How to photograph the night sky

How to photograph the night sky


Astrophotography is so exciting, but, you need to get to grips with a few basics to achieve great results. It will take a bit of experimentation, but there is one set up I always try first. I shoot with manual exposure, I use a 16mm lens shutter speed 25 secs, aperture is f/2.8, and with an ISO 3200. Wide angle shots work really nicely to get in lots of the Milky Way, but tighter shots can work well too. Just bear in mind that you will have to reduce the exposure time to stop the stars blurring as the earth turns. With these long exposures you are going to need a sturdy tripod and self timer release to help reduce shake. The key is a bit of planning, Before you set out, find out where the moon and Milky Way are going to be at different times and set your shots accordingly. The moon is always tricky. A little bit of light can be your friend, throwing some light on the landscape. But stars always look better with no moon at all. This is just fantastic.The result of night time shots can be really stunning, so please do give it a go.

How to Take Your Own Pictures 📸12 Pose Ideas!

How to Take Your Own Pictures 📸12 Pose Ideas!


I used to believe that I needed someone behind the camera every time I took
photos or videos. Over the years I learned how to master the technique of
taking my own pictures I know exactly what I want and with just the tripod
camera or even a phone you’re able to achieve everything on your own so today
I’m going to share with you my top 12 tips on how to take even better photos
by yourself these are all super creative ideas that
I’ve found on tik-tok Pinterest Instagram so I hope you guys like them
if you do give it a big thumbs up don’t forget to tag me at fashioned by Ali if
you try any of these photos I would love to see them so without further ado let’s
hop into this video go now I wanted to show you my equipment I usually like to
use so I’m taking photos by myself so I just have this baby tripod I have a link
for you guys on my Amazon store down below so be sure to click that this is
my brand new vlog camera I’m obsessed with it because it’s so wide you can get
a great selfie it has a flip out screen which is amazing I haven’t had a flip
out screen camera for probably like two years now and now I can see myself see
what I’m doing amazing and it has Wi-Fi in it so you can connect to your phone
and then use your phone as a remote again I like to use my phone to take a
lot of selfies and portrait yes I’m that girl for a while I was really struggling
to take pictures with my DSLR I always thought that I needed someone to help me
take pictures because it doesn’t have a viewfinder so I never know what it
looked like and I had a really hard time focusing but did you know you could use
your phone as a remote to find the Wi-Fi setting on your DSLR just go to the
wrench tool click on communication settings built in Wireless and then
enable your Wi-Fi okay and then now on your phone turn on the Bluetooth so I
just connected my phone all the way back here you position my
body and then I can try different angles so I like extending one leg out and then
one in way too short okay the next photo is inspired by Kiley
catch I love all of her photos on Instagram in this photo she has a
mouthful of sprinkles and then she’s just sticking her tongue out it looks
really fun and whimsical so I’m going to try to replicate that shot and let’s see
if I can do it okay so I assure you got a move so we
also have some sprinkles let’s do a quick let’s just studying
over here judging me oh hello so don’t be afraid to try something new because
self-timer photos are fun and no one’s there to judge you and you get to be as
creative as you like next up I wanted to try a kissy selfie so on the mirror I’m
going to kiss it with a few different lipstick colors that way I create like
an ombre kissing effect and you guys are ready for this
look at this giant lipstick from NARS I don’t know if I have enough lipstick on so make sure your mirror is clean oh no
there’s nothing this is done kissing me hi guys so Christina and I are matching
today because we’re going to a cute dessert cafe in the marina we’re
matching an all pink kind of photo shoot and then I have like a white top bottom
some cute we’re having dessert it’s my breakfast so now we’re gonna try to take our photo
using each one of this video tripod I’m controlling it on my phone what the salmon avocado chosen a macho
cake cake within my know bring two Japanese
breakfast this would be so awkward if you did this
by yourself but since I have Christina I feel so much more great yeah it’s harder
to get probably there’s two of us if you have to tripod and a really nice camera
I just do it safely in a neighborhood where you know that someone won’t steal
your camera we made it to our next location which is
here in Burlingame I love this beautiful pink nail salon so my next tip for you
guys is instead of shooting a photo straight on try angling yourself because
that way it creates a more dynamic shot so another tip is to add emotion to your
photos by either going flowy clothes eight or three flower petals or like
walking back and forth that way photos look so much more interesting than a
static like stiff standing shot the next photo tip is to always hit a touch shot
if you can’t get yourself in the photo to the test shot have your friend a
family member political hours or even like a stuffed animal does a really
great job last but not least I want to do a pose refresher
I feel pretty awkward with my hands I never know where to put them especially
when I’m sitting down so don’t do this because it makes your body look a lot
shorter but turn your body at a 45 degree angle and Bend one leg here
you’re creating triangles with your body that looks way more flattering so that
was 12 different ways that you can get more creative with your photos all by
yourself I really like taking my own photos and videos because I can create
the moment that I envisioned in my head there were definitely a lot of fail
moments where I really wish I had someone else helping me click the photo
I’m just happy I was able to accomplish so many different shots and angles all
by myself comment down below and let me know which concept you liked the most
and the one that you want to try sure to tag me in your photos at fashion back
alley I love you guys and I’ll see you next week bye

