How to Do Water Drop Photography | Testing the MIOPS Splash Kit

How to Do Water Drop Photography | Testing the MIOPS Splash Kit


Hi I’m Adam and welcome to first man
photography today we are going to be doing some very interesting photography
something you could easily try at home especially during this period of very
wet weather that we’re having here in the UK if you don’t want to get out and
do landscape photography outdoors then getting into a bit of macro photography
a bit of water drop photography in your home in the dry where it’s comfortable
warm then this is the video for you we’re going to specifically today be
testing out the miops water kits or what a splash kit whatever they want to call
it I’ve generally used the splash up to kit which is what I’ve created all my
water drops with miops has really been picking up a bit of attention a lot of
people have asked me about it so I’ve gone ahead and bought the kit to test it
out myself and just see how it does basically so what we’ll do is we’ll get
set up I’ll show you a few bits and pieces of how we do water drop
photography we’ll put that miops system to the test to produce some interesting
images hopefully then do a little bit of post-processing with a few really nice
tips for your post-processing in there as well and then we’ll hopefully be able
to create a really nice final print at the end of it so without further ado
let’s get set up and then do some water off photography right let’s go Right i am all set up with the miops splash
kits on here it does come with this sort of clump that you can attach to a tripod
which is quite handy but I’ve got it set up attached to this clump standard with
what Ostroff photography it is important obviously to have a
camera and a macro lens is what is going to allow you to get in close enough to
fill your frame with those water drops you can really use a kit lens you might
have to try get your camera a bit closer and then crop in in post-production but
a macro lens is really gonna help it’s pretty much vital then to use a flash
for this I’ve got this relatively cheap flash trigger attached to the top of my
camera and then some wireless triggers on on the flashes themselves I’ve got a
two flash set up here one here which is going to light up the water drop and
then another one just the front here which is lighting up the background
the trick with water drop photography though when it comes to your flashes is
is actually the flash that freezes the action so with your camera the settings
are very straightforward you want to have your camera set to the flash sync
speed of the camera in my case with this Canon it’s one two hundredth of a second
I then play generally around f11 and f-16 for the settings you want to be in
manual mode manual focus as well which we’ll talk about in a second with your
speed lights you want to have them in manual mode as well and they want to be
at a low power the reason for that is the low power produces a much faster
flash remember it’s that flash that’s freezing the action I’ve got this one at
the front set at 160 fourth power and background once sets and 1/128 a fairly
low powered self up to my ISO to 640 and that’s giving me a nice bright clear
image so when it comes to focus you want to start getting your drop
going which I have done already here with the my ops we’re going to pop it
into AV mode for a second and get our pencil and fired the water drop it off
like that and then just place the pencil into the water where the drop is hitting
the surface like that and then we go to our camera and we want to manual focus
on to that pencil just high Matt that’s looking pretty good
and we’re pretty much ready to shoot I’m going to play around with a few things
today we’re going to start off though with plain water because I’ve literally
never used this miops before and I have heard there are a few people out there
that say you can’t use anything thicker than water now adding xanthan gum to
your water drop mixture is pretty much vital to change the consistency of the
water to allow you to get those beautiful crown effects so if I can’t do
that with this system this system is definitely not going to be for me so
I’ve got it set up just with water in this in this tube at the moment I then
have a mixture of just plain water and xanthan gum mixture in the bottom so
that’s still gonna be a little bit thicker which might help me out
hopefully very plain setup to start with call us water colors bath and then a
blue background and that’s just going to give me chance to figure out how to use
the my op system so I’ve got it connected to the camera with the wire
here which sort of follows leads around into the my ops the the Bluetooth
connects to the my ups with my phone so then when I press the button the my ops
system should fire the camera off and the camera then sets the flashes off
like this they’re a world that was a big one it’s then just the case of playing
around with the my ops system on your phone that’s exactly the same as any
other system you’re essentially if you change the size of the first drop and
the size of the first drop will affect how tall your water drop is the second
one you then put a delay on so that comes out a moment later and you want it
to the first stop to hit the water bounce back up just as the second one is
coming down and it creates that collision so I’m just gonna play around
for a minute with this initial setup to get an idea
of how this works bike the other systems I’ve used before it is very similar in
terms of you’ve got to play around until you find what works for you and it’s
it’s different every time depending on the consistency of the wall to the
height that you’ve got the dropper above the bat so gonna play around with that
for a bit and see what happens okay there we go the red liquid with the
xanthan gum in it is now primed and it is quite thick so it’ll be interesting
to see what happens it’s still just plain water that will start to get red
as those drops come through but let’s just go with it let’s see what happens
so let’s just have a little go I definitely saw a collision on that one
didn’t capture it though so I might have to adjust the delay once you’ve got
xanthan gum in a solution as well bubbles start to form and they really
spoil the image I think so it was a good idea between each shot to just clear the
bubbles away from the surface so let’s just go with a few more and some see in
the collision so I map captured a really nice one there so we look about again
yeah nice stem nice collision so just keep fire in another one there yes I’m
not quite getting the height that I want so I’m going to start playing around to
introduce or make the first drop a little bit bigger which will make the
water splash up a bit more getting it to fill my frame now I do like the miops drop system but
I do have a couple of reservations that I don’t think you have with this part –
the main one I think is the fact that this nozzle is plastic it doesn’t have
the sharp edge of the metal nozzle on a splash art – and because of that I feel
like I’m losing accuracy I get a set where I can see a water drop happening
and then if something different happens every single time now that does happen
on the splash art – as well but the consistency of the drops is is not as
good with this and that’s my big bug bear really having said that I am still
getting some collisions so it is still working and it is cheaper than the
splash car – as well so and I quite like the setup with the tube it’s quite easy
to sort of set up and use and it does work relatively well with the app but
the app is my other bug bear because although it works well the system does
what really well it was easy to set up you can have three or four drops as well
which can just increase your levels of creativity however not having that
physical unit to control the walls drops which I have on the splash art – just I
feel like I’m losing a bit of that ability to react instinctively almost so
I’ve got to go into the app into the menu change the drop size I change the
delay whereas on this brush actually I can just use the knobs without looking
at it you know I feel I’m losing a bit of speed but that’s probably something
that not most people are gonna be bothered with I don’t know and but I am
still getting some results it’s just taking a little bit longer this is
obviously my first go with this system as well so I think it will improve as I
become more familiar with it I’m enjoying usually though it’s just the
