How to Use a Olympus XA 35mm Pocket Film Camera


Hi, I’m Jon and this is Prime Studios photography. In this video I’m going to show you how to use the Olympus XA 35mm film camera. This is easily my all-time favorite camera. It’s combination of small size, useful features, whisper quiet shutter, and sharp lens make it a wonderful camera to have with you all the time in lots of different situations To get your own Olympus XA, as well as the batteries and film to go with it, you can follow the links in the description down below. If you like this video Feel free to hit that “Like” button and subscribe to my channel for more film photography videos. The Olympus XA uses two v76 PX batteries, more commonly known as LR44s. The battery compartment can be opened using a quarter and the batteries need to be placed positive side out. You can check the health of the batteries by flipping the lever on the bottom of the camera to the “Check” position and listening for a tone and looking for a small red LED on the front to light up. To load the film you can open the back of the camera by lifting up on the film rewind knob. Make sure to check the light seals along the edge to ensure no light will get in and expose the film. If the seals are damaged you should be able to take the camera to most camera shops for repair. Insert the film into the left side of the camera and push down on the rewind knob to hold the film canister in place. Pull the film tab to the other side and insert the film tab all the way through one of the slots in the right take-up spool. You want to make sure that the sprocket holes are also lined up with the sprocket here on the bottom. Close the back of the camera and make sure it locks in place. Gently turn the rewind knob clockwise until you feel just a little bit of tension. Slide the camera open and set the ISO using the small switch at the front of the camera. If you look carefully you can actually see the light sensor moving right above the lens. Wind the film forward by using the wheel on the back upper right of the camera. You can verify the film is moving forward by making sure the rewind knob is turning counterclockwise. Activate the shutter button by pushing down softly and continue to wind the film forward and push the shutter until the counter, reads one. Keep in mind that the shutter release on this camera is very sensitive by design, which makes it very easy to take a photo whether you intended to or not. Making sure to close the cover when not in use will help prevent accidentally taking a photo. To take a photo, make sure the camera is opened and that the film has been wound forward as it also primes the shutter. The Olympus XA is an aperture priority camera. This means that you choose the aperture and the camera chooses the shutter speed based on how much light is hitting the light sensor. The aperture can be set with the aperture lever on the front of the camera. Here you can see the aperture getting bigger and smaller as I adjust the f-stop. Note that the aperture is actually made up of two blades, each with two sides which can result in a subtle square shaped bokeh. You can also see a shaped piece of metal in front of the light sensor moving back and forth. As you adjust the aperture you can see the shutter speed that the camera is going to use on the left side of the viewfinder. The XA has a maximum shutter speed of one 1/500th of a second and in all of my testing a minimum shutter speed of approximately 5 seconds. Going above one 1/500th of a second will push the needle into the overexposed area. You can force the shutter into a bulb mode by moving the lever on the bottom of the camera into the “Check” position before you push the shutter button. This will cause the shutter to stay open for as long as you like until you move the lever back to its original position. The annoying part is that the loud tone will be on during the entire exposure. Also, keep in mind the camera is not specifically designed to do this and it may cause your battery to down very quickly. The Olympus XA uses a manual rangefinder style focusing system. You can see both the window for the viewfinder and for the rangefinder on the front of the camera. This presents you with a small yellow square in the middle of the viewfinder Which you can place over your subject and line up the split images to achieve proper focus. The focusing lever also has some knurling just above it’s main handle in case you need to manipulate the focus while on a tripod. The camera also has a distance measurement in feet just above the lens. You’ll notice that the 8-foot mark is colored orange, along with the f/5.6 F-stop, as these settings are believed to be a good balance for general shooting without having to focus for every shot. The Olympus XA also includes a few other features like backlight compensation and a self timer. Both of which can be activated on the bottom of the camera by moving this lever. The backlight compensation feature tells the light meter to overexpose the photo by 1.5 stops of light in order to compensate for a dark subject in the foreground with a bright background. The self timer feature turns on a 12 second timer that activates when you push the shutter button. While it counts down it makes an audible beeping sound and flashes the red LED light on the front of the camera. Take note that it does not change the pitch or frequency of the beeping to indicate that it’s about to take a photo. Another nice feature of the camera is that it can be operated entirely with one hand. This combined with its extremely quiet shutter, and ability to fit into most pockets, makes it an excellent camera for stealthy candid shots or street photography. The XA is compatible with several attachable flashes with the most common being the A11. The flash can be attached easily to the side of the camera simply by screwing it on. The A11 flash takes a single AA battery and works well as a fill flash up to a maximum of about 18 feet at full power. You can turn on the flash by moving the aperture lever all the way to the top and firmly pushing it towards the blue flash symbol. It’s designed to give a little more resistance when moving it to this position. This will cause the flash to start charging, which is indicated by a light popping up and turning orange when fully charged. Leaving the aperture lever in the flash position sets the camera to a default of f/4 and 1/30th of a second. The flash itself can be adjusted for either 100 ISO, or 400 ISO film, or put to it’s full power by using a small switch to the left of the flash tube. Through some testing with my light meter, I’ve discovered that the output of the flash stays the same regardless of what aperture or ISO I set on the camera. The only thing that changes the actual output power of the flash is adjusting the lever on the flash itself. With 400 being the least powerful, then 100, then “Full” power being the strongest. Changing just the ISO switch on the camera, and not changing the ISO of the film itself, will change the shutter speed but have no effect on how bright the flash appears in the exposure. Even at higher shutter speeds the flash will still sync as the XA has a two-bladed leaf shutter. Taking the camera off its default flash mode, by changing the aperture, will both change the shutter speed as well as how bright the flash appears in the exposure. You can figure out which aperture will give you a proper exposure by setting the flash to the “full” setting and focusing on your subject to determine their distance. Then you can calculate the correct aperture to use with the formula “f-stop=flash guide number / subject distance. The guide numbers for the A11 flash are 33 at 100 ISO and 66 at 400 ISO. So for example, if we are using a 400 ISO film, and our subject is 8 feet away, then we’ll be using an f-stop of f/8. If our subject is 2.8 feet away, then we would use an f-stop of f/22. You can turn the flash off simply by pushing down on the charging light. You will know you have reached the end of your roll of film when you can no longer advance it. Make sure you do not try to wind the film by force once you feel resistance, as this might cause it to rip. To rewind the film, first close the camera cover and push the rewind or release button on the bottom of the camera. Lift up the rewind lever and begin to rewind the camera back into it’s canister. Once you feel the film physically come loose from the take-up spool and go entirely back into the film canister, you can lift up the rewind knob, and open the back of the camera, and remove the film. Thank you so much for watching and I hope this video has helped you. Please “Like” this video and subscribe to my channel for more film photography videos. If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below. Thanks!

