APERTURE and DEPTH OF FIELD, made easy. WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY. Botswana.

APERTURE and DEPTH OF FIELD, made easy. WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY. Botswana.


Hello! It’s Danielle from Pangolin Photo
Safaris on our home turf, the Chobe River. Today I am going to answer a question
that we often get asked, and that is how can I blur my background to the maximum? That basically means, how can I use depth-of -field? to my advantage, or how
can I control the depth-of-field? Today we have got some waterbuck to demonstrate the concept, and they’re quite nice, because they stand tall for a while.
Great to demo this on. So, the first way of doing it, is to control the distance
between yourself and the subject. Which is great, because we are in a boat, so we can either come closer or further away from the subject. The closer you are to the subject the more the background blurs. The second way of doing
it, is to control the distance between the subject and its background. So, as you can see, the background is quite far away, and that’s also fairly in your control,
as you can position the boat to choose a background that’s further away, if you
want more blur. The third way, is to use your zoom. The more zoomed in you are, the
more the background blurs. The last and obvious way to do it, is to
decrease your f-stop. So, take a shot at f/16. Then take a shot at your lowest
f-stop. Go down to f/6.3 or to f/4. Leave everything else the same
and take your shot. Zoom in and notice the difference in your background, and
you will see that that’s how you blur your background. For more videos, subscribe to our channel, or hit the bell icon at the bottom to get notified when the next video is
available. Until next time. Bye bye!

Should you rent a camera or buy?

Should you rent a camera or buy?


One of the most frequently asked questions to me by people who are just getting into photography is or they’ve been doing it for a while, is whether they should be buying camera gear or they should simply be hiring it. By the way can I please request you to subscribe to this channel so that you get all the updates that we send. Also it’s a good idea to hit the bell icon, so that you get instant notifications when we have new content. Well I don’t want to answer this question in simply hire or simply buy I’d like you to do a little bit of a math and figure out the answer yourself. So let’s do this exercise please list down all the trips you’ve been to the last two years. It could even be a weekend out or it could be a day trip birding out in Bangalore or Bombay or wherever. Now, apart from that I’d like you to make a list of all the camera equipment that you used on all of these trips and you can go to a website like ours which is the Toehold Camera Rent and take prices of these camera equipment and put them in the Excel sheet. In short, I’d like you to calculate the cost of hiring camera equipment in the last two years if you had hired them or if you really actually did hire them. Now that comes up to a particular number. And now look at the cost of actually procuring this equipment. If this cost of hiring it is not below 15 to 20 percent of actually obtaining these equipment or buying this equipment then in my opinion it doesn’t really make business sense or economical smart sense to actually be investing on this camera gear because it will take you nearly five to six years to break even this cost. And you know happens what happens in the world of cameras right in five years the camera is obsolete and it’s time for you to buy another camera so you’ll actually be as good as just being renting all the time. So in my opinion if you don’t travel 40, 50, to 60 days in a year which is one fifth of a year and you don’t use camera equipment for 50-60 days in a year you would actually be better off simply hiring equipment from a rental store rather than investing your hard earned capital on investing on equipment which are not just sitting idle in your house but are also depreciating. The value of a 600 millimetre lens today is not the same one year later and two years later. So you’re actually depreciating the value of this equipment. In this era of all of us using these shared cars and taxis and Ola’s and Uber’s it really makes no sense to own a car. If you really don’t use it regularly. Likewise the same logic with camera equipment as well. If your usage is not really very high you should not be investing on camera gear and making it sit in your house and not do anything and also develop fungus and for which you will now have to invest on more camera equipment like buying a dehumidifier to keep your camera equipment safe. So guys if you’re not really using your camera for more than 50 days in a year let’s keep that as a thumb rule. It makes no sense for you to buy equipment. You’re actually better off hiring it, paying whatever you want and the biggest advantage of hiring it is let’s say you’re going on a mammal photography trip like let’s say to Ranthambore, you wanted to photograph tigers. You need a 400 millimetre lens for example and next month you’re going to let’s say Corbett or let’s say a Pangot to make photographs of birds where 400 is a little short. You can actually be using a 600 millimetre lens. You go to Ladakh to photograph snow leopard you can be using a 800 millimetre lens so don’t get married to just one lens and hire it or buy it and keep it in your house. It’s a great idea to hire what you need for that particular day and that particular trip. So my choice is to be able to hire equipment when you want to. Unless you really know you shoot a lot and buy equipment like let’s say a 70 to 200 millimetre lens which you need for every trip and every place and you shoot more than 50-60 days a year.

