Nokia 808 PureView camera technology

Nokia 808 PureView camera technology


>>DAMIAN: Hi! I am Damian Dinning and I am
the lead programming manager for imaging experience for Nokia smart devices. There are three key
things that we have to make breakthroughs in to make this happen. The first one is the
sensor, 41 megapixel sensor, and genuinely there are 41 megapixels on that sensor. We
have had people questioning whether or not we are up-scaling or anything like that that
maybe it’s a 20 megapixel sensor which we are up-scaling, but it’s genuinely a 41
megapixel sensor. As you can probably guess, you can’t just go and get one of those things
off of the shelf. They just don’t exist so we had to co-develop that sensor. So, that
was the first thing we had to do. Second thing was with a sensor that was able to resolve
that amount of detail we had to introduce new optics. We worked closely with Carl Zeiss,
collaborated with them to produce optics that have roughly speaking a precision at ten times
higher than the rest of our lenses. So, that was the second thing. The third area was in
terms of the imaging pipeline. So, for example in video where we are recording 1080 video,
we are handling over 1 billion pixels per second which is about 16 times the number
that you will be able to handle in a regular smartphone that handles 1080 video, and you
also have that full field of view by the way which I don’t think you get in any other
devices that I am aware of at least that record 1080 video, so those are the breakthroughs
that we had to make. Now, of course everyone is talking about the 41 megapixels, but really
for us the story is not about the number of megapixels, but how we are actually using
those pixels. That’s the really big deal. So, the two key things that we are doing here
first is oversampling, and this allows you to capture and create 5 megapixel images which
are about one megabyte which have significantly more detail than any other camera smartphone
you have ever used or exists in the marketplace today by a long way not by a small way, but
a huge margin. So, that is the first thing. Incidentally, I should add to that, that pixel
oversampling also allows in low light a significant reduction in noise, so your images captured
in low light are significantly better than you have ever been able to produce before.
The second area that this very high resolution sensor allows which is the primary reason
why we developed it in the first place is the zoom capability. So in stills you have
roughly three times lossless zoom and video to full 1080 you have four times lossless
zoom, and if you record in 720 video that would give you the capability to have six
times zoom. In fact, you could even go further and use the 360p setting and that would give
you 12 times zoom completely lossless.>>MARK: So you can forget the digital zoom
thing that most cameras have?>>DAMIAN: We had great delight in completely
disabling digital zoom. There is no digital zoom in this device whatsoever. There is no
up-scaling at any point and whatever you are using, video or still, is purely based on
the resolution that the sensor has available to it. So, we preserve the maximum capability
of the optics and the high resolution sensor. This combination provides us with a number
of unique benefits over optical zoom. So, for example, we have a very large maximum
aperture of f-2.4 that is throughout the zoom range. It is not affected by the zoom that
you are using unlike optical zoom, typically when you zoom in for example three times zoom
might end up being 5.6. We are still 2.4 which means we have 5.4 times the amount of light
reaching our sensor throughout the zoom than you would get with conventional optical zooms.
It is completely silent as well that means when you shoot a video, you are not going
to hear any noise from the zoom mode or anything like that because there isn’t one. I can see a lot of people who currently have
N8s wanting to make the upgrade to this device; a lot of logic in that. I think there is also
going to be a lot of people, who, the kind of people who are interested in photography
either at the enthusiasts level or even at a level where they just want to take great
pictures really easily who will be really interested in this product. We saw a similar
thing with the N8 incidentally. So the PureView is the technology which we
are introducing which is a combination of high performance optics, high performance
sensor, and Nokia industry-leading image processing algorithms. There is a number of different
ways that we can utilize those elements together and what you will see over time is us using
different combinations of those in our future lineup.