Best CAMERA SETTINGS for WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY on safari in Africa. Canon 80d and Sigma 150-600mm

Best CAMERA SETTINGS for WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY on safari in Africa. Canon 80d and Sigma 150-600mm


Good day! My name is Guts from Pangolin Photo Safaris, and today we’re on the Chobe River. I am going to talk to you about my
‘go-to’ camera settings, so that I ready for any shot – that might
happen – when I go on Safari. Before we get started…please remember to subscribe, so you can get notified when there is a next video. Today we’ve got the Canon 80D, which is
the camera we supply to all our guests here at Pangolin Photo Safaris on the Chobe River. The ‘go-to settings’ that I believe is the best is starting off with the absolute
priority of shutter speed. All my camera settings – I always shoot in manual mode – and I preset the shutter speed at 1/2500 sec. Why 1/2500 sec? Because I can literally shoot anything…a flying bird, an animal running through the water. I don’t want to be too slow. I don’t want to be caught off-guard. That’s why my priority is 1/2500 sec. When there is a lot of light – like this – nice and bright sunny day… I would go to f/8. It’s almost fool-proof…with a 1/2500 sec shutter speed and f/8, I can just about go and shoot anything! That is, if we have enough light. If we don’t have this crazy amount of light, I will still prioritise my speed at 1/2500 sec…. but, I will go to my low f-stop – as
low as my lens can go. The cameras that we supply to our guests, are fitted with a Sigma 150-600mm Sport Lens, and our lowest f-stop will then be f/5. So, I will adjust to f/5 if there is a little bit less light. The next thing is my ISO…set on auto. BUT, I have capped the ISO at 3200, because with this specific body – with the 80D – I find that you get a lot of noise after 3200. So, I have capped ISO at 3200…and I know it’s going to be somewhere in between there. The next thing is my white balance, and because I shoot in raw, white balance doesn’t really matter, so my camera’s always on auto white balance. Again, not a big problem. The next thing is our focus point. Personally, I like the single focus point, with the ‘4 little helpers’. It just helps you to keep a bit of action (if it happens), but it’s not like a shotgun, that will just focus all over the show. The next thing that people always ask about, is light metering… Personally, I prefer partial light metering. It prioritises where your focus
point is, and a little bit around that. For me that works well. The advice with light metering, is that once you’ve selected one specific light meter, rather stay with it. I stay with partial metering, because I know how it behaves. I tend to never adjust my light metering, because it jumps up and down with spot metering…. if you are on the light, or off the light. So rather just choose a specific light meter – in my case I use partial – and you will never need to adjust it again… because you know how it behaves If it’s a picture that you need
to overexpose… I know on this specific light metering, I need to over-expose that much – so it’s a constant. Then, I have got my camera set on full frame – at 14 frames a second – which is gold, because when there’s some action you don’t want to pick up your camera and go click, click, click, click! You rather want to get all the action. Another thing that people tend to forget is, every night when I put my camera back in my bag, I set it on this go-to setting. What happens a lot, is that when you do night time photography, like star photography, or painting with light, and then tomorrow morning the first shot that you get, is a leopard running across the road. You pick up your camera, and you’re still on a 30-second exposure…and that’s a common mistake a lot of people are making. Alight! F/8, 1/2,500 sec, auto ISO in this light, it gives me an ISO of 200, which is more than adequate… and my light meter is on partial, and I am ready to go! The big thing is to always make sure that your exposure compensation is on zero – so, that’s your ‘go-to’. I always tell my guests that you should do ‘border patrol’. That is when you look through your frame, and you see all the sides of your image. In there you will see your f-stop, shutter-speed and exposure compensation (that’s on 0). You will also see the power left in your battery. Once you are happy with what see there, you can put your camera away, and if there’s anything happening, you can pick it up and just SHOOT! I hope you find that useful. Please come and join me here in the Chobe. We hope to see you soon. Thank you very much for watching guys! If you want to join me here for a Safari, I have put a link in the description below. If there are any other photographic questions you would like to ask, please let us know in the comments below, and we will see if we can make a video about that too! Thank you!