same as any time you do was drop photography can be frustrating but I do
feel like that plastic nozzle is holding me back if we could have a metal one I
think I’d be really happy with it it’s a thing that would increase the level of
consistency of the drops which is what you need to then make the adjustments
so I’m just gonna keep having to play until I get a shot now I’m happy with
and then we’ll head back up to the office to post process and image so
after a water drop photography shoot one of my favorite things is getting them
back on the big screen because it’s at that point that you first get to feel
the impact of what you have created now on this occasion using the miles I just
have not had the consistency that I’m used to
now all the time with water drop photography I’m probably getting about
10% of my images this are somewhat usable there is you shoot a lot of
frames and don’t get very much back in return just because of the nature of the
water and how it works and stuff but today we can look down the screen here
and there really isn’t all that many shots that are usable so I’m just gonna
flag the ones that I feel are somewhat usable it’s just have a very brief look
at them that one yeah it’s pretty nice not quite in focus maybe yeah I mean
that’s okay but you can see how when you don’t have the solution in the other the
xanthan gum in there you get these drops spraying off all over the place I think
you lose a bit of the detail and the overall symmetry and smoothness to it
with that one I do like that one that’s quite an interesting one yeah that’s
quite nice this one is really interesting but I don’t like it going
off the top of the screen that one’s okay I quite like that one is too close
to the top of the frame that one’s quite interesting actually
it’s nice colors in that one I’ve edited that a little bit but look at that
bubble just for me that absolutely ruins it it just pulls too much attention away
from where I want your attention to be which is on the wall to drop personally
that’s a deal breaker for me I quite like that one but it’s not quite right
this one I think is probably the winner so let’s bring that up that’s that’s
looking pretty good it’s a nice shape it’s an interesting shape it’s just not
quite tall enough though that’s the thing
I must prefer it when it fills the frame and with the macro lens you can do that
if you can get that drop to go up high enough but we’re just gonna crop it on
this occasion because it’s still gonna work quite well
and this would be similar if you are using a kit lens or a 24 to 17 melons so
let’s just bring up the crop tool very quickly and just get it down to
something that’s gonna fill the frame something like that and that immediately
looks really really nice in terms of composition that’s the sort of shot I
want I’m just gonna drag it up from the bottom because you can see the edge of
the dish just a touch so I’m gonna crop some of that out as well and that still
looks really nice nice and clean nice shape all around that’s the kind of
image that I love when it comes to water drop photography all right let’s go
through it very quickly and make some very quick adjustments now a top tip
when you’re editing any image if particularly if you’re in the rain or
you have a bit of water around and you’re getting little spots on your lens
they’re very easy to take out with the spot removal tool now you just hit the
spot removal tool up here or you can hit Q on your keyboard as a shortcut and
sometimes they can be quite difficult to see but if we’re going for a little bit
of perfection in our post-processing all you need to do is take the da’s
slider and just pull it to 100% and that what that does is allowing you to see
the spots a lot easier so you like this one up here now we can just really
easily and really quickly get rid of all of them I’m not might not get them all
during this little bit couple of drops there and yeah that doesn’t look too bad
one or two more just like that and there we go right now all you need to do is
just reset the D haze and there we go nice clean image for you so now I’m just
gonna make a few changes contrast boost always works really really well and then
we can just add a touch of clarity in as well and then drag the highlights down
just a touch shadows up a little bit just to raise these black areas here I’m
just going to drag the white balance down a little bit here you’ve got so
much control over your color with wastrel photography I’m gonna give it a
little vibrance boost a little saturation boost as well hit hue and I
just want to change that blue color a little bit more not that way but I want
to make it a little bit darker like that then go to luminance
on the blue and just bring the brightness of that blue down a touch and
that now looks really really good just briefly on the image I would prefer it
if this edge of this water drop was a little bit smoother see these little
notches here that’s because the the consistency of the actual liquid was not
as thick as I would have liked but as I was putting thicker and thicker liquid
into the miops it was just it couldn’t handle it and I think it’s because of
that plastic nozzle if you imagine the edge of a cup or a pan if you pour it
out in the edge is really curved and smooth you end up getting drips all over
the place if you’ve got a sharp bit of metal or something like that it comes
out it’s much easier to pour and that’s I think that’s the same with this water
dropper for the splash art see with this metal sharp metal nozzle it seems to
just work better with the thicker liquids but I can’t complain it’s a nice
image that’s what I’m now going to print so I’ll just get that set up for a print
every time I print my water drops I will just add in a third of a stop or
something of exposure to compensate for the loss of backlight on the screen and
that usually works out as a really nice print so I’m gonna go ahead and print
that and we’ll take a look at that in a second here we go the print is done and I think
that looks really and rather nice it’s always just so nice to see your images
printed out and particularly water drop photography because like I said earlier
it’s just like it’s the sort of thing that hardly anyone has seen before
overall impressions of the miops splash kits is this it’s got some pros and some
cons the pros are that it’s a really quite straightforward bit kit to use and
it’s also one of the cheapest on and now probably the most well no splash kits on
the market and you can produce some really nice images with it the app also
I think just a very simple redesign to have all those controls just on a dial
on a single screen so I can make fine adjustments really quickly would make a
huge world of difference so yeah over armed I do enjoy the kit but I just like
to see a couple little tweaks to it to really make it as good as anything else
on the market so that’s my overall impression of it I will put a link to it
down below along with the kit that I normally use to give you an opportunity
to compare those two things if you’re considering making the purchase if you
are going to buy the miops kit I would recommend you buy it from Amazon because
I bought it directly from my ops it was slightly more expensive particularly for
the cables I also ended up having to pay import tax and that cost me about
another 30 pounds or something so and then also make sure you check out the
raw room subscription to really get into that water drop photography masterclass
it’s very different to anything I’ve put on YouTube is – about two and a half
hours of in-depth content there’s about nine chapters covering everything from
how to make the solution and how to shoot the shoot it with a very basic set
of where you don’t need any splash kids and then also using the splash art –
kids where we get right into it in detail I think you will love it so if
you head to the link down below check out the raw rim for $5.99 a month you
can subscribe you can cancel at any time you have a full water drop photography
to class landscape photography masterclass and loads of other tutorials
that I’m putting up all the time so please do check it out if you want to
know more also check out my other wall strop videos if you’ve never seen them
before and I’ll see you on another video very very soon I’ve got another one
coming out on Tuesday actually which I’m excited about this week and extra video
for you so hope to see you then I’m Adam this is first man photography out