Catch the Sparkle – Hard Light for Sequins: OnSet ep. 233

Catch the Sparkle – Hard Light for Sequins: OnSet ep. 233


Hey this is Daniel Norton. I’m here in my studio in New York City with Paulina and today we’re doing kind of a fashion shot. We had this a beautiful Fila sparkly … I love my sparklies… so we wanted to play with this, and create kind of a cool shot for it. It’s kind of sporty… but it’s kind of like … you might wear it out to the club right? So you know I mean… if you go to the gym in this you’re actually not working out, we know that right? So it’s more of a fashionable piece, and since we weren’t like in a cool location to shoot or whatever when we’re in the studio, we decided to mix it up a little bit. I did originally shoot it maybe like on white, but it was kind of boring and catalogue… so we decided to create something that a bit of a sunlight feel… be using my 400 HMI from Dedolight up there, and we’ll start there and I’ll show you guys what we got. So we get Pauline into the light… so it’s gonna be very dramatic right? We’re gonna have a dramatic light coming from one side, so we do have to watch how she keeps her face but this is gonna help the shape… it’s also – the specularity of it is going to… you’ll notice…. it’s going to cause the sparkles to sparkle on her arm and we’re gonna play around a little bit with that right? When you’re showing something that is sparkly or reflective… show it as sparkly, clients are always like that’s too reflective… No it’s like… it’s supposed to look like that right? I mean so you want to let them know like that’s the point right? So that was a little bit boring though with the gray background, so I decided to add some color, and there’s a lot of different ways to do it. I had these really fun glass filters from Dedolight as well, this is in my 200 HMI… and you can see that this… I’ve got it in here, it’s blue, so give a good, good contrast… so we can sharpen or defocus it as we want. I’m gonna go a little sharp … what do you think? It was like a.. like some kind of weird… like modern effect, so I think that could be interesting in the background. So we’ll see what that looks like… by the way I’m at f/2… so that, even though it’s sharp back there… It’s gonna be more or less out of focus. Good you got to keep that in mind… when you’re doing this stuff right? Your… see now we’ve added this like graphic right? So there she is … she’s looking great she’s got some sparkles on her, got some sort… goes on her arm, the background has this graphic feel to it, which is kind of cool, and yeah I mean, some people would stop there, but we don’t do that right, we do not stop there… we want to add a little fill because it’s a little dark on the side, look when she’s facing me… we’re gonna have some issues with the shadows, so I could just put a regular reflector in there… however for this week only on sale… Red reflector right? Red reflector… red outfit, we’re gonna fill our shadows in with a bit of a red color… So you could also if you want to… use an active feel, like a flash, you could just put a red yellow on right, but this is a nice way to do it, nice and simple because remember whenever you are reflecting anything whatever color the object is is gonna reflect back. So like negative fill reflects back black right? Because it’s negative. Positive fill like, like white cards reflect back white… but a red one will be red, so we can see I took two pictures for some reason.. We can see neutral and then we can see red, and that looks really nice with the skin tone… it looks really nice for this whole thing. She’s looking all athletic… and at the club, so we’ll shoot a few like that… I’m just gonna work through it, I’m using the Nikon Z6 which is kind of nice, because I’m seeing my exposure as it goes like kind of like adjust if need be… but I’m also tethered, that’s nice, actually block her face a little bit, that was kind of
cool. I’m either gonna love that or hate it. It’s hard to say yeah, there we go, depends how much sparkles we get… a little bit more in front, there we go, chin up a smidge… good. I’m going to try to see what that looks like, sometimes you gotta mix it up a little bit… sometimes it doesn’t work, alright so, no we won’t do that, okay, good, good, good, chin up I’ll shoot a couple more… cause I get paid by the frame… there we go, one more like that, let’s just go straight on to me now… like oh yeah tough, that’s it, good, like that, beautiful. So I already walked away, because I knew I was gonna be good, because I have my fill, there is enough detail here on her eye. She looks great, the shirt looks great, it’s all nice…going to do one quick thing I’m just gonna defocus the background, just curious, just cuz we can… for one more. I like it because I think it works with the pattern and everything, but I feel like if you want it to be more clean, bring your arm back a smidge right? There good, now it’s more out of focus right… we can affect that.. actually do it with norm, because straight on I think it’s too much shadow on your face. Yeah that’s perfect, we can focus on here good. I’m cropped in a little bit more.. like a portrait to see what it looks like. A lot of times I’m trying to figure out exposure guys, I’ll come in close and shoot the face, because that’s kind of what’s important there, and now back up and get the whole thing. Good, like that, one more, good, last one, good, fantastic, well looks good to me, lots of good options. Okay my first option.. my first inclination was correct, I definitely liked the in focus in the background, I think it works cuz this whole thing is very graphic right? We’ll do it, we’re making a graphic look with the shadows and stuff, so they have a smoothy autofocus background. Didn’t really work, so play around, that’s why you have different tools to work with, so when you’re working with something that’s like a fashion item, think about like the vibe of it, like that’s what I always do when I walk into this. This is like sporty, right? So I want to shoot sporty sporty… even though it’s got a little glam to it, and you want to take advantage of things that are inherent in the garment right? This garment is sparkly, when it gets hit by a hard light, so we don’t necessarily want to throw a big soft box on it. It’s gonna kind of.. not have that effect that we have here.. So play around, have a lot of fun, that’s what fashion is about… So I’m gonna put Paulines information in the description, make sure you follow her, follow me DanielNortonPhotographer. Subscribe to AdoramaTV, hit the bell and everything, and I’ll see you next time OnSet.

