Your first travel camera and lens [Fuji x-t20 & 18-55mm f2.8-4 review]

Your first travel camera and lens [Fuji x-t20 & 18-55mm f2.8-4 review]


– Hey guys, in today’s episode I’m gonna take you
through two national parks and over 300 miles of motorcycling to bring you some photography captured specifically with some of my favorite gear for travel and adventure photography, the X-T20 and the 18-55
variable aperture zoom lens. But before we get into things I just wanted to remind everyone that next week we’ll be giving this guy, the X-T20, away, so it’s not too late to enter the drawing for that. So we’ll announce the winner to that early next week, as soon as we have our grubby paws on the new Fuji X-T3 to replace it. So anyway, look forward to that, and I hope you enjoy today’s episode. (“To the End” by Falls) Alright so you’ve got a trip planned, you’re super-excited about it, it’s something you’ve been planning for months and months. It’s gonna be special and maybe you’ve got an iPhone or a point-and-shoot of some kind but this time you think, because you want this
trip to be so special and have a special place
in those memory banks, you think maybe it’s time to invest in a camera that can really deliver something with a little bit more oomph, so you think maybe it’s
time to up your game. What camera do you choose? Well guys, the options really are endless and you’re going to get a lot of advice and opinions. But you’re here for my opinion and I definitely have opinions. I’ve done a lot of adventuring with a lot of different gear and my personal choice, right now anyway, which is end of summer, 2018, is this guy right here, the Fuji X-T20 with just one lens, the 18-55 F2.8 to F4 variable aperture image stabilized zoom lens. Now of course, Fuji is not the only manufacturer who makes a superb offering
in a small package. But for travel there are some specific reasons why I personally choose Fuji, and like all things these are all going to be controversial. Others will disagree with me and choose to leave nasty comments because, for many people, photography has become religion. To you people I say, “Watch less YouTube and take more photos.” For everybody else, let me explain why I love
Fuji for travel photography. But to do so I’m going to take you on a little photo adventure with me. I’ll give you a sampling of what this little guy can do and why I like it so much. So strap on a helmet and
let’s go take some photos. (“To the End” by Falls) So first let’s talk about why Fuji. There are several reasons why I like Fuji as a travel or adventure platform and the first and most obvious reason is the size and weight. To illustrate this I’m gonna draw in the sand here. On one hand you’ve got IQ, that’s image quality, right. And then you’ve got your continuum. And on this side we have size, I’m just gonna put S, size and weight. I guess I could put C. C for convenience. The X-T20 is right here. That’s why I love it. Over here we’ve got the GFX, or something like that, where the sensor is the size my hand. Over here we have a GoPro, a tiny tiny sensor that’s super-convenient. The X-T20’s right here where it’s pretty good image quality and really convenient. The second reason I love the X-T20 and the Fuji platform in general is the wonderful shooting experience. These are cameras that are as fun to look at as they are to shoot with. The buttons and dials provide a tactile experience that are nostalgic of a time when photography felt more pure and less processed. These cameras appeal to people who see their camera not just as a tool but also as a companion. The other the thing I really like about the X-T20 is it’s interval timer. I’m here at Canyon Overlook looking out over Zion and it’s the middle of the day. It’s not the the greatest
lighting in the world. On the other hand there is a lot of cloud movement. So that can be interesting. It can lend itself well to a time lapse where I’m not actually that interested in a photo, per se. So the X-T20 does a great job there as far as giving you a time lapse to remember your moment. The next reason love Fuji is maybe a reason that’s
a little less obvious and that is Fuji’s sublime color science. (blues music) As a brand with a strong legacy of superb film engineering, Fuji has put together not only a strong base color science but also some spectacular film-like color profiles for JPEG shooting that after years of shooting I personally feel can’t be rivaled. And I know this brings up a whole can of worms, this whole discussion on JPEG verses RAW which is the stupidest argument ever. Those us who don’t mind shooting in JPEG know when and why we do it. For me personally I love shooting in JPEG on Fuji when I’m traveling because those photos come out spectacular straight out of the camera with that filmic, documentary look I know I wanted before I hit that shutter button. Look, there’s nothing
wrong with shooting RAW and spending a lot of time poring over every hue and saturation value if that’s what you love doing, but for many people that’s not why we love photography. – You’re welcome. – Yeah, thank you so much.
– I’m Bill Spencer. – Alright Bill.
– Your name is? – Andrew. – Branch?
– Uh huh. – Okay.
– Yeah. – Glad to have met you and you’re always welcome. – Thank you, thank you. Bill was nice enough to let me meander about his car cemetery. I don’t know, he calls it his junk yard. I could spend all day here. Seriously, this is like my photographic heaven. Guys it’s the act of photographing and documenting a place-time that is most significant. It’s far more important than what RAW photo editor you use, and as far as color is concerned I don’t mind trusting that job to the hands of color scientists who’ve spent decades perfecting a pleasing set of defaults to work from. Fuji really has nailed it, and so many others, in
comparison, haven’t. With many other brands it feels like their attention to JPEG color profiles are an afterthought at best or gimmicky at worst. So I realize, at the end of the day, that color is going to be something that is personal. It comes down to personal preference. But again, you came to me, and I’m just gonna give
