his very personal style of lighting

Part 2 of 7: Steve Thornton and his very personal style of lighting


and none of that worked he was unusable light basically unless you want to shoot something gray with with no details whatsoever just the shadows was blocked up it was just it was just horrible especially dealing people who are going to move so you can’t use long shutter speeds so when I went to start using the strobes we had an assistant hold a reflector up and we attached the arm that some bounce now makes and I put a strobe head on it there’s a battery power stroke and we just adjusted to power up and down a little bit until it overpowered the light that was shooting into I was actually shooting into the Sun or where the Sun should have been he was brighter than we were had but i had to overpower that so i was running about f8 and i was using about 12 was seconds of power to get them and it overpowered the sun and you really came up with a stupendous image sorry the one good thing about yesterday morning as I learned a new trick Peter yes thank you yeah what I thought was I wish I had a lot earlier the Sun had been up for 45 minutes and the clouds were solid there was no edge the light it was gray it was ugly this is a commercial job i’m shooting for a client and i’m spending thousands of dollars every few minutes the very good people of California Sun bounce dragged out something that I’ve never seen before something that allow me to attach a strobe head to any of the reflectors and put like where it did not exist before it’s very controllable it’s incredibly lightweight if you use a portable flash or battery-powered flash you can have an assistant walk wherever the models going or moving on a little bit or move out a little bit and quite honestly for that portion to shoot it probably saved my keister because it was new I could do nothing absolutely nothing at all I’m thinking you’re right I look at every project as an individual there are some clients want me to do the same thing over and over and I try not to do that clients come to me for a photograph but I don’t give this photograph I give them my vision of the photograph my perspective on what I think that client is going to need to grow and to make money so as a result when I do is I will maybe follow the storyboard makes all the layouts they have and shoot that they now almost always go and shoot what I want the way I would have shot it before they even open their mouth I work very hard on locations locations are one of the teams I take the time to scout locations of the project I just finished up I’ve spent three days scouting and doing prep work finding out where I needed to be in what needed to be there in terms of elements whether it was just models or models and horses or models and horses and cowboys and longhorns at sunrise at sunset I spent a lot of time finessing every image I’ve already got in my mind what the photographs going to look like before I shoot it because I know the player is going to be brought to the shoot I know what the lights going to do I know what the location is going to give me I know what my wardrobe