APERTURE and DEPTH OF FIELD, made easy. WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY. Botswana.

APERTURE and DEPTH OF FIELD, made easy. WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY. Botswana.


Hello! It’s Danielle from Pangolin Photo
Safaris on our home turf, the Chobe River. Today I am going to answer a question
that we often get asked, and that is how can I blur my background to the maximum? That basically means, how can I use depth-of -field? to my advantage, or how
can I control the depth-of-field? Today we have got some waterbuck to demonstrate the concept, and they’re quite nice, because they stand tall for a while.
Great to demo this on. So, the first way of doing it, is to control the distance
between yourself and the subject. Which is great, because we are in a boat, so we can either come closer or further away from the subject. The closer you are to the subject the more the background blurs. The second way of doing
it, is to control the distance between the subject and its background. So, as you can see, the background is quite far away, and that’s also fairly in your control,
as you can position the boat to choose a background that’s further away, if you
want more blur. The third way, is to use your zoom. The more zoomed in you are, the
more the background blurs. The last and obvious way to do it, is to
decrease your f-stop. So, take a shot at f/16. Then take a shot at your lowest
f-stop. Go down to f/6.3 or to f/4. Leave everything else the same
and take your shot. Zoom in and notice the difference in your background, and
you will see that that’s how you blur your background. For more videos, subscribe to our channel, or hit the bell icon at the bottom to get notified when the next video is
available. Until next time. Bye bye!

Business Portrait On-location Photo Shoot (behind-the-scenes & Photoshop)

Business Portrait On-location Photo Shoot (behind-the-scenes & Photoshop)


