How to Take Good Pictures with ANY Camera

How to Take Good Pictures with ANY Camera


Let’s start with what we know. The camera
doesn’t make the photographer, right? You can take good pictures with any camera –
and, believe it or not, bad pictures too. So then, really, what does make a good
picture? How do you take that abstract concept of a successful photo and
achieve it with any camera? That is what I’ll cover today. This is not a ruler.
It’s a balancing device – and this eraser is the fulcrum. So what happens when I
set it up and then put a coin right in the center? Well, nothing too exciting. It stays balanced. And the same is true if I’ve got two coins and I put them
equidistant from the center. But what about three? Well, let me take these and then
stack this one on top. So, a stack of two, and then just one. And if you’ve ever
been on a seesaw, right, the answer is probably obvious: You put the heavier
stack close to the center, and the lighter stack farther away. Perfectly
balanced. And all of this has extreme relevance to photography. We like balance. It looks natural. Even people are roughly balanced. So is it really any surprise
that we also like it when it shows up in photography? Let me show you some
examples. Here’s a very centered composition – lots of balance. Now, the Sun
is in the middle (from left to right) and it’s definitely the most sucky part of
the frame. Right? It pulls in your attention. That’s the photo equivalent of
something heavy. It’s kind of like the coins; in this case, it’s like the very
first example with just one coin. The photo is balanced because the heavy part
is centered. And I’ll show you one more example like this: mountain, cloud, center. It’s balanced because pretty much everything in this composition is in the
middle. But things get a bit more complicated when there’s more than one
visually heavy item in your photo. Here’s a case with two of them. Now just like
with two coins I placed the sun and the rock stack
equidistant from the center. Each one balances the other. But what about even
more subjects? Well, when many different parts of your photos suck… visual
attention from your viewers… you’ll have to pay careful attention to how you
frame the image. Let’s take a look at this photo.
One main subject, the waterfall, but lots of little details that might draw your
eye. But I would say that this photo still feels pretty balanced. Now the
waterfall is heavy, but it’s pretty close to the middle of the photo. And this rock
is much lighter, but it’s also closer to the edge. Then the nearby tree shifts
things back a bit to the right, and then the distant trees, plus the water at the
bottom left, shift them back. Now one thing that I did do in post production
was darken this area of the water just a bit so that it doesn’t draw as much
attention. Otherwise, to me, the photo was leaning slightly to the right. As is, I think it’s very balanced. And here’s where things get a bit
philosophical. We like balance, yeah? It’s one of the best ways to compose a lot of
photos – but why? I think it all comes down to emotions. Balance feels peaceful,
stable, harmonious… and those emotions very often meld well with your subject
and with the message that you’re trying to convey. But what about cases when they
don’t? Not all your photos need to feel grounded, and that’s where imbalance
comes into play. Imbalance is not peaceful. It’s not stable. It’s dynamic;
it’s more intense. Take a look at this photo. Clearly, this is a harsh landscape.
Foreboding. It looks like that world where you fall into the mirror, and you
emerge, and everything’s evil. And that’s exactly what I want. That’s my goal. A peaceful, balanced, harmonious image would totally take away from the message
here. It works better when it’s imbalanced. But I will say, this is kind
of rare. At least personally, I almost always aim for maximum balance when I
compose my photos. It just feels more comfortable – more intentional. And usually,
that’s what I want. So, next time you’re taking pictures with
your camera, your phone, your secret spy pen with a camera in it… go for balance.
Try to analyze every part of your photo for visual
weight, and pretend that the image is on a fulcrum. Compose it left to right so that
both sides weigh the same. And when they do – most of the time – your photos are
going to look much better. What is something that everyone hates about the
modern world? Too many distractions. Everywhere. And the way that we feel about things in the outside world is very often how we feel about them in
photography. That was true of balance, and now it’s true of distractions. Everything
in your photos should be there for a reason.
If you internalize that, it doesn’t matter whether you’ve got a phone, DSLR, mirrorless, whatever… simplifying is the key. And I don’t want you to confuse
“simplifying” with “empty.” This photo has a crowded composition – almost no empty space. And that, believe it or not, is what makes it simple. My message was crowdedness. Empty areas just
would have been distracting. So, simplifying does not
mean that you need a basic Instagram photo of a person with the sky above
them and nothing else. Simplifying means streamlining your
message. That’s it. If you’re on the sand dunes, and you want to show how isolated
everything is, then you’d exclude any plants or footprints that are nearby. And
if you’re in a forest, and your message is peacefulness, then you’d exclude any
tangled messes of vines off to the side. And I actually have an example for that
one – bad photo. Why is it a bad photo? Well, too many distractions. Especially in the
area off to the right. And now, a good photo. Fundamentally, they’re very similar.
Same subject, same time of day… except I got rid of every distraction that I
could in the second shot. That’s simplification. Exclude anything that
makes your photo weaker. It sounds stupid simple, but you’ve got to think about it
in the field, or you just won’t do it. Most people never do. Next up is visualization. Visualization
can be summed up with the most important advice I’ve ever gotten in photography. And that is just: Put your noggin into it. Think!
Don’t let your decisions make themselves. Because when you boil it all down, what
makes a good photo is emotion. And the way to get emotions into your photos – at
least, one of the best ways – is to make a thousand little decisions correctly. I’ve
already given you two of the big decisions (first, balance versus
imbalance, and second, should you exclude “that thing” from your photo, or should you
include it?) – but there’s way more than just those. Crowded versus empty
composition. Time of day that you take the picture. Black and white versus color.
Bright photo. Dark photo. Camera settings. Should you or should you not whisper
words of encouragement to your camera before taking the picture? I don’t know!
All of these are decisions that *you* need to make on a photo-by-photo basis. I
almost have a mental checklist I like to go through to make sure that I’m
deciding all these things consciously rather than just letting them happen. And
the main reason why I take awful photos with my phone has nothing to do with the
quality of the camera. When I take pictures with my phone, I just don’t
consciously make any decisions. I pull it out of my pocket, snap a photo, put it
back. When I actually think about things, I do occasionally take phone photos that
I like. Here’s one of the very few. Now, I took it with the mighty iPhone 5, which
is many generations obsolete by now, but it still works. By comparison, with my
regular camera, I’m almost always on a tripod. Then I’m composing carefully,
examining the photo I’ve just taken, taking some variations, refining my
composition, moving around… and I’m putting conscious thought into what I
want to say. So here’s one more of the, we’re popping up a photo… and then same
landscape, same day, different emotions. These differences didn’t happen by
accident. I made conscious decisions both times to achieve that version of the
photo I had in mind. And some of that’s in the field, like the composition; I
included the Sun and then I didn’t. But a lot of it is also in post-processing, like
the black and white conversion. Now, how do you know which direction to go with
the emotions? Because this just showed you can kind of go either way.
Well, usually what you want to do is identify the emotions of the subject in
front of you. Maybe it’s a sharp-edged mountain, or
maybe it’s a nice field of wildflowers. Doesn’t matter. Then, try to unify the
rest of your photo around the subject’s emotions. That goes for every decision
you make: light, composition, camera settings. Try to synchronize them with
the emotions of your subject. That’s why, personally, I like the first
of those two aspen photos better. I did my best the second time to take kind of
a gloomy photo, and it sort of worked, but to me, bright, yellow aspen trees are just
a very happy subject. I’m gonna end this video with a series
of five photos. Let me first cycle through them, and then
I’ll explain, but each one is a refinement of the previous. One, two, three,
four, five. Back to Photo 1. There’s a few problems here. The subject and the
light don’t really match, for starters. And the composition… it is kind of
balanced, but it’s also empty and honestly kind of boring. With such an
amazing landscape in front of me, that’s really not what I want.
Photo 2, at least, is more dynamic. I found a better piece of ice, got some more
appropriate light, and I filled the frame with my subject. But now, the composition
is starting to get kind of complicated, and I really need to simplify things.
Photo 3 is the best one yet. The light here is right on point. The blocks of ice
aren’t perfect, but they’re pretty interesting, and this is also a more
streamlined composition (although there’s still some room for simplicity). Photo 4
just doesn’t work, but I wanted to show it to you for a couple of reasons. First,
the block of ice is the best one yet, and the light is still fantastic. But I went
back to the mistake of the first photo. It’s a very static composition, with a
lot of distracting, empty space, and no real sense of movement. So, what do I do?
Well, I combine the amazing piece of ice from Photo 4 with the composition from
Photo 3, giving me photo number 5 – my final, portfolio image. And that’s the
process. Now, it works best when you’ve got an image in your mind’s eye of how
you want the photo to look. When I was here at this location, I thought about
what emotions I wanted the photo to have, and I just kept changing things around
and making decisions until I got there. Now, is it time to close this one out? I’d
say so. I took the photos throughout this video with the iPhone 5, again. This
really cheap Canon point-and-shoot camera. Nikon’s most entry-level DSLR.
And, naturally, my regular, advanced camera. I’m not going to tell you that the
camera is irrelevant, because it’s not. But, compared to things like balance,
simplicity, emotion, and visualization… it’s practically a blip on the horizon.