Speedlight vs Monolight on Location: Take and Make Great Photography with Gavin Hoey

Speedlight vs Monolight on Location: Take and Make Great Photography with Gavin Hoey


in this video I take a small speed light, and see if it can shoot location flash portraits just as well as a big monolight. Hello I’m Gavin Hoey, and you’re watching AdoramaTV, brought to you by Adorama, the camera store that’s got everything for us photographers… Now whenever I do a video in my small home studio using a mono light flash, one of the most commonly asked questions is can I do exactly the same thing using a speed light? And the answer is always the same yes… yes you can absolutely, but what about on location? Well that’s a different story and in this video I’m gonna take both flashes on location, and do three very common lighting scenarios. I’m gonna use the flashes as fill flash, I’ll use them to overpower the ambient light, and finally we’ll do some high-speed sync flash. So to help me out today I’ve got the amazing Charlotte. Charlotte’s gonna be the model for this shoot, and the first look I want to do should be the easiest for both flashes.. I want to take the ambient light and add a little bit of fill flash… not too much, something fairly subtle. Now for this to work… the first thing I’m gonna do is work out what is the ambient light. So without actual flash firing, let’s just take a meter reading as such. So I’m going to come back here where I’m going to be shooting. I’ve got quite a bright sky behind me… I’m not too worried about keeping too much detail in… Charlotte’s in the shade moe… so actually everywhere is shady today, and at these settings… I’m getting about f3.5, 1/250th of a second ISO 200, the native ISO for my camera so all I need to do now is to get my flash to match those settings, now I could do this by trial and error but if you have a flash meter this is where it really pays off, so let’s just get a flash meter reading from Charlotte’s chin pointing the flash meter back at the lights and I just adjust this until it matches my camera settings… okay there we go, we’re pretty much there, that’s it perfect, okay, so I have the light matching what I need to do now is just take some photos look into the light for me Charlotte. The mono light is right down close to its lowest possible power, and the results are looking great… so I’m gonna take the same shot again, but this time I’m gonna use the speed light. So let’s get the speed light set up with the same light modifier, and we’re get it in roughly the same position, something like that, and we’ll take a meter reading and it’s the same technique. All I’m looking for… is to make sure that the flash matches my aperture… I’m right the way down at 132nd power until I get this. Right let’s take this shot… here we go Charlotte, the subtle effect I’m going for here means I’m not really stretching the power of this speed light at all, and the results look excellent. In fact when I look at the two results side-by-side, I honestly couldn’t tell you which was taken with a speed light and which was taken with a monolight. So for this setup, I want to do something much more dramatic… I want to overpower the ambient now, to do that I’m gonna run the flash at full power, and just see what sort of aperture I can get out of this flash. So we’re starting with the monolight – the Explorer 600, and it’s gonna take a meter reading from Charlotte I’m getting f/22 at full power… so I could run this at f/22 but I don’t want to run the flash at full power… because it will take longer to recycle wear the battery down… so if I bring the flash down to half power, I hit f/16, so let’s take a picture at f/16 without flash first of all… just to see how much drama I can get in the sky, which is the whole purpose of doing this.. Okay Charlotte here we go… and f/16, I’ve got some great clouds… they look excellent… but Charlotte clearly is in deep shadow. Then if I turn the flash on… well the flash has been meted for f/16…. so it should work really well, and it does, this is where the monolight should really excel. All that raw power means I get some very dramatic photos, whether you like this particular style or not. Well that’s another matter.. so now I’ve swapped it out to the speed light, I’ve got the same modifier… it’s roughly the same distance away. I’ve got it on full power… let’s see exactly how much light I can get out of this. So we were f/22 with the other light at full power… really… getting f/11… that’s really good…. f/11 it is then… so let’s take a few pictures… and see how this works actually in a real shoot… okay? here we go… Charlotte I’m gonna move around…. you know what I’m really surprised at what this little speed light is doing… yes I’m at full power so the recycle time isn’t brilliant but it is powered by a lithium battery, so it’s not too bad either… side by side I actually prefer the speed light picture, but of course the monolight gives me more flexibility. I can also match the speed light settings but at a lower flash power, less consumption of battery, faster recycle time, and so on. So for the final setup we’re gonna do perhaps the most challenging thing for any flash, and that’s high speed sync flash, now you might have thought that the last setup, overpowering the ambient was for high speed sync type work… but no high speed sync is not for that because of how it works… it strobes the light rapidly, meaning you get less power out of the lights… High speed sync flash is for a shallow depth-of-field, so I’ve switched to my 25mm f/1.2, and I want to shoot to f/1.2, so I’m going to turn the flash off first of all. I’m going to dial in f/1.2, I’m gonna go with my flash sync speed of 1/250th of a second and take a picture of Charlotte, and just see what I get at those settings… Charlotte, don’t turn it… face me, great, here we go and at those settings Charlotte looks really well exposed, but that sky the background, everything is really blown out… so I want to try and retain the detail in the background… let’s try 4,000th of a second, see how that looks… Here we go… so now I have a nice amount of detail in the background, I have a good sky it’s not blown out but Charlotte is clearly underexposed, and that’s where the flash comes in, and the downside of high speed sync is most flash meters won’t work…. So that’s no good for me… I have to do this by trial and error…. so let’s turn the flash on I’m gonna start to maybe a quarter power and see how this looks… here we go… quarter power- way too bright, let’s take it down to 1/16 power and that looks fantastic… okay… so let’s take a few shots like this. The monolight makes high-speed sync flash an absolute breeze… is no different to shooting with normal flash but with these amazingly shallow depth-of-field results. So once again I’ve switched it out to the speed light, I’m gonna do exactly the same high speed sync settings as I did with the monolight. I don’t think this is gonna cope, but we’ll see…. so 1/4,000 of a second I’m gonna put this to full power. It’s got to be full power I reckon, so let’s take a test shot… see what we’re getting… here we go.. but that’s…. that…. is really good – if anything it’s slightly overexposed, that’s fantastic, that means I can drop it down to half power. Okay let’s see… yeah that looks fine, I think we’re okay, I think I can actually do this with a speed light. I didn’t think that was gonna happen, but having said that, that’s just a single shot, let’s see if they can keep up with a little group of pictures in fairly quick succession. So Charlotte you ready? Okay here we go. Now of course I could easily get my flash power down by getting rid of the softbox, but that would mean much harder light on Charlotte, and that’s not really a fair comparison to the monolight. Ah okay, right, we’ve hit a snag- it stopped firing, and I think that probably means it’s overheating, which isn’t that surprising considering what I’m asking it to do… but if you’re not going to push it that hard, that’s doing really well. Now I’m back in the studio I’ve checked the files and I’ve counted a total of 18 flashes before the speed lights stopped working, but having said that, the little speed light didn’t just suddenly stop…. in fact what happens is the recycle time becomes much much longer, to the point aswhere it is pretty much unusable and as a result if you’ve got lots of high-speed sync flash work to do on location – you’re better off with a mono light… all of this however is dependent on some variables… how far my flash was from the subject… the amount of ambient light that was there on the day, and of course my softbox would all affect the results… saying that if you’ve enjoyed this video… or you’ve got any questions, leave me a comment below. Click on the bell icon to get regular notifications of all the brand new videos right here on AdoramaTV… and of course click on that subscribe button… I’m Gavin Hoey – thanks for watching.

Composition In Photography – Get BETTER fast!

Composition In Photography – Get BETTER fast!