So we’re on our way to a shoot at a car
dealership. I was hired to take pictures of all of the employees there for their
website. So I’m bringing my 5D Mark III, and what do you have there, Tony? -this is the backup camera it’s a 5d mark
II and you have the 70-200 which is perfect for
headshots. This is a 24-105 the nice Sigma f/4 and
again it’s just a back up, we shouldn’t ever need this. We also don’t plan to use the flash, but
if everything else fails if that Cyber Commander fails to trigger the strobes.
we can use the optical slaves from the flash here. -It’s always good to have a back-up, plan
on something failing. So we’re going to load up our car here
and just tell you what here we’re bringing as we load it up. This is our large Paul C. Buff
collapsible soft box so that will give a nice diffused light if there isn’t
adequate lighting in the dealership. -This is the Paul C. Buff Einstein E-640
which will attach to that soft boxe, this will be our main light. Here I have just a
bracket on the stand, it’s just useful to have one of these, you can attach
anything to it. -These are our Vagbond Mini by Paul
C. Buff and they’re batteries to hook our strobes up to/ -That way we don’t have to attach or have power
cords running everywhere where people might trip over it, it’s a little easier
outside of the studio. This is a reflector and we have
diffusers inside as well. Getting pretty crowded in there. -And this
is going to be a hair light or background light as we need it, just a
second light. It will be triggered by the Cyber Commander just like that Einstein
light and will run it from the other Vagabond. -I was told there would be a nice
background there but you’re never sure, we didn’t scope out the place yet so I
was going to use the white side of this backdrop in case their background wasn’t
very appealing. Throw that in there. I also brought a
lint brush just to make sure everyone is nice and clean. I have some painters tape to mark the
spot where everyone can stand so that everyone’s in the same location. And… some tape to hold the backdrop against the wall. -And this is a Panasonic
GH2 on a tripod, this is just going to be a b-roll camera for the
behind-the-scenes. The GH2 is a micro four thirds camera and it’s a little bit
old now but records great 1080p video and it runs forever, it doesn’t shut off
after 30 minutes like most DSLRs do. -I think that’s it. We just have to grab our coats and head
out. -Let’s go. -Alright. You might be able to find an angle where
we could get this line of cars in it, we have to stand up a little bit to look
down but we might be able to do that. -I was thinking this is a little too
colorful. -Yeah it is. You want to do it in my office then? -I have that, the other side is white. -yeah
the wall might be easier, I don’t know how much room there is in there. -yeah -The one other thing for this Tony, is that
we don’t have the nice natural light. -Yeah the lightning is, uh… rough. -We’ll have to use this.. -it’s a little tight to bring
lighting in. And I think we’ll just have one of us
stand behind him with the reflector -Yeah, I think it’ll be easy, so let’s get one more,
I’ll get my settings I’ll put a mark on the floor and we’ll get it done. You guys ready? Yeah will you be my model one more time? So I’m really glad that we picked a spot
that has natural light because a lot of the people here are different heights
and I would have had to adjust the softbox with every different person, it
would have been a lot more set up. So my recommendation for you would be to look
for natural light and bring a flash for fill light. -But be prepared in case it
doesn’t work out and you have to have artificial light. One of the reasons we
picked the 5D Mark III for this job is it takes two memory card slots and it can
write to both cards simultaneously. That way if one of the cards has a
problem we have another copy and we don’t have to go back and reshoot
everything. Yeah there you go. I didn’t think that it was the best I
could have done, I would have preferred if they came into the studio. I mean I know that that wasn’t possible. So now I’m back in my office and i’ve uploaded my pictures. I’m going to show you how to sort
through them, rate them and even edit them. Now that I have my photo in
Photoshop, I’m going to start by cleaning up my subject’s skin. So I have a filter
called portraiture and I love it and it does a really good job. It smooths out the
skin without taking away all the pores, which can kind of leave people looking a
bit lifeless and doll-like. So i’ll zoom in a bit more on his face so I can see
exactly what Portraiture is doing. I don’t want to lose any of these fine
lines or anything like that because it would make him look unnatural. So you can see, I can up the threshold