How To Take Basic Product Photos At Home – Photography Tips

How To Take Basic Product Photos At Home – Photography Tips


hey everyone Joe here well today I want
to show you how easy it could be to start taking basic product shots now
these photos are not fancy stuff that you put on bulletin board or anything
this is just normal basic product shots that’s like you would Percy on Amazon
you know stuff with a white background just to be able to see you know what
something is we chew on through your cart so search for products you know the
basic white background ones so anyway I thought I’d show you how I take product
shots and stuff in maybe it might help you uh you know develop your own
photography skills and taking products and stuff so anyway let’s first go over
here to start looking at our lighting setup okay we’re here we go here is my
lighting setup least for the start of it as you can see I’m using two octagon
softboxes on each side you know I’m powered by my dtb strobes and everything
however I’m not actually using the strobes that whatsoever on this this is
simply just using the modern lamps which works fine for product photos because
your camera’s not going to be you know can be sit on a tripod anyway so it
which works out for the best part now as you can see here on the top I actually
have a reflector just kind of sitting on the back kind of just pointing down now
I have the reflector side the silver side used here because it needs to
bounce more light back onto what I’m gonna have to try and take a photo of
and this really does help quite a bit you know trying to box in that light to
get even illumination now we can see here how I got to post a poster board
actually laid out now this is a simple white paper poster board you know much
like you’d find like at Walmart any other department store you know for arts
and crafts and stuff now you’ll notice I actually have it bent and that’s that
should create an infinite background that way when you actually see this here
that you actually never see it where it begins or ends and this really helps
give a lot more depth to the actual photos and stuff and Plus this card
boards that you really cheap so soon as it gets dirty you just throw it away
with another another good thing about these backgrounds is a lot of times for
example at the one I have here is that you black on this side
and that way if you want to use the black one you can get it but most ones
like your normal getting like Walmart frock school projects have no white on
both sides which nobody works up pretty good now to hold this I’ve simply just
got a tripod you look regular tripod lights light stand now that your tripod
kids what you want to call it it’s got three legs so it’s tripod okay and it
just kind of held up there some clamps on another little reflector bar now if
you really want to you could suspend the top reflector some on a stand or
something other but really it they’re so light most times they won’t cause your
soft boxes to saghini so I just kind of threw him it there on top and it works
well enough you don’t get part of the weights being held by the roof stand
here and it’s not heavy enough to recalls an issue the softbox is anyway
they’re pretty light now with the product actually in there
it’s not in the center of the two boxes I kind of keep it towards the back three
quarters go a quarter to the back you know that way you get when the light
goes around at trans go from the corner here the softbox to the other side takes
a longer to go vice-versa on both sides and what happens with that is you
actually get smoother a light around it and less shadows kind of kind of softer
light now it’s good to get good flat lighting on these because if you want to
add any more contrast anything you can always do that in post however if you
don’t have even illumination you can’t pull back shadows what causing
noise and stuff so it’s always good to have good even illumination and Plus
this also really helps when you try to go into Photoshop or any other photo
editing application and actual cut out the thing they’ll say if you want to
post them to another background that way it’s easy to catch oh yeah you know you
know select it and stuff and delete the background or mask out the background
depend on how whatever you’re doing here’s another shot of the back here I
wanted to show everybody you can kind of get a better idea of where the actual
you know the lens that I got here set a magic taking photos of and you can see
it’s right before the beam starts in the paper so you want to push it back
yeah almost to the bend that way when you actually see it you never see this
Bend it just looks like an infinite background which works quite well now
another thing you’ll probably notice here is my actual camera and the lens
I’m using on it yes when I actually take product photos of stuff I use anywhere
2125 925 yeah it’s around that one hundred thirty-five millimeter up to
around 200 new it depends the the reason is is because I want that isolate out
anything isn’t even close to the products but just possible and this way
you get you get a more narrow look at everything that also helps getting the
product in the shot without any of the background equipment and stuff like your
soft boxes and everything now another thing about the camera here is the
actual settings I’m using uh me I am using f/8 with this and I kind of just
you know the exposure to whatever it looks good to put on your lab your light