How to Use 35mm SLR Cameras : Knowing Digital 35mm Camera Essentials & Basics

How to Use 35mm SLR Cameras : Knowing Digital 35mm Camera Essentials & Basics


Hi! I am Fred Norwood on behalf of expertvillage.com.
In this clip we are going to discuss the different types of digital cameras. More and more people
are purchasing digital cameras these days. People like the options of taking lots of
pictures and only printing out the ones they like. Price drops along with better technology
allow you to get more camera for your money. Quality can be determined primarily by the
number of mega pixels the camera is designed with. If all you want are internet pictures
or screen savers, a 2-3 mega pixel camera would be sufficient. For enlargements 5/7
and larger, I would recommend at least four mega pixels in your camera. There are two
different types of cameras available. Point and shoot, which is this type or digital SLRs
for the more serious photographer. Point and shoot cameras have a wide variety of options
and sizes and weights available. Primarily you are going to pay for the number of mega
pixels that are included or the design of the camera. If you want something lightweight
and slim line you are going to pay a little extra for it but it may be more convenient
for you. If you owned film SLR equipment, you can purchase a matching digital SLR body
and still use your old accessories while gaining the advantage of again taking all the pictures
you like and choosing just the best ones.

How to Use Manual Mode on ANY Camera in ~5 MINUTES!

How to Use Manual Mode on ANY Camera in ~5 MINUTES!


Good morning. Hope you guys had a wonderful Christmas. Today I’m going to teach you how to switch
your camera over to manual mode so you can stop fiddling with it and then take some pictures
like this. Okay, let me give you a tour. Hello and welcome back to the channel. Good morning, good evening, good afternoon,
wherever you are. Today we are going to learn how to use manual
mode in about five minutes. Look, when I first picked up a camera, the
most intimidating thing for me were all these buttons. I just wanted to go out and shoot and take
freken nice pictures and instead I was fiddling around with my camera settings. You know what’s really fun too in its own
way, but a lot of people just want to avoid all of that and just take really nice pictures
from the get-go. So I shoot Canon, but all these settings apply
to pretty much any phone, mirrorless, DSLR nowadays as long as you understand this holy
trinity of camera settings, then you’ll at least be able to establish your foundation
for using your camera in manual mode. All right, let’s get started. Okay, so the first thing I want to talk about
is ISO. So ISO is your camera sensitivity to light. You always want to keep it at around 100. The lowest, the better because the more ISO
you introduce, then the more noise you also introduce into your picture. Now on top of that, the higher the range of
ISO you go, then the brighter your picture will be. Depending on your camera, some cameras are
able to push ISO way further than other cameras before you start introducing noise. For the ADD, for instance, I never go any
higher than 800 ISO because after that pictures looks disgusting. But then on the 1DX, which I’m shooting right
now, I can push that to way, way higher amounts for ISO. But bottom line though, you want to keep your
ISO at the lowest possible setting. Now, a lot of the times when you’re picking
up a mirrorless or DSLR camera, a lot of professional pictures, they have a nice blurred background
and that blurred background is called bokeh. Now, the one setting that is pretty much responsible
for that is called the F-stop. So you have ISO, which is adjusting your camera
sensitivity to light. The second setting that we’ll talk about is
F-stop. The lower your F-stop is, then the more light
you’re letting in because you’re opening your lens up, and on top of that, the blurrier
your background will be. So a lot of times when people are talking
about lenses and they’re talking about how fast it is, if they’re saying a lens is fast,
then it means that it probably has a lower F-stop and also means that it’s way more expensive
than the other lenses because 1.2, 1.4 lenses, those usually go for a lot more than 2.4,
2.8, and so forth. But remember, you don’t want to abuse this
blurry background image. For example, let’s say I’m doing landscape
photography and you have this nice mountain range and a giant boulder in front of you. Do you want to take a picture of the boulder
or with a blurred background of the mountain range, or do you want a nice clear picture
of the mountain range? Probably the mountains, right? So in cases like that, that’s when you want
everything in focus. Or for family photos, all that I would recommend
you use F-stop of F-5 or higher. Okay, so let’s combine those two settings
and understand them together. Right now the lens I’m shooting in is that
an F-2.0, which means that the ISO, I don’t have to adjust too much because it’s letting
in a ton of light already from two studio lights here. If I were to crank that to F-5, F-7, the room
is going to get way darker and then I’m probably going to have to compensate for that by adjusting
ISO to make it brighter or else you won’t be able to see anything at all. So ISO, artificial in-body lighting, F-stop,
how much light you’re letting in. The third and final setting I want you to
understand is shutter speed. Let’s say you want to take pictures of your
dog. How often are they going to sit still? Probably not, right? So here you want to freeze your motion in
place, and to do that, that’s when shutter speed comes into play. Shutter speed is that click that you have
for your camera. It’s pretty much dictating how long you’re
going to let light hit your camera sensor. So that means that the higher your shutter
speed and the faster you can freeze motion. The slower your shutter speed, then the longer
it’s going to remain open. So the higher shutter speed, the less light
you’re letting come in and therefore your picture’s going to turn down darker. But in exchange, your motion’s going to be
frozen in place. Okay, so let’s combine all three settings
as an example. I’m in front of a beautiful waterfall. What do I want to do first? For me, I always adjust F-stop first because
I think about what is my subject and focus. In this case it’s the giant waterfall, so
you don’t want a low F-stop for that, you want a high F-stop. So landscape photography, you don’t really
want anything blurry, high F-stop. Now in exchange when you are cranking up your
F-stop, your picture gets darker. How would you fix that? You want to keep ISO at one to 100 if we can. It’s mid-day so there’s a ton of light coming
in, which means we can now play with these shutter speeds. But since I want a nice flowy smooth motion
of the water, I want to move my shutter speed to like 15 seconds. I want it to remain open for a long time that
way you get a nice long streak of water. So high F-stop, it’s dark. Slow shutter speed, it gets brighter, and
therefore I can leave ISO at about 100 and then boom, you get a nice smooth waterfall
picture. I also use the ND filter on my lens here just
in case so I can keep the camera settings a little bit darker, but more on that on the
next video. But I’m going to talk about specific camera
gear or specific essential camera gear in another video. So more on that later. Okay, let’s try another example. I’m outside mid-day and I want to take picture
of a miniature from Lords of Helis, so product photography. I want a nice blurred background but I don’t
want the background to take away from my main subject, which is the miniature. So I have a small subject, blurred background. What would you do first? F-stop, right? So you’re going to crank your F-stop down
that we have a nice blurred, delicious background. But the thing is, you’re letting in a ton
of light. It’s mid-day, so it’s way overexposed. How would you fix that? ISO is already at 100. The last thing you want to adjust now is shutter
speed. So now you can crank your shutter speed a
lot. I can even go to like 1/4,000 if I want to. It’s not going to take away from anything
really. So that’s what’s nice about photography. You can always compensate with shutter speed
once you adjust the other two settings because it won’t matter as much as it would for video. For video you would get these staticky motions
and then you would see individual droplets of water if you have a shutter speed that
doesn’t match your frame rate, but more than that later. Let’s focus on the photography aspect here. So low F-stop, subject’s in focus, background’s
blurry. ISO’s at 100 and then I compensate for shutter
speed to make sure it’s perfectly exposed and then boom, example number two complete. Okay, last quick example, one of my favorite
types of photos are long exposure photography. Now for that one, let’s say I have a miniature
and I want to do some steel wool, so I just want to whisk it around the back and get these
nice long streaks of light. Now to do that, we’re going to mimic the same
thing we did for the waterfall example and keep a slow shutter speed, so we’re going
to keep it open for 30 seconds. It’s pitch black at night so you can’t see
anything else anyway, so 1/30th is going to give a ton of light coming in. And then for F-stop, I actually like to put
my F-stop higher just so you can see complete details of what’s going on and keep your camera
on a tripod tube. And then here I played around with F-stop
and ISO just a little bit here and there until I finally got nice streaks of light which
were, some were in focus, some were out of focus. But the main focus here, I said focus like
five times, but the main subject here is of course the miniature, so I want to make sure
all the details of that can be seen super nice and crispy and then the background just
accents what’s going on here. In this case it’s the monument of light, so
naturally it fits with the whole light streaks in the background. And that is basic camera settings, pretty
much how to use manual mode in about five, I’m probably way over that by now, five minutes
or so. But I hope you enjoyed how we puzzle pieced
the trinity of camera settings that way we can take nice, beautiful photos. Hope you found it helpful. If you found all this helpful, please hit
subscribe so we can grow the channel together in 2020 get it to as big as it can possibly
be. I’ve also linked my social media here if you
want to keep up to date with daily content or what I’m doing, and until next time, see
you guys later.