How to Pose for Pictures

How to Pose for Pictures


hey what’s up guys so I’m here on
Melrose Avenue and I just wanted to show you guys how to do some poses for
pictures so the first thing that you want to keep in mind is that when you’re
posing you want to make sure that what you’re doing is creating a shape with
your body a lot of times guys tend to get stiff and they just tend to stand
straight so they don’t think about creating shapes interesting shapes or
their body so it’s very key to create interesting shapes in your bodies that
way the photographer gets inspired by what you’re doing and the pictures turn
out to be great another thing to keep in mind is that you also want to play with
the clothing that you’re wearing you want to show off some the main features
of the clothing so what you can do to help you create interesting shapes with
your bodies is first of all you start off with your feet rather than having
both toes pointing towards the camera what you want to do is maybe have one
pointed towards the sides lift up the heel a little bit
create some variations and some different leveling with both of your
feet another thing that you could do is to maybe even cross them or another
thing that you could do actually is to put one to decide and lift it up lift up
the hill next with your hip area I know it’s very awkward for guys to to flex
their hips because guys tend to be very stiff in the hips what you want to do is
that you want to relax your hips as much as possible so just kind of switch
balance back and forth between one hip to the other another thing that you
could do with your hands is rather than having your hands straight to this side
or have an improv you want to have variations as well so you could have you
can create interesting shapes at your elbows so for instance if you stick out
an elbow like this that’s already an interesting shape that could that could
really inspire the photographer rather than just having it straight down to the
side you could also maybe even lift up your hand and put it behind your head
again you’re having your elbows point your elbows pointed out and that’s
creating an interesting shaped and this also create some kind of
visual interest for the photographer in the viewer of the photo and another
thing that you could do with your hands if you run out of ideas you can actually
just start fiddling with the clothing that you’re wearing so you could have a
pose like that you can have something like this you could play with the button
and notice that my elbows are sticking out and another thing that I like to do
especially when up when I’m kind of like getting towards that burnout phase and
I’m running out of ideas you just start stretching when you start stretching you
could actually accidentally find yourself into another pose try to keep
moving around don’t ever stay stiff just keep flowing
even though it feels awkward you would eventually find a couple of poses that
works great for you so now with the face because a lot of times we pose with our
body so we don’t really think about the face you have to change your face up as
much as possible so make sure you’re standing in front of mirror and make
sure you do a lot of practice shot because working on the face is very
important so as a guy what you could do is something attire bank says a lot is
to practice smizing so by smizing I mean just kind of like
keeping your face straight we’re just thinking about a happy thought and then
just arching the eyebrows a little bit another thing that you could do is to
clench your jaws so that your bone structure in your face really really
shows up in the image and that way you look really strong and masculine another
tip for smiling it’s to actually smile but it dropped as well just right before
the picture is taken and then of course you can actually really smile because a
lot of times guys have great smiles but they are not comfortable showing it so
it really you know helps build some emotion behind the picture and tells a
story and finally another tip for your face is to always cheat your face
towards the main source of life so in this case I’m outdoors and I believe the
Sun is right behind me so there’s no really source of light but if a
photographer had a flash coming from this direction what I would do is I
would cheat my face towards the flash so that way my face is hitting the light
and I’m evenly lit and the face can’t fault the light can’t fall on my face
and fall off my cheekbones which will make my face look really structured and
chiseled so guys there you have it’s as always if you have questions
just hit me up in the comments below and I’ll answer all of your questions thank
you guys for watching see you next time