Match Image Size in Photoshop – Two Powerful Techniques That You (Probably) Don’t Know


In this tutorial I’m going to show you two
methods that you probably don’t know to match document sizes. Hey everyone, welcome to The Photoshop Training
Channel. My name is Jesus Ramirez and you can find
me on Instagram @JRfromPTC. In this Photoshop tutorial I’m going to show
you two methods that you probably don’t know to match document sizes. We’re going to use a method that uses the
Image Size and Canvas Size window, and the second method uses a Crop Tool. Don’t forget to tell me in the comments
down below if you knew these methods already. Okay, let’s get started. So we’re going to work with two documents. I have this document here and it’s a PSD
called large. And this document here is a PSD called small. This document is 1280×720. And this one here is 1920×1080. To make a document the same size as another
open document, go to the Image size or Canvas size dialogue boxes. So go into Image + Canvas Size, with the Canvas
size window open, go into Window, and at the very button of the drop down, you will see
the filenames of your currently open documents. I have two psd’s, large.psd and small.psd. Notice what happens when I select small.psd. The Width and Height will match this document,
1280×720. The same thing will happen if I go into Image
+ Image Size, with the Image Size window open, I’m going to go into Window and also select
small and you’ll see that the Width and Height will change to match the small.psd. I can press OK and the image will be resized
to match the size of the other open document. In the second method, I’m going to show
you how to use a Crop Tools Front Image feature so that you can take the dimensions of one
image and crop a second image to those same dimensions. And let me show you how it works. I’m going to go into this image and first,
I just want to make a selection so that you can see that this image is 1800 pixels wide
x 582 pixels tall. Then I’m going to go into a Crop Tool. And from this drop down, on the Options bar,
going to select Front Image. Then, I’m going to go into my first image
and notice that the crop tool is active and it has the dimensions of the previous image
up here in the Options bar. So if I adjust the crop and hit Enter / Return
on the Mac, I’m going to crop the image into those dimensions. If I make a selection, you’ll see that that
image is 1800 x 582 pixels. So no matter what I crop it will always be
that size. I’m going to undo that crop. I’m going to select the Crop Tool again
and the Front Image is still active, we can see the dimensions up here. And I’m just going to make a really small
crop, and you’ll see that the dimensions are about 300 pixels. But when I hit Enter / Return on the Mac to
commit the changes, Photoshop enlarges that crop to 1800 x 582 pixels. So no matter what we crop, it will always
be the same size as the Front Image that we set. And, again, let me know if these methods were
new to you. If you enjoyed this tutorial and you’re
new to The Photoshop Training Channel, then don’t forget to click on the subscribe button,
and also click on the bell to get notifications when new tutorials are published. If you’re already subscribed, you can also
click on that notification bell. And that’s it for this tutorial. I hope that these methods were new to you. If you have any comments or questions, leave
them down below. Thank you so much for watching and I will
talk to you again soon.

An introduction to photography lighting – Should you be using Flash, Continuous or Natural light?

An introduction to photography lighting – Should you be using Flash, Continuous or Natural light?