You Might be Ruining your Camera Lens

You Might be Ruining your Camera Lens


– Psst, psst. Yo you gotta admit I’m getting pretty good at this clickbait game. Well hold on a second, ’cause you’ll be surprised
at how many people think they’re keeping
their gear nice and shiny, but secretly damaging
their gear in the long run. Like for example, who
knew that dropping a lens into a pool filled with chocolate would ruin that lens forever? No but seriously they did that once with the latest Charlie And
The Chocolate Factory, you know the one with Johnny Depp? They had a cable cam
system set up over the set and then a Panavision
lens estimated to be over 500,000 dollars, did a swan dive into the chocolate pool, it was ruined forever. But dude, those oompa loompas though, they freaked me out. I’ve been attacked before okay, I have trauma. Just kidding, Deep was
actually a really cool dude. Besides the fact that he
beat the (beep) out of me. And lenses themselves can last
30 years or even much longer especially if you know how
to take good care of it. So if you’re gonna dump an entire paycheck into a piece of glass, let’s talk about what you should know. First of all, it’s always gonna be better if you can do it in a clean environment. So since I already got
my clickbait thumbnail, let’s get out of here
and go to my apartment. Did I seriously just say
let’s go to a clean place, and then suggest my apartment? My apartment is still covered in confetti from the last video. All right guys, so I’m
back at my apartment now. If it looks like I just finished crying, it’s because my microphone
suddenly stopped working. You have served well, and also my roommate’s
cooking something with onions. I called customer support
and we can’t figure out what’s wrong with it so I
have to send it in for repair, it’s all Chris Rollins’ fault. Now before we get into this segment, I’m just gonna give you a little warning, that there’s a lot of
contradictory information on how to care for your lenses properly But one thing that everyone
can generally agree on, is if you’re in a dusty environment, and then your lens gets
a bunch of dirt on it, the last thing you wanna do, is pull out one of these from your pocket, and just like, rub that all off. If your lens has dirt on it, and you take a dry piece of
cloth and just rub it in, you’re essentially
creating a mild sandpaper. Over the years you’re gonna
slowly start grinding away at your lens and eventually
everything’s gonna look bleh. Rule number one is that
before you do anything, use air first like this guy. These things are basically the safest form of
compressed air you can use. It’s always gonna be the
right amount of pressure, and it can get a lot of
the dust particles off. You’ll be surprised at how often your lens looks perfectly shiny after just giving it a
couple passes with this. Some people like to use
canned air like this, but sometimes you risk
kinda like that happening if you shake it up or
you spray it upside down. You definitely don’t wanna
be spraying a 20,000 dollar piece of glass and have this happen to it. Ouch… There’s also the option of kinda just blowing off the lens. But of course there’s that risk of you spitting into the lens accidentally. And I’m sure we’ve all seen this, where we haze it up with our mouths, and then clean it off that way. There’s some contradictory
information on this. Some people say it’s fine, but some people say your
breath can be acidic, and the enzymes can eat away
at the coating of the lens. I’m not a saliva scientist, so I don’t know for sure. But generally speaking, I’ll
do that if I really need to, on a a cheap lens. But once the lenses get into
the thousands of dollars range, I only use this. Another thing everyone
generally agrees on, is that you should never
ever touch the lens, unless you need to. You only wanna make
contact with that lens, if you got like a smudge or something that won’t come out with air. So yeah, the next rule is
to only clean your lens if it’s dirty. Don’t touch that thing every time you pull off your lens cap. And the reason’s obvious right, you don’t wanna have like,
a speckle of dust on here while you’re cleaning it out and end up scratching your lens. Scratches, no good, but
another thing to consider is the coating on your lens
that’s super important. For example this lens has similar, if not the same exact glass
as it’s Rokinon little brother which is about a tenth of
the price of this lens. So a lot of the upgrades
actually takes place inside of the coating, how they process the glass after
they’re done with the lens. So if you were to go
through and clean this lens with something like acetone,
you may look at it and be like, ooh it looks so clean. But there’s a lot of ingredients
out there like acetone, which will completely strip
away all the coating in there. So you’re removing what makes
this lens more valuable. So with that in mind, the next rule is to
always use clean fabric. A lot of people just take cloth like this, stick it in their pockets, throw it in their dirty bags. In your pocket it’s picking up lint and all this other junk that’s in there, and then you’re taking this and rubbing it against your lens. You don’t wanna re-use
these over and over either. And your oils from your
fingers are getting onto it, and all this contamination
that you’re about to put onto this coating. So if I’m gonna carry
around little microfibers, I always keep it in kind of
like a little plastic container like this or this, so that it’s protected from the elements. And generally speaking, I only
use these a couple of times. These are expendables, I throw them out, or use them for something else. If you throw them into the laundry, you wanna be careful because, what chemicals are in
your laundry detergent and some of those chemicals may end up eating away at your coating. Better than these microfibers
are something like this. These are Kimtech Delicate Task Wipes. These seem to be the industry standard when it comes to the pro, pro lenses. There’s also packages like this, which is kinda like a little booklet. Tear a piece out, use it, clean. These are all one time use only, so once you use them,
they’re contaminated, throw it out. And there’s also brushes like this, that are specifically
designed for cleaning lenses. And these can help just flick off those little particles that are in there. The next thing is your solution, and this is where there’s the
most contradicting information I’ve heard some people
say don’t use solution unless you need to, because the alcohol from it
can eat away at the coating. You can use Windex, you can
this, and you can use that. But here’s what I hear most
commonly from the pros. Pancro seems to be the industry standard and it’s specifically designed for lenses. Whatever solution you use, make sure it’s specifically
designed for camera lenses. They say don’t use
solution for eye glasses, because a lot of those
can contain silicone, and that’s not good for a lens coating. Definitely don’t use anything
with any acetone in it, and there’s a million
different ingredients that they say is good or
bad for your lens coating, but generally speaking
everyone seems to agree that Pancro is a pretty safe bet. So these three seem to
be the golden combination I see everybody using. Never ever, ever, spray
solution straight into the lens. Liquid is a lens’ worst nightmare. Most high-end lenses are
designed to be weather-sealed but just in case that small droplet happens to sneak in there, it can cause mold. If you’re in a high humidity place, you wanna keep these
lenses as dry as possible. Always dry them off before you store them. If you’ve ever been shopping
for some vintage lenses, you know that fungus is the
worst enemy of aged lenses. Try to keep these things
dry as much as possible and another reason to never
spray directly onto the lens. You generally wanna bunch
up one of these things, give it a little spray, lubricate it, and ride it out. Always do circles, start in the center and slowly work your way out. Right here in the center
and then do circles, slowly work your way out to the outside. And if there’s any
liquid left on the lens, then you immediately dry
it with the dry side, with the same pattern. And I’ve heard people say
it’s always good to use some liquid on your tissue like Pancro, because it acts as a lubrication
as you’re rubbing it. Because rubbing it hard with something dry can shave away at the coating. Once the front of your
lens is nice and sparkly, go ahead and do the same to the rear. Another thing to keep in mind, is when you pull off your lens, don’t leave that sensor exposed for longer than you need to. If a piece of dust gets in there, it can show up in your image. And sensors are fragile and sensitive, you just wanna keep it