Common DSLR & Mirrorless Camera Settings for Beginner Photographers, DSLR & Video Shooters

Common DSLR & Mirrorless Camera Settings for Beginner Photographers, DSLR & Video Shooters


If you’re new to photography and you’re
a beginner, you’re probably shooting in Automatic Mode. This is fine to start, but
you’re definitely going to want to learn to shoot in Manual Mode quickly. If
you’re not quite ready to take that leap into shooting in Manual Mode just yet,
you can stay shooting in Automatic Mode, but you should make some adjustments to
your camera settings so you can get the best images or videos that you can. If
you don’t know where to start, watch this video. I’ll show you how to initially set
up your camera and then set seven DSLR and mirrorless camera settings to ensure
that you get the best images and videos you can. Be sure to stay tuned to the end
to find out how to get my F-R-E-E DSLR and mirrorless camera cheat sheet that’ll have
you shooting like a pro in no time. Hi, I’m Jim Costa. I’m a videography, photography and
technology guru and I created many other videos on improving your photography,
videography, filmmaking, video editing, audio recording and technology skills &
I’ll link to those in the description below and both during & at the end of this
video, so stay tuned. If you want to learn more, remember to subscribe to my channel
and hit that bell to be notified when I upload new videos. I upload every week
and I’ll be uploading many more explanations of film, video, photo, editing
and technology topics. Many beginning photographers often wonder what camera
settings they should use to get the best possible results with their current
camera gear. While there is no set rule for camera settings that work well in
every shooting environment, there are some settings that are universal across
all brands of cameras on the market. These are the base settings you want to
set your camera to initially. Once they’re done you probably won’t revisit
them. In addition, there are particular camera modes that make the process of
capturing images or videos quicker or easier, especially for someone who’s just
starting out. Let’s start with your initial camera setup. First let’s go over
some of the camera settings that should apply to any modern digital camera. You
should be able to find all these settings specified below since they are
more or less universal across different camera brands and models. Some of these
have the same name across different manufacturers and some have different
names, so I’m going to list different names where applicable. Image Quality
should be set to RAW. Long Recording should be set to Lossless Compressed if
this feature is available. White Balance should be set to Auto. Picture Control / Picture Style / Creative Style / Film Simulation should be set to
Standard. Color Space should be set to RGB. Long Exposure Noise Reduction should
be set to. ON. High ISO Noise Reduction should be set to OFF. Active D-Lighting /
DRO, HDR, Lens Corrections sometimes Vignette Control, Chromatic Aberration Control,
Distortion Control, etc. any features like this should be set to OFF.
Don’t worry if you missed any of these, I’ll list them below in the description
for you so you’ll have them in writing and easy to follow at anytime. The above
are the most important camera settings. So let’s review each of them. First, you
always want to start out by selecting the proper file format which should be
in RAW. If there is a setting for selecting RAW Compression, always select
Lossless Compressed since it reduces the amount of space your RAW files
consume on your media card. While things like picture controls don’t matter for
raw images, they only impact the way the image appears on your camera’s LCD
screen, it’s best to stick with a standard profile without tweaking any
other settings like sharpening, contrast, saturation and so forth as such settings
only matter if you shoot in JPEG format but not when you’re actually shooting in
RAW. The same is true with color space and white balance. You do not have to
worry about them when you shoot in RAW since you can change them later. Unless
you know what you’re doing, I would keep Long Exposure Noise Reduction turned ON
since it does affect your RAW images when you’re shooting long exposures. It
works by reducing the amount of noise you’ll see in your images, although we’ll
have also double the amount of time it normally takes to capture an image. It’s
a trade-off, but an important one worth taking to keep the noise in your images
down. All other in camera Lens Corrections, Dynamic Range optimizations
and Noise Reduction options should all be turned off as well since they do
nothing to improve your RAW images. Once you have the above initial settings
setup on your camera it’s time to move on to things that matter when you
actually take pictures. Do you have any trouble with your camera settings? If so,
leave a comment below and I’ll be happy to try and help you. Be certain to let me
know the make and model of your camera and the specific setting you’re having
trouble with so I can get you the best solution.
Also, be certain to check out some of my other videos on camera tips and tricks.
I’ll leave links to them in the description below. So what is the best
camera shooting mode? If you’re shooting in Automatic (or AUTO Mode), you’ll find
that most cameras have gotten really good at properly metering a scene and exposing
the subject. Aperture Priority does a great job as it gives you full control
not just over a camera aperture but also how bright or dark an image will appear
overall. If your camera takes a brighter image then you would like it to be,
simply use the Exposure Compensation button to adjust the exposure and you’re
all set. The Exposure Compensation button looks a lot like this image here. If
you’re wondering whether it is good to shoot with any of the “Scene” Modes of
your camera such as Macro or Sports or Fireworks or any others. I would
discourage the use of these different modes for a number of reasons. The main
reason is that such modes vary greatly not just between different camera
manufacturers but also between different camera models within the same
manufacturer. If you learn to always rely on a particular scene mode on one camera
and decide to upgrade to a new one in the future,
you might not be able to find the same “Scene” Mode on a different camera
model. It’s also important to highlight that most hiring and professional
cameras don’t even come with “Scene Modes in the first place. If you get too
reliant on these specialized modes you may actually be limiting yourself from
growing your camera skills. The settings on most of these modes can be achieved
by learning to shoot in Manual Mode anyway, so why even bother?
Next is the best Autofocus Mode. You should always make sure that you’re
shooting in the best Autofocus Mode depending upon what you’re photographing.
For example, if you photograph a still subject you might want to use Single
Area Focus Mode also known as “Single Area AF,”
“One Shot AF” or simply something like “AF – S.” Whereas if the subject you are
photographing is continuously moving around, you’ll want to switch to Continuous
/ AI Servo Focus Mode, since you would probably want your camera to actively
track your subject. To make things easy for beginners, camera manufacturers
sometimes include a hybrid mode that automatically switches between Single
Area Focus Mode and the Continuous / AI Servo Focus mode depending upon whether
your subject is still or moving. This hybrid mode which is known as “AF – A” on
Nikon or “AI Focus AF” on Canon cameras for example, can be great Auto Focus Modes to
default to if you find it too difficult to constantly switch between the “AF – S”
and the “AF – C” camera modes. Set it to that and the camera will do the work for
you so you don’t have to. Some cameras also come with an “Auto AF” Mode which
looks at the whole scene and tries to focus on either the nearest subject to
the lens or the subject that the camera thinks is important. I would actually
recommend avoiding using such modes for beginners because it’s better to have