Photography is the art of capturing
light so the light that you’re capturing has to be one of the most important
factors for any photographer today we’re going to be taking a look at the
different types of light that you can use as a photographer and what
advantages each of them have so settle in and I’ll get started Hi guys I’m Ben from Adaptalux and
today we are taking a look at the different types of lights that you can
use as a photographer so let’s get started with our first type of light and
probably one that you’ll be at least a little bit familiar with I’ve come over
here because there’s a little bit more of this first type of the light natural
light so when we’re talking about natural light more often than not we’re
going to be talking about the Sun during the day the Sun is our primary source of
light not only for us as people making our way around and doing things
in the daytime but also as photographers there’s a lot of things to consider when
you’re using natural light though it’s not quite as simple as it seems you need
to consider the time of day and the weather and also the time of year if
you’re shooting during the day and you want nice diffused light you’re going to
need some cloud cover if you want more light and absolutely powerful light to
get the best settings you want direct sunlight probably in the middle of the
day there’s something that we call the golden hour later in the day that gives
a really nice warm look to your images when the Sun is quite low down in the
sky and then of course when the Sun is setting
you get those classic sunsets so with natural light
it might seem pretty straightforward but there’s a few things to consider one of
the main advantages though is that it’s completely free everybody has access to
sunlight unless you’re living in one of the poles or in a cave then you’re going
to use natural light at some point during your photographic career there
are a few things that we can do with natural light to change the look of our
scenes and our subjects the first of which being the direction of the
lighting obviously if you’re shooting outside the Sun is in the same position
and you’ll have to wait until a different time of day or year to get
that into a different position something we can do though is manipulate our
subject in our scene to suit exactly why the Sun is all where our light is coming
from for things like macro photography that’s particularly easy because we’ve
got a nice small subject and we can move that around to wherever we need it
shooting in front of a window or door gives you that single source of light
and that single direction of light to shoot with and you can move your subject
around to exactly where you need it to be for the light direction if you wanted
to diffuse your ligh we can do that as well obviously we can’t go and put any
diffusion material over the Sun it’s a little bit too far away and quite hot
but we can put diffusion material over our subjects so if you have a big piece
of semi translucent material you can use that to diffuse bright direct sunlight
coming to hit your subject you can also use reflectors to bounce that sunlight
back onto a different side of your subject or just onto your subject in
general to change how the light is falling the next type of light that we’re going
to talk about is a bit of an ambiguous one it’s the one that confuses people
quite often because it’s not quite as well-defined as simply man-made or not
available light or ambient light what does that mean well it means light that
is already quite literally available in your scene before you start doing any
photography or any editing of your of your lighting so things like fire
candles natural light can be considered available light light bulbs that are
hanging from ceilings if you’re if you’re going into a brand new room if
the light is already there and you haven’t put it there for the purposes of
photography that is available light and you’re using essentially the light that
is already available to you in the scene without having to add anything now what
does this mean to us as photographers as a macro photographer I could take this
little candle put my subject right next to it and I’d be using available light
because I didn’t put that candle there specifically for photography purposes if
you’re shooting room scenes of portraiture finding available light
sources is really really handy it can make some really interesting impactful
lighting and it can often mean a lot more to to the photographer to the
subject especially if it’s a portrait if you’re only using what is already in the
scene it means that you’re not tampering with the way that the scene actually
looks in real life the opposite of natural light is
artificial light I’m using artificial light right now to to light this video
to like myself to light the background I’ve got two big soft boxes 45 degrees
just to to light myself and give me some consistency so I’ve been making these
videos for about a year now and if I were using relying upon natural light to
to light my videos then everything would be different from video to video I’m not
shooting at the same time of day or the same time of year all of the time so the
light is going to change even depending on the weather if I rely on some nice
consistent artificial light I can get my my lighting looking pretty similar every
single time now there’s two different types of
artificial light and we’ll look at those now starting with continuous light like
I’m using right now continuous light is what we’ve been using with the Adaptalux Studio for quite some time now LEDs are on all of the time and that’s what
makes them continuous that I’ve got bulbs in these soft boxes and they’re
continuous as well all it means is that the light source is on all of the time
so if you’ve seen some of our other videos then you’ll know that we use
continuous light quite often for macro photography I’ll link some videos up in
the top corner of the screen now if you want to go and check out some great
examples of how to use continuous light for your macro photography but for now
let’s take a look at exactly what the advantages of this are why would you
want to use light that’s on all of the time it’s on all of the time that’s the
purpose of it because you can see it all the time you can you can build your
scenes you can see exactly what your shot is going to look like before you
actually press the shutter button it makes it really really easy for learning