protected with something at all times. And also keep in mind that
where you store your lenses, can affect the longevity of your lenses. You don’t wanna leave it on the shelf where it’s gonna get dusty all the time. Because again, even though they’re
supposed to be weatherproof, if a piece of dust gets
into some of the elements inside of the lens, it can get really tricky to try
to get it out in the future. So always to store it in a case or somewhere where it’s dust-proof. I keep all my expensive
lenses in a Pelican like this which is actually waterproof. So if you have a bunch of
lenses sitting on a dusty shelf, then throw it in a
case, throw it in a box. You don’t want those dust particles to slowly start sneaking into your lens. And finally, whenever you’re dealing with
cinema lenses like this, you always wanna reset
it before packing it away and transporting them. So take you F-Stop, set it wide open, and take your focus
and set it to infinity. When it’s wide open, the lens
is in its safest position. See when you close down your iris, see all those blades that come out, they’re prone to being damaged when they’re exposed like that. So when you take that iris
and open it wide open, that’s where it’s most protected. So it’s least likely to get damaged if you hit a speed bump too fast, or if you put down the case too fast, or any sort of impact. Those little blades in there, super precise tools, you do not wanna mess with those things. Do that and your lenses, will be a good, long-term
investment for you. I’m gonna clean all these lenses, I’m about to head over to Orlando, Florida for a shoot. I’m shooting it for only one day. I’m gonna land there, I prep the cameras. I shoot the next day and fly right back I’m going to be exhausted Busy week for me but thank you guys so much for tuning in. I’ll see you guys next week. End Slate Marker. It’s not even nine minutes. For those of who don’t know, you basically make more money off adsense if you make your videos over 10 minutes. and uh… so yeah. This is my desparate attempt at making my video over ten minutes. I guess we can just talk about stuff for a minute, I don’t know, what do you think Chris? Hi I’m Chris Rollins, I’m from Texas. Please subscribe to my youtube channel. HAHAHA Are we at ten minutes yet? Uhhh.. nope. Alright, I just finished a five hour flight all the way from the opposite side of the country This time tomorrow, I’m going to be heading straight back so it’s going to be a very quick trip. Everyone here seems to be here for disney world. except for me. Kind of makes me with I was going to Disney World. I could just delay my flight and go by myself. Is that weird? Yeah that’s weird. Florida is a pretty weird place, it’s like sunny. And it’s like pouring rain, what is this place?

Learn How To Take Good Pictures – Start Taking Better/Great Photos Today

Learn How To Take Good Pictures – Start Taking Better/Great Photos Today


okay how to take good pictures see you just got your DSLR or maybe
you’re thinking about getting one or maybe you’ve had one for a while but
you want to take your skills to the next level all the best place to do that is right
here right now I was in the exact same spot you were
several years ago when I got my DSLR and I didn’t know
what the settings were I didn’t know how to take a picture how to take better photos huh I made all the mistakes that
everyone makes when they’re trying to figure things out
on their own so if you’re like me chances are you pictures are out of
focus they’re blurry they don’t have the cracked white
balance they’re not compose properly the exposures probably of the not colorful enough or word you’re
just taking pictures /a really boring things that no one wants
to look at now I was in that same place years ago but after years of
experimentation how to take good pictures years love looking into forms reading
books and watching YouTube videos I finally
have figured out the best how to take great photos and fastest way to fix all those
problems the people go through in the beginning
know you could do the same thing I did where you spend years upon years
experimenting but chances are you want to speed up
your results fairly quickly and that’s why I’ve
compiled the best East sensual hor information about photography into this online video
course you’re gonna get a huge jumpstart at photography in general you see most courses the only teach you a
fragment what you need to know and we’ve got the
rest they don’t cover the big picture some courses will teach you how to use
your physical DSLR but they won’t teach you about
composition other courses will teach you about post-production but
they won’t teach you about light how to take better photos but in this course everything is
contained in the big picture format see you can
get big picture idea what is going on and what makes a good picture the course
is divided up into for modules the first module is just all about mastering your DSLR
camera show you how to pick up your DSLR and understand what all the buttons are
on your camera so you can have the confidence to know
what settings you need to adjust how to take good pictures when you’re taking pictures have a
certain subject in a certain situation so in this module I’ll be going over
things like the aperture shutter speed ISO exposure focusing modes metering modes the white
balance all my good stuff is all in module one so after completing module one who have
a complete understanding a pure physical DSLR camera and then you
will be able to move on to module to which is
all about photography equipment now i DSLR camera body is
technically photography equipment and they do
compare contrast different types idea solarz you can get
a feel about if you’re if you thinking about getting a DSLR
then this module will help you as well but out also be comparing and how to take great pictures contrasting different types have lenses when you would want to use certain
lenses in certain situations and when when you I’ll be reviewing different types of
filters the could put on the lenses to get certain affects how to take good pictures in all also be doing a thorough review
about the lighting equipment to use just to give you an idea of the industry
standard what you can have in your kit to get good images and then after
that all done we’ll move on to module three which is all about composition know when
you’re holding your DSLR in your hands in your looking through the viewfinder how to take better photos it’s all night and dandy the you know
what all the settings doing everything but if you don’t have the photographers
II then you’re not gonna know what to look for to take interesting pictures and interesting way so in order to guarantee they’re going
to be taking pictures you’re really just gonna wanna know about the universe or
composition principles up photography the principles that all
good photographers use and have always been using throughout all time
his principles aren’t going away anytime soon when you
show people your photographs are actually gonna be drawn into the photograph not repelled by it
they’re not gonna pass over it because it’s something born-again wanna keep
looking at it because it’s so interesting you’ll know
the best times a day to take your pictures how to position your subjects with in
the frame how to take good pictures and you also know all about how to light
up a portrait and what type of lighting to use to get
a certain mood and then of course after that we’ll be
going on to module four which is just all about post-production to learn how to edit your photos on the
computer by using the Adobe software I’ll be
using both Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop after watching this
module your photos will be brighter sharper
more vivid and dynamic and they will just be perfected like a
strawberry sundae with the red cherry on top so if you’re ready to start building a
solid foundation in photography and learn it right the smart way simply
scroll down to the bottom of this page click the Add to Cart button filling
your information using the secure order form and then
you’ll be taken to members area where you can watch all
the videos online all I almost forgot there’s also a 60-day 100 percent money back
guarantee so if you aren’t satisfied in the least
bit with this course how to take better photos just email me within the sixty days and
I will refund your money completely just scroll down to the bottom of this
page place your order and by this time tomorrow you’ll be a
better photographer thanks so much for quickie by I’ll see
you inside the members area how to take good pictures