control over exactly where your camera for focus is by moving your focus point
to the spot that your camera should focus on. You can achieve this by
switching to the Single Point AF Area Mode. This mode tells your camera that
one spot within the frame is what you want in focus essentially. Once you have
a single point to move around in your viewfinder you can either move that
focus point within your frame to your subject or area of interest or move your
subject to the focus point, such as in this image you’re seeing here where the
point of focus is on the eyes. What is the best Metering Mode? While your camera
might have a number of different Metering Modes such as Spot Metering,
Center-Weighted Metering and something like Matrix / Evaluative Metering,
for most situations, it’s best to default to the Matrix / Evaluative Metering
Mode because it takes the whole scene into account and typically does a better
job at exposing your subject. Look for the word “Matrix” in the Metering section
of the menu and set your camera to that. The best Lens Aperture Mode. Lens
Aperture not only affects how your subject is isolated from the foreground
and the background, but also impacts how much light actually goes through
your lens, so you have to be careful about what aperture you pick in any
given situation. In addition, aperture can impact things
like image starkness and the depth of field, so it’s all about choosing the
best aperture for your subject and your shooting environment. If you’re taking
pictures in low light and you want to avoid introducing camera shade to your
images when shooting handheld, it’s best to take pictures with the widest
possible aperture your lens can provide so that your camera can receive as much
light as possible. For example, if you shoot with a 35mm F/1.8 lens,
you might want to keep that aperture set at F/1.8 in such conditions. However, if
you’re standing at a beautiful overlook like the Grand Canyon and you want to
capture a sharp photograph of the whole landscape, stopping down the aperture of
your lens to something like F/5.6 will be optimal because it’ll increase your
depth of field plus properly expose the image in most cases. Aperture is often
associated with how separated your subject appears from the background, but
that’s only one of its many functions. In this example, you can see how different
an image can appear when photographed at a wide aperture like F/2.8 versus a
smaller aperture like F/8. If this is making sense to you, put, “I got it” in the comments
section below. Next, is the best Shutter Speed. Just like aperture, the choice of
best shutter speed will highly depend on what you’re trying to capture. For
example, if your goal is to capture a dreamy photograph of a waterfall,
your going to need to use a slow shutter speed that might last several
seconds to make the running water appear that blurry smoky look to it.
Whereas, if you want to freeze a subject in your scene, you need to use very fast
shutter speeds that are a very small fraction of a second to actually
freeze the image. For most situations however, you are better off using shutter
speeds that are fast enough to capture images without introducing camera shake.
Next is the best ISO settings. When it comes to camera ISO you’re always better
off shooting with the lowest ISO possible because it produces the least
amount of noise and grain in your images. The last thing you want is every image
you shoot looking too noisy because you set your ISO too high. While using Noise
Reduction techniques might help, it’s better to avoid noise in the first place.
Notice the noise levels in these images. ISO 200 has almost no noise at all while
ISO 3200 adds a ton of noise to the image. However, shooting at the lowest ISO
is not always practical especially when you’re shooting in low-light
environments such as at night. In these situations, you will need to increase
your camera ISO in order to keep your shutter speed fast enough to avoid blur
from a slow shutter speed that would lead to unintentional camera shake. When
you have your shutter speed very slow, the aperture stays open a long time and thus
your image tends to be blurry because you move around.
Remember, photography is always a balancing act between aperture, shutter
speed and ISO known as the Exposure Triangle. I would recommend you spend
some time to understand how these three work and how they are related to each
other. I shot a video on the Exposure Triangle in the past, so feel free to
check it out. Next is auto ISO. If you have a modern digital camera, it most
likely comes with an auto ISO feature which can be a very handy tool for a
beginning photographer. Once you have the Auto ISO enabled, your camera will
automatically adjust your cameras ISO depending upon how bright your subject
and how bright the environment you’re shooting in is. Try to keep the shutter
speed at the same or higher level then the minimum shutter speed you set within
the auto ISO menu. Some cameras from Nikon, Canon and other manufacturers have
advanced Auto ISO menus that can take into account the Reciprocal Rule and
allow for an auto configuration for minims shutter speed which will take
into account a focal length of the lens being used. Such options can be very
useful for beginners because they take away the pain of constantly adjusting
camera settings. Lastly, don’t forget to take advantage of Image Stabilization
also known as Steady Shot, Vibration Reduction or Vibration Compensation,
something like that that’s offered either by your camera known as In-Body
Image Stabilization or your lens known as Lens Stabilization. Don’t forget to
turn it on when shooting handheld and turn it off when shooting from a stable
tripod because it’s not needed. Also, it’s always a good idea to half press the
shutter release for a second or two and let your camera or lens stabilize first
before actually taking your picture. This will reduce the potential for having
blurry images. My question of the day is, “If you’re still shooting in Auto Mode,
what’s keeping you from moving to Manual Mode?” Leave a comment below and let us
know. Maybe I can help you. Now you know the minimum camera settings you need to
get your camera set up for success. But what about learning more advanced camera
settings to get you shooting like a pro? I’ve created an absolutely F-R-E-E cheat
sheet for you on all the best camera settings for your DSLR, mirrorless or
video camera that will show you the settings that will allow your photos and
videos to compete with the pros. The link to get it is just below in the video
description. I’ve also created cheat sheets on other topics such as video
editing and even now offer training on video editing. I’ll link to those cheat sheets and
training courses below as well, so feel free to check them out.
If you want to join a community of photographers, videographers, filmmakers
and other people just like you, I have a secret society on Facebook where I share
even more pro tips and tricks. It’s called Video Producers and Content
Creators, so look for that on Facebook to connect there and join the group. We love
new members who want to share their work and learn from others. You’ll find the
link in the description below as well. You want to see even more videos like
this? Follow my YouTube channel Jim Costa Films for more. Think what you saw was
great? Go ahead and like it. Do you have an opinion? Please, comment below. Do you
know someone who could benefit from the information that I provided?
If so, then share the video. Do you want to learn even more? If that’s the case then
connect with me, Jim Costa Films on social media and online on Facebook,
Instagram, Twitter, YouTube and the web. I currently have over 4275 videos on my
YouTube channel, Jim Costa Films, so feel free to check out any of my other videos
for great tips and suggestions. I have almost as many images, well over 4100
right now, on my Instagram channel so you can see how I implement these techniques
that I’ve shown you in my own photographs. So look for Jim Costa Films
on Instagram and check it out there. I’ll be happy to hear your comments on
any of my images and I even answer questions from there.

