Tutorial: Better Sunrise Photography | Paul Adams

Tutorial: Better Sunrise Photography | Paul Adams


hello and welcome to the busy man’s
guide to photography episode 5 with me Paul Adams now we are heading out to do
some sunrise photography it’s Saturday it’s 20 past 5 Steve was a little bit
late this morning so I’m not sure we’re gonna get there in time it’ll be fine but we’ve
got some road to travel we don’t need roads why’s that cos we’ve got this that’s amazing where did you learn that YouTube hang on
it’s a bit bright we’ve come too far forward yeah back yeah I’ve done sunrise photography before
but today I wanted to follow the rules instead of fighting them so in my
research I’ve come up with these top tips for better sunrise photography scout your location you can actually go
physically to scout your location before you set up so you get a lay of the land
or if you’re busy use Google Maps check the weather check it every day because
the weather isn’t consistent this way you can plan ahead if anything changes
have an idea of the shot you want before you go you can always change it later
set up your camera before you go this will save you time later the best
aperture is between f11 and f-18 and the ISO should be around about 100 or
200 it’s a good idea to set your camera up in aperture priority mode because
it’ll reduce the amount of changes you have to make if the light changes oh
and make sure you charge your batteries use an ND filter cause light can confuse
your camera this way you can keep your shutter open for longer without
overexposing your capture it’s like sunglasses for your shooter use a tripod obviously you don’t want
any shake in your shot especially when you’ve got those long exposures lay
clothes out the night before to save you time dress for the cold and also leave a
lot earlier than you think you should just in case you’re late there we go Episode five is done now
such a beautiful day I’m so glad that we got out well some of us got up at 3
o’clock in the morning was definitely worth it I think viewing it was worth it
I think it was really nice I’m really excited to see the shots that we got on
the water with that sunrise you’ll see a shot at the end of what was taken it’s
been an absolutely beautiful day maybe things happen for a reason this is
probably a better location than yeah it was a better location than the one that
I’d originally scouted for so maybe you were late for a reason but next time I
think we should turn up on time don’t forget to Like subscribe and share our
videos our names will be at the bottom so you can you can look on to his
channel as well and make sure you hit those notifications so that you don’t
miss any content because he’s not regular let’s face it time to go Steve I’m still amazed by when he does that
hang on a minute Steve Steve Steve Oh

Medium Format Digital vs. 35mm DSLR Cameras – Which is better?

Medium Format Digital vs. 35mm DSLR Cameras – Which is better?