photography figuring out what differences diffusers make and the
placement of your lights as you make small changes to your scenes you’re
going to be able to see the results immediately both with your own eyes
through the viewfinder and through the live view of your camera with
having any guesswork on what it’s actually going to look like that I would
say is probably one of the main advantages of using continuous light and
the other advantage is that you can use it for video the light being on all of
the time means that you don’t have to switch between different types of
lighting to switch modes on your camera if you want to switch over to video mode
and capture a little bit of moving footage of your subject that’s
absolutely fine because the lighting that you’re going to use will be exactly
the same there is a disadvantage though to continuous light it means that you
can’t freeze subjects in motion at least not without a little bit of difficulty
things like water drop photography will be very very tricky with continuous
lights because you don’t have a single burst of light to freeze the motion of
the subject it is possible with continuous light if you’ve got enough of
it and a really high shutter speed but even with shutter speeds of say 1/4000th of a second you’re still going to get the slightest little bit of
movement in there as the position of the water drop changes while that shutter is
open if you’ve got a lot of light yeah you can push that shutter speed up there
but that is it’s not the most practical use of our lighting it will be much
better to go and get a flash if you’re doing subjects like that let’s talk about flash it’ll come as no
surprise I’m sure that flash photography is very very popular across almost all
genres of photography simply because it can freeze motion so the big advantage
of flash is the big disadvantage of continuous light and they’re somewhat
vice versa as well as you’re using your flash you’ll notice that no matter how
slow you push your shutter speed generally you’re going to get a nice
sharp image you can go as low as say 1/20th of a second while hand-holding
your camera and as long as your flash is powerful enough you’re still going to
get a nice sharp image with no camera shake and very little movement that
means that shooting moving subjects is really really easy with a flash you
don’t need to worry so much about your shutter speed as you’re shooting with
flash things are going to become really really apparent that it’s it’s a bit
more difficult to figure out where your light is actually going or where it’s
going to go because you can’t see it before you press your shutter button now
with some practice you can obviously get a decent idea of where your light is
actually going to fall but it’s not quite the same as seeing it there live
you also can’t use flash for video so that’s a bit of a disadvantage to flash
as well really only bothers you if you’re going to be doing video if you’re
shooting things like events or portraiture then you’re probably going
to be just fine with a flash on the top of your camera for macro photography we
now have the flash with the Adaptalux Studio so if you’re wanting to
shoot say insects or water drops then you can now do that while maintaining
the ability to use your Adaptalux Studio for continuous light as well we
wanted to give you all of those options so now you have them the last thing I want to touch on when
we’re talking about choices with lighting is modifying our light we’ve
already touched on diffusing our natural light you can do that with your
artificial light as well usually by attaching your diffusion material
straight to your light source rather than putting your diffusion material
closer to your subject and the way that works with say the Adaptalux Studio
is just by attaching a diffuser to the end of the lighting arm and then that’s
going to make your shadows a little softer other things like color
temperature and tint can make a big difference in your images as well if
you’ve seen all of the white balance settings in your camera and had a play
with those they can be really powerful for setting the mood in a particular
scene it’s a little bit more than a creative choice though it’s something
that we might need to compensate with with different types of light source so
a lot of artificial light will have a Kelvin value attached to them and
this can be imported directly into your your color balance settings in your
camera and you’ll get a very natural look out of your images it’s not it’s
not a temperature value so much as an emotional and impactful value so if you
make your images look blue by by changing your color balance then it’s
going to make the viewer a little bit melancholy and cold feeling whereas if
things go more orange and yellow then you’re going to feel a little bit warmer
and that is something that changes during the day as well so if you’re
using natural lights and the clouds come in then things are going to get cooler
everything is going to look a little bit more blue and you will have to
compensate using your color balance settings we also have tint as well which
goes on a scale from purple and magenta up to green it’s not often that
you’re going to have to change that but some artificial light might give off a
little bit more of green or purple hue which you might have to compensate for
as well we can use color deliberately the colored LEDs from the Adaptalux Studio makes for some really interesting and creative choices in your images you
can also use gels over flashes to change the color of the light that way
like I said color and modifying all of these lights it’s probably an entirely
different video and so make sure to subscribe if you want to see a few more
of these explainer videos when it comes to lighting and photography hit the bell
if you want to be notified next time we upload a video and make sure to give the
video a like if you enjoyed this one if all of this talk of different types of
lighting has inspired you make sure to go and check out the the links down in
the description for both our continuous lights and our brand new flash lighting
arms as well and learn a little bit more about lighting over on our website and
our blog if all of this is a little bit too much for you and you’ve got loads of
questions put them down in the comments and I’ll be there to answer them for you
for now though guys thank you very much for watching I’ll see you next time