you my personal opinion. The third reason that I love shooting Fuji, third, fourth? I don’t remember what, I don’t know number we’re on. But, it’s the lenses. If you need a system that’s going to give you But the reason, but the reason I like Fuji lenses as opposed to all the others is that they’re small and Fuji’s invested heavily in trying to build sublime top quality glass in a small package, that APSC package. And they nailed it. The sharpness, the build quality, the color, the contrast, the ease of use. Fuji’s high-end APSC lenses are probably the most important reason why I don’t ever want to switch away no matter how many advances in camera body technology
Sony makes, for instance. It’s those small, spectacular Fuji lenses that keep me from selling it all and jumping ship like so many other people. This is beautiful, by the way, right here. But anyway, this lens is is no different. Maybe it’s not considered by some to be a pro lens, but I use it for pro level stuff as well as travel and I have no issues with it at all. (chill electronic music) Guys, this is Fuji’s kit zoom lens, and in the world of photography the kit lens typically has serious negative connotations. It implies low quality,
beginner photography. That stop-gap choice you pick up until you can afford the really good lenses, quote unquote. If you look back at the video where I first tried this lens, I wasn’t even sure at that point if I wanted to keep it or not. But a year has passed and I have to say this lens has been on my camera body as much as any of my pro lenses have. Some of my favorite photos came with this lens. There’s several really
good reasons for that but I’ll have to tell
you about those tomorrow because it’s after sunset and I don’t know where
I’m staying tonight. I need to find someplace to stay. So, talk to you tomorrow. 5:45 AM. The way I feel inside right now, this is why I could never be a full-time landscape photographer. But this morning I’m
doin’ it for you guys. So let’s go to Bryce Canyon. (motorcycle starting) As a lazy landscape photographer, the thing I really love about Bryce Canyon is that you can just drive up and get out and walk a few hundred feet and you’re there at
these spectacular vistas. None of this fussing about with hiking and, naw, none of that. Now last night I was talking about this lens. And I have a few things to say about it but first I wanna say that if you’re new to photography, for more general use I would strongly recommend actually sticking to a prime lens or two. Prime lenses are important for beginners. They teach you more about composition than you can ever hope to learn by zooming around with a zoom lens. But having said that, for travel, it’s really hard to have
the flexibility you need with a fixed focal length. There are people who are really attracted to the Fuji X100 series, for instance, that have these fixed
23 millimeter lenses. And in all fairness, those are very attractive and very small devices, but when I traveled with those guys I felt like I was missing a lot of shots, that reach that I needed, that a zoom lens can provide to really get what I was after. So, I mean, if you’re
doing a lot of travel I’d say don’t give in to the draw and the romance of the X100 series before you’ve tried this system. When your traveling you just never know what sort of scene you’re gonna want to capture, and this lens provides you with enough flexibility to capture it. (chill electronic music) Of course there are wider Fuji lenses and some will say these are better for
landscape photography, but for those times I find it works great to just a stitch several shots together into a panoramic. As long as you have a
tripod or steady hands there really is no need
for a super-wide lens. What I did not realize is we’re about, I don’t know if you can see that, you probably can’t. We are about half way from where I stayed the night and where I would like to go, and I did not realize this, but apparently, the pavement ends. (blues music) It looks like I’ve happened upon some sort of motorcycle
event or something. Might as well get some shots while I’m here, I guess. So I mean, it’s not a sports action camera and lens by any stretch of imagination, but, I mean, on the other hand, it did okay, you know. Continuous autofocus
on the XT20’s not bad. I just love the
versatility of this camera. It can do just about
anything you need it to, in a pinch. A lot of people will say, well it doesn’t have a
wide enough aperture, you can’t really get that strong bokeh. That’s definitely true. It’s not going to compete with the 1.4, or even 1.2, of other Fuji prime lenses as far as getting that blurred, out-of-focus background for that really nice subject separation. But on the other hand, in travel photography you rarely need that level of separation. In fact, often, you want everything to be a focus. But if you really want bokeh the trick is to zoom out fully to that 55 millimeter max focal length and they get as close as possible, keeping your subject in frame. This will maximize the bokeh ability of the lens and sensor. (“To the End” by Falls) The other thing I like about this lens is that it has image stabilization. That means that you can get sharper images at lower shutter speeds. It also makes this lens perfect for video. And when I travel it’s nice to be able
to capture video also. The other thing about
video and this platform, is it has this little auto mode that’s meant probably for beginners, which is nice if you
happen to be a beginner. You don’t want to fuss about with all the various dials and what not that are associated
with shooting manually. Since I’m a vlogger I like to be able to, if I’m shooting normally, I’ve got everything set up for video or for photo stills for cinematic settings, ideal for the the correct
frame rate and shutter speed. But if I want to pull that camera around and start videoing myself I don’t want to have to worry about getting the exposure wrong. And you know what, if I’m filming myself it’s not as important that those cinematic type
settings are in place. So I just flip it onto auto mode and turn it around and I can vlog and not have to worry so much about if my exposure is locked in just right because I can’t see this screen. So guys those are all the reasons that I can think of right now why I like this set up. I sort of like it, if you can’t tell, and I highly recommend it to you for your next vacation experience. If you’ve enjoyed coming along with me consider subscribing and definitely check out my other videos on my motorcycle photography adventure. In the meantime, remember: Kindness before cameras. We’ll talk to you again real soon.