How To Pose For Photos | Instantly Look Better In Pictures

How To Pose For Photos | Instantly Look Better In Pictures


Brainy Dose Presents: How To Look Good In Every Picture – 13 Pro
Tips And Tricks Have you ever seen a picture of yourself and
felt mortified by what you saw?! Now, that may be a bit over the top, but really,
everyone could use a little help to look better in photos. While some people seem to be naturally photogenic
and others not so much, it’s really all tied to how we respond to the camera. We all get caught in front of the camera now
and again. But don’t worry; with the following tips
on your side, you’re sure to look your best! But first, if you enjoy these kinds of videos,
make sure you subscribe to our channel if you haven’t yet, and turn on notifications,
so you never miss a video. OK, let’s get to it! Number 1 – Study Photos Of Yourself The first step is simple; learn from the past. You need to know how you look in photos before
you can improve. Right? Gather some old pictures together, even if
they make you cringe a little. By analyzing these old snaps, you can find
out what helps and what hinders you. Take note of the angles and see what highlights
your features. Look over how your body is positioned in the
shots, and find a few flattering or natural poses you can use in the future. Number 2 – Practice In Front Of A Mirror Now that you’ve figured out what works for
you in photos, head over to a mirror. Take the time you need, and start using what
you’ve learned from your old pictures, practicing in front of the mirror. Your starting point is to narrow it down to
a handful of poses and angles you like best. Work on your favorites so that they come naturally
to you, and you’ll be able to mentally pick out a pose in the future – without a mirror. One thing that goes great with a nice pose
is a matching smile, so try out several smiles until you find one that fits. You should consider whether a closed or open-mouthed
smile looks better, going for the more ‘natural’ look. Number 3 – Wear Flattering Clothes The clothes you wear are an essential aspect
of good pictures. Consider both your skin tone and body type
when picking your outfits, and you should look for colors and garments that accentuate
them. Don’t worry; it’s simpler than it sounds. Clothing that is tailored or cut well will
naturally be more flattering, while baggy clothes have the unflattering effect of making
you look broader than you are – so do your best to stay away from those. When it comes to colors, try to lean toward
more neutral choices. Black, navy, white, and olive, for example,
pair well with most skin tones. Keep your eye on the patterns of your clothes,
too. They can negatively pull focus, altering your
appearance in the photo. If you have your heart set on a pattern, choose
it for only one element of your outfit – and steer clear of small, busy patterns. Number 4 – Don’t Face The Camera Directly Let’s be honest; facing directly into the
camera makes you look a bit weird. Not only that, it might bring out the double-chin
of doom! That’s a sure-fire way to ruin any photo! Instead, position your body slightly away
from the camera, and turn your head toward the lens. Then, lower the shoulder that’s facing the
camera a little bit. This will compliment your features – your
jawline primarily – resulting in a much more flattering shot. Also, remember to pay attention to where your
eyes are looking too. The safest option is to look straight ahead. It’s as easy as that. If you start looking in random directions,
people won’t know what you were trying to convey. If you look up, you may come off as confident
or proud, or like you weren’t ready for the picture. If you look down, you can seem sad or just
deep in thought. And if you’re one of those people who always
blinks when a photo is taken, relax, and instead of forcing your eyes open, try to blink right
before the camera goes off. Number 5 – Relax Your Mouth To Relax The Eyes Sometimes, what we see as ‘awkward’ in
a picture is just a display of tension. Our brains pick up on tense body language
– even in photos – and we see it as inauthentic. The eyes are one of the places where tension
shows up the most. It doesn’t matter if you have a huge smile;
unless your eyes are relaxed, you’ll end up looking like you’re scared or like you
don’t want to be there. Remember to take a breath and let your mouth
relax. This simple action will help your whole face
and your eyes to relax so that you can smile without the tension. Number 6 – Say “Money” I know we’re used to saying “Cheese,”
but this only creates a fake smile. Ditch the cheese and try out the word “Money”
instead. The ending ‘ey’ is a stronger sound that
forces the corners of your mouth upward and creates a crinkle around your eyes. The result is a more natural, realistic smile. You can also think of a happy memory or a
funny joke. Laughing at the camera gives off a more lively
and in-the-moment vibe. Another great trick to prevent a smile that