today I’m gonna talk about composition
and I will give you five ways how to improve your composition fast hi there I’m Peter fours got an old
positioner and a professional photographer from Helsinki Finland and
before we start talking about composition please consider subscribing
to my channel and hit that Bell so get notified when there is a new video
online my channel is all about you getting to be a better photographer and
about Olympus gear and remember I post two videos a week usually on Tuesdays
and on Fridays but let’s start to talk about composition first we need to talk
about what does composition mean and why it is so important and I will quote
myself from a book that I wrote in 2004 it’s called a good photograph and I
wrote this is say this this book is written and finished but this is a
translation of what I wrote about composition in that book let’s see with
composition we try to set the elements in the photograph so that it will make
our subject in the center of our attention well a simple word it just
means that we make the conversation so that our subject is in the middle of our
attention well it’s actually the same thing that I already said but that’s
that’s the simple simple and shortest way to say it and there’s always say
that you have these composition rules but actually there are no rules these
composition methods or ways of making the conversation is just formed because
those are the ways that we like and when we pick up photographs we tend to like
photographs with day let’s say with a golden ratio or a rule of thirds which
is quite close or I will get back to back to those terms later in the video
but it’s just something that our eyes naturally like I don’t know it’s been
for ages like golden ratios been for ages we have old paintings that are the
composition is like golden ratio and that’s just something that we’re used to
and we are kind of like learned that it’s right nobody has set the rules in a
way that’s why it’s kind of funny to say about rules because usually rules are
set by some some authority says that this is good but that’s not the true or
that’s not the case with with making compositions but let’s start with the
number one use rule of thirds and remember when I talk about the rule of
thirds it also applies to golden ratio they are very close to each other so I
don’t have a special tip about golden ratio but it works the same way as rule
of thirds we don’t want to put the horizon necessarily in the middle of the
photograph we might want to have it in you know two thirds from up or two
thirds from the bottom it all depends on what’s more interesting the foreground
the ground the water whatever is in the foreground or the sky it all depends on
that then what we want to tell it will make the composition show that there is
more space in the sky usually the photograph looks more open it but on the
other hand if we concentrate on the ground on the foreground on the on the
sea in the front of that it makes image more closed and of course that’s another
way but as I said the main thing is that which one is more important if we have a
beautiful sky then we might lower the horizon to be in the bottom of the of
the frame and then of course if there is something really interesting in the
foreground we do the opposite in rule of thirds you try to set your main subject
on these points and a pro tip for making the
conversation with the camera in many cameras you can set grid lines to your
viewfinder or LCD and in olympus those can be find in special menu D it might
be a special menu d3 it depends on the camera that you have and there are
several different options that you can choose from and said the grid line that
you need I usually use this ones because this is pretty close to golden ratio and
it’s actually a rule of thirds and then number 2 symmetry we in symmetry we try
to put everything in the middle so that it’s kind of like if you would put a
line and make a kind of like a mirror image to the other side it would be
almost the same that you have the attention in the middle of the frame and
that’s a really powerful way also but remember sometimes doing a symmetrical
can be a bit boring but used nicely it will make a difference and it will look
good both of these two that I already said the rule of thirds and the symmetry
uses in many cases so-called leading lines the leading lines are lines that
will guide the viewers eye to the main subject of the image what I like about
leading lines is that it really helps the viewer to see what’s important in
your image and what are you what is your intentions that you want to show to the
viewer we want to draw our viewer attention to the things that we want
that’s why making a great composition or making the composition so that you think
what the viewers are looking and what you are or what you want them to look at
also and that’s why it’s really important to understand a good
composition and what it means experiment with these you know rule of thirds and
symmetry are a bit opposite but try to experiment with the different ways of
making me making the composition in your image which one you use actually more
symmetry or rule of thirds take a look at your images and see what is your way
of doing because either one of these is right or wrong it just depends on what
you want to tell the viewer and then number three using foreground
having something in the foreground is a great way of making the composition
there are two main things that or why this is very very good way the first one
is that you frame the subject the elements that you have in the image it
can be a tree it can be some constructions it can be some shapes in
the in the environment in the in the scene usually in the cities you can have
always you can’t always you have corridors you got tunnels whatever you
have that is a frame in your image and also if you have the frame in the
foreground it will give the image some depth you will have a foreground you
have will have the subject or the mid part then you will have the background
you will have kind of like three layers which makes the two-dimensional space
more 3d and that will make the image more interesting so try to make so that
you have something in the foreground in your image and this does not mean that
this for using foreground elements is something different from symmetry or
rule of thirds you can still use the front element in both of those symmetry
or rule of thirds it will make those images two more interesting because it
will give the a bit of more depth to the images so do you that you have the 3d
three-dimensional feeling of the image and then number four is framing which we
actually already covered a bit but framing is something that you can draw
your attention more closely to your subject put something around the subject
and it will draw attention immediately and leading lines is also a very
important thing in that so the lines leads to the frame and then you have the
subject inside the frame and as I said earlier you can combine all these
different tips and this one also framing and foreground they are closely together
you can use the frame in foreground or you can use it somewhere in the middle
of the image but just put your subject inside the frame and the frame as I said
already can be you know a tree can be a a door can be a doorway or or whatever
and then of course you can use the leading lines to guide your viewers
eye to your subject which is inside the frame so you have many different ways of
making the composition and combining several different tips so this is not easy actually it’s it’s
easier it’s actually hard to say how to explain that but it’s also quite hard to
make this does some practices I already said experiment and try different things
and and don’t just grab the image but quickly but just you know so walk around
the thing and look what’s in the background and are there any things that
you could use as a frame there are lots a lots of things especially in cities
you have lots and lots of things that can frame your subject and before we get
into the fifth one yes there will be number six too but the first one is
light light is very important in photographs without light there won’t be
any photographs the word photography comes from the Greek language and means
drawing with light so always look for the light and light is also a very
important part of making the composition because when we look at the photograph
the first thing we see usually is the lighter part of the image so try to have
your main subject be the most light lightest thing in the in the frame
that’s where our eye is heading but of course if you have totally white
background then our eyes will look for the darker areas so but in may in many
cases you don’t have a pitch a pitch black you should pitch black I was
talking about white background so remember that we tend to see the light
part of the image first and this is also very important when we do
post-production in our images try to always make so that if you know if you
cannot make it at the location so that the the lighter part of your image is
just object you place the subject on the latter part of the image then you can
try to do that in post make your subject a bit lighter and darken the background
that will help a lot to draw your viewers eye to the to your subject so
that we will have the attention on the subject and that will help you make the
composition and usually it also makes the image look a bit better when you
have different shades of black and white shadows and highlights
when I say black and white I mean hideouts and shadows of course and
that’s really important and that’s something that you need to understand
when you do post-production that’s I think that’s one of the starting points
and then of course cropping is another thing you might want to crop and
fine-tune your cropping in post to I don’t think there was nothing wrong with
cropping your images in posts but of course if you can do the perfect
composition in location it’s fine it’s of course it’s better but nothing wrong
with cropping your image if if the cropping makes it better then just do it
and remember you also have gridlines in Lightroom you have a different options
to choose from these are very handy if you want to crop your image afterwards
that will help you to make the perfect composition to your image and then we
have the last one number six and this is break all the rules that I’ve just said
yeah I know this might find a little contradictory but that is something if
we do everything by the book and so the less I was staying up talking about the
rules and we do everything like that the problem is that most likely your image
is going to be a bit boring if you do everything by the book having something
that breaks the rule a bit something that is a bit distracting in your image
something that it’s wrong usually makes it a lot lot better it’s more
interesting because it starts to bother the viewer and it can really it’s it’s
just not a pretty image you start looking at it because there’s something
wrong with the image and I think it’s it’s really hard to explain but that is
something that you really should start doing and thinking about that break the
rules and make the images more interesting and that something also is
important when you’re breaking the rules you need to have a feeling that we’re
telling a story with by breaking the rules they’re more likely to be a story
people start thinking why that thing is there and why is this person like this
or why is the thing right there because it’s ruining the image and people are
starting questions and that’s why it is really really hard to what the judge
images because when you’re breaking the rules
it’s kind of wrong but then the might the the image might be a lot more
interesting start mastering your composition and you’re happy with them
then start breaking the rules but of course breaking the rules by accident is
not the way you need to learn the right way first and after that you can you can
start breaking the rules and start making your images more interesting but
that is something that you should start thinking about and start improving your
photography that way that learn the basics and then break the basic rules
and you will get a lot better and your images will be a lot more interesting
and you might want to watch these videos next this is a playlist of different
photo techniques and then we have videos about the brand new if I mark 3 if you
haven’t watched those I recommend watching both of these playlists
there are lots and lots of good stuff about photography and about cameras ok
thanks for watching and bye for now

Juggling Cameras! One Handed Wildlife Photography

Juggling Cameras! One Handed Wildlife Photography


I’m on a very busy bridge but look at
this view it is so beautiful! Hi everyone! Another one of my favourite
local landscapes… Hendrie Valley Preserve. There are lots and lots of small
woodland creatures here. This is where I got an image of an owl the last time I
was here but today it’s just this beautiful fall color, chipmunks and squirrels.
I’m just in the mood to capture some images of the animals getting ready for
winter. So I’ve got on my 70 to 300 lens and ISO
800. I’m at – 0.5 of an exposure value. It’ll give me a slightly faster shutter
speed and I think it’s fine. It’s going to be easy to work with. The animals are
everywhere here but it does help to stop and take a second and look around. So I have to say there’s not as many little
creatures on the path today. They may already have found success looking for
their winter food but I think we’ll find them. There was this big fat blue jay. He
landed right in front of me. It was amazing. I was almost all set to take a
picture and yeah my focus was not where I wanted it to be and I missed it. Also a
big group of kids came running running down the path really enjoying themselves
which is awesome but… Oh there’s a squirrel I wonder if he wants to be friendly. I’m reaching the boardwalk. It is just
beautiful. There are always so many different types of birds here. It’s just
gorgeous. The Ducks among the reeds are really
neat. They’re always swimming around here. The funky coloured duck is called a wood
duck and it looks like his mate is there. She’s not quite as bright. I’m guessing
that would be his mate. And there are swans among them. It’s really cool. In the fall you’ll find a lot of
pumpkins around here but this is so neat! It looks like they light them up along
the path. Just gorgeous! One of the pumpkins is carved with “Will you?” and I
think it means, “Will you marry me?” How awesome! These little birds love the
pumpkins. They’re actually nibbling on them and eating them. It’s so neat.
So they’re landing very close to me. I think one might have tried to land on my
hat and oh it’s just it’s so great! I love it. I’m still on ISO 800… Same settings I told you before and yeah I just have to
remember to keep it off of the two second timer. Somebody told me that there’s
a heron. If I continue on this path I’ll get to the water and there’s a heron.
We’ll see. This is just beautiful. The ducks are
posing. Look at this! The reflections of the fall colours in this pond. It’s just
gorgeous! I don’t see a heron but that’s okay. It’s just beautiful. So I didn’t see as many animals today as
I expected but the ones I did see were so cool. Speaking of which, there’s one
right above me. They’re beautiful. They’re all very friendly. They’re used
to being fed and they’ll come right up to you. They’ll land on your hand and yes
I’ve been here before. The bonus of today is the gorgeous fall colour, the pumpkins
along the walk, and having you with me. The hardest part about doing this kind
of photography is… well for me anyway, is trying to video in one hand, take
pictures in the other. So as I said I have ISO 800 and I’m going for the
fastest shutter speed I can because I’m moving around and I’m climbing a big
hill! Whooo! So yeah I need that fast shutter speed and I need to be able to juggle
with two hands but it’s totally worth it. It’s all cool. Sometimes I capture the
image. Sometimes I capture the animal. Sometimes I capture neither but it’s
okay because I’m out here and I’m really really enjoying this. Oh, so much to see!