7 Amazing Tips for Great Portrait Photographs | PhotoCube

7 Amazing Tips for Great Portrait Photographs | PhotoCube


Hello All, welcome to photo cube today we
would be discussing about the 7 best tips to click amazing portrait Photos, so why
wait let’s get started tip number one “Play with the light” keep experimenting on the way you light
your subject and as a result, you would certainly get amazing portraits, there
are almost unlimited possibilities when it comes to using light in portraits
side lighting can create mood backlighting and casting your subject to
cover their features can be powerful applying different color filters and
shape filters and your camera lens could fascinate your photographs further. tip number two “Play with eye Contact” you could try two ways out of which
first way is make you subject looking off the camera that is you have to let your
subject focus their attention on something unseen and outside the field
of view of your camera, this can create a feeling of candidness and also create a
little affair and interest as the viewer of the shot wonders what they are
looking at and now in a second way make you subject look in the direction of
an object within the frame (or towards camera itself) that is in the direction of some other subject or
an object within the frame itself for example a woman looking at her newborn
baby it also helps create a story within the
the image , now tip number three “introduce a Prop or second subject , add the prop of
some kind into your shots and there you go you have now created another point of
interest that can enhance your shot may it be a flower a toy or even a
person can make your portrait look more interesting and now tip number four
cover part of your subject a variation and the idea of zooming and
on one part of the body is to hide parts of your portrait subjects face or body
you can do this with clothing objects their hands or just by framing part of
them out of the image doing so will definitely add mystery in your
photograph and now tip number five take as many shots as possible take as many
shots as possible this step is really important for beginners and even
professionals as one or two shot are never going to be enough by taking
multiple shots you increase the chances of taking that perfect one shot that you
always wanted now tip number six try changing perspective
change the perspective try different angles different ways to keep your
subject and camera see the result it might fail sometime but most of the time
you would get amazing results apply the rule of thirds yes if required you can
apply the third rule here to in portrait photography and now the last tip number seven that
is editing yes this is the most important and final part in getting the
best portrait photograph but remember overrated and could the greater your
photograph – best software to edit your photographs is Adobe Photoshop you could
apply different filters and check which is best suited your photograph you could
even try to isolate a particular color for example you could just keep a red
colored intact and the rest white and black so you can apply these seven tips
in both DSLR camera and mobile camera and get amazing results thanks for
watching this video and and remember here you will find amazing awesome
photography tips which can help you to click amazing photographs so to never
miss any video click on subscribe further if you liked this video don’t
forget to press Bell icon

Chose your Focus – DOF and HSS in Practice: OnSet ep. 232

Chose your Focus – DOF and HSS in Practice: OnSet ep. 232


Hey this is Daniel Norton, I’m here in my studio in New York City with Erica and today I want to talk a little depth of field. there’s a there’s been a lot of discussion about this.. People ask me questions like why you said do certain death of field at certain places… and I want to talk very specifically in this case about shooting kind of in a studio versus let’s say location… but kind of the, the topics are.. you know the, the reasons are kind of the same… it just varies slightly depending on where you are… and the main reason that you change your depth of field is clearly to get things more or less out of focus. If I’m shooting in a studio though and I’m have a plain background, like in this case… I had this great background. I don’t care if it’s in or out of focus because it’s a plain background right? What I do care about… if I’m making a portrait or a big shot is that Erica is in focus, so yeah, I can use autofocus, and I can use a fast lens, and get like.. just her eyes sharp, but if she’s moving and I’m interacting with her like I often do when I’m making a portrait, there’s a chance we’re gonna get more kind of out-of-focus pictures or she moves really quickly… she might go out of the range, so giving myself a little bit extra depth of field is gonna help. so I usually shoot somewhere around f/8 when I’m in the studio… Another kind of bonus to that in this studio cuz daylight studio is by shooting at f/8, I can eliminate all the the window light without too much trouble, we will actually use high-speed sync in a minute too. I’m gonna give you both examples but that’s kind of the reasons why I start there in most cases… So let’s take a shot like I normally would do so I have my Profoto here with the three foot octa this is a B1X. I’ve got the Nikon Z6 the 85mm of the pics.. to it… I do have an A1 one on top of my camera, this is just being used as a transmitter. I’m not using as a flash… so I’m at 200 of a second at f/8. I’m in TTL… so I’m gonna frame it up… actually I’m gonna have you come slightly this way… good, there we