is too wide or gummy is placing your tongue on the back of your front teeth. Number 7 – Sit Up Straight If you want good shots, you need good posture,
so be mindful of how you position yourself while sitting or standing. Slouching whether you’re sitting or standing
looks terrible in pictures. It makes your neck and body appear shorter
than they are, and worst of all, it makes your waistline appear bigger. To avoid this, keep your spine nice and straight
and pull your shoulder blades closer together. If you’re sitting down, don’t lean back. Sit a bit forward and turn half-way to the
camera to add definition. Number 8 – Don’t Square Your Body The camera really can add ten pounds – depending
on how you stand! If you stand directly into the camera, you’re
prone to looking more ‘chunky.’ However, if you keep your legs ‘shoulder-width’
apart, bend your front leg and distribute your body weight to your back foot, the result
will immediately make you appear slimmer. Standing at a 3/4 turn is always a winning
pose – especially if you’re with a group of people, as this position cuts your size
in almost half. Also, try to wiggle your way into the center
of group shots when you can. You won’t be sticking out awkwardly at the
edge of the group, and people on either side can cut off a few inches. When it comes to taking “groupies,” you
should always pass the camera to the person with the longest arms. They’ll be able to get everyone in the frame,
plus, they can comfortably hold the camera upward while tilting it down a little – so
everyone is at their best angle. Number 9 – Do Something With Your Hands Doing something with your hands will help
you appear more at ease, instead of just having your arms dangling by your side. Ladies, this could be as simple as touching
your hair. The natural movement of doing a little root
fluff or playing with the ends will also infuse your pictures with spontaneity and sincerity. Another great trick that works like magic
is placing the hand closest to the camera on your hip; this also adds definition to
your upper arm! Guys, perhaps the most natural thing YOU can
do is put your hands in your pockets, or cross your arms. You can also use props to eliminate that awkwardness. They not only provide an anchor for your hands,
but they also keep the shots feeling fresh and dynamic. It could be as simple as holding a drink or
sunglasses. If you are sitting down, hold your hands in
a relaxed grip in front of you. Number 10 – Emphasize Your Face You can also use your hands to draw attention
to your face subtly. Just don’t clench your fist and lean your
head on top of it, as it can look forced! Instead, gently cup your extended fingers
under your chin without making contact, drawing focus to your features. Number 11 – Choose The Right Lighting If you want to look good in pictures, you
must pay attention to lighting. Getting some sunny snaps on a bright day sounds
fantastic. Right? But in reality, the sun can quickly move to
an unfavorable spot and create harsh shadows – and raccoon eyes – that are anything but
flattering. If you want a beautiful glow, the best time
for pictures is in the evening hours as the sun is going down. Otherwise, opt for slightly cloudy or overcast
days. It’s also worth mentioning that standing
right under an indoor light will have the same effect as the sun, so try a source of
natural light instead, such as a window. Number 12 – Clear The Background Believe it or not, the background can either
make or break a photo. Having an over-cluttered background can pull
focus from YOU – the subject, and make the photo look ‘busy.’ When you are posing for pictures outside,
use a plain wall or building as your background. When indoors, make sure that your environment
is clean and free of clutter. Number 13 – Be Authentically You When it comes to pictures, we usually have
an idea of what we want ourselves to look like – but we tend to try too hard, and this
can lead to awkward smiles and unnatural poses, ruining our snaps. The best thing you can do is let go of all
that stress. The camera is supposed to capture YOU, so
allow yourself to be in the moment, and you’ll be much more relaxed. Instead of over-analyzing how the picture
will look or what people might think, be true to yourself. Draw strength from your sincerity, and this
will show through in your photos. Just be yourself – no filter can top that! All in all, your photos are probably not as
awkward as you think – you’re probably just judging yourself too harshly. But as long as you avoid silly poses and remember
to use these tips, you’re well on your way to looking great in pics! And if you know any other tips and tricks
that didn’t make this list, share them with us in the comments below! If you enjoyed this video, give it a thumbs-up,
and share it with your friends, so we can keep making them. For more videos like this, hit the subscribe
button, and remember to click on the notification bell. Also, be sure to check out our other videos
as well. Thanks for watching!