GOOD VS BAD Photographers // Don’t Get Scammed

GOOD VS BAD Photographers // Don’t Get Scammed


hey what’s up guys welcome back to my
channel so in this video I want to break down the differences between a
professional photographer versus an amateur photographer especially for
those who are interested in fashion portraits so if your model and you’re
looking to book a photographer but you don’t want to spend so much money
wasting your time and all that with someone who’s not as good how do you
know the difference how do you know who’s a really good photographer and
who’s gonna deliver versus someone who’s not gonna deliver and just waste your
time take your money and then you end up with images that you’re not so happy
with so let’s break it down guys so in this video I want to tell you guys how
to spot someone who’s professional and who you should work with versus someone
who you shouldn’t work with alright guys so one of the key differences to a
professional photographer versus an amateur photographer is that a
professional photographer what most of the time always have a website now a
website is really their main platform this is where they host a lot of their
work and if you’re really a professional a professional should have a website
with their contact details with their portfolio and all of that versus an
amateur most amateurs photographers would claim oh we’ll just look at my
work on Instagram oh I don’t need a website I have Instagram just check that
out but if you’re really a professional photographer booking real clients real
clients are not gonna look at your Instagram accounts I mean they might but
they also need to see a website is something polished they want to see what
publications you’ve been in they want to see if you have media behind you if
you’re represented etc so most of this information will be found on the website
so that’s one way to distinguish it is that a professional photographer most of
the time always has a website an amateur photographer has excuses and other
websites another way to spot a professional photographer versus an
amateur is that a professional photographer would never ever list their
rates so you’re not gonna find their rates on their Instagram accounts you’re
not gonna find their rates on their web they’re gonna actually to contact them
because they need a creative brief they need to know what exactly you’re trying
to shoot and they’ll get back to you with the quotes now an amateur
photographer would post their rates on Instagram I’ve seen amateur
photographers supposed to rate saying hey I’m doing a two-for-one special
right now I’m doing like a special Thanksgiving promotion for my
photography I’m shooting two headshots for 150 stuff like that that’s something
that should raise a question mark when you’re looking at photographers to use
for your shoots another way to distinguish a professional photographer
versus an amateur is their use of light in so professional photographers would
always use flash equipments and even if they’re shooting outdoors they still use
flash equipment sometimes or if they don’t use flash though use a balance
board or stuff like that so amateur photographers they just tend to shoot
with nothing but just the camera and a lot of times they claim well I like to
shoot at natural lights I just want to shoot a natural light natural light
works best for me or they go to a studio set up and they don’t have any flash
equipment or they don’t know how to use the flash equipment and that’s because
there’s a lot of training that goes into lighting techniques and learning how to
use the flash properly and how to like get the right tone and shadows and all
of that so there’s a lot of like training intense training that
photographers has to go through to learn how to really optimize those things so
amateur photographers are gonna stay away from flash as much as possible
professional photographers will welcome flash photography as much as possible
another thing is that a professional photographer would have a set of prime
lenses and what I mean by prime lenses prime lenses are like your 24
millimeters you’re 50 you’re 85 etc and most of the time you wouldn’t see a lot
of professional photographers using zoom lenses I mean they might depending on
the situation but they prefer to use prime lenses because the quality that
you get out of prime lenses are just so much better amateur photographers only
have one lens for the most parts and that’s the lens that came with
camera the manufacturer lens they use this for everything whereas professional
photographers when you go on a shoot with them you see them walking around
with several lenses maybe they have like a bag that where they hold saw your
lenses and they’re changing their lenses constantly during the shoots because
they’re trying to get different angles different perspectives different depth
of fields etc now when it comes to retouching professional photographers
either retouch the pictures themselves or they send it to a professional
retoucher or retouch warehouse to retouch the pictures for them with some
instructions and create brief and all that amateur photographers do all the
retouching themselves always the key difference is that professional
photographers would use professional software like Photoshop Lightroom
retouch Academy whatnots amateur photographers like to use apps
that you find on your mobile devices okay another dead giveaway is that
professional photographers always shoot Camera Raw now Camera Raw this is really
the image in the highest quality without any compression without any
interpretation from the from the camera because when you shoot JPEGs what
happens is that the camera shoots raw or your camera interprets the colors and
the shadow and the light and all that and really compresses all of that
information and gives you a JPEG but when you shoot RAW you’re getting
everything as is and then it gives you the flexibility and creative freedom to
adjust the exposure adjust the color temperature and all of that so so always
actually a photographer is like hey or you shoot it raw or you shouldn’t JPEG
if they’re shooting JPEG then that’s a dead giveaway that’s a red flag you
should not work with this person another dead giveaway is that professional
photographers always always will shoot in manual mode while amateur
photographers would shoot in Auto so a professional photographer would
always love to work with a team they prefer to have a stylist on the shoot
they like to have a makeup and a hair stylist as well and also a photographer
assistants well an amateur photographer and amateur photographer will prefer to
work alone they don’t really suggest you having
other people on the set because one maybe they don’t know what they’re doing
or they’re not so confident and they don’t want other people to see their
process if you guys like this video I always appreciate thumbs up if you have
questions feel free to hit me in the comment box down below, I always appreciate
it you guys I’ll see you guys my next one

300sq ft apt looks expensive with no budget – Tiny, Eclectic, Amazing Spaces video

300sq ft apt looks expensive with no budget – Tiny, Eclectic, Amazing Spaces video


CHARLOTTE BROWN: I feel like the
small size really adds to the charm of the apartment. It didn’t matter how small the
apartment was, you really can make the space a home and
very warm and inviting. I’m Charlotte Brown. I’m a photographer
and illustrator. I live on the Upper West
Side, and this is my 300-square-foot apartment. My style is not modern. I’m very traditional in style. So when the doors opened, I
was love at first sight. And I knew the potential that
this apartment had, and how I could utilize the space to
create three rooms in one. I wanted a kitchen, a living
room, and a bedroom. I really love the fact that
it is over 100 years old. And after looking for probably
eight months for an apartment, this space definitely worked for
my budget, and for what I wanted to create. My style is traditional. I love French country homes. I have very expensive tastes
and a very small budget, so each item I found I really
had to save for. The first item I purchased for
the apartment before I even had it was the bed. One of the main elements to
living in a small space is that every item you have
has to be storage. And I was able to do that
by adding a bed skirt. I also keep my camera
equipment and clothing under my bed. I have a lot of art books that
I’ve collected over time. So I use the pieces of coral
to make it more decorative than just books on a shelf. I had seen in a lot of
decorating magazines everyone had the collage of frames, so
I definitely wanted to bring that element into
my apartment. I didn’t want it to look too
cluttered, and this is the only way I could really add
color to the space. So I used postcards. I used some of my
own photography. I used shadow boxes, and my
old Christmas ornaments. And in my kitchen area, I
brought in the kitchen island. And what I loved about it is
that it gave me storage on one side, and it blocked off the
rest of the kitchen from the other room. So I could have more
seating, and also I could have more storage. One of the things I did
was I bought a big piece of wrapping paper. I was able to measure
it out, cut it. The piece of paper cost $5. I used Mod Podge glue and I just
created my own backslash. I just recently learned that
I’m one of the five million people that has a
pink bathroom. So the way I tried
to decorate the bathroom was through florals. I added flowers to the bathroom,
flower prints, and I kept the shower curtain very
neutral, so it wouldn’t overpower the space. I’ve had 13 people in this
apartment, so I’ve been able to really utilize the space. I’ve had a Christmas party. I’ve had pot luck dinners. My friends are all in
awe of my space. We all live in about the
same square footage– some have roommates,
some don’t. And I definitely lucked out with
the fact that I’m able to live on my own, with my
budget, at my age. I really love the small space. I was able to really add my
personality into it and my creativity. It’s really taught me that it
doesn’t matter what size it is, it can still be a home. And my landlady said to me that
she really loves what I’ve done with the space,
and that I’m never allowed to leave. -Are you a social
media darling? Do you like to hangout on
Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest or even Tumblr? If so, you can check us out
at all those places. Or, of coure, you can just click
subscribe right here to see what we got going on.