here and it smooths them out way too much. Looks like a boudoir shot or something
and this is a professional photo so he’s definitely not going for that. These
sliders here control the details. So this would control the large details and
smooth it out less if you were to bring them down and I actually think that looks
pretty good. Let me turn down the fine details a bit so
play around with it, it’s definitely to taste. And my only suggestion would be to
not smooth out people skin too much. Not even women. If you notice any residual marks, you can see there are a few just little
pores you can leave them in and use other tools in Photoshop to take care
of that. So i’m satisfied with this for now and then i’ll zoom in and use my
other tools to take care of any other small imperfections. So I want my spot
healing brush and i use my left bracket. I don’t want to remove too many things
because once again it will look just too unnatural and smooth. I think that looks pretty good the one
other thing I’m going to do is in person I didn’t see that his brow is furrowed at
all so I’m going to take the little furrow out of his brow. And I’ll just
use my lasso tool, circle it, delete and then use content
aware fill, that usually does a good job. And then use Ctrl D to deselect the area. I like to just zoom in to make sure it
looks natural and that actually doesn’t look too great. So I’m gonna try it again. That looks much better. The next thing I’m going to do is just brighten his teeth a little bit. They look great,
they are nice and white, but we’re used to seeing very white teeth in in the media so it’s
nice to just kind of brighten them up a tad bit. And here i added a new layer and i use
the overlay layer I select my paintbrush and use bright
white. You’re going to think this looks insane
but you just fill in just the front teeth. This is really bright, but once i’m done
i’m going to turn down the opacity and it will look natural. We’ll see I don’t want to whiten them them too much. So I’ll zoom out and make sure it looks natural. You can even turn down your opacity on
your brush a little bit it to get these back teeth, but remember that the back
teeth are usually a bit darker, so if you make these really bright, let me show you what I mean. I can’t really because i have the
opacity down, but if you make these too bright it won’t look good. Ok. So the teeth look nice and next I’m
going to just brighten his eyes a tad bit. So i’ll use my Dodge tool, I have the
mid-tones selected and my exposure down to thirty percent and I just do a little half circle. Let me see And the next thing I’m going to do here,
just because he has fair skin is just fill in his eyebrows a
little bit. They’re in the midtones, so I have the mid-tone selected and my
exposure is really low, it’s only sixteen percent, and i’m just going to define
them a little bit. Lastly I’m going to brighten up the
background. I’ll do that by selecting the background
and i’m going to use let’s see, I think I’ll use my magic wand tool
to fix the areas that it’s selected that I don’t want selected I can use this
tool to subtract from the selection but I usually like to press alt, the alt key,
and then it does it for you. You can also use this button here to add to the selection, but i’m actually going to use
layer masks and i’ll show you how. If you aren’t great at selecting by hand, you can
also use the mask tool which i think is easier. So i’m going to show you how to
select the background better using the mask tool. So i will go to the
brightness and contrast and i’m going to raise the brightness of the background,
you can see i missed a big chunk, but that’s not a big deal because then I can
go into the mask and use my paintbrush with either black or white to add or
subtract to the selected area. So white is going to add to the selected area, so I
will make my brush bigger by pressing the right bracket and then just paint it
in. And I selected the wrong parts here, so i’ll use black to get rid
of that. So you can see this is the before and it
still looks natural just a bit brighter and better and this is the after. Since they’re professional photos, you
don’t want them to look too glamorous or touched up that can actually be
embarrassing if they’re going to be meeting with a client and in their
picture they look 40 years younger, that’s going
to be off-putting to the client. So make sure that it looks like they
look in real life but just the best version of themselves. That’s it, pretty simple! If you like this
video please subscribe to our channel and if you like our lessons and teaching
style you can check out our book Stunning Digital Photography. Thank you!