go good… well I should point out there’s a light in the background as well, you guys probably se it over there…. that light is giving her a slight hair light, so we come in here, and we can see at f/8 you know nice crispy eyes… but if you look, her whole body is… you know her hair, everything is gonna be nice and sharp, right? Nice good depth there… and it looks good, you know, this is kind of how I like to shoot if she was moving around, so we can shoot a couple, or if I’m not exactly right you know then we can always keep her in focus without too much work.. right? And because I’m eliminating the lighting space I don’t have to worry too much about you know… any movement of her right… Nice and easy just like that…. okay now if we switch… so I’m gonna go to f/2 well first thing is if I just go to f/2 and I’m in TTL so… okay we’ll see if the light goes down low enough… without going into high-speed sync… try to start there. So I’m at f/2 at 200 of a second… okay so we can see right away a couple of things, we’re picking up some light in the room, so we’re getting the background lit up which I guess is an advantage if you want that… you know and you can actually see already there like I’ve missed focus slightly at f/2. I’m sure it’s focused somewhere yeah there… it is, so let’s try again, that was probably more me than anything else, there we go… so we’re here… now she’s sharp on her eye, but you see how quickly it falls off. Now if you like it this look… more power to you right? But the problem is is you saw in that very first frame that I shot is.. if she even moves a hair, you move a little bit with the camera after you focus… it’s gonna be out of focus, so I don’t like typically to do this unless I have to. Now what I would do though… cuz I want control right is, they do have something called high-speed sync… so we’ll talk about that very briefly, what that essentially does is allows the flash to shoot above the normal sync speed. So if I do a little math… somewhere around 2,000th of a second will put us back where we were… like math wise, So 2,000 of a second at f/2 is gonna get the background dark again… Again with only our light affecting it, so we’re not gonna have any chance of any motion blur. and again she’s sharp, but it falls off really quickly at f/2. So let’s shoot a couple like this, this can be really nice like I said, but probably more for a posed slower movements, that we should… we’re always sure she’s in focus, you know, a little slower of the shoot, maybe look like a more practiced model that kind of stuff. That’ll work really nice for you, right? And you can certainly do that. Took a look here again… you know we’re able to do it cuz she was moving slower… and Erica of courses she’s done this before a couple times… okay but why would I shoot that f/2 without it.. forget about the rest of it, if there was something in the background that I didn’t want to be in focus, so I actually have back here surprisingly almost like we planned it. I have back here behind the paper, I’ve got some lighting equipment, so let’s let’s start off where we did before, we’re gonna go to f/8 at 200 second, and we’re gonna make a similar shot. Now I’ve got the lighting in the background, now a couple things are gonna happen here… number one, it’s kind of dark back there and muddy, and doesn’t look that good right? And number two, they’re kind of sharp right? Not super sharp, but they’re they’re very sharp, like we can kind of see what’s back there, to me that’s super distracting right? So here’s what we want to use our depth of field but now I’m not gonna worry too much about high-speed sync yet… anyways I’m gonna just dial down to f/2 this is gonna allow me to let some of the light from the windows bleed in, and it’s gonna allow me to knock this cleanly out of focus. Right now this looks a lot better, because they’re not these big solid blocks behind her head right, Now if you wanted them to be lit differently.. clearly you could throw a light on them, but for our purposes we’ll just do this… and I think I might actually shoot horizontal for this…. I’m coming in nice and close…. and that stand’s in the shot… so I’m gonna actually change my composition slightly, to go over here again. I’m still a TTL this is actually one of the great things about TTL’s… we can change things up really nicely and quickly… and not have to worry too much about, yeah about it. Good, nice and simple you know, and that’s kind of an extreme case, but you can see why you’d want to use a wide open aperture versus a close down one, right. Wide open aperture is gonna give us, it’s gonna give us, you know the shallow depth of field, so if there’s stuff in the background we don’t want to see… we want to knock it out, it could be your on the street, there’s people back there you don’t want to see. It could be… you know… anything, in this case this could be some art on the wall or something weird, you don’t want to see it. I just wanted to make color shape of it make it really interesting… other times you’re gonna be someplace where you want that stuff in focus, maybe you’re doing a landscape and you want the whole landscape in focus… so you’re at you know Historic Site you want everything in focus so whatever there’s different reasons to do it… think about that, don’t just say hey I bought a fast lens I’m just gonna shoot wide open all the time, because that’s not always the best solution. So I will put Erica’s information in the description. You guys can follow her, be sure to follow me @DanielNortonphotographer. Subscribe to Adorama TV… ring the bell and all that and I’ll see you next time OnSet.