What is ISO in camera and ISO Settings photography tutorial

What is ISO in camera and ISO Settings photography tutorial


Hello Guys You may be wondering why I have small mugs with me today. do not be surprised, it’s an important memory
of my past. You must have seen, some numbers printed on this mug So, In this video I will discuss about these
numbers. When we shoot with film cameras in our old
days, We kept several films of different numbers
in our camera kit. And in different lighting conditions, different
films used to suit the requirements. I prsonally used Fuji Velvia, Sensia and Provia
. 50 printed on Velvia Sensia & Provia come with 100 to 400 numbers Actually Actually these numbers are represented to
ISO. One of the three pillars of photography that
can dramatically affect on your images is camera ISO . the other two being shutter and aperture. In this video of Photography Basics part-III. I will explain ISO . by using simple examples so that you can make the most of it. for your own photography. In very basic terms, ISO is simply a camera setting that will brighten or darken a photo. As you increase your ISO number, your photos
will grow progressively brighter. So, ISO is a good tool to capture images in
dark environments However, increasing ISO has consequences. A photo taken at too high of an ISO will show a lot of grain , also known as noise. In the days of film, as you used film with
higher ISO values, your images had more visible grain. You can easily seen this pictures. In digital cameras, raising the ISO means a similar decrease in quality, as a result
increase grains that called “noise.” The difference is clear in these two pictures the image at ISO 10000 has much more noise
than the one at ISO 100 . This is why you should avoid high ISOs whenever possible, unless conditions require you to use them Every camera has a different range of ISO
values or ISO speeds You can see values of ISO in picture, ISO
100 Low ISO, 200 400 800 1600 3200 6400 12800 High ISO So, a photo at ISO 400 will be twice brighter than ISO 200, which will be twice brighter than ISO 100. You can see as I raised ISO 100 to 200 Picture has brighter than ISO 100 photo So the same way as I raised it 200 to 400,
picture has mre brighter than 200 photo. You can also see the difference of the levels
in histogram showing here , The pictures we took at 100 200 and 400 ISO Changing your ISO varies from camera to camera. For entry-level DSLRs and mirrorless cameras, you probably need to open a menu and find
the section for ISO. Select the value you want, or set it to Auto. For higher-end cameras, there may be a dedicated
“ISO” button on the camera. Press it while spinning one of the wheels
to change your ISO setting. Turning on that feature allows the camera
to push the ISO up. when it decides the shutter speed is getting
too low for a good picture. Even better, newer new cameras have added “ISO Sensitivity
Auto Control” to the menu choices. ISO will increase or decrease automatically
according to lighting condition even on manual mode. You can see the menu of my Nikon Camera , where I selected ISO Sensitivity Auto and
displaying ISO-Auto. On display panel Here are some ISO sensitivity settings that
I will discuss in my next coming advance video on ISO Till then you can ask me anytime in comment section below.I will be pleased to answer And I am requesting you please share your ideas So, I can create those videos that you want to like to watch If you like my video don’t forget to subscribe my channel And click on bell.

How to take your best black and white photos – a beginners guide to photography

How to take your best black and white photos – a beginners guide to photography


Today we’re going to talk about one of the
most important things you can do to improve the quality of your black and white photographs.
This one simple technique is probably something that really catches your eye in a lot of black
and white photographs and once you learn it we think you’ll see it everywhere. Hi photographers! Welcome to Easy Camera Lessons. We’ve designed
these tips to help you with your everyday photograpy with the things that you love to
photograph. Someone told me when we were first starting
this channel that there’s two types of YouTubers, the ones that stay in their room and the ones
that get out and about. We really hope that going to these different locations is helping
you to think about all the situations you can be in with your camera. G’day! In every single black and white photograph
there’s going to be a range of tones. We have blacks at one end and whites at the other
and everything in between. If we look at this scene, this section here is really black.
But maybe up in the distance there’s a lighter grey, and other different greys all throughout
the scene. Let’s illustrate what we mean by tones with
a simple experiment. This rock here is a very similar tone to the sand behind it. There’s
very little contrast between the background and the rock. When we swap the rock with a
black rock there’s a very different tone between the grey of the sand and the black of the
rock. And what this does is create contrast, and that’s what we want to be looking for
in our black and white photographs. So next time you’re taking your black and
white photographs just have a look at your scene before you take it and think “is there
something in this scene that’s really dark, and something that’s really bright?” And that’s
going to create more contrast. We would love to see your black and white
photographs on Instagram so tag them #ECLbw and that will share them in to a feed that
everybody can see and like and comment on. If you’d like to receive these YouTube videos
in your inbox every week, just to remind you, you can go to our website at EasyCameraLessons.com
and just pop in your email, and we’ll send you out an email with the video. We’ve also just started a Facebook sharing
page that’s closed group, that only Easy Camera Lesson photographers can join, so you can
share your photos in there and get any comments, you know, if you’re not ready to share them
in a public place yet, you can pop them in there and, you know, it’s a constructive place
where people can encourage you, and say “Good job!” See you next week!

This Cheap Cinema Projector LENS Will Make your Jaw Drop

This Cheap Cinema Projector LENS Will Make your Jaw Drop


This lens was made in Germany and it
was for 35-millimeter cinema projectors like this kind of huge cinema
projector in this episode we will see how to adapt this lens on a mirrorless
camera and use it as a photo and video lens this lens is sold around $100 right
now on eBay and as almost all projector lenses it has no diaphragm so you are
forced to shoot at f/2 all the time The main problem with this lens is that
there no official way to adapt it so I had to do some Frankenstein work and
create my own adapter after some testing I found out that the back of the lens
fits almost perfectly inside this old helios 44 empty body all I had to do was
to add some rubber bands to make it stay firmly in place and finally I plugged
the thing into an M 42 flat adapter to get the Infinity focus for all my rubber needs I use an old bike inner tire That I simply cut with scissors the
rubbers are really strong and black so it’s perfect to create some
do-it-yourself lenses because the lens only aperture is f2 there is a lot of
light coming in and colors are very well defined there’s something vibrant and artistic
to the color redition and not only because I shot the test in
the museum the lens is extremely sharp in the
center making it a great tool for capturing details for example the details in the building
structure are very well defined even at f/2 and still the environment is not
overexposed you can see here that the corners of the lens are way more soft
but they do not vignette and that’s a plus at f/2 even in the dark museum
environment the lens delivers a clean image without rising the ISOS because the center of the image is so
sharp portraits are just amazing so the background is not as melted as if
it was an f1.4 lens but still it’s easily the subject in a very
organic way as I already mentioned in previous episodes projector lenses are a
true secret treasure that get you some amazing quality for really cheap all you
need is to learn to adapt them and work on your manual focusing you can check in
the description links to the other projector lenses I reviewed before and
you can also visit the weird lens museum for free right now so don’t forget to
subscribe to get the new episode follow me on Instagram to check my weird
experiments and I see you real soon bye you