Your first travel camera and lens [Fuji x-t20 & 18-55mm f2.8-4 review]

Your first travel camera and lens [Fuji x-t20 & 18-55mm f2.8-4 review]


– Hey guys, in today’s episode I’m gonna take you
through two national parks and over 300 miles of motorcycling to bring you some photography captured specifically with some of my favorite gear for travel and adventure photography, the X-T20 and the 18-55
variable aperture zoom lens. But before we get into things I just wanted to remind everyone that next week we’ll be giving this guy, the X-T20, away, so it’s not too late to enter the drawing for that. So we’ll announce the winner to that early next week, as soon as we have our grubby paws on the new Fuji X-T3 to replace it. So anyway, look forward to that, and I hope you enjoy today’s episode. (“To the End” by Falls) Alright so you’ve got a trip planned, you’re super-excited about it, it’s something you’ve been planning for months and months. It’s gonna be special and maybe you’ve got an iPhone or a point-and-shoot of some kind but this time you think, because you want this
trip to be so special and have a special place
in those memory banks, you think maybe it’s time to invest in a camera that can really deliver something with a little bit more oomph, so you think maybe it’s
time to up your game. What camera do you choose? Well guys, the options really are endless and you’re going to get a lot of advice and opinions. But you’re here for my opinion and I definitely have opinions. I’ve done a lot of adventuring with a lot of different gear and my personal choice, right now anyway, which is end of summer, 2018, is this guy right here, the Fuji X-T20 with just one lens, the 18-55 F2.8 to F4 variable aperture image stabilized zoom lens. Now of course, Fuji is not the only manufacturer who makes a superb offering
in a small package. But for travel there are some specific reasons why I personally choose Fuji, and like all things these are all going to be controversial. Others will disagree with me and choose to leave nasty comments because, for many people, photography has become religion. To you people I say, “Watch less YouTube and take more photos.” For everybody else, let me explain why I love
Fuji for travel photography. But to do so I’m going to take you on a little photo adventure with me. I’ll give you a sampling of what this little guy can do and why I like it so much. So strap on a helmet and
let’s go take some photos. (“To the End” by Falls) So first let’s talk about why Fuji. There are several reasons why I like Fuji as a travel or adventure platform and the first and most obvious reason is the size and weight. To illustrate this I’m gonna draw in the sand here. On one hand you’ve got IQ, that’s image quality, right. And then you’ve got your continuum. And on this side we have size, I’m just gonna put S, size and weight. I guess I could put C. C for convenience. The X-T20 is right here. That’s why I love it. Over here we’ve got the GFX, or something like that, where the sensor is the size my hand. Over here we have a GoPro, a tiny tiny sensor that’s super-convenient. The X-T20’s right here where it’s pretty good image quality and really convenient. The second reason I love the X-T20 and the Fuji platform in general is the wonderful shooting experience. These are cameras that are as fun to look at as they are to shoot with. The buttons and dials provide a tactile experience that are nostalgic of a time when photography felt more pure and less processed. These cameras appeal to people who see their camera not just as a tool but also as a companion. The other the thing I really like about the X-T20 is it’s interval timer. I’m here at Canyon Overlook looking out over Zion and it’s the middle of the day. It’s not the the greatest
lighting in the world. On the other hand there is a lot of cloud movement. So that can be interesting. It can lend itself well to a time lapse where I’m not actually that interested in a photo, per se. So the X-T20 does a great job there as far as giving you a time lapse to remember your moment. The next reason love Fuji is maybe a reason that’s
a little less obvious and that is Fuji’s sublime color science. (blues music) As a brand with a strong legacy of superb film engineering, Fuji has put together not only a strong base color science but also some spectacular film-like color profiles for JPEG shooting that after years of shooting I personally feel can’t be rivaled. And I know this brings up a whole can of worms, this whole discussion on JPEG verses RAW which is the stupidest argument ever. Those us who don’t mind shooting in JPEG know when and why we do it. For me personally I love shooting in JPEG on Fuji when I’m traveling because those photos come out spectacular straight out of the camera with that filmic, documentary look I know I wanted before I hit that shutter button. Look, there’s nothing
wrong with shooting RAW and spending a lot of time poring over every hue and saturation value if that’s what you love doing, but for many people that’s not why we love photography. – You’re welcome. – Yeah, thank you so much.
– I’m Bill Spencer. – Alright Bill.
– Your name is? – Andrew. – Branch?
– Uh huh. – Okay.
– Yeah. – Glad to have met you and you’re always welcome. – Thank you, thank you. Bill was nice enough to let me meander about his car cemetery. I don’t know, he calls it his junk yard. I could spend all day here. Seriously, this is like my photographic heaven. Guys it’s the act of photographing and documenting a place-time that is most significant. It’s far more important than what RAW photo editor you use, and as far as color is concerned I don’t mind trusting that job to the hands of color scientists who’ve spent decades perfecting a pleasing set of defaults to work from. Fuji really has nailed it, and so many others, in
comparison, haven’t. With many other brands it feels like their attention to JPEG color profiles are an afterthought at best or gimmicky at worst. So I realize, at the end of the day, that color is going to be something that is personal. It comes down to personal preference. But again, you came to me, and I’m just gonna give