Nikon Z7 and Z6 are next step in photography’s evolution

Nikon Z7 and Z6 are next step in photography’s evolution


I hope you’ll excuse me … this one is a bit raw. I had basically a medicine induced panic attack right as I was trying to get this thing rolling and it’s just a train wreck so it’s gonna be a little raw it’s gonna be a little straightforward kind of chatty and I’ll try to return next week with some production value and something fun and all that good stuff so thanks uh and here’s the video! Hello I’m Jamie Maldonado welcome to Camera Insecura. This is Episode 18. Hard to believe. I’m obviously still learning a lot about how to make these videos good. I could do like one a month and make it pretty nice-looking but then no one would watch… it would take me years to build up content and I feel like it’s kind of slow motion. I’m doing two a week it feels like a lot. If I’ve done something that you like, if I’ve done something that you wish I had done more of or I came so close to something cool let me know your feedback drives the show it makes it so fun I enjoy doing this anyway. I like talking shop. But what really really makes this fun is when you comment and when you like when I see your views so hopefully you know I look forward to hearing from you. I feel like right now this pace is the best for me to learn how to make better content. So today we’re talking about mirrorless cameras. Nikon has announced their mirrorless series the Z6 and Z7 and it’s all over the place. I don’t need to read you the stats or I’m not gonna complain about one memory card or whatever. My point is that I like the mirrorless thing and I think some of you might need to know why that even matters. Because that’s my kind of audience generally that I deal with a lot of people who are beginning and I like it. That’s why I like feeding philosophy and stuff to people who are beginning because I feel like the more you hear that more you’re exposed to the why of things the better you’re gonna get. There are a lot of people talking about the Nikon mirrorless and a lot of people fall on a lot of sides of this a lot of people were like overly into the mirrorless thing and a lot of people are overly against and act like it’s a amateur stuff… and that the small cameras you know make you look less professional and junk like that … Professional is a broad term that means that you give money for your photography. You don’t have to have a certain kind of camera to make money from photography. I know a person who produced high-level national publication art with what’s considered a beginner digital camera and he was a master. It didn’t matter. So yeah if you’re sports photographer and you’re going out there with a mirrorless that can’t grab focus you will be challenged … and if you can get great shots that’s awesome. But that same camera in the hands of a landscape photographer or street photographer or somebody who doesn’t need autofocus will do just fine. So it’s it’s a decision that is all about you and your style and what works with you. I have used everything. My first digital camera was the Nikon D 1 – a beefy pro body, still the best the best modern style digital camera body I’ve ever used in my life. I had it in 2003 when I was 23 years old I bought it for my own birthday because I had a pretty cushy job working as a newspaper designer and copy editor. And and then I’ve gone from like I went from that to the Canon 20D and I had Nikon D700 I had the Hasselblad digital back on a Hasselblad camera. I have shot professional photographs with a variety of gear and yes … like lens quality can can create problems like let’s say you’re doing a group photo and – this happened to me — is that there’s a lot of fringing and soft edges because I was transitioning to this current job and the equipment just wasn’t up to spec anymore. It may have been at one time but not for what I was doing. I had to work through some upgrades and I but you know what I noticed the soft edges but you know how many other people noticed the soft edges? I got paid for that all the same I got paid for that all the same as if I had used the new 24 through 105 f/4 I got paid for that all the same as if I had used the new 24 through 105 f/4 [Subtitles went wonky here, but you haven’t missed anything.] That i currently have for that same job And that camera definitely makes it a lot easier than the 6D I was using at a time but both of them will do professional work if you’re a professional photographer. So don’t let that stop you. My current workhorse for personal work is this Fuji GFX 50s because look how little this is and this is with the adapter. Look how tiny is this this is medium format this is mind-blowing – this viewfinder by the way: phenomenal. I love seeing a computer viewfinder versus the optical viewfinder. So let me set the scene: It’s 1927. You’re Ansel Adams – you are a photographer and concert pianist you’re shifting your career toward photography, but you don’t – in musical terms – have a hit yet, so you set out on a journey through Yosemite and your goal is to take a picture of Half Dome that just knocks people’s socks off and I mean this might be paraphrased so this is the basic idea. You have somewhere like I think it’s like 10 or 12 plates – this is literally a plate – they were literally emulsion on glass. Negatives used to be glass. You’ve got a large format view camera it’s not quite an 8 by 10 I forget the exact size but you’ve got a large format view camera which back in the days pretty much means you were carrying a whole lot of gear. They didn’t use safety equipment to climb mountains back then and and go on hikes and stuff like this. So anyway you go through the day you’ve got your 12 negatives and you’re shooting them and you get to Half Dome which is this granite rock face and you get there and you realize that you’ve only left two negatives so you have two shots for the the the main reason you went out to take pictures that day. So Ansel takes his first one and he puts a starts working with and has a yellow filter – a yellow filter in this case would give you a little tone in the sky basically this would be like kind of whitish Yellows make it kind of grayish because this is all black and white of course and he’s like “this isn’t how it feels” so – this is a famous story, I’m far from the first person to tell it – but long story short he puts a red filter over lens which darkens the sky to an extreme level and he gets it. He becomes mega famous … he becomes Ansel Adams of legend. This kind of contradicts what I’m I’m going to get out about mirrorless cameras but I want to point out that that was a mirrorless camera. Number two I want to point out that he in his life and went from those like pack-mule cameras to a little handheld 35 millimetres and wound up i guess primarily shooting a Hasselblad later in life. You know you could put you can park it on a tripod because I usually do that with my Hasselblad and he also shot a bunch of Polaroid actually … that’s another episode. My thing is that yes the equipment doesn’t matter but also he was shooting a mirrorless camera so yeah there were no mirrors and view cameras – and the average view camera has a direct projection from the lens to what you’re composing on – a piece of glass ground glass – frosted glass basically – and it’s upside down and backwards. You compose it and focus it you put in the film and it’s projecting on the film by that point it exposes the negatives and so on so my point is that through Ansel’s life camera technology progressed greatly and he died in 1984 I think and he had made this series of books before he passed away, updates on his uh Ansel Adams Photography Series I think. anyway there are multiple references in this to small format cameras. Especially in book one “The Camera,” and he’s got things like it talks about how fast you can shoot how you how you can shoot through 24 and 36 frames just in seconds and how handheld and mobile it is and talking kind of like people talk about digital cameras and phones. So yeah this whole small or faster more thing is it’s just the history of photography. so when I shoot this thing this is a continuation and my whole point about why