power and everything or they’re actually the product you’re taking the photo of
you know brighter things take less light so there’s no really set exposure you
can just use for anything but I like to sit I like to you shoot at f/8 and iso
100 and it doesn’t matter how long it takes because you know you want a really
good strong sturdy tripod like I’ve got here this Benro which is the video
tripod it’s about as sturdy as you gonna possibly get and it’s but all you really
do need for this now the thing is about this also uh said I’m shooting FA but
what are you taking product photos and everything a lot of times you may want
to consider uh doing focus stacking so if I will take like a product photo and
say at the front of it then at the back of it for example our lens over here now
our lens we got here you can see I have it here in front but you probably see my
fingers blurring out anyway our first focus on where it says that Canon 35
millimeter here then I’ll actually go to the back and actually focus in where it
says that 67 moment at the top there and now I may even actually take another
photo in between even though shoot this helps me put
those three images together and create an
image that doesn’t have any blurs to it and everything’s you know fully seen and
just you know that way everything’s sharp and everything’s in focus and like
I said that infinite background helps that too because there’s no other things
in there and just kind of zoom in and zoom out and or focus in and focus out
to know how you want to do it and get a good even product shot across so that
way everything sharp now another thing about the little lighting setup like I
have here it unlike a lot of those little specialized little boxes that you
can buy yo from Amazon or whatever heõs you pick product photos and stuff
with there’s a lot of times you may need to actually move your light boxes and
stuff and that’s to get the best your lighting across something reflective or
kind of situate the Lighting’s better so this setup is actually better because I
can actually pull these out move them around a little bit funny to kind of
fill in some light or like you know it’s easy to take a photo of this lens here
you know because it’s round it’s a cylinder shape but some things are not
you made you know get this weird gleam or shine on something you may not want
this you know moving these boxes around helps a lot and on top but if you really
wanted to that softbox on top you can actually put it on a light stand if you
want to and pull it here in front if you want to you know change it and of course
right now I have it on a silver reflector but you can use the white too
if you order two depends on how much light you need abouts and how well you
think how you want the product that you look when you actually take it a photo
of it so yeah that’s my little you know lighting setup for taking a little basic
product shot so it’s pretty easy known there is it much really to it you just
want to kind of fill in all around it make sure you don’t have any shadows you
know good things about we put him out other back further like I do that really
does help with the shadows you know if you put it up you think you put it above
the center of the two boxes that you’d have less shadows actually ended up
smarter shadows are sometimes so pushing it further back like I said like here’s
the softbox putting about right here that seems actually weren’t the best for
the most part a lot of times like I said it has a lot to do the way light travels
and you know so anyway I thought I’d show everybody how to take a little
basic you know shots these are really simple it’s
really budget looks it you don’t even need strobes if you want to use this
very continuous light even if it’s just regular y’all press fluorescent or LED
bulbs like you picked up at local hardware stores or in you know really is
no real set requirement doesn’t have to be very bright because you can put the
camera in you’ll take a photo and just let it go now I did want to point out
when you do do want to take a photo you don’t want to be want to be touching the
camera or anything I’d normally set mine like to a two-second delay or I grab my
remote which happens to be on this tripod at the moment and you hit one of
the two so it really doesn’t matter and you know as long as the camera’s not
shaking any which is what’s really important you know less shake you put it
in the better and of course if you using kind of leans out this telephoto right
here or any kind of lens that’s got image stabilization turning off when
it’s on the tripod if not that thing will be trying to move and you’ll be
trying to Center your your product up and you’ll be wondering what it’ll be
doing this on the screen with you so yeah you want to turn that off and that
real I said it also helps when it goes to stack the photos and stuff that way
he doesn’t move a lot there will be some focus breathing there always is I’m any
lens for the most part but you know that way you’ll be zooming in is up but when
you carried into uploading your photo editing apps like I use affinity photo
but I’ve also used like a photo shot before a matter of fact I did a tutorial
on focus stacking and I’ll link it in the cards and you check out that way if
it’s not moving a lot it really does help from your focus stacking everything
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in the next one