you my personal opinion. The third reason that I love shooting Fuji, third, fourth? I don’t remember what, I don’t know number we’re on. But, it’s the lenses. If you need a system that’s going to give you But the reason, but the reason I like Fuji lenses as opposed to all the others is that they’re small and Fuji’s invested heavily in trying to build sublime top quality glass in a small package, that APSC package. And they nailed it. The sharpness, the build quality, the color, the contrast, the ease of use. Fuji’s high-end APSC lenses are probably the most important reason why I don’t ever want to switch away no matter how many advances in camera body technology
Sony makes, for instance. It’s those small, spectacular Fuji lenses that keep me from selling it all and jumping ship like so many other people. This is beautiful, by the way, right here. But anyway, this lens is is no different. Maybe it’s not considered by some to be a pro lens, but I use it for pro level stuff as well as travel and I have no issues with it at all. (chill electronic music) Guys, this is Fuji’s kit zoom lens, and in the world of photography the kit lens typically has serious negative connotations. It implies low quality,
beginner photography. That stop-gap choice you pick up until you can afford the really good lenses, quote unquote. If you look back at the video where I first tried this lens, I wasn’t even sure at that point if I wanted to keep it or not. But a year has passed and I have to say this lens has been on my camera body as much as any of my pro lenses have. Some of my favorite photos came with this lens. There’s several really
good reasons for that but I’ll have to tell
you about those tomorrow because it’s after sunset and I don’t know where
I’m staying tonight. I need to find someplace to stay. So, talk to you tomorrow. 5:45 AM. The way I feel inside right now, this is why I could never be a full-time landscape photographer. But this morning I’m
doin’ it for you guys. So let’s go to Bryce Canyon. (motorcycle starting) As a lazy landscape photographer, the thing I really love about Bryce Canyon is that you can just drive up and get out and walk a few hundred feet and you’re there at
these spectacular vistas. None of this fussing about with hiking and, naw, none of that. Now last night I was talking about this lens. And I have a few things to say about it but first I wanna say that if you’re new to photography, for more general use I would strongly recommend actually sticking to a prime lens or two. Prime lenses are important for beginners. They teach you more about composition than you can ever hope to learn by zooming around with a zoom lens. But having said that, for travel, it’s really hard to have
the flexibility you need with a fixed focal length. There are people who are really attracted to the Fuji X100 series, for instance, that have these fixed
23 millimeter lenses. And in all fairness, those are very attractive and very small devices, but when I traveled with those guys I felt like I was missing a lot of shots, that reach that I needed, that a zoom lens can provide to really get what I was after. So, I mean, if you’re
doing a lot of travel I’d say don’t give in to the draw and the romance of the X100 series before you’ve tried this system. When your traveling you just never know what sort of scene you’re gonna want to capture, and this lens provides you with enough flexibility to capture it. (chill electronic music) Of course there are wider Fuji lenses and some will say these are better for
landscape photography, but for those times I find it works great to just a stitch several shots together into a panoramic. As long as you have a
tripod or steady hands there really is no need
for a super-wide lens. What I did not realize is we’re about, I don’t know if you can see that, you probably can’t. We are about half way from where I stayed the night and where I would like to go, and I did not realize this, but apparently, the pavement ends. (blues music) It looks like I’ve happened upon some sort of motorcycle
event or something. Might as well get some shots while I’m here, I guess. So I mean, it’s not a sports action camera and lens by any stretch of imagination, but, I mean, on the other hand, it did okay, you know. Continuous autofocus
on the XT20’s not bad. I just love the
versatility of this camera. It can do just about
anything you need it to, in a pinch. A lot of people will say, well it doesn’t have a
wide enough aperture, you can’t really get that strong bokeh. That’s definitely true. It’s not going to compete with the 1.4, or even 1.2, of other Fuji prime lenses as far as getting that blurred, out-of-focus background for that really nice subject separation. But on the other hand, in travel photography you rarely need that level of separation. In fact, often, you want everything to be a focus. But if you really want bokeh the trick is to zoom out fully to that 55 millimeter max focal length and they get as close as possible, keeping your subject in frame. This will maximize the bokeh ability of the lens and sensor. (“To the End” by Falls) The other thing I like about this lens is that it has image stabilization. That means that you can get sharper images at lower shutter speeds. It also makes this lens perfect for video. And when I travel it’s nice to be able
to capture video also. The other thing about
video and this platform, is it has this little auto mode that’s meant probably for beginners, which is nice if you
happen to be a beginner. You don’t want to fuss about with all the various dials and what not that are associated
with shooting manually. Since I’m a vlogger I like to be able to, if I’m shooting normally, I’ve got everything set up for video or for photo stills for cinematic settings, ideal for the the correct
frame rate and shutter speed. But if I want to pull that camera around and start videoing myself I don’t want to have to worry about getting the exposure wrong. And you know what, if I’m filming myself it’s not as important that those cinematic type
settings are in place. So I just flip it onto auto mode and turn it around and I can vlog and not have to worry so much about if my exposure is locked in just right because I can’t see this screen. So guys those are all the reasons that I can think of right now why I like this set up. I sort of like it, if you can’t tell, and I highly recommend it to you for your next vacation experience. If you’ve enjoyed coming along with me consider subscribing and definitely check out my other videos on my motorcycle photography adventure. In the meantime, remember: Kindness before cameras. We’ll talk to you again real soon.