I’m I’m okay with letting go of this camera – and I’m filming with is a 5d Mark IV traditional SLR you like SLR camera with the viewfinder that’s direct light from the lens which is cool because you were seeing literally what you get at least as far as the primary part of the frame goes unlike a range finder or twin-lens reflex and you have the convenience of the image being corrected unlike older cameras that are upside down and backwards or backwards and so on there’s a prism that corrects everything so you see it as it happens, which is nice and it was an incredible advancement in photography, but now we have this. Which i think is great because it removes that slapping mirror with vibration and weight and bulk and now I could travel easily with this – this is a billboard machine in my hand and it’s great. That’s not gonna make me a better photographer but Ted Forbes actually pointed out recently on his Art of Photography series that we have better cameras than Ansel Adams and though his his work was great and his cameras I mean they’re still nice and everything but we have the the thing this is built on Ansel’s work and all those other photographers and photographers now who push equipment to the edge so we have now arrived at this compact package with incredible almost unthinkable power. At least like I would go back a couple of decades and and think of this power that we have. So what I like is that this removes an obstacle. I don’t like photographing with obstacles. The fewer obstacles I can get the more I like to photograph -that’s kind of what one reason why I think people who who can light – you can do artificial lighting don’t do it – or prefer natural lighting or people prefer natural lighting because they’re afraid of artificial lighting but also because it can be inconvenient that’s why I shoot I try to shoot primarily with one flash and ambient light … it’s it’s my best mixture of the qualities I seek and convenience and removing obstacles and I like it because I like these things because I can get such image fidelity which is an important thing to me and I think an aspect of my work which even though I use old lenses and stuff adds a sharpness and depth to my work and I seek that maybe it’s not important but if it’s important to my heart and mind my approach in its the so you know this videos gonna look kind of hideous. I guess but I don’t like things that get in the way and I kind of chase perfection a bit in equipment but I’m looking for a conduit. I’m looking for a conduit that will help me get what I want. And so I like mirrorless because to me it’s a thing that helps you get what you want. If you look at the Sony series and they’re now Nikon Z series they’re tiny but they packed so much punch … this Fuji packs so much punch and if we can get to where we don’t need the flapping mirror we can get faster frame rates less vibration sharper images and yeah the lenses could still be huge but it’s still lighter and it’s still nice to work with and I like being able to zoom in my my viewfinder. And another thing I like is I shoot into the Sun a lot I don’t know if you’ve noticed but a few years ago I went to the optometrist and I had a freckle on my eye and I don’t think I had anything to do with my laserbeaming my eye setting up backlit shots but it kind of freaked me out and made me think about the Sun I was beaming directly into my eye especially when I’m like nearly blind when I look away from the viewfinder. And mirrorless is nice because I am looking at basically a tiny television screen a tiny monitor and I it helps me I’d rather the sensor take that hit alone and not not my poor eye and it really made me feel like mortal and I’m almost 40 and I want to be able to see when I’m older and yeah so maybe that’s weird maybe that maybe that’s baseless but it’s something that I think about. I’m not wooed by this Nikon Z series thing but I like it – it’s a move in the right direction. Canon killed their FD mount for the EF and EOS Series in the I guess that it does amid – late ’80s and people got pretty mad but they were at the end of that it had this confusing breech-lock thing on the FD system and they just scrapped it all and uh became the dominant camera manufacturer for maybe up until now and it’s still not off the top it’s just threatened. So they they took a calculated risk with Nikon has had their mount forever so it has limitations that little the smaller size and everything it’s it’s starting to hold them back and so maybe it’s their turn to eliminate their mount. It sucks but I mean I shoot with FD lenses still so it’s not like you can’t use old equipment anymore it’s just sometimes things change and I wouldn’t be shocked to see the Canon EF lenses go away. It’s been a couple of decades it’s nice but those days of being able to rock your camera for 50 years are gone if they ever existed in the first place. But you can still rock the same camera for 50 years. I’ve got a Hasselblad from the ’70s I use it just fine I mean it’s not a digital camera since … at least since I sold my CFV50C back but hey it still works just fine… still makes great images and that is one of my problems with digital photography is it’s highly disposable nature versus the film photography products. But you know ups and downs pluses and minuses it’s all it’s all part of the game. I also like how adaptable mirrorless is and Nikon’s mirrorless has such a tiny flange distance – in short, basically the the the distance between the lens and the sensor, the closer you can get to that and you saw this in the Mamiya 7 series is that that those that flange distance is tiny and on that large format film they used it was incredible … with not a large format but large medium format 6 x 7 film … they got some incredible images and I briefly owned a Mamiya 7 – long story – but it was beautiful and I longed for a digital version of that ,,, which not quite but really close really close … we’re getting there and things like mirrorless are getting us there and we’re currently stuck on only small format for digital for the most part. There’s Largesense which but we’re at a point where the consumer and and average pro can’t afford medium format except for something like this and I’m still lucky to have gotten this but I think medium format moving into the average working photographers repertoire again is important and it used to be something that was very available. Digital happened and everyone is stuck in the tiny formats so we forgot that we used to have a lot of options and we used to have a lot of different cameras and range finders were thing and SLRs and twin lenses and view cameras and so on so we’ve been locked into the DSLR the SLR for so much of the last 15 plus years it was really I feel like 9-11 that the digital camera started truly coming into its own and since then it’s just gotten more and more dominant. So new photographers in this era don’t know anything different and it’s just another evolution of photography and I welcome it because when I first started that Nikon D1 I shot 1600 ISO at concerts it was grainy as all get-out but it was just incredible because it was fairly decent versus 3200 and 1600 speed film and now look at what we can do it’s it’s so mind-blowing and we’re just removing obstacles to our creativity and that’s what matters about it to me and I think that’s what should matter matter about it to you we want to remove obstacles to our creativity and that’s why equipment is nice but it as we all know as we are told many times sometimes it’s not everything so don’t think you’re not going to be a professional don’t think you’re not you know also not capable because you have the slapping mirror you’re gonna get the same photos when you can if you like it go for it if you don’t like it don’t go for it it’s personal taste and rent a mirrorless camera play with some adapted lenses if it doesn’t float your boat cool. it’s not you. But it changes and I think it changes for the better. Don’t forget to like this video subscribe if you haven’t you know I appreciate it and leave a comment let me know what you liked what you didn’t like let me ask any questions say hi whatever let’s talk and I will see you on Monday morning.