PHOTOGRAPHING a NILE CROCODILE on the CHOBE RIVER. Botswana. Wildlife Photography. Canon.

PHOTOGRAPHING a NILE CROCODILE on the CHOBE RIVER. Botswana. Wildlife Photography. Canon.


Hi! I am Sabine from Pangolin Photo Safaris. I am out in the National Park in Botswana. I currently have a crocodile in the water right in front of me. I would like to show you how I
go about photographing some details on this beautiful crocodile. To photograph an animal, it’s not always necessary to get the whole animal, or the whole head in your frame. Sometimes it’s nice to really concentrate on some details. Like that
beautiful green eye of the reptile, or maybe even the pattern on the skin. Let’s see what we can do with it. First of all (before I get started) what I will do is go down low to eye level with the crocodile, which will give me a much more intimate perspective. Being right on a level with them. All right, so I am going use those canvas flaps to rest my lens on. There is beautiful sunlight on the crocodile. What I will do is that I will slightly under-expose. Going -1/3 with my exposure compensation, so as to not blow out highlights, because there are strong highlights on the crocodile. I will then use a shutter speed of roughly 1/2000 of a second, which is double my
focal length. I am on a boat and there’s a few waves hitting the boat now and
then, so I just want to make sure the image is nice and sharp. There’s good enough light. I also want to increase my f-stop, or aperture, to a value of about f 10, to make sure the eye is nice and sharp. The crocodile is not too far away from me, so just to get it really nice and sharp. I zoom right in. Frame the eye a little bit towards the top right hand side, because it is looking to the left. …and there we go. Beautiful! Nice contrast between the green eye and the yellowish skin of the crocodile. So,
it is instantly recognisable as a crocodile, although you don’t see the full animal. Another cool detailed shot would be the tail. I see his tail is now and then flipping out of the water, and is being hit by some waves. This time though because the tail is a bit backwards, I will shoot a bit into
the light. So, I am just going to change my exposure compensation to about
+1 2/3, to make sure that the scales are really bright. What I basically do is wash out the water and get a completely
white background behind my crocodiles tail, which will probably (later) look
really cool if I convert it to a black and white image. Yeah! That looks about right. If you are not sure how much + you need, the easiest way is to switch on your highlight alert or ‘blinkies’ in the menu, which is a little bit of a flashing when you review your image. So as you look back – what should be
happening – is that you should have flashing in the water behind your crocodiles tail, or whatever you shoot your subject. You don’t want any flashing to happen on
the subject itself. It means you went a bit too far. You must then dial it a bit back. The whole background behind should be flashing, so you lost all the detail, and you get a completely white background right behind your subject. Thanks very much for watching today. Please don’t forget to subscribe on the link below. Press the Bell button for more info on new videos we send out. Cheers. Have a good day.