How to use 3 speedlights for an editorial beauty shoot

How to use 3 speedlights for an editorial beauty shoot


Hey guys welcome to a new video here on phloshop
my name is Joseph. In today’s video we’re going to be talking
about shooting a 3 light beauty editorial with speed lights.
If you think it’s something you’d be interested in kindly stay till the end of the video. Let’s roll the intro. So today we’d be shooting a 3 light beauty
editorial with speed lights with Najat and we have Coffee Session styling and art directing.
We also have Joseph on the makeup. canvasbackdrops. Was supportive enough to
send us a few hand painted backdrop samples to use for the shoot and we chose this warm
toned colour as it complemented the look we were going for. I will put their links in the video so you
can check them out. let’s just jump right into the shoot. I’m using my Canon 6D mark 1,
3 Godox speed lights A 120cm octabox from Fotodiox as the main
Modifier In front of the model positioned slightly to the camera left
A 71cm octabox also from Fotodiox as the rim light placed behind the model and shifted
to camera right to add some separation. In order to add even more separation we added
a 3rd light right behind the model with a grid on it directed towards the backdrop.
That created a bright point or hotspot and graduated towards the edges, adding depth
to the image. We wanted a bit of a fiery look hence the
choice of the warm colours ranging from the headgear, lipstick, background and maybe the
tube. I’m not sure how the final crop would be like but if i would include more of the
chest then I’ll change the colour of the tube to a slightly warmer colour or leave
it as it is. It would depend on my mood when I’m post processing the image. Subscribe to my channel and turn on the notifications
icon so you’re notified when I release the videos on how I retouch these images. I’ll
also put a link in the description of that video that leads to the raw file of the image
I edit so u can follow along so be sure to like, subscribe and share my
video. Back to the video, I placed the main light with the speed light
above and about 4ft away from the model, angled it down towards the model at about 45 degrees.
The rim light was placed behind he model and the position and power setting was adjusted
till I got the light where I needed it to be. I’ll take a test shot and see how this looks.
Well, This could pass for a decent shot.. but we wanted to go a step further that’s
why we added the 3rd light behind the model, gridded it to prevent a lot of light spill,
but rather focus the light right in middle I’ll add another image here so u can see
the difference. Without the third light, now with the third
light. For this I wanted a bit of a dreamy or blurry
background to balance out the rather powerful, fierce and edgy expression we made the model
portray with her poses. This required that I shoot at about F2.8.
On my canon 85mm 1.8. The other settings were shutter speed at 1/160s
and iso 100. Once she had the idea of what we wanted we
just went on clicking and varying angles till we got what we wanted. Yh so with three speed lights we’ve been
able to shoot a 3 light beauty editorial on a budget.
Let me know what you think in the comments down below. Also if you enjoyed this video kindly give
it a like as this helps us create more content, Go BEZErK on the Subscribe button if you haven’t,
And I’ll see u in the next one.

NORTHERN LIGHTS | How To Photograph The Aurora

NORTHERN LIGHTS | How To Photograph The Aurora


(upbeat electronic music) – Hey guys, I’m here in Iceland in this beautiful valley called Thorsmork. I’m gonna be doing some hiking and camping here for the next couple days, but I’m also gonna be
photographing the northern lights and I wanted to share
with you how I do that. The best time to see the lights is generally in the fall and winter between September and April, and it helps if you’re far
up in the northern hemisphere in places like Alaska,
Canada, Norway or Iceland. You need certain conditions to be met if you’re gonna be able to see them. Number one, you need really good weather. So clear skies. The other thing you need
is strong solar activity. Now, this can actually
be measured somewhat, but it changes from day to day. So, some days you could have
really strong northern lights. Other days, there could
be absolutely nothing. I use a smartphone app called Aurora, which helps predict the
strength of the solar flares. And it’s not 100% accurate, but it does a pretty
good job of helping you determine what is gonna be a good night to be outside to look for the lights. Another important factor is your location. You wanna be somewhere
with a clear view north. You wanna be outside at night for a long period of time as well. Not just one hour. I’m saying two to four
hours, or all night, if you’re really dedicated. Because the lights come and go. So if you’re not out
there for long enough, you may not see them. I’m using a Sony A7R3 with a 16-33mm lens. It’s a 2.8 lens. Now, this is kind of a fancy camera, but you don’t need a camera this nice to get photos of the northern lights. It helps because the sensor on
this camera is really large, so it’s really good for
low light photography. But you can use something like this. This is a Sony RX100. The basic requirements, you need a tripod, and you need to know the proper settings to manually control your camera. For lenses, you want something with an aperture of at least F 2.8. You can shoot it with F4 as well. I’ve done that before. That fast lens helps capture as much light as possible into your camera. Something else you may
want is a shutter release. What this does is it allows
me to plug it into my camera and then I can sit back in my chair here, take photos with a button, so I don’t have to be
crouched up behind this thing, especially if you’re gonna be
sitting out here for hours. The other thing I like
to do is you can put this in your pockets and stay warm. You’re also gonna want
some cold weather gear, because if you’re gonna be out all night in the northern hemisphere in the winter, it’s gonna be cold, so
usually I bring gloves, I bring a winter hat
for sure, a warm jacket. Heat warmers for your hands. I put these in my pockets
so when I’m not shooting, I can keep my hands nice and toasty. And probably a little alcohol
to make it through the night. One thing you’re definitely
gonna need is a tripod. Because you’re shooting
at longer shutter speeds, you need your camera to be super stable. And you can’t do it handheld. Focusing your camera at
night can be pretty tricky, especially up at the sky,
so I recommend pre-focusing your camera before the sun completely sets on something far off in the distance, like maybe a tree or a mountain, and that way you can then
turn it to manual focus and it’s set and ready to go
for when the light show starts. All right guys, we got lucky. The light show has begun. I’m in my folding chair,
nice and comfortable. I’m gonna be here for a
couple hours shooting photos and I’m gonna show you how I do it. Generally, the settings I use
for my northern lights photos are an ISO between 2000 and 4000, an aperture of 2.8 or 4.0, depending on the lens I have with me, and a shutter speed between two seconds all the way up to 13 seconds. Again, depending on how
bright the lights are and how fast they’re moving. I also always shoot them in raw, and I switch my white
balance to incandescent. You can change that in
post-processing later anyway if you’re shooting in raw, but I like to be able to see approximately what the photos are gonna look like, and the incandescent
setting for white balance creates a bluer image, and it really makes the colors pop. The camera is set up nice and low here. I’ve got a 16 to 33 millimeter lens on. I’ve got it at 16 millimeters right now. Nice and wide so you
can see the whole sky, and I’ve got my (mumbling
here) with a little light on hanging down from the top to make it glow. And the lights are all up here. You’re not gonna be able to
see it with this video camera, but I’ll show you my photos in a second. (camera shutter clicking) (camera shutter clicking) (camera shutter clicking) It’s hard to tell on
the little screen here, but this shot was ISO 2500 shot at F 2.8 and a four second exposure. When deciding how long
to keep the shutter open, it really depends on how
fast the lights are moving and how bright they are. If you use an exposure that’s too long, it’s gonna make the whole sky green and you’re not gonna be able to see the individual kinda rays
of light from the aurora. Now that I’m back in front of my computer, I’m gonna show you some
of the post-processing techniques I use for editing
my northern lights photos. While there are a million different ways to edit northern lights
photos, this is how I do it. We’re gonna take this raw, unedited image, and turn it into this one. Because adjusting the exposure, contrast, texture and white balance
of your aurora images can really make them stand out. So the first thing I’m gonna do is remove the lens chromatic abrasions and enable the lens profile
corrections as well. Next I’m gonna increase
the color temperature a bit to make it a little warmer and not as blue as it was originally shot. Then it’s onto exposure. I’m gonna brighten the whole image. Maybe a stop, stop and a half. I’m gonna increase the contrast a bit and decrease the highlights so
the highlights in the aurora themselves aren’t so blown out. Then onto shadows, which I’ll increase to bring out the shadows in the landscape, in the darker areas in the landscape. And decrease the white point a bit. And increase the black point. Again, this is to bring out the darker colors in the landscape. I’m gonna increase the clarity, add a little de-haze effect, as well as increase vibrance and decrease saturation just a tad. Onto the tone curve, I’m gonna increase the
black point a little bit, and then create a slight S-curve to boost the contrast in the whole image. You can see the difference
when I turn it on and off. Now we’re gonna tweak the colors
of the image a little bit. First up, orange. There’s really no red, so I’m
not gonna worry about red, but the orange here in the tent, I wanna make it less contrasty. Less saturated. Now we’re gonna do yellows. The yellows often affect grass color, even though grass is normally green. There’s some yellow in there too. And now onto the green. I’m gonna adjust the
hue of the green channel as well as desaturate the green. We’re gonna do the same
with the aqua channel, and this is gonna affect
the tone of the lights. So I’m gonna change the hue a little bit, and desaturate them just a bit as well. And the blue channel. It’s gonna affect kinda
the sky above the lights. Reduce the saturation a little
bit so it’s not overdone. And darken the sky a bit as well. Purple and magenta really
aren’t affected in this image. So we’ll move on to sharpening. Now, I have a particular way I like to sharpen most of my images. The amount is 30 and the masking is 11. Onto effects and a vignette, and what this is gonna
do is it’s gonna draw the viewer’s attention into
the center of the photo by darkening the edges. That’s about it for the basic adjustments. Now, I’m going to throw
on some gradient filters to adjust just certain
portions of the image. This is a linear gradient, and we’re gonna make a nice, big, soft one and just affect the colors of the northern lights themselves. First I’m gonna drop the color
temperature of the sky only and then make it slightly more blue. Increase the contrast a bit. We’re gonna increase the highlights. And increase the clarity. The clarity is really gonna bring out the rays of light at the top here. It’s gonna separate the northern lights from the night sky in the background. Now, we’re gonna using a circular gradient to reduce the strength of the
lights in certain parts here where it’s kind of a mush
of overexposed aurora. So we’re gonna drop the exposure and drop the highlights
in just certain areas. And we’re gonna increase
the clarity a bit too. Again, for the same reason. To bring out some of
that texture and detail. And then one more of much the same. Just adjust the position of it here. Okay, so I think that’s done. We’re gonna do one more circular gradient, and this time I’m just gonna focus on these individual rays of light at the top. What I’m trying to do here is to bring out the texture and detail of
these individual light rays. So we’re gonna increase
their exposure a tad, and boost the clarity. Just from this region. And another one. If at any time I’m moving through this editing process too fast, you can actually slow down the video and see it a bit slower. Now I’m gonna do another linear gradient, and this one is just going
to affect the ground. I wanna bring out some of those shadows and dark spots in the ground here. I think I took out too much green earlier, so I’m gonna bring some of
that back in the grass here. And I’m gonna drop the color temperature because the grass was looking a little too yellow on the right side. Now if we zoom in,
you’ll see kind of like, kind of a brighter haze at
the very top of the tent and I don’t like how that looks, so we’re gonna drop the
exposure and the highlights and increase the shadows
in this section just a hair so it doesn’t stand out so much. And I think that’s about it for Lightroom. I’ll show you before and after. It’s quite a big difference. One more topic I want to cover here about northern lights
photography is composition. You’ll notice in all my images, I have some kind of foreground element to draw your attention in rather than just shooting
photos of the sky directly. Here we have Iceland’s famous plane wreck on a black sand beach. One of my favorite images of all time. I spent all night camped
out next to this plane waiting for the aurora to appear. This is actually a
composition of three photos. One where I lit the outside of
the plane with an LED light, one with a red LED light inside, and finally, one of the spectacular aurora that suddenly exploded in
the sky for about 15 minutes. In this photo, I’m using
the road as leading lines to draw the viewer into
the heart of the image. In this one, I grabbed my head lamp and did some light painting
with a nice, long shutter speed. The key is to put some kind of subject in the foreground of your
image to give it some depth. Well, that’s it for my quick northern lights photography guide. I hope you guys enjoyed it, and thanks for watching. Let me know if you have any
questions in the comments and don’t forget to
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Common DSLR & Mirrorless Camera Settings for Beginner Photographers, DSLR & Video Shooters