Photographer Jonathan Calm Retraces Jim Crow-Era ‘Green Book’ Locations | KQED Arts

Photographer Jonathan Calm Retraces Jim Crow-Era ‘Green Book’ Locations | KQED Arts


– There were definitely
more dangerous times to be a Black motorist, even though it doesn’t
feel like that today. We have, unfortunately, way
too many Black men and women being pulled out of cars, being
killed by police officers. So my project is to look at the past, to understand where we are today. And I’m just gonna read
directly from the book itself. The Green Book was also known as the Negro Motorist’s Green Book. First published in 1936,
was a product of the rising African American middle
class having the finances and vehicle for travel, but facing a world where social and legal restrictions barred them from many accommodations. As a person of color, you
could be denied service if you were trying to
eat at certain places, definitely in trying to get hotel rooms. The owner of a hotel
could say we were full, even if there were vacancies,
but they just didn’t want to serve you as a black person. This book helped black
motorists know where it was safe for them to actually have accommodations. My Green Book project is to
travel as many of these sites as I physically, possibly
can, to get a sense of what are these locations. What I’m looking for is
this classic, quintessential narrative of what is America. We have as a nation in our psyche that car mobility is important to us, but there are different rules for different people when they’re driving. This house, we’re in the
historically Black neighborhood called Oak Park, and this place is called Dunlap’s Restaurant. Blacks that owned property
created businesses out of their homes. They’d rent out rooms. They were always ready for business. I think about it as an
early form of Airbnb. It is ironic that it is
actually now an Airbnb. – [Talking to a neighbor] She’s the only one listed in Sacramento. – Oh, no way. – Yeah. A neighbor came out to find
out what we were doing, which I was glad. You know, I like it when people come out and talk, as opposed to call the
police or just, you know, stare at me awkwardly. Traveling the nation, by the time I’m done, there’ll
be hundreds of sites covered. The New China Club in Reno. A lot of gambling, parties. There were beauty pageants
that occurred there, and all that could have been
left is a tiny piece of facade. And it looks like it’s a
parking lot for the stadium. These spaces, they’re disappearing. I want to capture them
before they’re all gone. My Green Book project
started three years ago for a project that the BBC commissioned, and with my first trip to the South, to Tallahassee, Florida;
Montgomery, Alabama; Jackson, Mississippi; Memphis, Tennessee; ending back in the North
in St. Louis, Missouri. That trip, it was an opportunity to take myself back in time. My understanding of the South was what I learned in school in the North. I felt I wasn’t
welcomed there, generally, but, if anything, I
think to visit the sites, what I saw, I saw a lot of emptiness. Towns and cities that were hollowed out. The hotel in a Black neighborhood,
the building is there, maybe one business is
left still operational, but the hotel is gone. That first trip was so powerful,
and I saw so many things that are happening in contemporary culture that it just makes me want
to compare and contrast. I think we feel that this
bit that I’m photographing is history, and it is,
but that fear that I have, that fear that other people have for me, is a very similar fear that
people would have had back when The Green Book was published. I don’t think the hotels or
the buildings I’m photographing are the destinations, actually. It’s having the experiences
between each site, the actual driving and
stopping and eating, and my own connection to being on that landscape and on the highways. There aren’t black
photographers doing that, and so I see part of this
work as a performative act. I want to be free, and
this drive is investigating that level of freedom.

This is why some photographers can charge $1000 (or more) per hour.

This is why some photographers can charge $1000 (or more) per hour.


Hello, I decided to film outside Hi, hey, what’s up? It’s Derek halpern in this video. I want to walk you through The difference between a freelancer that can charge $50 an hour $100 an hour or thousands of Dollars an hour Hey, what’s up, Sara? Cal focus on building your audience. Those are good products are just doing everything I’ve come to find that everyone wants to get paid more for their products and their services oh But here’s the deal if you want to make more money and get paid more by the hour or more by the Project you want to be worth more to your client? You need to bring something else to the table That is more than just your craft Let me explain so it’s having the conversation with my videographer actually the guy who is filming this right now bring the camera So it’s how great. My life is make this admin I was talking about what’s the difference between a videographer that makes 50 bucks an hour 100 bucks an hour? thousands of Dollars now or get paid $25,000 for a project and I told it’s very simple many people Who are offering a service like video or photos or web design or whatever they? They only bring their craft to the table so for example You could be the best videographer in the world But if I’m making all the content and all you’re doing is picking up a camera Pointing it at me and filming me on a backdrop that Isn’t really worth that much money? I’m really good at coming up with scripts and ideas and teaching people concepts kind of like I’m doing right now But where I struggle is coming up with Demonstrating this in the real world, how do I? Show the message versus just tell you a story about that message, and I totally if you want to be a videographer That’s worth more to me if you can come up with these visual demonstrations if you can find a location where you can film me Talking or negotiating with someone in real life you can do that orders work Now you go from being someone that I’m going to pay just fifty dollars an hour to someone I’m willing to pay a lot more money to but then there’s that third level the level where you’re starting to get $25,000 a shoe I have a web design that I spent $25,000 on and a lot of amateur web designers will always tell me oh, I can’t believe you spent $25,000 on that web design would a waste of money like well, what that guy did for me? And I was telling us the reality was that he brought vision to the table. He brought a whole visual brand to the table He helped me understand the message I was trying to communicate, and he matched it with the perfect visuals for my website So I was telling the video guys you want to be the guy that can get twenty five Thousand dollars a project you need to come with the vision of what? They’re trying to present to the world And I said let me give you an example There’s three types of content there could be where I come with the content you Shoot it boring there could be I come with the content you Shoot it and you think of an interesting way to tell it, okay That’s a little bit more interesting then it’d be the third type of content where you’re actually coming up with these video Ideas and you’re coming up with a story you’re coming up with a message And then all I’m doing is being the talent If you can create and do the work for me So all I have to do is show up and talk to the camera see the cuts in the frame are is that possible? Okay, but cut it cut out of my head no. I can’t sleep oh Don’t do that Now you’re delivering something that’s inherently more valuable. I mean even some of the scripts that we write at social figures I have a team that I pay you know we have researchers We have people who help me edit scripts and stuff like that the concepts expensive to create, but if I have a video guy That’s coming up with the story to tell and then we’re filming those stories, and those stories are going viral wow You’re willing to pay that person anything Because they’re able to do more than just pick up a camera and shoot the camera They’re telling a story they’re helping you get your message out into the world. They’re not just shooting They’re actually helping you grow And that’s the secret to Charging more for your products and services a lot of people like to get stressed out that they’re getting Offered less than their work, and I get it it stresses me out when that happens, too But if you want to be the type of person that commands those premium prices you need to do more than just your basic Craft you have to bring vision to the table you do that right? You’ll never go hungry you