My New Camera & Why YOU don’t need a new camera (2019)

My New Camera & Why YOU don’t need a new camera (2019)


all right I did it I bought a new camera
now a lot of people tend to get mad because I don’t tell them which camera
model I got or which lens or anything so to put all those hard feelings aside I’m
gonna show you right now all right so there you go you can buy this camera in
the affiliate links below just kidding undo any of that anyways this video is
not about me or my new camera this video is about why you don’t need to buy a new
camera now I’m a firm believer that you use the gear until it dies and died it did my camera did in fact I had my camera since around 2012 and over the past few months
it just stopped working like it wouldn’t turn on anymore
which is why I bought a new camera now this its not new in a sense that it didnt come out a few months ago or this week or anything like that it’s new as in it
hasn’t been used before actually this camera I bought came around two years
ago but if you’ve been watching my channel for a while you already know my
philosophy is that these days pretty much any camera is good like any camera
after 2012 it’s just flat-out amazing one of my friends here on YouTube
actually made a video he noted all the Hollywood movies that were made with old
cameras like Canon 5d or 5d mark ii i’m gonna link it down below cuz it’s
actually really eye-opening i want to ask you why do you need a new camera i
mean do you think buying a new camera is going to make you better youtuber better
photographer what is it i mean because a lot of people spend a lot of time a lot
of money upgrading their equipment thinking their quality is going to
skyrocket somehow magically without putting in all the work and there’s also
a lot of aspiring youtubers who actually turned gear obsession into a whole
sinkhole and they spend so much money upgrading equipment and they never make
any of that money back financially it just makes no sense buying a new camera
every time it comes out like there’s always a new camera just around the
corner it’s always going to be better than any other camera blows it out of
the water Canon is dead Nikon is dead oh my god Fuji film is not in touch
with any other users blah blah blah but you know youtubers and people on
reddit’s and people in the comments section they’re like a very very small
minority like what they want is really not in line with what most consumers
want you know like people just want to take a nice picture they don’t give a
crap about 4k or 6k or do card slots or any of that junk you know I mean there
are cameras for consumers and there’s cameras for prosumers and professionals
but this is especially true of like the techies here on YouTube I don’t want to
turn it into a run against them but there is no best camera all right now
I’ve said this many times before but if you’ve got a camera that can change
lenses and can shoot raw that’s pretty much all you need I mean if you have
good lighting any camera is going to perform amazing now I know there’s
professionals out there and I know there’s like prosumers and enthusiasts
and you know the the needs of a professional are different from the
needs of most people watching this video all right do you really need 20 frames a
second chances are you don’t I mean that’s more of a professional thing like
the birders the sports photographers those kind of people who who actually
rely on this as an income who need that shot but do you really need that
yourself do you need slow mode because slow motion on YouTube there’s very few
people who know how to use it well most of it sucks to be honest is I really
have no stomach for gimmicks kind of funny because I should say a punk for a
toffee but for me to life and then okay 4k we’re up to six K and a K now do you
really need 6 K because I can tell you right now most people don’t even have a
computer that can handle editing HD quality footage like let alone 4 k 6k
8k even most like friends I know who actually do photography for a living
don’t have a camera that can handle 8k footage duo card slots once again your
professional yeah you need it you know you need to have a backup in case your
camera fry for some reason it’s never happened to me but I’ve heard of it but
you are you going to lose anything by losing a few pictures here and there
this this whole nonsense about dual card slots like people fighting over it’s
just really really annoying and I really recommend that you don’t listen to gear
reviews here on YouTube like most of them are useless they are just nonsense
like I can tell you right now there really aren’t any professional
photographers I know they’re watching gear reviews on YouTube like they all have
some level of disdain for them because they they know they’re just misleading
you like we’re gonna be doing shooting pictures of walls or graphs looking at
the sharpness of um oh this lens is sharper than this one let me tell you
right now when you’re out there shooting your photos like that’s really the last
thing you think about you you you’re just worried about nailing the focus not
so much all right man this one is much more sharper than that one now again if
you’re like a professional and just someone on YouTube prosumer I dare say
this stuff doesn’t really matter for you like you don’t need 69 megapixels you
hear like portrait photographer like a portrait photographer that makes money
yes maybe you do need that you need to like crop in and stuff like that you
know but the average person doesn’t need 69 megapixels the average person doesn’t
even have the memory space to store all these files you know like just by the
reading the comments on YouTube like most of these people never even open
Lightroom in their life and they’re watching all this YouTube your view
channel saying you need the latest Sony cuz it shoots 14 bit raw and dual card
slots and 69 mega piece of files and it has ibis and like 400,000 I so I mean
you really need I was – I mean have you never heard of a tripod now I have heard
from people that they wanna do video and that
they need the ibis and ask yourself how often do you really really make video
because you know other professionals I know that make video they usually use a
gimbal and if you’re like a techie kind of person you probably own a gimbal
already so you don’t need a base gimbal and lens stabilization like seriously
now I’m gonna a photographer I should in the lowest of the lowest of the lowest
light my eyesore never goes over 6,400 I’m usually around 1800 3200 ISO something
right and there are these cameras for like 400,000 iso and ibis
and i don’t really know anyone else shooting in light and in order than me
alright okay I’m not gonna use an example cuz you know I can’t use myself
as a baseline for these kind of things I’m just saying do you really need that
I mean come on I wanna I want you to take a serious introspection here why do
you need a new camera does that camera do something that your camera can’t
currently do because the only reason I need I see for upgrading a camera or
only two reasons are one your camera dies and you need to buy a new camera
now my new camera is actually like two years old yeah it’s not really new it’s
also really discounted but the only the second reason I see is that you have a
job but you can’t perform that job with the current limitations of your camera
so you actually need to upgrade now but then it becomes a financial matter I
mean I know watching YouTube channel somehow seems like every professional is
upgrading camera bodies every time there’s a new camera released or
switching systems and you know what those aren’t professionals those are you
two photographers you know and they don’t actually buy those cameras they’re
just loan those camera by the company so that they can promote their services and
you can buy those affiliate links professionals don’t buy a new camera
every time a new camera comes actually has some kind of feature because if you
did you’d be broke you wouldn’t have any money all the time you know it just you
know how expensive these things are you think you’re gonna be switching systems
because oh this camera has I this and this one is this camera I’ve had is
trash now because it doesn’t have a base or come on like get serious we don’t buy
new cameras every time a new camera we tend to buy a camera and then use it
until either it breaks or you have a job that you can’t do because you need a new
camera with certain features so yeah that’s that’s something to think about
you’re thinking of buying a new camera my real recommendation to you is to just
focus on lighting learning composition learn the out of the camera you have now
and then later once you want to do things that you’re seriously limited by
your camera then you can upgrade it’s all about the light I mean if you have
if you have a good light then the oldest camera does the trick just fine given
that this video but really it’s all about the light you know if as long as
you got good light then everything else is worth taking care of you know and if
you are going to if you’re dead set on buying a new camera make sure you’re
doing it because you can make the money back or if you’re just like a hobbyist
or enthusiast I really suggest you learn your camera you have right now really
really well because then you just throw money into a sinkhole and thinking buy
lenses or new camera body it’s going to make you better photographer it really
is just nonsense anyways thanks for dealing with me and yeah I mean I’m
really nobody but thanks for watching my photography videos see you