Hello guys Josh Geiger here. Product
photographer from Atlanta and instructor at photigy.com. Today we’re going to talk
about two types of cameras, 35 millimeter DSLR and medium format DSLR I like most
of you started out on a 35-millimeter system and its really all we’ll ever
need for the majority of our work but sometimes we find ourselves in a
situation where we need to upgrade or we’re looking to upgrade down the road
and when you start talking about systems like this you’re looking at big money
and it’s a good idea to have a little bit more information before diving
straight in when I was looking around online for more information about medium
format systems I found the basic information kind of hard to find if you
root around deep enough you can find you know a whole bunch of technical
information but I was really just want to start at the beginning the basics and
that’s kind of what we’re going to do today we’re going to break down each
camera system to their main parts talk a little bit about them and then we’re
going to dive a little bit deeper and do a pros and cons comparison we’re going
to look at some of the benefits of each system some of the negatives of each
system obviously it cost comparison maybe a little bit of photo comparisons
and you might be surprised at what you don’t get for fifteen to thirty thousand
dollars let’s check these out first we’re going to start with the 35
millimeter system that we’re all pretty familiar with but for those of you who
don’t know everything about these and we’re not going to go over everything we
are going to dive a little bit deeper and break this down so let’s go ahead
and do that alright so here we have a nikon d700 this belongs to a buddy of
mine i’m currently using my d800 making this video so it still gets plenty of
use this is a 12.1 megapixel camera it shoots like five to eight frames per
second and it’s a full-frame camera meaning that it’s chip is the same size
as a full piece of 35 millimeter film but that’s not all there is to this
camera so let’s take a deeper look inside okay
so looking at the 35 millimeter DSLR it’s pretty simple we have two main
parts here the body and the lens I’ll remove this lens cap real quick and a
lens hood and we see our front element our rear element and inside of this lens
we have aperture blades that open and close to varying amounts allowing more
or less light in which is actually referred to as your f-stop obviously the
more that is closed down the less light will come in the more open it is more
light will obviously come in looking at the body you can see inside here there’s
a mirror that mirror actually reflects the image up into the viewfinder behind
that mirror is the shutter curtain and the sensor when you press the shutter
button the mirror flips up the curtain does its thing in the sensors exposed
looking at the back we have our LCD screen which on the majority of new
DSLRs is really great our regular controls for the different functions
which will of course vary depending on the body that you have whether it’s
Nikon or Canon or any other brand that’s pretty simple LCD on the top for just
viewing more information and that’s the basics this camera actually happens to
have a pop-up flash most do and of course slots for memory cards and here
our battery slot very simple hasn’t changed much in a pretty long time with
the exception of maybe you know software options
and that’s it moving on from this we’re going to take a look at the medium
format system okay so now that we’ve seen the 35 millimeter system we’re
going to do the same thing to this here we have a medium format DSLR the body is
a mamiya 645 DF they also make a DF + and you’ll notice too that you see
cameras that look just like this thats a phase one on them phase one I believe
purchased mamaya leaf and so they produce the same bodies with you know
the different name on them I think now they might actually all be phase one but
it’s the same camera here we have the digital bag this is a leaf aptus to 10
it’s 56 megapixels and the chip in this is a little bit wider format then is
typically found in other medium format digital bags also you’ll notice that the
battery on this is external on newer backs a lot of the batteries are
internal which is kind of nice and it also helps with some weather proofing
I’m not sure I think they have some weather proofing digital bags not
positive anyway that said let’s take a deeper look inside this what I’m going
to do first is just go ahead and break these pieces down and then we’ll talk
about them individually so getting started I have here a really right stuff
L bracket on here so I’ll remove that and then I’ll remove the battery so we
can just set this down flat make it easier to deal with if I can manage to
get this piece on here oh that would help wouldn’t it okay so first let’s
take off the lens it’s a little bit different than we’re used to on the 35
millimeter systems normally you’d have a button on either side of the lens that
you would press and rotate the lens off here the button is actually over here
which is actually kind of dangerous because I’m always afraid I’m going to
hit that which is partially do I keep that L bracket on here it kind
of blocks that but anyway moving on let’s take that off for a second and put
the cap on and then our body we will remove our digital back and I’m just
going to put the cap on that real quick while we talk about some other stuff I’m
just a little protective of that to keep the chip clean so looking at this body
obviously it’s bigger than the 35 millimeter body but the first thing we
notice is we can see straight through it it does still have a mirror in here and
actually a focusing screen but when you take off the back it automatically flips
up it really works just like a regular 35 millimeter DSLR the only real
difference is the chip comes off the back there is a shutter in here it just
so happens that this lens is a mamaya sec or d schneider leaf shutter lens and
what that means is is unlike the 35 millimeter lens this not only has
aperture blades it also has its own built-in shutter which has its own
blades they call Leafs and the benefit to this really is just that you get very
high sync speeds on this it actually sinks up to 116 hundredth of a second
which can be quite handy in a myriad of situations but setting that aside again
with the rest of this body we have our LCD screen our control knob
your regular array of scroll wheels and doodads for changing your different
options and then actually i’ll move this over here here we have our digital bag
this is pretty cool because it’s basically a little computer what we have
here is our normal LCD screen on the back which as I said we’ll talk more
about in the pros and cons it is a touchscreen LCD this particular back is
a firewire tethered support back some of them will do USB 3 even some of the
newer ones you’ll get Wi-Fi support for tethering which is really nice but we’re
moving that if we put the battery back on you can see we have an external
battery some of the new digital backs have the bit battery um built in which
is kind of nice it just reduces a little bit of the bulkiness and then let’s just
take a look at this chip for a second look at the size of that bad boy typically a full frame medium format
chip is going to be twice the size of a 35-millimeter chip and without getting
too specific into technicalities here basically what that means is larger
depth of field more sharpness and all-around image goodness but breaking
them down they’re really pretty similar to the 35 millimeter systems biggest
difference being this little computer pops off the back and is incredibly
expensive so I guess now we’ll get into the meat of this situation which would
be the pros and cons where’s one beat the other and let’s do that now okay so
now that we’ve broken down both of these systems and taking a look at their main
parts we’re going to do a little pros and cons comparison let’s start with the
35 millimeter system first it’s got an accurate auto focus it’s fast it’s
accurate there are tons of auto focus points on the majority of these DSLRs
and having the ability to fly around the viewfinder with your selection wheel and
just pick a specific thing that you want to focus on is a real big help
especially if you’re looking through the viewfinder it’s sometimes hard to see
and check focus visually so the electronic focus check is pretty much
imperative if you’re not tethered to something with live view also is OS in
these cameras because of the chip they use the iso range is incredible most of
them come around standard or native a hundred ISO and go upwards of you know
6400 and then ridiculous numbers above that high one high 2 & 2 just crazy
numbers I normally wouldn’t go above 1600 iso I just happen to like it’s
clean of images as possible I know some people like noise especially in black
and white photography but needless to say the ISO ranges in here
are great and you can get some really clean photos with iso s in the four six
eight hundred range and that’s real beneficial in low-light conditions also
the capture rate another benefit to the chips and knees is that they can capture
images faster like I said this camera i think will do five frames or so some of
the higher-end cameras will go upwards of 10 or 11 frames a second which is
just so fast rear displays on these cameras talking about our LCD they’re
great they’re bright they produce color nicely which leads us into the other
thing is that a lot of these you can do video and having a nice screen that’s
got a high resolution is good to have when you’re doing video work easy access
to controls there’s tons of buttons on these cameras everything’s pretty much
right at your fingertips that’s really nice not having to dive down into menus
and select around and find what you’re looking for and make your adjustment it
just speeds up the workflow quite a bit weatherproofing most DSLRs are going to
have some degree of weather proofing I wouldn’t soak them in a tub or anything
like that but I’ve seen plenty of instances where in a light drizzle or
something you don’t really have to worry about it I’ve seen other instances where
somebody left their camera outside in a storm and it was just soaking wet and it
survived I wouldn’t suggest that but I’ve seen it done and they’re not too
expensive for what you get you know you can get upwards of probably seven or
eight thousand dollars on a high-end DSLR body and 35 millimeter format but
really for somewhere between you know one and three thousand dollars you can
get a really nice camera it’ll do pretty much anything you needed
to do and there’s tons of lenses available form a lot of manufacturers a
lot of specialty lenses macro lenses tilt-shift lens is really that kind of
boils down to the markets just so much larger you know when there’s a lot of
people out there with these cameras that’s a lot more customers out there
for companies to create products for I guess that kind of brings us to the
negatives the downsides I don’t really consider it a downside but when you’re
comparing it to a medium format system you could say image quality nowadays the
images you get out of these 35 millimeter systems are incredible but
you do get a little bit more out of a medium format camera they’re difficult
to clean as we saw earlier when you break one of these down and you look
inside you know if you want to clean the sensor you got to lock the mirror up and
then get a light so you can see what you’re doing down there and you know