6 Tips for AWESOME Drone Photos | Drone Photography Tips

6 Tips for AWESOME Drone Photos | Drone Photography Tips


– Hey guys, this is James
Shooter for NatureTTL.com, and today we’re going to
be looking at the top tips for aerial photography using drones. (tranquil music) (camera clicks) Drones don’t like the rain. Not only are your motors going to get wet, but also the front of your
camera, so just don’t do it. Strong winds can be a problem as well. They can lead to shaky footage, but also the propellers coming into shots as the whole drone leans forwards. As a general rule of thumb,
you want a fast shutter speed that’s going to counteract the vibrations that the propellers are
going to make in the air. For film, you actually want the opposite. You want a slow shutter speed, and that’s really going to
smooth out those vibrations and create a smoother video overall. It’s worth noting that sometimes you can’t get those slow shutter speeds, and you can actually get
a neutral-density filter that will block out some of
the light going into the drone so you can achieve those
slower shutter speeds, around 1/50 of a second when filming. Aperture-wise, you
can’t choose an aperture on a DJI Phantom, and that’s worth noting, and also the ISO capabilities
aren’t that great because it’s such a small sensor. If you’re wanting different settings, it might be worth looking at an Inspire, which is a grade above, where
you can choose aperture, and the ISO’s going to be better as well. Now because you can’t really use graduated neutral-density
filters with drones, especially when filming,
because the horizon’s forever shifting, you
really want to be shooting either front-lit or side-lit. If you shoot back-lit,
you’re going to be shooting into the sun, and that bright
sky’s going to be too hard to balance the land. The only thing you need
to watch out for if you’re shooting front-lit, if the
sun’s directly behind you, it’s going to create a
little halo in your image, and that’s because the
sunlight’s dispersing through the propellers in the drone. It’s not so much of an
issue in still photography because you can just clone it out. But in moving photography,
it can really spoil a shot as it’s tracking through your scene. With lighting in mind, if you
do have to shoot back-lit, or there isn’t very much
sunlight on your land, you can bracket the scene. So that means taking three
or five different exposures, and then you’ll blend
them together in Photoshop afterwards to balance the scene. So it can be achieved a different way. In the air you’ll see
some spectacular vistas. I almost always choose
to do several panoramas at a 16 by seven format, alongside the more standard six by four. This will incorporate more of the scene, and it’ll also add to your resolution. This Phantom 3 Professional
actually only shoots at 12 megapixel files,
so by shooting panoramas you’re increasing that file size. Now just because your camera’s in the air, it’s easy to think that your camera’s getting great shots no matter what. That’s not always the case. You still need to follow the
rules of landscape photography. Remember the Rule of Thirds,
look for leading lines in the landscape, and maybe sometimes even cut out the sky, look for patterns or different perspectives
from straight above. So cheers for watching my 10
tips for aerial photography. I hope you’ve enjoyed it and maybe learned something along the way, too. The main three things to
remember is be responsible, get creative, and don’t break it. (propeller whizzing) ♫ This is our jam ♫ This is our jam

DIY Photo Props! | Tay from Millennial Moms

DIY Photo Props! | Tay from Millennial Moms


(sweet guitar) – Hey guys, welcome
back to Millennial Moms. I’m Tay, and that means that it’s Tuesday. (smooching) Alright guys, today I’m
gonna be sharing with you another fun prop we made for
Landice’s tenth birthday. This is really easy, and it’s inexpensive, so let’s get going. (cheerful strumming) (camera click) Alright, so we’re gonna start
by cutting out some images, picking out what we want, lips, bow ties, hats, all that is good. I’m using my Cricut,
because Cricut design space has all of these already,
although you can go onto Google and find all the images you want, print them out, and then
cut them out onto paper I found these stir sticks
in the Target Dollar Spot. And I just cut all my pieces of paper out, and then glued the pieces together. For some of them, I cut
out two different sizes, so that I could layer them, so that they were more sturdy, and had a fun little pop
of color behind them. And then I just glued all the
little pieces, well actually, Landice glued all these
little pieces together. So we had ties, bow tie, lips, masks. Just make sure that you
make them nice and big. So you can also cut them
out onto regular paper and trace them onto card stock. So then I took the stir
sticks that I found, and you can just buy, like chopsticks, or any type of stick that you can find, but I like these because
they had a big base that I could use to hot glue to the back. And then a way to decorate them, I used chalk pens for some of them, and I just used the hashtag that we were gonna do for the party, #PartyLikeAPanda animal. Most of these girls
don’t have social media, so this hashtag really didn’t get used. And then the other ones, I
used glue and some glitter, because you always have to have
a little glitter at a party. You just have to, it’s
just one of the rules. So my favorite way to do glitter is just to make, like,
a crazy mess with it, dump it out onto a paper towel, and then fold it in half
and dump it right back into the glitter container so
you don’t waste any glitter. So then I went and I embellished
all of the little crowns and things like that that I did. Just made ’em really cute. And these’ll be nice, because
you can store them away, and use them for more parties later on. And they’re always good to have on hand. (casual guitar) If you guys want to see yesterday’s video, check out right there. If you guys want to see more
from me at Millennial Moms, check out right there. And if you guys want to subscribe to Millennial Moms, Millennial Moms, check out right here. Alright you guys, thanks for being a subscriber if you’re
already one already. I love you guys. Don’t forget to check out my own personal channel, Auntie Tay. Love you guys, bye. (smooches)