Photography Tutorial: Essential Photo Skills That Will Quickly Transform Your Photos

Photography Tutorial: Essential Photo Skills That Will Quickly Transform Your Photos


Light is the magical stuff that we use
to create our pictures. It’s found all around us and comes from a variety of
sources both natural and man-made. It also comes in many forms and colours, each
one affecting the atmosphere of our pictures differently. To help us
understand light I’ve broken it down into four main categories: transmitted
light, reflected light, soft light and hard light. Hard light comes from any
light source that is apparently small. Now the sun on a clear day is a prime
example. Now we know the sun’s not actually small but it appears small
because it’s so far away and it acts like an extremely bright but small light
bulb in the sky. Soft light comes from any light source that has a large
apparent surface area. Now a great example of that is like the light we’ve
got right now and that’s where the sun is shining through an overcast sky or a
large blanket of cloud and that large blanket of cloud has now become the
large light source and that large light source is what’s giving us the soft
light. The characteristics of hard light are that it has a very high contrast
because that high contrast it gives very sharp hard-edged shadows. It also has a
certain sparkle and sharpness to the light because of the high contrast and
it also reveals texture very strongly if the light source is at the right angle,
whereas soft light is very low in contrast and hardly gives any shadows at
all. In actual fact if soft light is used
incorrectly it can look quite dull. So what type of light is best for
photography? Well right now is what photographers call the ‘Magic Hour’ and
that’s because it has all the magic ingredients. We’ve got soft light from
this large light source above us which is the sky, but we’ve also got hard light
from the sun which is setting over there and it’s cutting through the earth’s
atmosphere so it’s reduced in intensity to a much more manageable level and by
combining hard light and soft light makes the photographs much more
interesting. Now to add to that we’ve also got transmitted light and that
means we can see the light source in the picture, plus we’ve got reflected light
reflecting off the surface of the water and off the wet sand and by putting all
of those things together we’re going to get a fantastic image, and if I can just
get this piece of driftwood to stay still I think we’re going to get the
shot that we want. That’s coming together really nicely, just going to move that
over a little bit. Some beautiful reflections off of the bit of wood, it’s
a little bit too close, just going to move it back down there. I want to be
quite precise.Oh no, she moved out the way again! Oh still that’s quite a good
result quite, a good result. We’ve got the water flowing by, got the bit of wood. As you can see sometimes you need to get
your feet wet to get the best shot. For this shot I was using a super wide
angle lens and experimenting in manual mode with shutter speeds from one to six
seconds. I used a small aperture for maximum
depth of field. To balance the light in the sky with my dark foreground I use ND
filters, which we look at in depth in our travel and landscape DVD. To understand
light better start looking at it in different situations and try to figure
out what you are seeing – is it hard light or is it soft light or is it a
combination of the two? For the best light try to shoot at least half an hour
before and after sunset, if the weather conditions are right then this will
usually be the most attractive light of the day. We’ll try a couple more shots before we pack
home and I can change out of these wet socks and shoes. Fantastic! The ‘Magic Hour’ is not the only time or
light that we can shoot in. You can even take advantage of hard light at midday
by shooting indoors. I’m going to show you how you can create stunning
portraits with nothing more than a window and a reflector for lighting. Now
a great lighting set-up that you can easily use in many different locations, even in
your own home, is simply a large window. Now here we’ve got Vicky modelling for us
and we’re using this large window light to illuminate soft light all the way
down the side of Vicky’s face. Now one of the problems when you just have side light
like this is that the other side of the body will be in shadow, now a great way
to get around that is simply to use a reflector and reflectors are great tools,
now you can get a variety of different reflectors. This one here is a
commercially available reflector that just pops open like that and you can
take out on location with you and then if you look at Vicky’s face here you’ll
see the difference that that reflector makes as I put that light in and out of
the shot like so, so a huge difference. Now it’s silver on one side and it’s white on
the other so the silver side gives a harsher light, but if you don’t want to
use a reflector like that you can even use something as simple as a piece of
white card like this, here I’ve got a little bit of white board, just a bit of
white foam board, and again watch the result here what we can do there. So this
side of the face is dark and in shadow, simply bring white board in and we’ve
got a great reflector, great fill in panel to illuminate that shadow side for
us. So very simple technique – large window, nice soft light beautiful for portraits,
fantastic for portraits, and then simply a reflector on the other side to fill in
the shadow side. So I’m going to get Vicky leaning in against this window and
then we’re going to use a couple of different reflectors and we’re going to
see what results we get. Okay Vicky. That’s great, come down towards me a bit more. And head over the other way, that’s it. This shot uses a white reflector close
to our subject, here the reflector is further away resulting in less fill
light and more shadows. In this shot no reflector was used at all, and in this
shot the white reflector was close to our model. That’s good. Great. Okay just give me a
little hint of a smile there Vicky, that’s good. Just chuck that light there, perfect. Same
pose, that’s it. The difference without the reflector and then with the
reflector, without, with. And you can see that even without the reflector can be
quite nice, in that case there’s actually a little bit of light bouncing back from
the other side of the room anyway which is filling in a little bit and then on
the one with the reflector it’s almost a bit too strong so I think what we do
Fab is just get you to go in with the white card this time, we’ll just go from a
little bit further away. Much softer light, which is fantastic for filling in
all those creases on Vicky’s face. That’s it good, okay, excellent. I’m just
going to drop that down a little bit. Okay turn your head towards the window
Vicky, that’s it good keep that there. That’s lovely.
You can see from this that the surgeon is going to have to do the reconstructive work round about here and then probably shrink the nose a little bit,
expand the head, lift those out, yeah lift those out, maybe make your fingers longer,
so they they drag on the floor like an orangutan, which would probably suit you quite well but yeah. So I think it’s worked out quite nicely. For the picture on the left we used a white reflector from approximately two
meters away, giving a slight fill to the shadow side of our image. For the shot on
the right the reflector was moved further away, resulting in a stronger
shadow. Notice how in both shots I have used a
large aperture to blur the background, concentrating the attention on our
subject

Rain Photography  “Masterclass”