special tools and there’s oil in there for the mirror to flip up and stuff and
you don’t want to touch anything and smear oil inside and it’s just really
kind of a hassle to get in there and most people actually suggest you just
have them done professionally I’d call that a downside and I guess probably
least of the worries is if you’re dealing with high-end clients or
something like that they’re just not that impressive you know a camera’s a
camera is a camera but if you’re dealing with a client it’s used to walking in
and seeing somebody using you know either large-format cameras or medium
format DSLRs and they come in and they see a 35-millimeter DSLR it doesn’t mean
you can’t do the job right or produce images they want necessarily but it
might make them feel not as comfortable as they were when they originally hired
you for the job but I wouldn’t let that hold you back that’s not reason enough
to upgrade to a medium format system that said I think that’s probably all
the cons that I could come up with on these things they’re just great little
cameras wonderful and I guess we’ll move on to
breaking down the medium format let’s go okay so now we’re going to do the same
thing with the medium format DSLR first the pros I would think that the first
pro that I have with this is if you’re going to work a system like this you
have to have a digital back and by having the digital back you have more
versatility because one thing that we know is you can take the digital back
off and put it on a technical camera that just opens up you know the
possibilities of what you can actually do with the equipment and that’s just
amazing of course the image quality you’re dealing with a sensor that’s
twice a size as a 35-millimeter sensor and that’s going to produce shallower
depth of field it’s going to capture more light it’s going to be sharper and
of course that’s all the stuff we’re going for but what it also does is
provides more color information more accurate color representation larger
dynamic ranges you know from the blacks to the whites you know you’re looking at
12 14 stops of dynamic range and easy to clean you know when you take that back
off that chip sitting right there you just get your swab wipe it clean it up
brand new of course you know it’s impressive that’s just kind of a little
ego driven thing there I guess and you have great lenses available on these
things now you don’t have the range of lenses like you do in here which will go
in the con list but the lenses you do have available for these are superb
they’re sharp they’re crisp you have the leaf shutter options in some of the
lenses they’re just magnificent and of course another thing that’s not
necessarily a benefit of the camera itself but when you get into a system
like this is the customer service you get from the company that you purchase
from I don’t know about all of the you know different companies and plans
available and stuff like that but I know that if something goes wrong with this
camera I can have it taken to the shop I’ll get something to use in exchange
for it it’ll be taken care of in no time and ship back to me I’ve heard some
horror stories of course on both sides and you can’t win them all all the time
but I have heard a lot of bad things about new models and cameras that come
out in the 35 millimeter world my d800 when it first came out had some issues
and luckily I ended up with a model that came out after those issues were taken
care of but I haven’t heard of that many issues out of medium format systems I
would think that’s mostly because when you have a customer forking out that
kind of money the last thing you want is for them to be angry with you because
you didn’t give them a functioning product that said I’m only saying that
because I personally haven’t heard of any of those issues and then I guess
we’ll get to the cons the bad sides and you might be surprised at some of these
a they’re super expensive no kidding no surprise the lenses super expensive
maybe a little bit of a surprise but um I guess it should have been expected
right working with these you have a single focal point unlike these where
you look through the viewfinder and you have a ton of little boxes and a ray to
choose from and you can flick it around in there and get whatever you need in
here you have one circle in the middle of the frame that’s your focusing point
you do have the ability to kind of decide where it’s going to weigh you
know where it’s focusing so I’m like the edges of the focusing circle or the
center of the focusing circle but you can’t move it around the frame and when
you’re shooting something like this with a shallower depth of field that becomes
even more difficult because if you have to say focus and recompose
you got to be really careful doing that because the slight change in your
recomposition can completely blow your focus so it’s not the easiest thing in
the world to deal with of course again if you’re shooting tethered and you have
a live view saying capture one or some other similar program and becomes less
of an issue I so capabilities basically I wouldn’t use this camera on anything
over its native iso 100 if I have to I might put it on 200 but like I said I
like clean images but these things produce a lot of noise I think it might
go up to 800 iso and that’s just completely unusable so you’re not going
to be using these for sporting events low-light situations you know and some
soccer in a field at night of your family you’re definitely not going to be
getting photos with this guy you’re going to want to take something like
this with the long wide aperture lens and just have a blast and capture rate
you know on these we were talking about five frames a second upwards of 10 or 11
frames a second something like this you’re looking at one frame a second
maybe one point zero five frames per second something like that but uh
they’re slow and I think a lot of that has to do is just how long it takes to
process such a large image image file it’s it’s not really that big of a deal
for the kind of work I do if your still life photographer or something like that
but you know if you’re shooting say hi fashion or something and you’ve got a
model that’s there’s just a whole bunch of energy and she’s going through these
tons of poses and you want to be able to capture as much of that as possible this
you’re not really going to be able to do that with you know it’s going to be
click click click and that’s about as fast as it’s going to get the LCD screen
on the back of these cameras I’m not going to say this about the new ones
because some of the newer ones the Krytos and the IQ to
forties or two 80s or 2 60’s or whatever they are probably have really nice
screens on them I haven’t had my hands on one yet but I do know that the older
digital backs or even some of the newer versions of older models like the Aptus
series from leaf the screens just aren’t very good you get a lot of banding and
gradients and stuff like that for color representation and it’s just kind of
difficult to deal with the touchscreen is nice but you end up with fingerprints
all over the screen and I find myself having to wipe it constantly and no
built-in live view some of the newer ones do like I said the sum of the
Krytos and the IQ series from phase have live view built in and I can tell you
that would definitely be at the top of the pro list if I had one of those but
as of right now it’s got to sit on my con list because it’s in the majority of
the older more affordable digital backs that you find the lower quality screens
and accessing some of the controls you know if you take a look at this you
don’t have all the buttons that you had on this I mean it’s just buttons
everywhere on this thing here you’ve got a knob you know your dial of three or
four buttons here and a button here you know what I mean the rest of it is in
your digital back so if you want to change your white balance or your ISO or
any of that kind of stuff you have to go in here route into your menu or whatever
it is go to wherever it is and you can set up a favorites folder that has your
most accessed options and that’s pretty convenient but still it’s not really as
easy as just pressing the button scroll to where it is and you’re good to go I
find with this I don’t have to really look at what I’m doing when I’m making
changes with this I do and complicated custom settings you know over here it’s
pretty easy to set up custom menus and settings but over here when you get into
the customizations nothing’s really named
intuitively it’s like c1 c2 c3 and then there’s all these just different
categories that don’t have even abbreviations that make sense so you
kind of to keep a little cheat sheet with you or something that tells you
what they all mean if you play with that kind of stuff a lot I find myself not
doing that I tend to just keep it in manual hundred iso and then I’m just
messing with you know shutter speed and aperture and even shutter speed not that
often because I’m using you know strobes and I typically keep it a it max ink so
that would be that talking about the lenses again you know I said that with
medium format the lenses that are available are incredible but where you
have a problem is there aren’t that many available at least not in comparison to
35 millimeter there are a couple tilt shift lens available a couple of macro
lenses available but really the choices are fairly limited good news is the
choices that are there are superb they’re also incredibly expensive I
think I say like a 85 millimeter tilt shift lens from Schneider or well let’s
go with Nikon which is pretty much just as good it’s 90 millimeters from
schneider i believe the 85 millimeter tilt shift lens from nikon is going to
run you a couple thousand dollars and that’s expensive but it’s a great lens
and it will do what you needed to do however on medium format the 90
millimeter Schneider tilt shift I’m sorry 120 millimeter Schneider tilt
shift lens is depending on where you get it going to run you somewhere between
five thousand and six and a half thousand dollars that’s pretty expensive
likewise just regular you know leaf shutter macro lenses 120 millimeter from
the same company you’re looking at four grand ish four or five thousand dollars
so it’s very expensive but you do get the quality out of that and that pretty
much wraps up for this pros and cons when I only
had my d800 system when I was dreaming about having a medium format system I
kind of expected that if i was going to fork out that kind of money everything
would just be better that this all the options that you had in this would
transfer to this and it would just do the job better maybe even provide me
some new trickier options that weren’t previously available in this kind of
system that turned out not to be the case actually a lot of the things that
are available here are not available here and when they are available here in
a handful of instances they actually don’t perform as well as they do in the
35 millimeter system so as I said at the beginning of this you might be really
surprised at what fifteen to thirty thousand dollars won’t buy you in a
future part of this series we are going to compare a medium format DSLR system
with this digital back on a cambo Ultima monorail camera and we’re just going to
compare the pros and cons of using both of those systems obviously using the
large format system is going to slow things down a bit but it might get us
some really nice results that we don’t expect to we’ll see I’ve been Josh
Geiger with photo gcom and we’ll talk to you later