20 How To Choose An Affordable Display For Your Tethered Photography Workflow

20 How To Choose An Affordable Display For Your Tethered Photography Workflow


(serene techno music) – Welcome to the monitor
or display section of this tutorial. We wanted to show you
some additional options if you want to a little bit further from your MacBook Pro or your laptop, to provide an additional monitor in your work flow setup. There are a lot of options out there, it can be overwhelming with all of the features that all of them have. The different types of screens, the different types of qualities, and the price point can
vary quite drastically. So in this part we’re gonna start on the lower end and we’re gonna cover something that is provided by Acer. So introducing our resident expert, Sinh Troung. Would you consider yourself an expert in the display category? – Of course, of course. – Of course. So he is going to be explaining a lot of the features that you wanna consider when purchasing a display, and what that’s gonna do for you on set. So, you went out and got
these two as an example of something that’s on the lower end. So let’s start with this one and kinda tell me, tell me about this one. – Sure. Just to be clear, Acer is not a bad brand these just happen to be some of the cheapest displays that we’re able to find. So on the right here we have, their both like around $100. This one’s a 23″ IPS, and then this is a 23″. It’s a newer, TN. And they’re both around $100. – So you said “IPS”. What is IPS? – In-plane switching. So it’s a type of technology. It’s basically the panel technology. So all monitors they have a panel, and that’s the screen that you look at. IPS is something that is preferred by most professionals. It has some inherent qualities that benefit photo editing. Where as TN has also great panels and they do make great TN panels as well, but it’s different strokes
for different folks. So if you game this may be the route that you take. If you do mostly photo
editing or video editing this could be the better option. – So correct me if I’m wrong but In-plane switching or IPS, is really a way to consider a monitor that you can see it from about 178 degrees from all the way around? – Yeah, it has better view angles so the colors do not shift when you go off axis. Where as a TN panel, there’s a sweet spot. So you kinda have to
look at from straight on. A lot of tvs are TN panels or MVA panels. So when you go off axis of an LED or LCD tv, you notice that it starts to fade. The colors aren’t as vibrant. – So that is actually a big thing to consider IPS. When you consider having a team of people looking at a monitor, obviously everyone can’t be 90 degrees on to that monitor. You’re gonna have a team of people trying to get their head in looking at that monitor, looking at their work. Whether that’s hair and makeup or a design team, or the creative agency, or client. So IPS is something you
really want to make sure your monitor has, when you pick one up. – Yeah, and luckily IPS technology has basically taken over as the preferred choice of displays. If you go to the store, most of the displays that
you see on the shelves are actually IPS displays. And they reserve pretty much TN panels just for the low-end or really good gaming monitors. So, most of what you’ll find are actually these guys. But not all IPS are created equal so that’s also important to know. – So what are some of the other features? We talked a little bit
about the screen itself. What about resolution? What about ports? What about how you connect it? These are the same price monitors and you also lose and gain something. So for example, even though this is an IPS display it doesn’t have an HDMI port. It only has a VGA and DVI port. So, you’re limited on connections here. – That’s like your grandma’s ports. Those are the two ports you’ll find on your grandma’s tv when you go to Nana’s house. – What’s actually funny is we try to find a DVI cable in the office but we couldn’t find it, so we actually can’t
hook this one up today. – Yeah. So there’s only two ports on there, so a lot of the newer monitors, especially like Apple monitors, those are gonna have the miniDV ports or the Thunderbolt ports. – Yeah, DisplayPort and HDMI are the main input and for Apple it’s Thunderbolt but it converts to like a DisplayPort for video connection. – So one thing to consider if you have, this is the 15″ MacBook Pro, this actually has an
HDMI port built in to it. Some of the computers
that you’ll get from Apple and also PCs might not have an HDMI port. So if you want to free up some of your Thunderbolt ports on your computer itself, let’s say you only have one and that has to go to a display, well then you can’t hook
up your external hard drive to that computer itself. So you’re actually going to be losing out quite a bit depending on
how many ports you have on the side of your computer, and also how many dongles that you want hanging off your computer if you need to go to
something like VGA or DVI. – Yeah, yeah. Fortunately though, DisplayPort is the new port that everybody is using, and actually on this computer you have the HDMI but that Thunderbolt could be adapted to work with just about any display. – And that’s actually going away. Now Apple’s gotten into the USB-C. So there’s only one port and it’s serious Dongle City. – Yeah, it’s pretty serious Dongle City but USB-C is very similar, it’s identical to the
Thunderbolt in the way you could hook up multiple displays. So the new MacBook Pro with the touchbar has four ports. You can use any of those four ports to convert and plug into a display. – So what is the resolution
of these two monitors? – They’re both Full HD, so 920×1080. So the same resolution. Some of the features that you’ll see here so I’ll show you. This one has a VESA mount right here. I think this is VESA 100. So you could attach it to an arm or you could attach it
to a different stand. – Right. We actually have, this is also made by Tether Tools itself. You can now really quickly right out of the box mount this, get rid of the stand itself, and if you want to create
an additional height to your digital workstation, which we’re actually
gonna show you later on in this tutorial with Clake Cook. It’s very to take something like this, lift it up off a table, and now you’re working in a mobile station with both your laptop, and also an additional monitor. So you can have like your Color palette on your laptop itself, and then a preview on