Photography Books: Stories Behind The Images

Photography Books: Stories Behind The Images


hey what’s up guys welcome back to my
channel and as always thanks for watching this will be a quick video I
just got done making my aperture MC Lyte video it’s a really cool inexpensive
light that packs on a ton of features and it’s RGB so if you haven’t checked
out that video I’ll link it up above but that’s not what this video is about this
video is about what are you guys doing this winter maybe you’re traveling
visiting family painting it at home because the kids are out of school and
you just want some home time maybe you’re chilling by a fire because it’s
cold outside so you probably no matter what you’re doing need a good book to
pass the time well as videographers photographers we’re all about capturing
images and sometimes we want to know the stories behind the images we see well
this new book that I picked up is one you’ll love it’s by Corey rich who’s an
adventure photographer his book is entitled stories behind the images this
is a really awesome book not about the images he captures but the stories
behind them what so for him to become a venture photographer how does he get
motivated and you know not really about technique but again about the stories
behind the images he captures it’s a really interesting read and the cool
thing is you don’t have to read it from chapter 1 all the way to the end you can
kind of skip around to whatever you know story catches your eye anyway thought
I’d recommend it check it out stories behind the images I’ll link it down in
the description as always thanks for watching and I’ll catch you in the next
video

5 Camera Facts You Might Be Getting Wrong!

5 Camera Facts You Might Be Getting Wrong!


– Cameras, videography, and
photography are confusing. There are a lot of misconceptions
on how things work, and YouTube can sometimes
be a lonely thing to do. Most of the time, it’s just
me here, all by my lonesome, talking to confusing
cameras, so in today’s video, we’re going to attempt to
improve both of those issues by taking a look at clearing up some common misunderstandings
in the camera world with the help of some incredibly talented friends from YouTube. My name is Dunna, and if
you’re new here, welcome, and if this is the kind
of thing that you like, consider hitting that
subscribe button, and the bell, so that you can keep up
with what I’ve got going on. All right, let’s hop right into
things with our first guest, Dr. Chris Nicholas. You might know him from the
channel Becki and Chris. He saves lives, he flies
helicopters, and right now, he’s gonna give you the
rundown on something that a lot of people are confused about. – Hello, Dunna’s audience,
Chris from the channel Becki and Chris here,
and Dunna asked me to weigh in on what I think one
of the biggest misconceptions with cameras is, and that is
the myth of lens compression. Now, I’m gonna start with a question. Do you think that this
lens at 600 millimeters would make the background
of an image bigger with respect to the subject
than a wider angle lens like this 12 millimeter lens? And I would venture to say
that it doesn’t matter. So traditionally, people
have always been taught that a longer, or more
telephoto lens will increase the size of your background
with respect to the subject, as compared to a wider lens. I think that’s a bit of a
myth because it’s the distance you are from your subject
that actually determines how big the background appears. The only difference is, you
have to use a longer lens to get the same framing, and therefore, people always associate the longer lens with the bigger background elements, but it’s really just the
fact that you are far away from your subject. I’m gonna illustrate
this point very quickly, and succinctly with a
dolly zoom shot here. So as I’m moving
backwards, I’m zooming in, and you can see the background gets bigger with respect to the subject. Now, if I move back, the
same camera movement, but leave the focal length the same, but I simulate a zoom
in by just magnifying or enlarging the image in
post, you get that same effect, you get that dolly
zoom, Alfred Hitchcock effect, so there you go. That’s proof that the
focal length, or the lens actually doesn’t have
any effect on the size of the background. It’s all about perspective,
and how far away you are from the subject. If you wanna dive deeper
into this, we actually have a full video on it in
our channel link up here, but in the meantime, back to you, Dunna. – If you wanna see an even
more detailed explanation of what Chris was just
talking about, feel free to head to the description
at the end of this video. There’s another video link
in there that you can go check out, and you might
even see yours truly, but in the meantime, let’s
get on to our next guest, and our next topic. When he’s not busy
editing television shows and documentaries, Mark
Holtze is reminding us that newer isn’t always better. It’s easy to get caught up
in the latest and greatest, but his YouTube channel
is often an affirmation of just how awesome vintage lenses can be. Tell us about that vintage goodness, Mark. Thanks, Dunna. Lenses, it’s said that
lenses are for life, and that they’re one
of the best investments you can make when it comes to photography. This full frame 50 millimeter
f/1.4 lens is 45 years old, and can easily be adapted to
mirror-less digital cameras for use today. So if lenses are for life,
can a 45-year-old vintage lens compete with today’s modern lenses? Well, I say yes, they can. It just depends on how you use them. Vintage SLR lenses still
have a lot going for them when used in photography. They’re fast, inexpensive,
built like tanks, and work almost seamlessly
with modern cameras. This makes them highly
accessible for anybody willing to experiment with them. They may not have that
edge to edge sharpness of modern lenses, but what they
lack in clinical sharpness, they make up for in character, or patina, which is really just a nice way of describing optical imperfections. Embrace imperfection. When properly used, you
can exploit the individual charm these lenses offer
to get some unique shots. For example, the Helios
44M 58 millimeter f/2 is know for its swirly
bokeh, which is best used to emphasize portraits
with nice bokeh background. This effect leads the eye
towards the middle of the image, isolating your subject. It’s an effect that’s hard
to replicate optically with a modern lens. This is just one of many
examples, but if you leverage these flaws, and turn
them into opportunities, you can capture images
that really help you stand out from the pack. Using vintage lenses today
definitely requires you to alter your perception
a bit, but I think there’s a lot of value in that. It’s not only a cheap
alternative to a modern lens, it’s a great opportunity to step outside your comfort zone, learn
photography fundamentals, and to experiment, and
most important, though, it’s fun, and ultimately, that’s what’s gonna keep you going. Thanks, guys. – And, once again, I’ll
link to an awesome video in the description that you can check out if you want more info on this topic. Okay, here’s something
that we can all agree on. If we want to take photos
or videos, we need light. Our next guest is the resident
pro, and host of Aputure’s four-minute film school
show on YouTube, as well as an incredible travel doc