How to Take Pictures in Small Room (3 Techniques for Boudoir)

How to Take Pictures in Small Room (3 Techniques for Boudoir)


– Okay, what’s up guys? Welcome back to the channel. I’m Mike Sasser, Boudoir photographer in
Los Angeles, California. But today we are in New York because I am teaching a little workshop on how to shoot video during
your boudoir sessions. And if you guys know
anything about New York, you know that the rooms are
really really really tiny and that is exactly the
hotel room that we have here. I mean this place can barely fit this bed. Now I worked really hard in Los Angeles to find like the perfect space, a spot with big windows, a spot with good light
that’s got nice floors and like a deep space so that I could shoot
exactly what I want to shoot. But I know that’s not
the case for everybody. A lot of people are shooting
in these smaller spaces. So I wanted to make this video
of three little techniques that I use when I do have
to shoot in small spaces. And hopefully these are
really gonna help you guys out for when you have to as well. (upbeat music) Now with an ultra wide angle lens, this hotel looks like it’s a decent size, but it’s really only ten feet by ten feet or three meters by three meters, for those on the Imperial system. But let me show a few
things for comparison so you can actually see how
little space there is in here. So here we’ve got, I think
it’s a Queen size bed. It may be a full size bed and then we’ve got, this is my carry-on piece of luggage that you can see, if I try and put it in between this space, like it doesn’t even
actually hit the ground there ’cause there’s not enough space
for it to sit on the floor. Here we have just a
regular computer desk chair that, I mean, barely has
enough space in between the bed and the desk. And here’s my camera bag, which, like, kinda opens but not really, in between this little space over here. And we do have one little
extra walkway over here that’s gonna allow us to
get a little bit more depth but pretty much, this is
what we’re working with. So for things to work with
in here, we have this bed, we’ve got big nice, light windows and we have this really awkward throne, like super unnecessary… I don’t know why they thought, like, you know what would really
tie this room together? A snake skin… Looks like a tarantula arm or something but we’re gonna use it. Hey Genesis! She’s gonna be helping us out today. – Hi! – And we’re gonna start
talking about our three tips, I think with a little
bonus tip at the end. I might cut that out ’cause I can’t remember if
I added a bonus tip or not. So the very first tip that we’re gonna do is going to be to shoot
from different heights. (smooth music) I like to shoot at eye-level a lot. And so, what that does, I think it makes things like
more personal with a client. I think it gives an evenness
of power and a connection. But, when you are limited
in a space like this, you kinda have to start to get creative. So let’s see a couple examples of how we can use some different heights to make some cool pictures. Okay, first thing we’re
gonna do is get rid of this ridiculous yellow. Where do you even put
this in a room this small? We’re gonna put it in here. (banging) Okay, so even though this
is a pretty small space, we have this massive, amazing window and I’ve always thought that window light, like good light, is more important than anything else, above location, above the outfits that they brought, above the furniture. So we’re really lucky that we’ve got really, really good light, so we’re gonna use that to our advantage. (music playing over Mike
instructing Genesis) (smooth music) (music playing over Mike
instructing Genesis) (smooth music) For this next shot, another, like, little bonus tip, I almost always shoot
with a 50 millimeter, like almost always in my space. But when you are in tighter spaces, I recommend that it’s a good idea to check out something a little bit wider. We’re gonna use the 35
millimeter for this shot. I’m gonna get nice and low and shoot up on her and the 50’s only gonna be
able to capture her face. We wanna be able to see more than that. So let’s make it happen. (music playing over Mike
instructing Genesis) (smooth music) (music playing over Mike
instructing Genesis) (smooth music) Alright, so that’s tip number one. Tip two is gonna be to add
a little depth to the space. We’re gonna use a foreground object. (smooth music) This can pretty much be anything. I made an entire video on this, which I’m gonna link above
and in the description. Basically what we’re trying to do is give the illusion of depth by using just something out
of focus in the foreground. Now I didn’t prepare and
I didn’t bring anything, so we’re gonna search
around the hotel room and see if we can find something that’s gonna work really well.
Let’s see what we have here. We’ve got like some half and half. That’s probably too small for it. Does this come off? Oh no, that’s just a turn. I’m definitely not gonna hold
up just the whole coffee mug. Actually it’s a good thing
that I got these yesterday because, I think maybe the… You want one? – [Genesis] I’ll take one.
– Yeah. It’s important to have
chocolate at your shoots for a number of reasons but
also ’cause I’m pretty sure these wrappers are gonna work, the way they kinda reflect the light off. So let’s go ahead and… White chocolate, so good. So when you put the
aluminum foil out of focus with the light reflecting off of it a bit, it’s gonna look really cool out of focus. We’re gonna take this phone
out of the background. (laughing) Clean up your backgrounds guys! Also this light is super
bizarre here for some reason. We’re just gonna make this a normal light. The more clutter you
have in your backgrounds, the more distracting it is, so I really recommend that, as simple as you can make them and as normal as you can make them. The whole kinda concept is there’s a little bit of
voyeur sorta character to it, so you won’t be looking
at the camera for these. Alright, go ahead. (music playing over Mike
instructing Genesis) (smooth music) (music playing over Mike
instructing Genesis) (smooth music) (music playing over Mike
instructing Genesis) Alright, so that’s tip number two. Tip number three is to shoot details. So what I love about boudoir
is not every single picture has to have a full body. It doesn’t have to have
their whole face in it. So when I’m selling albums, the goal is to get variety. So, in order to do that, we
shoot a lot of detail shots of, like, their collar bone, of their fingertips, of
their lips, things like that. So, especially when
you’re in a small space, you can sorta lean on
that a little bit more. So we’re gonna put her in a pose and then just get as many
detail shots of that one pose as we possibly can. (music playing over Mike
instructing Genesis) (smooth music) Tip number one, shoot
from different heights. This is gonna give you
more variety in your space. Tip number two, shoot through something. This can be anything you find, flowers, candy wrappers, doorways. And tip number three, shoot details. Uses the opportunity to
get a variety of images that you can sell in addition
to your standard photos. I’ve got even better videos
for you guys coming up in the next couple of weeks, so if you’re not subscribed, you’re definitely gonna
wanna hit that button. Go check out Genesis on Instagram and if you guys need a little
help with your editing, all of the photos in
this video were edited with my Ever Summer presets. There will be a link in the description and I will see you next week! (smooth music)