Photography Tutorial: Essential Photo Skills That Will Quickly Transform Your Photos

Photography Tutorial: Essential Photo Skills That Will Quickly Transform Your Photos


Light is the magical stuff that we use
to create our pictures. It’s found all around us and comes from a variety of
sources both natural and man-made. It also comes in many forms and colours, each
one affecting the atmosphere of our pictures differently. To help us
understand light I’ve broken it down into four main categories: transmitted
light, reflected light, soft light and hard light. Hard light comes from any
light source that is apparently small. Now the sun on a clear day is a prime
example. Now we know the sun’s not actually small but it appears small
because it’s so far away and it acts like an extremely bright but small light
bulb in the sky. Soft light comes from any light source that has a large
apparent surface area. Now a great example of that is like the light we’ve
got right now and that’s where the sun is shining through an overcast sky or a
large blanket of cloud and that large blanket of cloud has now become the
large light source and that large light source is what’s giving us the soft
light. The characteristics of hard light are that it has a very high contrast
because that high contrast it gives very sharp hard-edged shadows. It also has a
certain sparkle and sharpness to the light because of the high contrast and
it also reveals texture very strongly if the light source is at the right angle,
whereas soft light is very low in contrast and hardly gives any shadows at
all. In actual fact if soft light is used
incorrectly it can look quite dull. So what type of light is best for
photography? Well right now is what photographers call the ‘Magic Hour’ and
that’s because it has all the magic ingredients. We’ve got soft light from
this large light source above us which is the sky, but we’ve also got hard light
from the sun which is setting over there and it’s cutting through the earth’s
atmosphere so it’s reduced in intensity to a much more manageable level and by
combining hard light and soft light makes the photographs much more
interesting. Now to add to that we’ve also got transmitted light and that
means we can see the light source in the picture, plus we’ve got reflected light
reflecting off the surface of the water and off the wet sand and by putting all
of those things together we’re going to get a fantastic image, and if I can just
get this piece of driftwood to stay still I think we’re going to get the
shot that we want. That’s coming together really nicely, just going to move that
over a little bit. Some beautiful reflections off of the bit of wood, it’s
a little bit too close, just going to move it back down there. I want to be
quite precise.Oh no, she moved out the way again! Oh still that’s quite a good
result quite, a good result. We’ve got the water flowing by, got the bit of wood. As you can see sometimes you need to get
your feet wet to get the best shot. For this shot I was using a super wide
angle lens and experimenting in manual mode with shutter speeds from one to six
seconds. I used a small aperture for maximum
depth of field. To balance the light in the sky with my dark foreground I use ND
filters, which we look at in depth in our travel and landscape DVD. To understand
light better start looking at it in different situations and try to figure
out what you are seeing – is it hard light or is it soft light or is it a
combination of the two? For the best light try to shoot at least half an hour
before and after sunset, if the weather conditions are right then this will
usually be the most attractive light of the day. We’ll try a couple more shots before we pack
home and I can change out of these wet socks and shoes. Fantastic! The ‘Magic Hour’ is not the only time or
light that we can shoot in. You can even take advantage of hard light at midday
by shooting indoors. I’m going to show you how you can create stunning
portraits with nothing more than a window and a reflector for lighting. Now
a great lighting set-up that you can easily use in many different locations, even in
your own home, is simply a large window. Now here we’ve got Vicky modelling for us
and we’re using this large window light to illuminate soft light all the way
down the side of Vicky’s face. Now one of the problems when you just have side light
like this is that the other side of the body will be in shadow, now a great way
to get around that is simply to use a reflector and reflectors are great tools,
now you can get a variety of different reflectors. This one here is a
commercially available reflector that just pops open like that and you can
take out on location with you and then if you look at Vicky’s face here you’ll
see the difference that that reflector makes as I put that light in and out of
the shot like so, so a huge difference. Now it’s silver on one side and it’s white on
the other so the silver side gives a harsher light, but if you don’t want to
use a reflector like that you can even use something as simple as a piece of
white card like this, here I’ve got a little bit of white board, just a bit of
white foam board, and again watch the result here what we can do there. So this
side of the face is dark and in shadow, simply bring white board in and we’ve
got a great reflector, great fill in panel to illuminate that shadow side for
us. So very simple technique – large window, nice soft light beautiful for portraits,
fantastic for portraits, and then simply a reflector on the other side to fill in
the shadow side. So I’m going to get Vicky leaning in against this window and
then we’re going to use a couple of different reflectors and we’re going to
see what results we get. Okay Vicky. That’s great, come down towards me a bit more. And head over the other way, that’s it. This shot uses a white reflector close
to our subject, here the reflector is further away resulting in less fill
light and more shadows. In this shot no reflector was used at all, and in this
shot the white reflector was close to our model. That’s good. Great. Okay just give me a
little hint of a smile there Vicky, that’s good. Just chuck that light there, perfect. Same
pose, that’s it. The difference without the reflector and then with the
reflector, without, with. And you can see that even without the reflector can be
quite nice, in that case there’s actually a little bit of light bouncing back from
the other side of the room anyway which is filling in a little bit and then on
the one with the reflector it’s almost a bit too strong so I think what we do
Fab is just get you to go in with the white card this time, we’ll just go from a
little bit further away. Much softer light, which is fantastic for filling in
all those creases on Vicky’s face. That’s it good, okay, excellent. I’m just
going to drop that down a little bit. Okay turn your head towards the window
Vicky, that’s it good keep that there. That’s lovely.
You can see from this that the surgeon is going to have to do the reconstructive work round about here and then probably shrink the nose a little bit,
expand the head, lift those out, yeah lift those out, maybe make your fingers longer,
so they they drag on the floor like an orangutan, which would probably suit you quite well but yeah. So I think it’s worked out quite nicely. For the picture on the left we used a white reflector from approximately two
meters away, giving a slight fill to the shadow side of our image. For the shot on
the right the reflector was moved further away, resulting in a stronger
shadow. Notice how in both shots I have used a
large aperture to blur the background, concentrating the attention on our
subject