Common DSLR & Mirrorless Camera Settings for Beginner Photographers, DSLR & Video Shooters


If you’re new to photography and you’re
a beginner, you’re probably shooting in Automatic Mode. This is fine to start, but
you’re definitely going to want to learn to shoot in Manual Mode quickly. If
you’re not quite ready to take that leap into shooting in Manual Mode just yet,
you can stay shooting in Automatic Mode, but you should make some adjustments to
your camera settings so you can get the best images or videos that you can. If
you don’t know where to start, watch this video. I’ll show you how to initially set
up your camera and then set seven DSLR and mirrorless camera settings to ensure
that you get the best images and videos you can. Be sure to stay tuned to the end
to find out how to get my F-R-E-E DSLR and mirrorless camera cheat sheet that’ll have
you shooting like a pro in no time. Hi, I’m Jim Costa. I’m a videography, photography and
technology guru and I created many other videos on improving your photography,
videography, filmmaking, video editing, audio recording and technology skills &
I’ll link to those in the description below and both during & at the end of this
video, so stay tuned. If you want to learn more, remember to subscribe to my channel
and hit that bell to be notified when I upload new videos. I upload every week
and I’ll be uploading many more explanations of film, video, photo, editing
and technology topics. Many beginning photographers often wonder what camera
settings they should use to get the best possible results with their current
camera gear. While there is no set rule for camera settings that work well in
every shooting environment, there are some settings that are universal across
all brands of cameras on the market. These are the base settings you want to
set your camera to initially. Once they’re done you probably won’t revisit
them. In addition, there are particular camera modes that make the process of
capturing images or videos quicker or easier, especially for someone who’s just
starting out. Let’s start with your initial camera setup. First let’s go over
some of the camera settings that should apply to any modern digital camera. You
should be able to find all these settings specified below since they are
more or less universal across different camera brands and models. Some of these
have the same name across different manufacturers and some have different
names, so I’m going to list different names where applicable. Image Quality
should be set to RAW. Long Recording should be set to Lossless Compressed if
this feature is available. White Balance should be set to Auto. Picture Control / Picture Style / Creative Style / Film Simulation should be set to
Standard. Color Space should be set to RGB. Long Exposure Noise Reduction should
be set to. ON. High ISO Noise Reduction should be set to OFF. Active D-Lighting /
DRO, HDR, Lens Corrections sometimes Vignette Control, Chromatic Aberration Control,
Distortion Control, etc. any features like this should be set to OFF.
Don’t worry if you missed any of these, I’ll list them below in the description
for you so you’ll have them in writing and easy to follow at anytime. The above
are the most important camera settings. So let’s review each of them. First, you
always want to start out by selecting the proper file format which should be
in RAW. If there is a setting for selecting RAW Compression, always select
Lossless Compressed since it reduces the amount of space your RAW files
consume on your media card. While things like picture controls don’t matter for
raw images, they only impact the way the image appears on your camera’s LCD
screen, it’s best to stick with a standard profile without tweaking any
other settings like sharpening, contrast, saturation and so forth as such settings
only matter if you shoot in JPEG format but not when you’re actually shooting in
RAW. The same is true with color space and white balance. You do not have to
worry about them when you shoot in RAW since you can change them later. Unless
you know what you’re doing, I would keep Long Exposure Noise Reduction turned ON
since it does affect your RAW images when you’re shooting long exposures. It
works by reducing the amount of noise you’ll see in your images, although we’ll
have also double the amount of time it normally takes to capture an image. It’s
a trade-off, but an important one worth taking to keep the noise in your images
down. All other in camera Lens Corrections, Dynamic Range optimizations
and Noise Reduction options should all be turned off as well since they do
nothing to improve your RAW images. Once you have the above initial settings
setup on your camera it’s time to move on to things that matter when you
actually take pictures. Do you have any trouble with your camera settings? If so,
leave a comment below and I’ll be happy to try and help you. Be certain to let me
know the make and model of your camera and the specific setting you’re having
trouble with so I can get you the best solution.
Also, be certain to check out some of my other videos on camera tips and tricks.
I’ll leave links to them in the description below. So what is the best
camera shooting mode? If you’re shooting in Automatic (or AUTO Mode), you’ll find
that most cameras have gotten really good at properly metering a scene and exposing
the subject. Aperture Priority does a great job as it gives you full control
not just over a camera aperture but also how bright or dark an image will appear
overall. If your camera takes a brighter image then you would like it to be,
simply use the Exposure Compensation button to adjust the exposure and you’re
all set. The Exposure Compensation button looks a lot like this image here. If
you’re wondering whether it is good to shoot with any of the “Scene” Modes of
your camera such as Macro or Sports or Fireworks or any others. I would
discourage the use of these different modes for a number of reasons. The main
reason is that such modes vary greatly not just between different camera
manufacturers but also between different camera models within the same
manufacturer. If you learn to always rely on a particular scene mode on one camera
and decide to upgrade to a new one in the future,
you might not be able to find the same “Scene” Mode on a different camera
model. It’s also important to highlight that most hiring and professional
cameras don’t even come with “Scene Modes in the first place. If you get too
reliant on these specialized modes you may actually be limiting yourself from
growing your camera skills. The settings on most of these modes can be achieved
by learning to shoot in Manual Mode anyway, so why even bother?
Next is the best Autofocus Mode. You should always make sure that you’re
shooting in the best Autofocus Mode depending upon what you’re photographing.
For example, if you photograph a still subject you might want to use Single
Area Focus Mode also known as “Single Area AF,”
“One Shot AF” or simply something like “AF – S.” Whereas if the subject you are
photographing is continuously moving around, you’ll want to switch to Continuous
/ AI Servo Focus Mode, since you would probably want your camera to actively
track your subject. To make things easy for beginners, camera manufacturers
sometimes include a hybrid mode that automatically switches between Single
Area Focus Mode and the Continuous / AI Servo Focus mode depending upon whether
your subject is still or moving. This hybrid mode which is known as “AF – A” on
Nikon or “AI Focus AF” on Canon cameras for example, can be great Auto Focus Modes to
default to if you find it too difficult to constantly switch between the “AF – S”
and the “AF – C” camera modes. Set it to that and the camera will do the work for
you so you don’t have to. Some cameras also come with an “Auto AF” Mode which
looks at the whole scene and tries to focus on either the nearest subject to
the lens or the subject that the camera thinks is important. I would actually
recommend avoiding using such modes for beginners because it’s better to have
control over exactly where your camera for focus is by moving your focus point