How To Film Slow Motion Boudoir Videos

How To Film Slow Motion Boudoir Videos


– Okay, what’s up everybody? Welcome back to the channel, I’m Mike Sasser, a boudoir photographer in Los Angeles, California, and I think it’s time
you and I had a talk. You’ve been following my
channel for a little bit, you’ve been taking your pictures, you’re getting more comfortable with it, you wanna try something new,
something more adventurous, so by the end of this video, I wanna make sure you have what it takes, that you have the know-how
to make a super cool, very beautiful, slow-motion
boudoir video like these. (slow rhythmic music) Now, one should be honest, does video sound scary to you? (screeching music) Look, I get it, it’s new, it’s
different from photography, but video has definitely been the thing that has set my photography business apart from all of the rest of the
photographers in my area. Not just with slow-motion
videos like you just saw, but client testimonials, but the other videos
that are on my website that show a little bit of the experience. And I wanna give you guys a little leg up so that you can start to separate yourself from all of the other
photographers in your area too. Now, I have a full two and
a half hour online course that talks only about how to shoot video. Now, I’ll link it in the description, but I’m gonna see if I can get through the majority of it in just 12 minutes. (deep breathing) Let’s go. All right, let’s do a
quick lesson on settings. Switch your camera into video mode. You got this part, guys. I know you do. Photography settings and video settings are more alike than you would think, especially for exposure. There’s only one rule that
we really have to abide by, and that is that the shutter speed is at least twice the
number of our frame rate. What does that mean? So this video right now, I’m shooting 24 frames a second, or 24p, which means that my shutter speed is one over a fiftieth of a second. It can go above that, but
don’t let it get below that. And if we’re shooting slow motion, which we’ll go over in just a minute, we’re shooting at 60 frames a second, which means that our shutter speed should not get below 1/125. The rest is pretty much
the same as photography, and I know videographers are gonna be yelling at me in the comments, but just ignore them. All right, now let’s talk about the most dreaded thing that I hear over and over and over again, which is shaky footage. Let me guess, you drink a lot of coffee, your hands shake, you’re about as stable as a three-wheeled wagon rolling down a street made of rocks. Well, join the club! I mean, not the coffee part, you know, I really only drink chocolate milk, but having stable footage will really improve the quality of your videos. Now, I personally hate using tripods and monopods and gimbles
for stuff like this, so here’s how you get stable
footage without those things. The very first thing you’re gonna wanna do is keep your arms tucked in. The more contact points you have, the more stable your footage will be. Now, if you want an
even more stable set-up, I recommend that you either sit down, use your knees on your elbows. You could lean up against a wall. Just basically, the more
contact points you have with not just yourself, but other things that are really stable, it’s going to help stabilize your footage. The next thing that’s actually gonna help is just shooting slow-motion. Because you’re seeing all of the movements played back more slowly, it’s going to appear more stable. The next thing is in-body
image stabilization. All the current Sony’s come with it, the new Nikon’s come with it, you’ve got the Panasonic GH5, and that series of cameras comes with it. If you’re really serious about
doing more hand-held video, I highly recommend that you
check out one of these cameras, and if not, they’ve got
image stabilized lenses that will help you out immensely. And tip number five is
just to add a little stabilization software. With Final Cut, it’s a button, with Premiere, you’ve got warp stabilizer. DaVinci’s got, you know,
whatever it is they have. Most software has image
stabilization built in. So we’ve got keep your arms tucked, brace yourself against
something, use slow-motion, get an image stabilized
camera, or sensor, or lens, and use software stabilization, and those five things should really really help you get much much
smoother and stable footage. All right, now let’s talk slow-motion, which is pretty much the basis for all of my boudoir videos. There’s a right way and a
wrong way to do slow-motion. When I was a kid, I used
to film snowboarding with my friends, and have them film me. Now, the cameras back
then didn’t really have the ability to shoot
these high frame rates, like 60 frames a second, so if you wanted it to be in slow-motion, it would look like this. (ding) Ah, I was cool. We’re used to seeing most movies and videos like this in 24p, which means the camera actually takes 24 photos in one second. And then the computer
plays back that video at 24 frames in one second, so everything looks really natural, everything looks really normal, the recording speed is the
same as the playback speed. That also means that if you want to slow that video down to 50%, that one second is going
to have to take place over two seconds, so it’s going to have to duplicate each frame and play them twice, resulting in that choppy,
old-timey, kid snowboarding kind of look. Now, most cameras now can shoot in 60p, which means 60 frames in one second. Now, most the time, the
camera will play back 60 pictures in one second, so it doesn’t actually
look that much different than something that was
shot regularly in 24 frames. The big difference is when
we wanna slow it down. When you stretch it out,
let’s do a little math here, 24 divided by 60 equals 0.4, which means that we’re gonna
slow our clip down to 40%. Now, in this side-by-side,
you can see that when you play it back in normal speed, there’s really no difference. But when we slow it down,
you can see that the video that was shot in 60p is much smoother. Okay, so all of that was
basically just to say shoot in 60p, and then
slow your camera down in your software to 40%. Moving right along, always be moving. Now, Wes Anderson has made his career on stable shots, on tripods,
shooting in one direction, but for boudoir videos, I really recommend that you always have the camera moving in some way. That could be leaning
forward and leaning back a little bit. I often say it’s like rocking a baby, just rock your baby back and forth, but here’s an example of two video clips that are basically the same, except one’s moving, and one isn’t. All right, this next one is one that photographers really really
have a hard time with, and it is the three-second rule. I just made up that name. You can’t shoot 10 almost identical images and sell all of them to the client, just like you can’t shoot
10 seconds of footage that basically all looks the same and put those in a video. So I keep this three-second rule, which is basically,
don’t shoot the same shot for more than three seconds at a time. In your hand, shoot one,
two, three, change something. Scoot back, scoot forward, get taller, change lenses, ask them
to do something different. Whatever it is, don’t shoot it
for more than three seconds. All right guys, so now you’ve gotten rid of your shaky camera, and you’ve got beautiful
movement in your videos, and you’ve got amazing slow-motion, and your clips are short, and now you’re ready
to put it all together, nothing is worse than having
a bad song in your video. (bouncy upbeat music) Now believe me, I know it’s
a pain to find good songs, I have spent hours of my life looking, I found this website
https://www.epidemicsound.com/, and I’ve actually already gone through and chosen a bunch of
really good boudoir songs that I’ve used for my clients that you guys can just
screenshot this and look it up on their website. They’re giving away 30
days free to download as many songs as you want and use it how you want
to for that first month just so you can try it out, but we’re gonna go ahead and grab this one that I’ve used before and
that I think is perfect. All right, final step, editing. Now, we’re gonna be using Final Cut, but you could use literally
any piece of software for this, they’re pretty much all the same. This isn’t going to be a how-to on how to use Final Cut
or your editing software because there are literally
thousands of videos like that on the internet. What we are going to be talking about is the principles of a good boudoir video. So the very first thing
that we’re gonna do is just grab a couple
of clips that we like and toss them into the timeline. I told her to flip her hair. (laughs) So you can make a selection
from your gallery. I usually do it by tapping
the I key for in point and O key for out point, and then you just drag and drop. All you’re trying to do here is go through and find really good clips, the sections within
your clips that you shot that are really good. You can also just tap E and it will add that clip to the
end of your storyline, and that’s how you’ll keep
building your timeline. There’s a great shot of her
sliding her hand up her leg, we’ve got another good
shot of her rolling over, and then to finish, I had her walk away kinda more out of focus,
a little artistic shot, silhouette, and I really love what we got. Next, what we’re gonna do is we’re gonna drop our song in here. Just drag and drop right underneath. So there’s a lot of depth
when it comes to editing. You can get real crazy,
you can do effects, you can do little mini-storylines, you can do all kinds of things, but the main thing that I want you guys to take away from this is cutting to these little spikes. Watch. So within this track, there
are these little spikes. These little spikes, and
these are going to be typically either kick
drum hits or snare hits, and that’s when we want
to change our clips. It’s gonna add even
more impact when we do. So let’s take a listen. (slow melodic music) All right, first of all,
that clip is way too long, so we gotta chop it up. So we’ll do, here’s one, we’ll go until just before she looks up, so we just delete this. All right? So let’s try that again. This big spike here,
we’re gonna cut it here, and then it’s gonna go to the next clip. (slow melodic music) It’s a little shaky at the beginning, so let’s just get rid
of this section here. Here’s another spike, so we’re gonna drag this out a little bit, and then it’s gonna come right inside. So that’s pretty much it. So you’ve got cutting to the spikes, you’ve got, you don’t want
your shaky footage in there, so take those sections out. You wanna keep your clips
short like we talked about, so we’re gonna keep them
at about three seconds, and I’m just gonna do that
for the next couple of clips, so let’s play that again. So here’s another one, I’m gonna use B for
the blade tool and cut. I will go forward a little bit to right before she peeks up. That looks good. I’m gonna cut out the middle
part of this sandwich. That one was a little late, so we’re just gonna drag this over to be right over the spike. That, okay, let’s say
you wanna put together a 20-second really quick promo video for your business, throw
it up on Instagram, whatever you guys wanna do, this I exactly what you’re gonna do. Oh my goodness, that
was so much information, but we got through it
together, we did it you guys, I can’t believe it, but
we’re here for each other, and that’s what I love to see. Now you know how to shoot slow-motion, keep your camera stable,
put motion in your clips, you’ve got shorter clips,
you know how to edit it, you know how to choose your good song, and I’m so excited for you to get out and try some, make some
mistakes, see what happens. Now, I’ve just released
a brand-new newsletter that has exclusive tips. These are tips that I’m not
even putting up on YouTube. We’re gonna be going over how I dodge and burn my photos, we’re gonna be going over how I make clients feel comfortable, we’re gonna be going over some of my favorite couch poses,
how to tell your clients that you don’t like particular
outfits that they brought. I mean, we’re covering a ton of stuff, and they’re short tips,
but they’re exclusive to this newsletter, so if you guys wanna get in on that, definitely go ahead and click right here, and enjoy this fully-edited
boudoir video from Bali. (slow rhythmic music)