Rain Photography “Masterclass”


all right so today I thought I’d tell
you guys my secret settings to shooting with the phone so believe it or not I
get this question a lot and the answer the secret that’s going to make you
better than everyone is there isn’t a secret you just push the button you take
photo all right and yeah I don’t even know why I’m making a video about this
but many people ask me how you take photo in the rain and there’s really
nothing to it besides just taking the photo in the rain I mean that’s it it’s
not a setting that’s gonna make you better than anyone else and there’s no
secret editing technique you just take the photo and it’s a phone I mean you
just push button there’s no aperture – ISO dial or whatever but I mean I guess
there are some apps and do it but I’m really worried about that if you are
worried about how to do all that what I have a tutorial where I just show you
how to shoot with the phone but it’s nothing more than me pushing buttons so
I hope that helps someone because people keep asking but you know what can you do
just keep repeating the message and hopefully people catch on

How to timelapse professionally

How to timelapse professionally


Today I’m going to teach you how to do a time lapse professionally So here’s the thing anyone can do a time lapse the problem is can you do a time lapse Correctly, my name is noe and I sell time lapse professionally to TV stations and movies I’ve even been on National Geographic and I think I am pretty qualified to teach you guys how to create time-lapse Professionally now, let’s get one thing out of the way first first of all there’s two different kinds of time lapse one is made by speeding up the video and To be honest, it doesn’t look so good. I mean it’s it’s an easy way to do it and anyone can do it, but actually The time lapse itself does not look very professional so what we’re going to be doing today is we’re going to be shooting stills and Turning that into a time lapse because stills you can actually manipulate many factors It looks a lot smoother and in post-production, you can actually look make a look much much better. So Usually gear is not so important when it comes to photography when it comes to time lapse it is and can be quite important especially if you want a professional Looking time lapse most importantly you’re going to need a tripod. That should be a given in any photographers arsenal You’re going to need an intervalometer now these costs anywhere from ten to twenty dollars You can get them on Amazon or Ebay or pretty much any photo store different camera brands have different Intervalometer some cameras don’t need an intervalometer I like I know Sony cameras usually have an inbuilt intervalometer, but Canon sells them separately. So depending on your camera brand you might have to buy an intervalometer or you might not Next you’re going to need and most important you’re gonna need a camera of some sort whether it be a DSLR or a mirrorless camera It’s actually easier to do with a mirrorless camera than a DSLR But I’m going to go over the differences and you’re going to need And the filter depending on the time of the day that you’re shooting now the reason you need an ND filter is because when I look at time-lapse footage either it’s very choppy and amateurish I mean see people just kind of flying in and out of the frame or it can be very smooth and it just it just flows very Very nicely it’s hard to explain but you can see it very clearly when you shoot with an ND filter, you can use lower shutter speeds during the daytime, but if you shoot with a faster shutter speed without an ND filter You’re going to be having very choppy footage and maybe for you guys. You don’t know the difference but me as professional I notice this right away, so Please get an ND filter depending on the time of the day. If you’re shooting a night. You won’t really need it But if you’re shooting in the daytime, you will definitely need an ND filter for a professional-looking time lapse So let’s go back to talking about gear and this is actually very important because when we do time lapse, there’s this phenomenon called flicker so most amateur time lapses don’t notice this but it stands out like Day and night to me usually when I saw time lapse two movie stations if there is some sort of flicker in the footage, they will not accept it and Here is how timelapse flicker is caused When you use when you create a time lapse with a DSLR for example what happens is that every time that the camera takes a picture the aperture opens up so you can see through the mirror and then it will close down To take the picture Now you would think that every time it takes a picture. It has the exactly exact same F-stop, for example, you shouldn’t have f/8 it always closes to f/8 But that is not exactly correct because there’s very very small fluctuations between each picture photo So what happens is when you’re doing a time-lapse with a DSLR camera? Sometimes one picture is just a little little bit brighter or a little bit Darker than the previous picture and when you put this time-lapse together you get flicker in your footage now I know most of you will know and probably won’t care. But if you want how to time-lapse correctly Professionally you will care now You might ask yourself. How can I get rid of? timelapse tlicker now you can use software to get rid of flicker, but actually that doesn’t always work and the software is Expensive there’s two ways to get rid of time lapse flicker completely first method is to Shoot with a manual lens. So if you use those old manual lenses, they don’t have electronic contacts and When you take a picture the aperture stays the same it doesn’t change at all So there won’t be any changes in exposure between each picture That’s one of the best ways to do it The second method of preventing flicker is actually the lens twist method now. This is a little tricky and it is kind of risky But actually I’ve been doing this for years and I’ve never had a problem the way you do. The lens twist method is You’re going to have to hold down the depth of field preview button on your camera. So what that happens is The aperture is going to open up and then to prevent the aperture from closing and resetting You’re actually going to have to unscrew the lens, but you’re not gonna take off the lens You’re just trying to do it so that the electronic contacts are not touching with a camera. So when you do this The aperture stays consistent it’s not gonna open or close between shots and what that’s gonna do is going to prevent flicker now there is a third way to prevent flicker and This is not always consistent because they’re different it differs between cameras but if you’re using a mirrorless camera, I’ve noticed that most mirrorless cameras the aperture stays the same and There isn’t flicker in the footage But if you notice that your mirrorless time-lapse has flicker Then you might want to consider trying what I told you or using a manual lens next. Let’s talk about timelapse Shutter speed so you have your camera ready? And people always ask Should I shoot time lapse in aperture priority mode and as a professional I tell you know Don’t shoot in aperture priority mode. I want you to shoot time lapse in manual mode So you’re going to expose for the scene now? If you’re doing something like a sundown sunrise time lapse there are ways to change the exposure over time Manually, and I’m going to do a separate video about that But for now, let’s imagine you’re doing a regular time-lapse and you’re going to shoot in manual mode So you’re gonna set your picture you’re gonna set your exposure. However, you want it Typically you want the ISO as low as possible Depending on how much broken or not you want in the scene you’re probably going to be shooting at f/8 or higher and when it comes to the shutter speed and this is the important part you’re going to be wanting to shoot at a shutter speed of One second or somewhere around one second now This is very important because you want your picture. You want your time-lapse to flow So you want to take pictures that have a little bit of blur a little bit of movement in them? that way when you play back the time-lapse video everything just Smooths out like ebb and flow if you use a high shutter speed like one sixtieth of a second Then your time which is going to come out kind of choppy The people are going to move very unnaturally. And if you’re an amateur, you’re just gonna think wow at a time That looks great. But if you’re professional this kind of thing stands out As clear as night and day so you’re going to want to be using a low shutter speed and that’s why earlier I told you guys if you’re shooting in the daytime, you’re going to need an ND filter Now there are exceptions to this For example if you’re shooting a landscape, and there’s no people or movement directly in front of the lens then it’s okay because you’re just focusing on nature and you focusing on the clouds and The movement is so slow that you don’t really notice it however, if you’re using a time-lapse for people or for cars or for anything directly in the vicinity Then you should use an ND filter. I mean you can do the time-lapse without the ND filter But remember this is making a time lapse professionally so settings Iso 100 as low as possible aperture a fader above shutter speed should be Any word on the area of one second, so these settings are not going to be exactly correct for you? But you’re going to want a low ISO you’re going to want a shutter speed of a second or around a second for sure and Your aperture should be higher than F8, even if you’re using an Indy culture So I will leave the correct exposure to you guys But you should keep the ISO and the shutter speed at what I told you now if you’re doing clouds and stuff like that, then the shutter speed doesn’t matter so much, but if you’re doing people or Movement in front of you. You’re going to want to show you’re going to want a shutter speed above About one second. So next is the interval or How much time should you take between each picture and I’m going to give you a general? Guidelines, I mean you don’t have to do this this is just what I typically do when I’m doing a time-lapse of people of driving or of cars moving or Something in front of the lens nearby. I like to keep the interval at one second. That means I take one picture I wait one second and I take another picture and I just keep it at that if I’m doing landscapes And there’s fast-moving clouds in the sky. I typically shoot at an interval of about three seconds However, if the clouds are moving relatively slow Then I usually keep the timelapse interval at about ten seconds. So I’ll shoot a picture ten seconds. Later I’ll take another picture for sunrise or sunset I keep it anywhere between ten and fifteen seconds usually around twelve seconds and When I’m shooting stars, I keep it anywhere from 15 seconds to 30 seconds Normally, I just do about 20 seconds. That’s your time lapse calculator. so the last thing when you talk about are the frame rates because when you put your pictures into the computer You need a good frame rate if you’re doing Ten pictures per second as a video as a movie Your time lapse movie is going to be very very choppy. Actually anything under 20 seconds is going to look very choppy and amateurish I typically shoot my time lapses settings anywhere between 24 pictures per second or 30 pictures per second. It’s really up to you so that usually means I shoot about a hundred and sixty-eight pictures or Sometimes up to two hundred pictures per timelapse session that gives me at least around seven or eight seconds of time-lapse footage So now that I’ve gone over all the timelapse camera technicalities of shooting a time-lapse Let’s put it all together and I’m going to show you guys exactly how I do my time-lapse First of all, I set my tripod and I set my timelapse camera next I would compose the picture How I would like it to be now first You have to compose your picture because next we’re going to put the ND filter on our timelapse camera So after our ND filter is on the camera We have to figure out the exposure here is where you’re gonna play around with timelapse settings and try to get a perfectly balanced photo So my ISO is 100. My shutter speed should be about a second if I’m taking pictures of people and it doesn’t really matter So much if I’m taking pictures of clouds, so if you’re taking pictures of clouds You don’t need the ND filter once I have these settings set. I set my aperture to get the exposure that I need typically, it’s anywhere between f/8 or f/11 or above so once I have set my exposure I Hold down the depth of field button and I unscrew my lens so that I don’t get any flicker in my photos That’s if I’m shooting with a DSLR Sometimes I’ll use a manual lens and I don’t have to worry about flicker. But like I said if you’re using a DSLR You’re probably going to be worried about flicker So either use a manual lens or do the lens screw method Now if you’re doing if you’re using a mirrorless camera, you might not have to worry about this But it does vary between mirrorless cameras So if you notice you’re getting timelapse flicker, you might have to do either either of these So once I finish preparing my time-lapse now I set my timelapse intervals Like I said for people I usually do one second same thing for traffic and same thing for driving If I want to do fast-moving clouds, I’ll do one picture every three seconds if I’m doing slow moving clouds I’ll do one picture every 10 seconds if I’m do sunrises or sunsets I would do Anywhere between 12 and 15 seconds finally if I’m doing a time-lapse of the stars, I’ll do about 20 seconds But you can go as high as at once every 30 seconds Now next step comes timelapse post-production and I’m actually going to make a separate video about post-production also if you guys are interested in hyperlapse tutorial, I will be making Tutorials on hyperlapse videos, but this is an essential first first you need to do first You need to know how to do a time-lapse guide before you can do a hyperlapse vs timelapse. So thanks for watching this video Please like leave a comment. If you’re having any trouble any problems, let me know. I will help you And actually I have a really really really old video About how to do a time-lapse if you’re doing interested in watching it I’ll put the link below but it’s really old. The audio is bad. That’s why I remade this video and I updated it So thank you very much, and I’ll see you next time