Rain Photography  “Masterclass”

Rain Photography “Masterclass”


all right so today I thought I’d tell
you guys my secret settings to shooting with the phone so believe it or not I
get this question a lot and the answer the secret that’s going to make you
better than everyone is there isn’t a secret you just push the button you take
photo all right and yeah I don’t even know why I’m making a video about this
but many people ask me how you take photo in the rain and there’s really
nothing to it besides just taking the photo in the rain I mean that’s it it’s
not a setting that’s gonna make you better than anyone else and there’s no
secret editing technique you just take the photo and it’s a phone I mean you
just push button there’s no aperture – ISO dial or whatever but I mean I guess
there are some apps and do it but I’m really worried about that if you are
worried about how to do all that what I have a tutorial where I just show you
how to shoot with the phone but it’s nothing more than me pushing buttons so
I hope that helps someone because people keep asking but you know what can you do
just keep repeating the message and hopefully people catch on

How to Shoot Phone Infrared Photography

How to Shoot Phone Infrared Photography


welcome so if you’re watching this video
you’re interested in shooting infrared photography with your phone and I
managed to do just that actually there are so much to infrared photography to cover
in one video that I cant explain to you guys the basics of infrared photography
in this video I don’t want to get a ton of questions so just please wait to the
future when I make a video which is all about infrared photo for now I’ll let
you know that you can actually shoot infrared with a filter for example the
Hoya r72 filter which only lets light in infrared light of 720 nanometers and
above the problem is that even though you can hold it up to your phone camera
there’s going to be light leaks to the side it’s gonna ruin your picture so
I’ve actually taken infrared photos just holding the filter to the phone but
they’re not very good so I made this contraption to block visible light from
the sides and it wouldn’t ruin my picture the problem is some of it still
gets through but I just kind of block it like this now I know some people are
gonna ask me where they can buy this and the answer is you can’t I made this out
of Chinese parts I bought online and I had to wait a while for them but it’s
not that complicated I mean this thing attaches to your phone and this is just
a glorified filter holder that’s all it is and it didn’t have any threads to
screw on a lens so what I did was about to step up rings one for 44 millimeters
and the other one to 77 millimeters and I just put them together unfortunately
it was still too big for this so what I did was a hot glue gun
one of the filters to the bottom and then after I hot glue gunned it I just
wrapped it in black tape inside and out just to make sure no light gets through
and after that is quite easy I just screwed on a 77 millimeter thread and
then after that I could just put on the infrared filter and yeah I’m using the
Hoya R72 filter our assembly to fill
and I can’t really get into a details of infrared photography in this video but
720 nanometers is not as saturated as like 590nm or any other one really so the
colors are much muted much more muted than my usual pictures but I still
enjoyed it I still think I got some nice pictures but you have to be shooting in
the middle of the day so with that being said let me show you guys how it went
especially my first time around and then I’ll show you some of the photos that I
got please be sure to leave a like leave a comments and if you got like specific
infrared questions I’m actually going to make a new video about about all that so
please be patient okay so I am mounted a filter on my camera remember this is
just a filter holder okay nothing special it just holds the filter in
place but so far it seems to be working there are some light leaks right here
maybe I’ll fix it later but I can just cover it and yeah let’s go see see if it
works so the thing is there is some light that
goes into the back let’s cover it somehow I have to find a way to stop the
stomach I’m going in but so far it seems to be working that makes me pretty happy
and yeah we don’t know how the pictures will come out until I take them but at
least we know this is working also it’s the end of winter so it’s not as green
as I wish it was you know you need you need to be shooting in the middle of the
day but what’s right this spot is where I I guess photography
started kind of I remember many years ago I was here with my friend and just
before I had the estudar before I had a Video camcorder I use had a facility
camera on and my friend was a bit darker and I asked him how do you make the
water blurry and he taught me about long exposure this is it this is where it
this is where I kind of started you know I mean years later after I had yes at
all I took my first the picture but this is where it began