Camera Basics: SHUTTER SPEED

Camera Basics: SHUTTER SPEED


Hey everybody, Mike here welcome to part
two of my camera basics miniseries that I’m doing on the channel where we’re
talking about three basic topics in photography and videography and that is
aperture shutter speed and ISO and today in this video we’re gonna be talking
about shutter speed. Okay let’s jump right into this here and answer the
question “What is shutter speed? Shutter speed can best be described as the
length of time that film or a digital sensor inside of a camera is exposed to
light. So this happens when the shutter is open when taking a photograph it’s
literally the act of the shutter opening and closing thus exposing the film or
digital sensor like I said to light and shutter speed is essentially the amount
of time that that shutter is open it’s pretty easy stuff but we’re gonna talk
about how it applies to photography first and then at the end of video we’ll
talk a little bit about video so just in case you guys hear any beard noses
during this video my dog Remy is on the floor behind me cheering a bone ok so
just as an FYI all SLR cameras and most point and shoot cameras have settings
within them that will allow you to change and adjust your shutter speed
through the settings cell phones do as well but if you’re like me and you have
an iPhone then you’re gonna need to download a third-party app that’s going
to give you access to the manual controls within that camera so shutter
speed basically controls two things it helps to control the exposure in the
image as well as the motion in that image. Exposure is controlled by shutter
speed by the act of that actual physical shutter either opening or closing slower
or faster and that determines the amount of light that is collected by the image
sensor or the film inside the camera as that passes through the lens motion in
the image is determined by the length of time either long or short that the
shutter is open as well okay so let’s real quick talk about how
it’s shown because in order to understand this you actually need to
know how it’s written or how its portrayed on the back of your camera so
you can understand which settings you’re using and how that affects your image so
it’s shown either as a fraction or as a whole numerical number that is
representative of seconds and like I said you really have to think of this as
time because that is exactly we’re talking about we’re talking about the
amount of time that the shutter on the camera is open when you take an image so
on one hand the spectrum you have really fast shutter speeds and on the other
hand you have really slow shutter speeds and in the middle you’ve got a varying
degree between there but basically that’s what this boils down to is
extremely fast shutter speeds and extremely slow shutter speeds okay so
let’s take a look at some examples so you guys can understand what I’m talking
about here for example you can see on your screen now one over 1,000 so
basically what this means is one one thousandth of a
so this means that the shutter is open for one one thousandth of a second and
this would be a really really fast shutter speed another example we can
look at here is one over 125 so this would be one 125th of a second taking a
look at another example here we’ve got one over four which would basically be
one-fourth of a second and this is gonna be a lot slower even than one over 125
and this is a very slow shutter speed and going even slower we can look at
things like actual seconds so like five seconds ten seconds even something like
one second that’s gonna be a lot slower of a shutter speed than one over four or
1 over 125 or one over 1,000 so these are just some examples guys obviously
you know every camera is gonna be a little bit different for example my
camera here shoots its shutter speeds as fast as one over 8,000 or 1/8 thousandth
of a second all the way up to slow to shutter speed as thirty seconds so that
shutter is open for a full 30 seconds and obviously their settings throughout
that I can adjust and change depending on whatever I’m shooting just as a quick
side note though most SLR cameras have what’s called a bulb mode that’s the
little B on your dial and basically what that is it just allows you to have your
shutter open for the length of time that your camera shutter button is pressed so
when you press to take a picture you can hold that down and keep that shutter
open for as long as you want and that’s basically the functionality of bulb mode
so on the back of some cameras when you’re messing around with your settings
the shutter speed is actually represented as just a solid number so
it’s not going to be shown as a fraction and I’ll show you guys a video clip here
real quick of what my camera looks like every camera like I said is different
but this is essentially what my camera looks like and this number unless it’s
indicated with quotations which would be signaling seconds is essentially the
number that is on the bottom of that fraction so if your camera says
something like 60 that is essentially the shutter speed and it would basically
be 1 over 60 or one sixtieth of a second so if my camera then said ten with the
quotation marks on it then basically the shutter speed would be ten seconds okay
so now that we understand how shutter speed is written and how it looks on the
back your camera let’s talk about what it actually does and how it affects your
images in photography okay so as I mentioned a minute ago you know that
shutter speed affects both your exposure and your motion and the motion can
actually sort of be broken down into two categories either freezing of the motion
or slowing down and letting in more motion blur
into your image and you know I mean on the scale here you’re gonna get a
varying degree of blur as you adjust your shutter speeds but to better
demonstrate this I’m gonna head out into the field and take some photos I’m gonna
bring you guys with me and show you exactly what I’m talking about okay so I
had every intention of leaving the house but it’s raining right now so we’re just
gonna stay inside I’m gonna do these examples for you guys in my basement
with my ping pong table and a ping pong ball so basically what I’m gonna do is
I’m gonna roll this ball across the table and I’m gonna take two separate
photographs each with a different shutter speed so one’s gonna have a fast
shutter speed and one’s gonna have a slow shutter speed and I’m going to show
you guys the differences okay so the first image here this was taken with a
shutter speed of 1 over 320 so this was one three twentieth of a second and as
you can see the ping pong ball is really crisp there’s basically no motion blur
here at all and for all intents and purposes you really can’t tell how this
ball is moving essentially this fast shutter speed allowed me to freeze the
motion of the ball as it was going across the table now contrasty in the
second image actually use a shutter speed of one second so you can see the
difference here it’s very dramatic but you can actually see a ton of motion
blur in this image the shutter was open for a full second so it captured a lot
of that ball moving across the table there’s a long trail of that ball as it
moved across the table and there’s apparent motion in this image you can
obviously tell that something was moving through the frame so obviously as you
can see side-by-side these are very different images and I tried to do this
on purpose to give you an example of one extreme versus the other extreme
obviously there’s going to be varying degrees of this amount of blur in your
images depending on what shutter speed you use but these are two basic examples
where you can see one image that was taken with a really fast shutter speed
and what that created an image I was taken with a really slow shutter speed
and what that created okay so now that we understand how a shutter speeds work
let’s talk about some creative uses within photography both for fast and
slow shutter speeds so for fast shutter speeds people do some really cool stuff
of this like water droplet photography or dropping cool items into aquariums
and freezing that motion instantly so you can see all the little bubbles and
all that stuff that’s in the water also sports photographers use really fast
shutter speeds as well because look let’s face it nobody wants to look at an
image of a basketball player going up for a dunk and had that be all blurry
what they want to see is the beads of sweat on their face they want to see the
position of the ball cocked back behind their head is they’re about to throw it
down they want to see the expression on that person’s face they want to see the
expression on the defender face as he realizes he’s going to become
the victim of this dunk and might be embarrassed by having this clip shown on
ESPN SportsCenter’s top 10 the next day that’s what they want to see that’s why
sports photographers used really fast shutter speeds there’s a lot of other
applications for fashion under speeds as well but those are just some examples so
let’s quickly talk about some examples and creative ways to use slow shutter
speeds slow shutter speeds are used to blur the subject in your image and those
can be used in images like this where you’re showing somebody that’s running
or jumping and you want to show action or movement in your image some other
creative uses for slower shutter speeds are for creating images with light
trails so if you want to show the movement of cars or lights or if you’ve
got an image where you want to paint light actually on your image or draw
things like those are all really fun creative things to try with slower
shutter speeds star trails are another one as you can see here there’s the star
trails going across the sky slower shutter speeds allow you to capture
things like that same with stuff like this where you’ve got blurred clouds
also water is a very popular subject to capture with slower shutter speeds so
you can either have images like this where you take slower shutter speeds of
a waterfall it makes it look all dreamy and silky smooth looking same with ocean
waves as well I’ve seen really cool images like this where people do slower
shutter speed effects on their photos to capture the movement of ocean waves you
can also do a technique called panning which is basically where you take your
camera and your shutter speed is quite slow but you’re actually moving at the
same speed of your subject so the subject in your image actually stays in
focus and isn’t blurred at all but the background behind them is blurred so it
still gives the effect of motion but it allows the person viewing the image to
focus on that subject and it gives kind of a nice creative effect behind them as
well if you have a zoom lens you can actually do this kind of create a
technique where you actually zoom in your lens slowly while you push down on
the shutter and let that shutter speed stay open I actually went to a local pet
store to check this out they have some little fish tanks with
some crabs in it and so I decided to try this out here was the image that I got now I’m just kidding that’s a mr. crabs
meme for spongebob I actually didn’t go to the pet store I probably should have
it would have been a lot of fun but here’s some images anyway of some stuff
that I found online with this technique that you can check out and sort of kind
of get the idea of what I’m talking about there so anyways those are just
some examples you can go experiment with those and find out what you like or what
fits your style but those are just some creative ideas I’m sure there’s a lot
more out there but those are just some that I thought about the top my head for
why people will use slower shutter speeds and how they’re creatively used
in photography and I should mention as well that sometimes you actually have to
use a slower shutter speed depending on what you need for exposures so if you
need more light into your image you may need to compensate with a slower shutter
speed to allow more light to enter in and properly expose that photograph okay
so let’s talk about videography and how does shutter speed affect videos I’m not
really to go into too many specifics on this all you really need to know is a
simple rule and that is essentially that any time you shoot video if you want to
have normal-looking motion blur in that image you’re gonna want your shutter
speed to be double your frame rate so what I mean by that is that if you’re
shooting let’s say a film or a movie in 24 frames per second your shutter speed
on your camera for that video setting you’re gonna need that to be double your
frame rate in order to capture normal motion blur so what you’re gonna do is
you’re gonna do simple math 24 or I guess you’d be shooting in twenty three
point nine eight frames a second but essentially you’re shooting in 24 frames
a second multiply that by two you’re gonna get 48 most cameras don’t do a
shutter speed of 1 over 48 so you’re actually just gonna bump that up round
up to 1 over 50 and that’s gonna be the shutter speed you’re gonna want to shoot
out for normal looking motion blur in a 24 frames per second video if you’re
shooting video at 30 frames per second you’re gonna want to use 1 over 60 for
your shutter speed if you’re shooting at 60 frames per second you’re gonna want
to use a shutter speed of 1 over 120 or actually I think my camera does like 100
125 it doesn’t do 1 over 120 so whatever’s closest to those is where
you’re gonna shoot at if you’re shooting at 120 frames per second you’re gonna
want to have a shutter speed of 1 over 240 now again if you’re shooting at 24
frames per second in this example no cameras gonna allow you to shoot below
what the actual frames per second is so you’re not gonna be able to shoot at a
frame rate that’s lower than 24 and that in this 24 frames per second example
okay but like I said if you want to capture normal motion blur in a video
you’re gonna want to double your frame rate and make that bottom number of your
shutter speed double that of your frame rate there’s some creative differences
in little things you can try but for the sake of the basics video I’m just giving
you guys that rule so you understand it and this might be a topic we go into in
a later video all right guys so that’s gonna wrap this
up for today I hope that you learned something if you guys did or if you
enjoyed the video please be sure to hit that thumbs up button on the video and
make sure you guys subscribe as well the next video we’re gonna be talking about
we’re gonna be covering the topic of ISO and that’s going to round out the third
part of our three-part miniseries here covering camera basics
I’d hate for you guys to miss out on that if this is a series that you’re
enjoying so make sure you subscribe once you do that also be sure to click the
bell icon as well because YouTube does a really bad job of just pushing videos
out to subscribers sub boxes so if you click that Bell icon then you’ll be sure
to get a notification the next time you log into YouTube also I’ve got links to
like my Twitter discord Instagram Facebook all that stuff down in the
description I post announcements on all those whenever I post a new video so
guys make sure you follow me on those as well
and yeah thank you so much for watching I hope you guys enjoyed the video and I
will see you guys in the next one peace you