Neon Noir Lightroom Tutorial

Neon Noir Lightroom Tutorial


all right so I’m gonna show you guys how
I’m going to edit this photo it seems to be pretty popular this style so I want
to show you guys how I do it now like what I said last time is I’d like to
find something that is white try to make sure the white balance is correct that’s
usually the first thing I do and by now this could kind of become like an art to
me so it’s pretty quick so I’m gonna increase the contrast all the way decrease
the highlights I’m gonna increase the shadows the whites just until they peak
you see that red that signifies I overdid it something I’ll scale it down
right about there now increase the blacks all the way but that does not mean it’s
gonna stay this way it just means that’s how I like now I like my pictures a
little soft not always too soft but actually I’m gonna eyeball this actually
I like it like that so I mean this is really to your style it doesn’t have to
be exactly the way I do it if you want to have your clarity like there it’s
fine you wanna jack it up that’s fine too so I like my picture soft
people people usually say that I increase the saturation all the way and
shit like that but it’s not that’s not even the case I actually decrease it
there’s no set number it’s just the way I see it if it looks good to me that’s
the way I’d leave it so that’s looking more or less better the way I want it
now I don’t always change the highlights but I think I’ll add a smidgen of purple
just like that barely noticeable there we go so now I like to reduce the noise little
bit to go to luminance and add a vignette something like this, I’m gonna increase the
highlights in the vignette area actually what I would like the way I see this is
I want this to be lit but I want the area around it to be dark but the
vignette’s not cutting up for me so I’m gonna come to the radial filters over
here I’ma lay a filter right over it and Invert it, I’m a decrease
exposure but not too much like I said I’m just gonna eyeball this and however
I see the photo how I envision it that’s what I’m gonna do it
you guys don’t have to copy me exactly I mean if you don’t like something you can
just do it the way you want to do you know I’m just giving you guys like a
base like this is the way I like to do it and you don’t have to like this
completely now I wish I could increase the contrast so what I’m gonna do is I’m
just gonna slowly add more blacks in there there you see not all the way
now I actually maybe maybe I will deal with that vibrant so up a little bit
more okay that looks fine so I want to see
these signs over here in these cables that’s kind of a big point to my picture
and uh I’m gonna go over here and increase the highlights so we can see the brighter parts
starting to come out over here which is what we want
I’m gonna remove this part I’ll do something else right there
increase the highlights there you go it’s time to add more pop to our photo
which is what we want now I’m gonna make another brush this time I’m just gonna
add to the shadows maybe we can change We can change the brush later so it’s fine so like I said this is to each their
their own so however you want to do your photo and that’s up to you but this is
the way I like it and what else can we do
I want more pop in these lights some do yet another brush this time going for
the highlights so you know toss it in there not too much and we want this kind
of wire to shine a little so yeah let’s see how it looks
okay these lights are a little bit too bright so we don’t want that we want
them bright but not too bright and this is basically what you’re doing you’re
gonna paint your picture you know how you see it how you want it this is the
way I envisioned it and actually I envisioned this being a little bit more
but not too much so I’m going to do yet another brush so this is all a process
you know see let’s try 20 okay looks much better so
I’m just adding highlights to places that should have highlights you know
kind of where all this little white sparkle okay that’s good now I don’t
like them being this saturated so I’m gonna actually reduce the saturation a
little bit with you guessed it another brush yeah we don’t want them to look
like tomatoes and like I said there’s no set numbers
to this I mean you do this the way you want to do it and I really really want
to see the top over here because that’s like the main thing for me so the
brushes are not doing it time to increase the exposure a little bit and
some contrast do we have contrast yeah yeah so I’m liking that much better
already you know it’s good but I don’t want the lights to be too bright either
so there you go you have a noealz style photo and I hope you guys are enjoying
this these kinds of tutorials and videos please be sure to subscribe and follow
me on Instagram and if you have any questions or if you want to share your
photo with me be sure to tag me I’ll check it out for sure and I’ll see you
around you