Speedlights for Portrait Lighting / Flash Photography Techniques

Speedlights for Portrait Lighting / Flash Photography Techniques


Versatile Photographers Have One Thing In
Common: Flash Photography Skills. Being versatile enough to use your lighting
skills no matter the situation will make you a much better photographer. A wedding photographer
or portrait photographer who can wield his speedlights with authority and use them in
creative ways will be way more confident than one who needs to rely on natural sunlight
all the time. In this portrait here, a speedlight made a
big difference. Even though the key light which lit her face was natural sunlight, the
area above her was dark. There wasn’t any light coming from there. Her hair is dark,
and would have blended into the dark background, if a speedlight wasn’t used. A lighting assistant
held a bare speedlight above her and created a separation light that distinguished her
hair from the background. Apart from highlighting her hair, the speedlight
also created a rim light on the edge of her arms and legs, which also helped separate
them from the background. Notice the top edges of the steps? That’s also the work of that
single speedlight. Studying a portrait lighting setup is one
way to learn flash photography. This is the teaching approach used in the SimpleSLR Photography
Guides. The scenario is illustrated through detailed portrait lighting setups. In the
Portrait Recipes collection there are 24 lighting diagrams that show – the position of the light
– the position of the camera in relation to the subject and light sources
– how light modifiers were used – environmental factors such as ambient light,
and whether it was shot indoor or semi-outdoors – availability of walls as bounce surfaces
– and much much more. Test drive these lighting setups now for FREE.
You can download 5 portrait lighting setups to see the amazing difference that flash photography
can bring to your pictures.

Fill Flash Basic: Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace

Fill Flash Basic: Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace


Hi everybody, welcome to another episode of Exploring Photography, right here on Adorama TV, I’m Mark Wallace hanging out with Alejandra, you probably remember her from our gobo video that we shot a couple weeks ago in the studio. Well we’re outside today and I’m going to show you a very easy way to balance our ambient light with a studio strobe. When you have a flash on your camera you have two exposures, one exposure is the ambient light, that’s the light that you can’t control, that’s everything in the sky the Sun and the clouds, and all of that stuff, we can’t control that light, we have to make sure we set our camera to make that properly exposed. The second exposure we have at the same time is our studio flash. So I have a little flash right here behind me, we can’t control that light, so what you need to do is first set our exposure for the ambient light, and then match that with our studio strobe and everything will be all good. So the first thing I’m going to do is shoot a photo with no flash at all, and so what I want to do is, we’ve got all these these features, these clouds and stuff in the sky, I want to make sure I expose that, maybe a tiny bit underexposed, so what I’m doing here is I have my camera set to manual mode, now this will work with any camera Sony, Nikon, Canon, Fuji film, it doesn’t matter, this will work so set your camera in manual mode. I have my ISO as low as it will go, ISO 100, and then I have my camera set to my camera sync speed, that’s one 1/160th of a second for my Leica M 10. If you’re not sure what sync speed is, don’t worry, Gavin Hoey just made a really fantastic video about sync speed. I put a link to that video in the description of this video, so you can check that out. So ISO 100 sync speed now I need to figure out my aperture value, to do that I’m just going to look through my camera, use the built-in meter, and then figure out what it tells me the proper exposure is. So I’m doing that right now, making some adjustments, and it is telling me I have a proper exposure of f/4, so I’m going to take a photo really fast, look right at me Alejandra, perfect and well as expected we have a lot of light coming from behind, and so Alejandra is under opposed, we expected that, so we need to fill in that. The underexposed parts with a flash, that’s what fill flash is called, so I have a studio strobe right here behind me, this is a Profoto B2, and what I need to do now is meter this light so that it matches the exposure that I already have, which is f/4, so I happen to have a light meter right here I’ll turn this on. Luckily for us Alejandra is a photographer as well, so she knows how to use this meter, so I’m gonna give this to you, and now I’ll grab my little trigger really fast, I’m gonna put that on my camera, and I’ll do that, it’s metering at f/4.5. I’ll take the power down just a hair, just like that, just a little bit more, I want it to be about 4, ok now we’re at 4, we’re metered at f/4 which is perfect. Now if you’ll notice, I have no light modifier on my flash at all. We’re gonna start there, so you can hand me that, now let’s take a shot, and see how this compares to the original shot that we took, so again look right at my lens here, beautiful, gorgeous, just like that, turn it this way with your eyes just toward me, there you go, I love that, awesome and now we can see that Alejandra is popped off of the background simply by adding this flash. Step 1 – Meter for the ambient light with your camera. Set all the settings correctly for that. Step 2 – Meter the flash to match that setting and then start shooting. So now we’re gonna take a few pictures what I’m also going to do here is, I’m gonna let the sun go down a little bit, we’re gonna add a softbox to this, so we can soften up the light, but the principles are always the same. Meter for the ambient light, then meter your studio strobes so that it matches, and take some photos, one of the things that I noticed when I was shooting is that, I had a very hard light, and so we’re getting some specular highlights on Alejandra’s face which made her look shiny, even though she’s not, she’s got great skin, her makeup is perfect. So what I did is I changed and added a Profoto, 2-foot octa box, that’s just gonna soften up the light, and makes things less specular, and so that’ll make you not so shiny. That’s one of the tricks for any flash, make the flash larger, and you’ll get less shy and less specular highlights. The other thing I did is, I ditched my tripod because I want to be able to move around and get this entire scene, and specifically I want to do that, because I’m shooting with a 35 mm lens, which it’s not usually a portrait lens, but I want to get the background, and the scene, and all of Alejandra, and it’s just looks sort of cool. So the first thing we need to do because we switched our light modifier. Is to meter, remember, I’m shooting still at f/4 ISO 100, 160th of a second, so let’s meter this really fast Alejandra. So we’re looking at that, it is metering at f/3.6, so I’m just going to add a tiny bit of light here, I’ve got a remote control on my camera, this is a Profoto Air Remote, and so I don’t have to actually touch the flash at all, we’re now metering it f/4, everything is set, and now I can sit back here, make sure I’m all focused up and what I want to do is, perfect, I want to take one photo without, and one photo with, so that pose right there is the perfect pose. So we’re gonna do that without a flash, so this is without a flash, beautiful, and then here’s one with a flash. Same exact thing, you can compare these two, and you can see clearly that adding that flash adds the punch that we need. It’s just perfect, easy, alright now, I’m going to do something that’s sort of counterintuitive, I was shooting with a 35 mm lens, I really like that, but I’m gonna go even wider, so I just switched to a 28 mm lens, which is something you would never use with a portrait, we’re gonna see how it looks alright, let’s just see what happens, This is not something I would normally
do, totally counter intuitive, but it I think it looks better, so let’s keep shooting, some of that. In fact I’m gonna get close. Well I think these photos look really wonderful Alejandra, and it’s very, very simple. You have to just meet her for the ambient light, and then adjust your flash so that it matches, and then take shots. The other thing that we have to remember to do is, take some chances, so we took a chance on a 35 mm lens, which is a little bit wider than a normal standard 50mm or 70mm or something like that, but then we went the opposite direction and used a 28 mm lens, and that even worked, and so I really like how this is set up, and how it works. Try this at home, you can do this with a speed-light, you can do this with a studio strobe, you can do this with just about any kind of camera that you have. It just works, it’s really simple, and really fun. Hey thanks for joining us. Don’t forget to subscribe to AdoramaTV. It’s free and also turn on the bell so you get notifications, and please follow me on instagram, I’m posting behind the scenes photos and videos of all the photo shoots and stuff that I’m doing. Alejandra you can also follow her on instagram – she is a photographer, and a model, and so I’ve put links to both of those Instagram accounts in the description of this video.. so you can check out her stuff, she’s a really, really good photographer. So make sure you check out her work, alright? Thanks again for joining us, and I will see you again next time!