How to COLLAB WITH OTHER CREATIVES and get published as a photographer

How to COLLAB WITH OTHER CREATIVES and get published as a photographer


hi my name is Leyla May and help creatives to unleash their creativity into a pay check so today’s subject is how to
get published step-by-step instructions on what you need to do and where you
need to know and who they need to contact this video is for you if you are
a photographer or videographer makeup artist set designer or anybody in the
creative field who has an idea pretty much this is for you first and foremost
you need to know what they need to shoot you need to have a concept and you need
to have an idea what you’re looking for so I suggest for yourself create a mood
world and have a clear understanding of what this shoot is about who it is for
after you figure out what your project is about the next step is to build up a
rockstar team general speaking this easier when it’s a bigger team so you
can focus on what you do best and also gives you an opportunity to collaborate
with new people so you help you with that you can start looking at Instagram
accounts I think that’s an excellent source and you can find people who are
in the industry who might have a similar aesthetics as to what you do I have
similar beliefs to what you do and you can kinda easily scan that by looking at
people’s Instagram I personally had a bit of a trouble looking for a stylist
so I opened up Instagram and Google stylist Toronto that’s it or another
more reliable way is to find the person who is in your industry already for
example a photographer you like and start looking which models or which
makeup artist always said design is he has been working with or she has been
working with and that’s a great starting point so then you can collect those
people’s information and see if they aligned with your vision for that
project in my last video I provided 33 portals that you can use to submit your
work for absolutely nothing and get published in an actual magazine on
online publications so please check out my last video link in the description
below and that give you an idea of where exactly you
want to get published so when you email people make sure it is clear what’s your
idea where you want to get published the examples of your previous work and the
mood boards for this sheet that can be an amazing start and the person will
clearly see what are you trying to convey what your objective and when you
ask people to participate in your project make sure you specify the date
and the time that’s important that sounds like a small thing but it makes a
big difference so people can plan ahead and plan their day accordingly I don’t
suggest DMing people but you can email them if they don’t have their email
listed then you can DM them and just explain what do you want to do and how
that can be beneficial for them in the end of the day it’s a collaborative
project and it has the benefit both sides if you are just starting out and
this is your first editorial maybe it’s not the best idea to DM the head stylist
of your work start with something smaller and start with people who are
interesting in those publications in those ideas you are proposing but to be
honest it’s even okay to say look I have this project and this is the date this
is location and I need a stylist or I need a makeup artist or need a sub
designer and that can be a start and that’s amazing because most of the time
people will say yes to your preposition in the description below I am sharing
the email I send to people modeling agencies models makeup artists stylist
videographers and other creatives that helps me to get collaborations and helps
me and opens the door to many places I’ve never been before so check it out I
think it’s worth it it’s working for me and I’m pretty sure
gonna work for you just copy and paste that change to details to make yours and
I think can be quite incredible and can lead
new ideas and new projects and new clients potentially if you are cheating
people you can contact modeling agencies that can help you find the perfect model
for your shoes there’s nothing wrong working with not
professional models but models who work in the modeling agency have experience
and they know how to work their body so it won’t be awkward on the set when
you’re trying to explain your ideas and the person just is not understanding it
clearly so that’s a big benefit with when you work with models but on the
other hand I feel like working with models can be a bit limiting there are
many many people around and not all of them look like models so it may be
interesting for you to try to work with people who have different facial
structure or have different body Constitution than the majority of people
so that can be interesting and that can be an subject an idea in the shoot
itself I’m not sure if this is an advice but it is a good practice to credit your
team those are the people who helped you and those are the people who make it all
come together so make sure you do leave credits in
every description to review for the shoots to your model to your makeup
artist a designer whoever else was on the set that day who wasn’t who was
leaving your idea so who gave you suggestions so please cut it up I think
this is important for people’s recognition and just to make sure they
understand that you value their time and you value the work you did together I
think this is really important tip number three is to read the requirements
it sounds ridiculous but sometimes there are many cases when I forgot to read the
requirements and I didn’t submit right so the submission need to go through
make sure you make it as easy as possible for the editors to go for your
work PQ so for example if you get an amazing
photo shoot and just something doesn’t comply with their requirements of
standards and you won’t get published because of that that would be really sad
so read the description and read the requirements word by word so there’s no
disconnect so just the some of the video there are few key points a you don’t
have to work with a professional model B you can work with people you want to
work with and I provided a email template that you can copy and paste in
your email just do chase few details C do leave credits for your team because
those people work hard and they deserve it d don’t forget to read the
requirements this is crucial it happened to me before and by a simple
mistake you can just eliminate a chance of getting published and the final most
important one I believe is to share the result with everybody so to get those
tears sheets to your team members and to get those magazine covers to them maybe
not in physical format but at least in digital it’s not doesn’t much doesn’t
cost anything but it’s really amazing and really thoughtful and beneficial for
their portfolio as well and that would be the reason why they would like to
work with you after and this is how you build relationship that lasts and I
think this is a very important point in the end they were all human and you can
be the best photographer ever but if you’re really hard and brilliant
pleasant to work with sorry bye I am very new to youtube so please let
me know what am I missing if you would like to know more about
something else if I can give you more ideas on how to create your ideal
project or anything on that subject please let me know I’m open to your
suggestions and ideas comment below if you like this video or don’t and explain
why not that would be great please subscribe to my channel so I can
provide more and more useful information for you and make
sure you know how to get published and make sure you know how to accelerate
your career to the new level