to the spot that your camera should focus on. You can achieve this by
switching to the Single Point AF Area Mode. This mode tells your camera that
one spot within the frame is what you want in focus essentially. Once you have
a single point to move around in your viewfinder you can either move that
focus point within your frame to your subject or area of interest or move your
subject to the focus point, such as in this image you’re seeing here where the
point of focus is on the eyes. What is the best Metering Mode? While your camera
might have a number of different Metering Modes such as Spot Metering,
Center-Weighted Metering and something like Matrix / Evaluative Metering,
for most situations, it’s best to default to the Matrix / Evaluative Metering
Mode because it takes the whole scene into account and typically does a better
job at exposing your subject. Look for the word “Matrix” in the Metering section
of the menu and set your camera to that. The best Lens Aperture Mode. Lens
Aperture not only affects how your subject is isolated from the foreground
and the background, but also impacts how much light actually goes through
your lens, so you have to be careful about what aperture you pick in any
given situation. In addition, aperture can impact things
like image starkness and the depth of field, so it’s all about choosing the
best aperture for your subject and your shooting environment. If you’re taking
pictures in low light and you want to avoid introducing camera shade to your
images when shooting handheld, it’s best to take pictures with the widest
possible aperture your lens can provide so that your camera can receive as much
light as possible. For example, if you shoot with a 35mm F/1.8 lens,
you might want to keep that aperture set at F/1.8 in such conditions. However, if
you’re standing at a beautiful overlook like the Grand Canyon and you want to
capture a sharp photograph of the whole landscape, stopping down the aperture of
your lens to something like F/5.6 will be optimal because it’ll increase your
depth of field plus properly expose the image in most cases. Aperture is often
associated with how separated your subject appears from the background, but
that’s only one of its many functions. In this example, you can see how different
an image can appear when photographed at a wide aperture like F/2.8 versus a
smaller aperture like F/8. If this is making sense to you, put, “I got it” in the comments
section below. Next, is the best Shutter Speed. Just like aperture, the choice of
best shutter speed will highly depend on what you’re trying to capture. For
example, if your goal is to capture a dreamy photograph of a waterfall,
your going to need to use a slow shutter speed that might last several
seconds to make the running water appear that blurry smoky look to it.
Whereas, if you want to freeze a subject in your scene, you need to use very fast
shutter speeds that are a very small fraction of a second to actually
freeze the image. For most situations however, you are better off using shutter
speeds that are fast enough to capture images without introducing camera shake.
Next is the best ISO settings. When it comes to camera ISO you’re always better
off shooting with the lowest ISO possible because it produces the least
amount of noise and grain in your images. The last thing you want is every image
you shoot looking too noisy because you set your ISO too high. While using Noise
Reduction techniques might help, it’s better to avoid noise in the first place.
Notice the noise levels in these images. ISO 200 has almost no noise at all while
ISO 3200 adds a ton of noise to the image. However, shooting at the lowest ISO
is not always practical especially when you’re shooting in low-light
environments such as at night. In these situations, you will need to increase
your camera ISO in order to keep your shutter speed fast enough to avoid blur
from a slow shutter speed that would lead to unintentional camera shake. When
you have your shutter speed very slow, the aperture stays open a long time and thus
your image tends to be blurry because you move around.
Remember, photography is always a balancing act between aperture, shutter
speed and ISO known as the Exposure Triangle. I would recommend you spend
some time to understand how these three work and how they are related to each
other. I shot a video on the Exposure Triangle in the past, so feel free to
check it out. Next is auto ISO. If you have a modern digital camera, it most
likely comes with an auto ISO feature which can be a very handy tool for a
beginning photographer. Once you have the Auto ISO enabled, your camera will
automatically adjust your cameras ISO depending upon how bright your subject
and how bright the environment you’re shooting in is. Try to keep the shutter
speed at the same or higher level then the minimum shutter speed you set within
the auto ISO menu. Some cameras from Nikon, Canon and other manufacturers have
advanced Auto ISO menus that can take into account the Reciprocal Rule and
allow for an auto configuration for minims shutter speed which will take
into account a focal length of the lens being used. Such options can be very
useful for beginners because they take away the pain of constantly adjusting
camera settings. Lastly, don’t forget to take advantage of Image Stabilization
also known as Steady Shot, Vibration Reduction or Vibration Compensation,
something like that that’s offered either by your camera known as In-Body
Image Stabilization or your lens known as Lens Stabilization. Don’t forget to
turn it on when shooting handheld and turn it off when shooting from a stable
tripod because it’s not needed. Also, it’s always a good idea to half press the
shutter release for a second or two and let your camera or lens stabilize first
before actually taking your picture. This will reduce the potential for having
blurry images. My question of the day is, “If you’re still shooting in Auto Mode,
what’s keeping you from moving to Manual Mode?” Leave a comment below and let us
know. Maybe I can help you. Now you know the minimum camera settings you need to
get your camera set up for success. But what about learning more advanced camera
settings to get you shooting like a pro? I’ve created an absolutely F-R-E-E cheat
sheet for you on all the best camera settings for your DSLR, mirrorless or
video camera that will show you the settings that will allow your photos and
videos to compete with the pros. The link to get it is just below in the video
description. I’ve also created cheat sheets on other topics such as video
editing and even now offer training on video editing. I’ll link to those cheat sheets and
training courses below as well, so feel free to check them out.
If you want to join a community of photographers, videographers, filmmakers
and other people just like you, I have a secret society on Facebook where I share
even more pro tips and tricks. It’s called Video Producers and Content
Creators, so look for that on Facebook to connect there and join the group. We love
new members who want to share their work and learn from others. You’ll find the
link in the description below as well. You want to see even more videos like
this? Follow my YouTube channel Jim Costa Films for more. Think what you saw was
great? Go ahead and like it. Do you have an opinion? Please, comment below. Do you
know someone who could benefit from the information that I provided?
If so, then share the video. Do you want to learn even more? If that’s the case then
connect with me, Jim Costa Films on social media and online on Facebook,
Instagram, Twitter, YouTube and the web. I currently have over 4275 videos on my
YouTube channel, Jim Costa Films, so feel free to check out any of my other videos
for great tips and suggestions. I have almost as many images, well over 4100
right now, on my Instagram channel so you can see how I implement these techniques
that I’ve shown you in my own photographs. So look for Jim Costa Films
on Instagram and check it out there. I’ll be happy to hear your comments on
any of my images and I even answer questions from there.