Tutorial: Better Sunrise Photography | Paul Adams

Tutorial: Better Sunrise Photography | Paul Adams


hello and welcome to the busy man’s
guide to photography episode 5 with me Paul Adams now we are heading out to do
some sunrise photography it’s Saturday it’s 20 past 5 Steve was a little bit
late this morning so I’m not sure we’re gonna get there in time it’ll be fine but we’ve
got some road to travel we don’t need roads why’s that cos we’ve got this that’s amazing where did you learn that YouTube hang on
it’s a bit bright we’ve come too far forward yeah back yeah I’ve done sunrise photography before
but today I wanted to follow the rules instead of fighting them so in my
research I’ve come up with these top tips for better sunrise photography scout your location you can actually go
physically to scout your location before you set up so you get a lay of the land
or if you’re busy use Google Maps check the weather check it every day because
the weather isn’t consistent this way you can plan ahead if anything changes
have an idea of the shot you want before you go you can always change it later
set up your camera before you go this will save you time later the best
aperture is between f11 and f-18 and the ISO should be around about 100 or
200 it’s a good idea to set your camera up in aperture priority mode because
it’ll reduce the amount of changes you have to make if the light changes oh
and make sure you charge your batteries use an ND filter cause light can confuse
your camera this way you can keep your shutter open for longer without
overexposing your capture it’s like sunglasses for your shooter use a tripod obviously you don’t want
any shake in your shot especially when you’ve got those long exposures lay
clothes out the night before to save you time dress for the cold and also leave a
lot earlier than you think you should just in case you’re late there we go Episode five is done now
such a beautiful day I’m so glad that we got out well some of us got up at 3
o’clock in the morning was definitely worth it I think viewing it was worth it
I think it was really nice I’m really excited to see the shots that we got on
the water with that sunrise you’ll see a shot at the end of what was taken it’s
been an absolutely beautiful day maybe things happen for a reason this is
probably a better location than yeah it was a better location than the one that
I’d originally scouted for so maybe you were late for a reason but next time I
think we should turn up on time don’t forget to Like subscribe and share our
videos our names will be at the bottom so you can you can look on to his
channel as well and make sure you hit those notifications so that you don’t
miss any content because he’s not regular let’s face it time to go Steve I’m still amazed by when he does that
hang on a minute Steve Steve Steve Oh