Why I Shoot at Bizarre ISO’s for Boudoir

Why I Shoot at Bizarre ISO’s for Boudoir


– What’s up, guys? Welcome back to the channel. I’m Mike Sasser, boudoir
photographer in Los Angeles. And today I wanna talk about ISO and why I don’t give a (beep). And today we’re gonna talk about ISO and why I could care (beep). And today we’re gonna talk about ISO and why I typically shoot at 400, when I could be shooting at 100. – See? Ya see? Oh, you don’t see it? Right there! Wait, wait! Right there! Right– – That tickled me probably
more than it should have. So the reason why I’m making
this particular video is I’ve been making a lot of videos with my camera settings
attached to the photos and with that, I’ve been getting
a lot of comments saying, “Wait a second. You’re shooting ISO 400 or you’re shooting it at 800 or whatever it is you’re shooting at and if it’s anything
other than ISO, it’s like: “Oh my God, the dynamic range!” “Oh my God, it’s gonna have noise in it!” “I could never deliver a photo to my client shot at 800 ISO!” I mean one guy called me a flat Earther. Okay that’s, nobody said that to me. I just wanted to make this
video to explain why a lot of people are focusing on the wrong thing. So first let me start off by saying, if you’re a commercial photographer shooting for Gucci or
Mercedes or Coors Light or whatever marketing firm,
magazine, shoot at ISO 100. Use your phase one, use your
lights, hire a retoucher, shoot at f/8, go get
paid, I’m happy for you. But if you’re shooting commission
work like family portraits or weddings, or boudoir, like me, ISO is pretty much the
least important thing you could possibly be
worrying about during your photo shoot. Now I typically shoot, pretty much the whole session at ISO 400, even though usually in my
studio it’s bright enough to shoot at ISO 100. And that is because sometimes
it will get overcast and when it gets overcast
and if I was shooting at 100, I would probably have to
bring my shutter speed down to somewhere around a 50th of a second, which is not fast enough for the type of portraits that I do. Because of that, I would
then need to adjust two out of the three exposure
compensation methods. So, I’d have to raise my ISO and then adjust the
shutter speed accordingly. Conversely after the sun comes back out, I would then have to lower the ISO and then raise the shutter speed because 100 ISO is at the
limit of where you can go with that particular
camera setting exposure. It doesn’t give you a whole lot of range to go in the opposite direction, whereas if you sit at 400 ISO
you can pretty much go between a 200th of a second and
an 8,000th of a second and anywhere in between
and you won’t be able to tell the difference in
what the image looks like. This is allowing me to only worry about one of the exposure methods, and then the rest of the time I can focus on the important stuff, like: Is my client comfortable? Is she doing the pose correctly? What angle am I shooting with? Is this even the best lens, which you’ll learn from the
video at the top of the screen which I outline the best boudoir lens. Now, that said, that
makes my life much easier, but the main reason why
I think people struggle with the idea of ISO 100
versus 400, 800, or 1600 is because what if there’s
noise in the photo? Ahh, noise! So let me ask you; is noise even a bad thing? Well, in the days of
film it was film grain, and it’s actually a
really sought-after look. And in my images where the
photo’s slightly out of focus, I’ll just turn it black and white and add film grain in Lightroom
and my clients will say, “Wow! Look at how artistic this photo is!” If you’ve decided that noise and grain is actually really terrible
and it’s the devil’s work, then if only there was,
like, a slider in Lightroom that could reduce the amount of noise. Oh, wait! There is! I definitely understand that not everyone has the budget for the
latest and greatest gear, so if you’re using an
older crop sensor body I recommend you just shoot a little dark, brighten it up afterwards,
add some noise reduction, and then sharpen it back up. I use Option + Alt when
selecting the mask slider so you’re only sharpening
the edges and not the noise. The bottom line of all
of this is if, that, your client doesn’t really care about it, you probably shouldn’t either. Photographers are pixel
peepers, our clients aren’t. And let me be clear. I’m not talking about things like the difference between 1.4 and
5.6 because they don’t know the terminology of what an f-stop is. Doesn’t mean that that isn’t important. They’ll see the two pictures side by side and be able to say things like, “I like this one better because
the background’s blurry,” or “I like this one better because the subject seems to stand out more.” That’s different than noise because most people who don’t have a trained eye won’t really even notice
it, and even if they did, they don’t really know that it’s supposed to be
bad in the first place. So that probably seemed like
a pretty ridiculous rant, but hopefully it shares a little bit of what I think is the more important parts of your photo session versus being so focused on your ISO
and where it’s supposed to be to get the optimal dynamic range, and the least amount of
noise, and all these things that your clients probably
aren’t even gonna notice at all, when the more important things
like client communication, how comfortable your
client is, their pose, the light that’s falling on them. All these other things take
up a lot more mental energy. I think they’re way more
important in your photo shoots. So I’m gonna post few more
photos at the end of this video that are pretty high ISO that
if you didn’t know they were, you probably wouldn’t notice at all. If you haven’t seen my
natural lighting tutorial, I’m going to put a link to that because that video is maybe the most helpful thing that I’ve put on YouTube so far. So enjoy these next pictures. (mellow electronic music)

Event Photography Tips From a Pro

Event Photography Tips From a Pro


Great event photographers take photos that
have a way of making you feel like you are back in the moment every time you look at them. And today’s shot and tips come from Robert
Lounsberry from North Carolina. He shared his checklist for event photography
and we’re sharing it with you. But before I get into it, I want to thank
Canon for sponsoring this video. And remember to come visit us at the Digital
Goja showroom in Miami. And, don’t forget, we publish new content
weekly, subscribe to our channel and tap the bell icon to get notified about the latest
videos. Unlike street photography that can be more
of a spontaneous exploration, event photographers have a lot of context before shooting an event. Robert Lounsberry, an experienced event photographer,
is sharing his approach for great event photography. When Robert was starting, he posted photos
and used social media to get exposure. He’s come a long way and was recently chosen
as the primary photographer for the Raleigh Christmas Parade. Robert mentioned that he’s shot exclusively
on Canon since he started. He’ll usually take two Canon 6D’s, a Tamron
24-70mm lens because of it’s Image stabilization, and a Canon 70-200 lens for close shots at
a distance. According to him there are three key things
you need to get for every event if you’re going to be successful. Those three things are families or small groups
of people, moments of joy, and the main attraction that brought everybody to the event in the
first place. For street festivals, which are Robert’s favorite,
the photographic story also has 3 parts. The before shots, or establishing shots, buildup
shots, and, finally, the main event. Before, or establishing shots are mostly done
before the event has started. This includes getting an empty venue or the
location of the event and capturing it during set up as people start to filter in. Build up shots include the location with a
bit more people and some action, but still not completely full. Last, you’ll want to get the main event,
the why of the event, and get in on the action to make the photos as immersive as possible. You can see how he builds a sense of direction
to his photography with a big payout at the end. When getting these shots, it’s always a
good idea to get lots of smiles, candid photos of people interacting with each other and
having a good time, and crowd shots showing the scope of the event. You can get vendors in action, maybe during
deliveries, vendors themselves to help show how many people were involved in putting together
the event, and it’s also important to get shots of key sponsors. The more complete the story is that your telling
with your photos, the more successful your event album will be. Now if you capture the essence of the event
and have someone who didn’t attend feel like they were there, then you did your job. I want to thank Robert Lounsberry for sharing
his insights and photos with us. You can find more of his photos and info at
his website in the description below. If you liked this video remember hit the thumbs
up button below, subscribe to our channel and tap the bell icon. And if you’re in Miami, come visit us at
the Digital Goja showroom. Thanks for watching and we’ll see you in
the next video.

TOP 3 Lenses for Portrait Photography | Sony Alpha Universe

TOP 3 Lenses for Portrait Photography | Sony Alpha Universe


I have a variety of different Sony mirrorless lenses
and I have a lot of favorites, but I have some of my favorites to kind of rise to the very very top for the portrait work that I do. My top favorite is my 90mm macro. I am a fan of sharp images, I’m a fan of sharp video and being able to get this like high definition quality whether I’m doing stills or video. And the 90 macro is like unrivaled in its ability to be
able to give me that. I use the 100mm G Master lens; it’s an amazing lens and
I feel like I’m in this like special group of people that has been utilizing it and getting great images and I just can’t wait to see more people just realize how amazing this lens is. And then I would say the 85mm 1.8 from Sony. I am constantly amazed at the quality that I’m able to get from this lens when I’m shooting portraits whether it’s full-body, whether I’m shooting close-ups
and it’s also amazing for video as well. So right now that’s like my Top 3 and
they’re all in that 85 to 100mm category. These lenses are part of the reason why I use them is that they just make people look really really good and I don’t have to work so hard at it.

What is a vignette? – Learn Photography


Vignetting is a term you might hear in
photography it refers to when your photograph starts to darken around the
edges and especially in the corners and there are a few different ways in which
it can occur a hard vignette is when you can see the frame of the filter you
might have on your lens a soft vignette on the other hand is where the corners
start to darken this is more gradual than a hard vignette and can sometimes
be quite subtle at really wide focal length if you use the same size filter
as the thread size of the lens that you have on your camera and this Delta’s
quite thick you’ll tend to see the filter at the edges of the frame if this
is the case you’ll have to buy some step-up rings and a bigger filter for
this lens and some manufacturers also make low-profile filters to try and
combat this this next example shows what happens when you use a crop sensor lens
on a full-frame camera you can see this has a hard vignette giving a solid black
edge and it’s very pronounced some lenses also have a vignette in them as
the manufacturer is pushing the limits of these optics and a lot of the
programs like Lightroom will have lens profiles that will remove them with a
click of a button also a lot of cameras have a lens profile built into them so
as you take the shot the brains of the camera will remove this vignette now
it’s quite easy to see a vignette on a white wall like this but when you have a
shot that is full of detail it makes it a little harder for example this shot
has a vignette but until you enable lens Corrections you might not notice it also
during the editing process you can add a vignette now this is where it comes down
to your taste and how you want the photo to look but try not to go to old school
with your vignettes if you do do this now to learn more click on this video
for my 7 rules in photography and click down here to learn about getting a
wide-angle photo with a kit lens and if you haven’t already make sure you
subscribe for weekly videos and tutorials I’ll see you next time
you