Focal Length Explained 1 – Don’t just zoom – MOVE!

Focal Length Explained 1 – Don’t just zoom – MOVE!


Quite often when you go out shooting
with your camera you’ll probably see a scene that you think’s interesting; frame
it up a bit and then zoom around with your zoom to try and get the composition
that you want, but there is a much better way of doing things than this. If you
consider your zoom as a selection of prime lenses, by prime lenses I mean
lenses which can’t zoom, they have fixed focal lengths like 18, 40, 50, 90, 150 whatever it may be. If you use a prime lens you can’t zoom
so you have to move yourself backwards and forwards in order to frame the shot
that you want. When you start controlling your focal length you can control what
the picture looks like, what’s in it and what isn’t, but how do you know which
focal length you’re going to need for which shot that you’re going to take? I’m
going to show you but to do so I’m going to need a nice, friendly, helpful
assistant called Natasha. Hello Nat! This is Jane’s daughter Natasha and
she’s kind of… well I guess I’m your evil stepdad am I that bad?
– Ahhh I can put up with you Mike Ah she’s sweet! Right Nat, could you come and stand here for a moment, go that way
a little bit, there we go – perfect. supposing Natasha and I were standing in our own the garden or something rather than in the street which is a little odd,
I might just think ‘Ah there’s Nat, that would make a nice picture’ stand there and zoom
around and just sort of zoom in and out like that and take a picture and it’s
going to be okay, but I could get a better result if I chose the focal
length for the shot. I’m going to show you a little exercise here which I would
like you to repeat afterwards. What I’m going to do is take the same picture of
Natasha over and over again but at different focal lengths, so you can see
what happens to the environment around her. Now this is going to involve a bit of
lens changing and fiddling around so you may have to bear with me for a minute.
Nat can we go over here? The reason I’ve chosen in the middle of a street is
because you need somewhere which has got sides that go off into the distance and
that has an end behind. Now it’s really important when you compose your shot that you compose it exactly the same each time, so I’m going to give Natasha probably about
a hands width of sky above her head, that’s going to be the very top of the
picture and the bottom of the picture is going to be this seam at the top of
her dress – that will be at the bottom of the frame each time. So first off 10
millimeters, now I’ve got to get right into your personal space here Nat to get the
seam at the top of your dress and only a handful of sky there it is – oop no – there it is – perfect. Now zoom the lens, I’m going to double it to 20 millimeters and do the same thing.
Now that’s made Nat come closer so I’ve got to move back a bit and that’s
only subtle – there it is. All right now we’re going to a longer
lens, from 20 millimeters (camera straps drive me me on the bend)
let’s go to 35 millimeters. So frame the same shot, now I have to move back
because the lens has got longer – again handbreadth of sky, seam on the dress,
excellent. Let’s double that, let’s go out to 70 millimeters so again, she’s
really filling the frame now because it zoomed on to her, so I move back a
bit and very carefully line up – this is a great exercise – oh you blinked, don’t blink!
Right, there we go. Now we want to go out further. I’m gonna
have to change the lens because the next set of focal lengths go out a long way.
We’re going to go from 10 millimeters right out of 500 that means I’m going to
use a whopper of a lens. Even if you don’t have lenses this kind of focal
length, please go and repeat this exercise because it really will help you
understand what on earth it is I’m talking about. Now with the last one at
70 I’m to do the next one at 150, so I’ve set the zoom on the lens I’m not going to
zoom in and out I’m going to frame the shot up with Natasha. Oh look that wasn’t
a bad guess, I’m actually going to go a little bit closer, here we go… train your
eye to look around the viewfinder to line up these gaps like the the bottom
of the dress and the hand breadth of sky. Let’s zoom then on out to 250. Again
Natasha will have come closer in the lens so I’ve got to move back to get the
same shot. Here we go, line up the elements, the gap at the top
and the seam on the dress and then finally we’re going to go all the way out from
250 to 500 millimeters so I’m moving back again. The environment behind
Natasha is changing with each of these shots and this one I promise, you would
never know we were standing in a street… but there’s a lot of fiddling to
get this right – still too close – there it is Good stuff. Nat! Come and have a look So beginning at 10 millimeters, here we go.
Here you are at 10 millimeters. yeah you see how it’s pulled Natasha’s face forward? But look
I’ve got the bottom of the picture as the seam of the dress, the top of the
picture but a handbreadth of sky. As we move on from 10 to 20, see how it’s
changed? Natasha has got a more normal shape. Also look, the cars and
the houses jump forward as we flick between them. Moving on out from there I
think we went to 50 which is a much more normal looking Natasha.
As we move on through – oop we want the other camera as we’re now out to 100 or
so. You see how everything’s starting to take a step forward
each time we extend the focal length until now you don’t know you’re in a
street, and we get to the very last shot there’s no hint of a house or anything.
We’ve just got a clear grey background which is actually the tarmac of the
streets as it goes off up the hill in the distance. This is all you need to do, it
doesn’t matter what you practice this with. If you don’t have a Natasha to take
into the street just put your camera bag on a table in the park or something like
that and take the same shot over and over again, changing the focal length and
moving back so that you get the idea of what’s going on
to the environment and then look at all the pictures one after the other.
This isn’t just the realm of a digital SLR you could do the same thing with a
little compact camera anything that has a zoom on it. If you’re cycling along the sea wall you might not want to carry a monster like that.
Natasha would you mind? We’re going to do a very brief one. Here you go, over
there a bit. If I set the zoom to its widest take the same picture of Natasha getting
right into her personal space, good stuff Nat, and then zoom it to it’s
longest zoom, do the same thing move back. You know if you’re at a party and just got a little camera and you think ‘Oh I’ll take a picture…’ There we go, as you can see the
two are very, very different. Don’t just think I’m going to go and try this in
the morning. Once you start treating your zoom lens as a series of prime lenses
and moving yourself around not being lazy, you’ll really set loose the magic
of your camera and your photography. Don’t leave it, get out there right this
minute! Go and try this.