filmmaker, Valentina Vee is here to shed some
light on the situation. Yeah, I’m sticking with it. – Something that a lot
of people come up to me and ask me about is what
lighting should I buy? And then, they don’t
tell me anything else, and what lighting you
should buy really depends on two things, what is your
budget, and what are you making? If you’re just gonna get a
three-pack of these panels, that’s fine, but it’s
probably not gonna be the best in every single one of your situations. Why? This is a multi-source light. As you can see, there are 672 lights here, which means that this light
is only ever going to be soft. You cannot create hard shadows. You cannot imitate sunlight. You can’t do a lot of
things with this light that you can with a light like this. This is the Aputure 300d II. It is a single-source
light, which means it has one giant diode, instead
of 672 small ones, so with something like
this, you’re gonna be really able to not only get
the harshest light you can, but also, the softest light
if you add different types of modifiers like soft boxes. So when you’re considering
what type of lights to buy, again, are you only
ever going to need to light soft things, or large spaces,
or do you wanna invest in something that’s gonna
give you a little bit more flexibility, and is
gonna give you more creativity down the line? That’s it. That’s all I have to say. I don’t have anything else to say. – That is super awesome advice
to a really common question. You need to know stuff like
that when you’re looking to pick up lights for your project. Now, before I get to my
point, we have one more guest that’s gonna blast through
some misconceptions of sensor size. Everyone’s favorite YouTube
camera nerd, Gerald Undone. He’s crazy. – Despite the number of videos
I’ve made on the subject, I’d say the impact of
sensor size is a topic I still see drenched in misconceptions. The most common one is
that larger sensors have a shallower depth of
field, and when it comes to depth of field, the only
role sensor size plays is determining how far you’re
standing from your subject, and what lens you’re using. Focal length and subject distance are the determining
factors, not sensor size. However, if you use a
smaller sensor, you’ll likely be using a lens with
a shorter focal length compared to composing that
same shot on full frame. For example, you might be
using a 16 millimeter lens on Sony APSC, compared
to a 24 millimeter lens on full frame to achieve the same look. This 16 millimeter lens will produce a deeper depth of field
not because of sensor size, but because of the diameter
of the entrance pupil. I have a whole video on that
if you wanna learn more, but the simplified version
is that a 16 millimeter lens, when using the same aperture
will have a smaller front hole for light to get in, which
focuses the rays more closely together, and increases
your depth of field. Sensor size is irrelevant. Shorter lenses always have
a deeper depth of field, when everything else is the
same, and the same is true for subject distance. If you were using the
same lens on both cameras, you’d have to stand farther
away on the crop sensor to achieve the same framing,
and being farther away from your subject will always
increase your depth of field. The only way to compensate
for this is to use a wider aperture on your shorter lens. In our 16 millimeter
example, we need to be at f/2 to match the entrance pupil
size of the 24 millimeter full frame lens at f/2.8. Now, the rays will be coming in similarly, assuming you’re standing
the same distance away, and your depth of field will be similar. Of course, shooting at
f/2 will appear brighter than the f/2.8 exposure,
which is the perfect time to drop your ISO to match
because smaller sensors do, generally, produce
more noise than full frame at similar ISO settings, so
you should reduce your ISO by your crop factor squared to complete the equivalency, and
make your images match. In the case of the 1.5 times APSC crop, this is similar to about
one stop, so ISO 800 at f/2 on APSC will be
quite similar to ISO 1600 at f/2.8 on full frame,
however, this leads to another misconception, which is
that somehow, these rules don’t apply when putting a
lens design for smaller sensors on a matching camera, i.e.,
a crop lens, on a crop body, but they still do apply, and
I’ll pass this back to Dunna to tell you more about
that, since he shot a ton using lenses specifically
designed for APSC. – Oh yeah, the old focal
length misconception is strong when it comes to
lenses built for different sensor sizes, so let’s break it down. This is a 16 millimeter
lens made for full frame camera bodies, and this
is a 16 millimeter lens made for APSC camera bodies. Now, if I take a photo
with each of these lenses on cameras with the intended sensor size, the full frame lens looks like this, and the crop lens looks like this, and just for clarification,
the camera was the exact same distance from the subject in each photo. As you can see, the APSC
crop photo is more zoomed in. It has a narrower angle of view. The thing that trips people up about this is that if they have the
same name, 16 millimeters, how come they don’t look
the same, considering one lens was designed
specifically for crop bodies? Why do we have to do math? And I definitely understand
the confusion because we’re used to thinking
of how wide a lens is, based on that number, the 16 millimeters. What’s happening here is, we’re confusing our focal length of 16
millimeters with our angle of view, which is the true
measurement of how wide our photo or video will be. Those things are definitely
connected, but not the same. The focal length is a physical measurement of the distance between
the lens’ optical center, and the center of the
camera when that lens is focused to infinity. I know that sounds very
complicated, but just remember this, it is literally measuring
a part of the lens. As that measurement gets
longer, let’s say we go from 16 millimeters to 35
millimeters, the angle of view gets narrower, which we
would think of as zooming in. Basically, you are seeing a narrower slice of the scene, or a narrower angle of view. So, the reason that a 16
millimeter lens made for crop sensors is still
called a 16 millimeter, even though the photo looks more zoomed in is because physically, inside
the lens, that measurement is still 16 millimeters. It’s a different angle of view, but it’s still the same focal length. This is why we take
crop factor into account when buying lenses for crop cameras. In that case, you may hear terms
like full frame equivalent. That’s because a 16 millimeter
lens on crop cameras has a similar angle of view
as a 24 millimeter lens on a full frame camera. If I keep going on on this,
I’ll start feeling like I’m talking in circles,
but if I haven’t made myself clear enough, always
feel free to hit me up in the comments, and I’ll do
my best to help you understand. I wanna say a huge thank you
to Chris, Mark, Valentina, and Gerald for helping
me out with this collab. I highly recommend going
and following them all. I’ll leave links to all of their channels in the description. I sincerely hope that you
feel slightly more enlightened than you were coming into this video. If so, make sure to hit that like button, and subscribe to the
channel for more like this. Thank you so much for watching,
and I’ll see you next time. (calm music)