The Crete, Greece Photo & Video Workshop welcomes you! With Greg & Mark Hemmings

The Crete, Greece Photo & Video Workshop welcomes you! With Greg & Mark Hemmings


Hey friends, we’re coming to you from
Tolo in Greece! It’s a beautiful little seaside beach resort town where we’ve
just completed our 2019 Greece Hemings Brothers, Kefi Travel, Photo and Video
workshop tour. We had such an awesome time . . . so many people got a lot of value
out of learning photography and video – we tried so hard to provide a really good
experience that we thought well, let’s do it again for the third time! So this time
we’re going to go to Crete, and John from Kefi Travel, tell us about Crete in 2020 for
our next photo and video workshop! Well I think as you said it was great to have
the group doing both photography and video, and Crete has a different culture
from the rest of Greece because it’s a large island south of here, we’re going to get
to experience the wonderful food and wine and and history of Greece at the
same time as something slightly different,
to allow them to try some different things, you to show them some different
techniques and that at the same time have an incredible time on a beautiful
island in the Mediterranean Sea. And what’s making me excited is this is my
first time joining my brother Mark on one of these workshops but it is not the
first time that we have put on Filmpreneur courses, so this was a
combined course where Mark taught everybody about photo and video and the
technology behind it, and I took my group and we really worked on storytelling and
making films. And on this trip we made two films and it was absolutely one of
the funnest things that you could do to come here and make a film, and we’re
going to do the same thing in Crete when you come, we’re going to talk as a group and
we’re going to figure out what is the story that we’re going to tell while we’re at
Crete, and within a day we’re going to shoot a film and take two or three days to get
it edited, and all at the same time learn more about photo and video and continue
to eat and swim and do everything else that we do on these trips. So one of the
largest ironies of photo workshops is a lot of people say “well I’m not at the
level to even join a workshop” and that is a complete falsity! I love helping
people along with their photography at any level. Please – if you have not even
taken a picture before this is for you. It’s designed for any level, even professionals.
So do you agree with that Greg? It’s like this is for everybody, this is for
everybody! It’s valuable for every person who wants to just get better at taking
pictures, better at creating videos, and especially eating wonderful food and
enjoying the beautiful sun! So for more information click on the website below
and I hope to see you sign up, and we’ll see you in Crete!