How to Get Sharp Images With Olympus OM-D

How to Get Sharp Images With Olympus OM-D


Hi my name is Robin Wong and I want to
talk about how to get sharp images from Olympus OM-D system. Some people claim
that sharpness is a bourgeois concept, I strongly disagree with that.
I think sharpness is very important in photography because to me photography is
a representation of reality, even just a small slice of reality. When I look
around with my eyes I see everything crystal-clear, and I want to represent
that in my photographs. Feel free to disagree with me.
It is extremely crucial to get your images sharp while you are shooting it.
Get everything right in camera because if your images are not sharp, if they are
blur because of camera shake or slightly out of focus then you will never be able
to recover the sharpness while in post. iI you have wrong white balance settings,
your colors are a bit off, you have a little bit slightly underexposed
images or overexposed images you can still correct those with adjustments in
post-processing, but if your images are not sharp there’s nothing you can do in
your computer. There’s no amount of photoshop that can save your blurry main
subject in your photograph. Get it right in camera and here is why I’m sharing
these five tips on how to achieve sharpness in your images using OM-D cameras. Tip number one – move the focusing point
to the area exactly where you want it to be in focus. This is a crucial step I
never skip for every single photograph that I take. Just simply move the
focusing point around the screen you have enough focusing points to play with.
Find the area that you wish to be in perfect focus, place the focusing area
there half press the shutter button and take your shot.
If the focusing area is exactly at where you want you will get pin sharp image. Now I don’t trust Center focus and
recompose, I’ll show you why. Because the distance changed, the focal plane changed
and if you recompose the image there is a very dangerous chance of getting
slightly out of focus image. Tip number two – stop down your aperture. All lenses,
all lenses will benefit from stopping down just a little bit instead of
shooting wide open say F1.8. If you stop down to F2.8 or even F5.6 you
will notice increase of sharpness. Using aperture priority, I can control the F
number freely. Now I’m shooting an F1.8 wide open, I will show you that the
image it is good, it’s very decent there’s nothing wrong with this, in fact
I would perfectly use this with no issues. But if you just stop it down a
little bit say F5.6, now we will compare the images that we have taken.
There is some difference it is quite noticeable. Tip number three – use anti-shock. Now
anti-shock is a way to reduce shutter vibrations. You can find it here
anti-shock denoted by the diamond shape and by default it is not available you
can’t find it. There so you have to dive into menu to go to anti-shock silent
dive into it then you will go for the 0 second Anti- shock
make sure there is turn on right “0” second so that there is no delay and once “0”
second anti-shock is activated you will see that the camera is less prone to
shutter vibrations or shutter shock which is a phenomenon that happens when you
use longer focal lengths or at certain shutter speeds where the camera can
actually cause a little bit of softness due to shutter vibrations. Tip number four – shutter speed. Watch your
shutter speed, make sure that it is fast enough to get rid of hand shake or else
there’ll be some softness or blur in your images when using a longer focal
length. There is higher chance for the camera to shake while hand-holding. Now
I’m using the 45mm lens, I’m using dangerously slow shutter speed. and
you will see that there is noticeable hand shake causing blur in the image. Just by ensuring that I have fast the
shutter speed usually just use what a wider aperture or a higher ISO
then we’ have safe shutter speeds you will guarantee that there is no handshake and
you get pin sharp images. Finally tip number five – don’t drink
coffee! I’m kidding sorry about that.
Well this tip is applicable for you if you are shooting JPEG be careful of the
noise filter. If you have set a noise filter to standard or high you will get
cleaner high ISO results meaning that the noise will be reduced but at the
same time the fine details and overall sharpness of your image will also be
affected. How normally we recommend to set the noise filter to low or just turn
it off completely. You can find the noise filter settings in the camera menu under
the cogs then on the noise filter if you turn it high, let’s see what happens.
I don’t recommend this, should you get noise filter high
it was smoothing out the noise but it will also make all the fine details
disappear you can very smooth result. You don’t see traces of noise but you don’t
see any hint of sharpness as well to me I actually prefer if we turn off or use
a noise filter low. I don’t really mind a little bit of noise in my images as long
as the structural integrity is maintained. Now you can see there is more
fine detail captured. That’s all the tips I have to share in
this video I hope you have found those five tips useful and I really hope that
the next time you go and shoot with your Olympus OM-D you will acquire sharp
sharp sharp results. If you like this video please give me a thumbs up and
please consider subscribing to this channel. I will do my best to do more
videos and I will definitely see you again in the next one in the meantime
please go out and take more photographs! Bye bye