the display port on top or display up top. Then this one. – This one doesn’t. – This one doesn’t have it. – You’re limited to just the stand that it comes with. – So you’re not gonna be able to mount. So another thing to consider is, “Can I mount this? “Should I not want to put
it on the stand itself?” – There’s another huge difference between the two. You wanna turn that one around so we can show them? Other way. Alright. So the big difference obviously is the screen texture. So this is glossy, notice it’s very reflective. And this is, matte. Fortunately again, just about all the new displays are matte and if they’re not matte, they’re semi-gloss. Nothing is really as glossy as this. – Except Apple computers they’re all real glossy. – Except Apple computers, yeah. – Apple, what did you do to us? You used to make a matte screen. Remember the 30″ Apple display, we still use those here in the studio. – Cinema displays, yeah. – Cinema displays. They’re great. So, from here if this is something that maybe you have a little bit more budget where would we go from here? – Well, you could stay with the IPS you could actually get a decent one, Full HD, just a little bit more money. – What’s Full HD? – So same resolution as this, maybe bigger size and more ports, for a little bit more money. – How important is it so now that my files are 50 megapixels and they’re huge, should I really consider wanting to put that
preview on a 1080 display? Do I want to retouch on a 1080 display? – That’s a tough question, cause it really all boils down to personal preference, your budget, of course. And just know one thing is, your camera is always
gonna have more pixels than your display. Unless you’re shooting an old digital camera. For example, Full HD is 2 megapixels. There’s 2 million pixels on this screen. Most cameras are what? Like 24 megapixels? A 4K display is 8 million pixels. So you’re never going to be able to display, natively, what your camera outputs. That’s just how it works. – Seems to me though
that the kind of standard is at least a 2K display, right? – This is 2K. – Well if you consider 920×1080. – Yeah. – If you’re considering
that part of 2k display by the marketers. – Like 4K. – 4K, 2K, 2.7K. How many “K”s are there? – The most popular resolutions right now that you could buy are obviously Full HD. Then there’s QHD which is like 2560×1440, like the Thunderbolt displays from Apple. Or 2560×1600 which is a 16:10 ratio. Those are really popular, those are great displays, great resolutions. And then you go up to 4K which is 3840×2160 or something rather. – That’s the 2K display I’m talking about. That’s length and width. The width is what I’m talking about. – Then you got 5K and
there’s gonna be 6K displays. So the resolutions are getting wild. – It’s getting wild folks. – It’s also like, you can’t just plug in a 4K display and work for a lot of people out there. You have to make sure that your hardware is compatible. For example, 4K, requires certain output. So you have to have DisplayPort 1.2 or HDMI 2.0. – What about your graphics card? How important is your graphics card in your computer to support clear display? – Graphics card is incredible important because when you’re running
high resolution displays in order for you to run efficiently you need a lot of video RAM. Which is why so many computers now have like 4GB of video RAM, or 8GB, or more than that. Professional workstations, the sky’s the limit as far as what those graphics cards
will have in memory. – A lot of Apple computers
come standard with 2GB and you can’t upgrade it to 4GB. – Yeah, and it’s not that
you can’t upgrade it. – You have to upgrade it when you buy it. – Yeah. You have to buy it with that spec, and just because it’s capable of displaying to a 4K display, doesn’t mean that it will do it well. So a lot of machines, yeah you can hook up a 4K display to it, but how well will it work? Will your computer be able to keep up with that 4K? Cause it has to pump out, for a lot of displays they’re 60Hz, so it has to keep up
with what you’re doing at 60 frames per second. It requires a lot of power to do that. Probably a little bit
more with PCs than Mac. Just because Apple has really good scaling and a lot of times, for example, the 5K iMac. Even though that screen is a 5K screen, most of the time it’s
actually running on QHD, it’s scaling most of the time. So they kinda cheat that way. So that way you get the most out of the internal graphics. – So it’s actually not 5K sometimes. – Sometimes, sometimes. – Like web? When is it not 5K? – Yeah, if you have a regular laptop and you’re trying to run a 4K display, unless you’re doing just
spreadsheets on the web, that’s okay. If you gonna plan on doing video editing, or if you’re planning to do photoshop where it’s really straining your computer, where you’re moving the canvas around, you’re gonna notice maybe some tearing. – Tearing? – Tearing, yeah. – What’s tearing? That sounds scary. – Where the image on your screen basically breaks apart. A lot of the times it’s
because your hardware isn’t capable of keeping
up with your display. – So there’s a lot to consider here. If this isn’t confusing, and we know that it is
a little bit confusing. I think the best thing to do is first start with your computer itself. Look at the specs of
what that will support and then start there. Next, look at the actual hardware that you’re gonna need, the hookups that you’re gonna need that go to the ports on your computer, and then make a decision on that based on your budget. I would recommend going to somewhere with a really good return policy. Maybe getting one or two to start out, testing them both, look at the colors, calibrate them, and see if there’s any tearing or any sort of lagging that you experience in testing phase, and then choose the one
that’s right for you. Okay, so to recap, I know that’s a lot of
information coming at you. But the first thing that we really want you to consider is A, start with your computer. What do you have to work with? Also think down the road. Are you going to be
upgrading anytime soon? The second step, look at the hardware of
the displays themselves and also things like the IPS, matte screen, glossy. Again, the Acers
themselves is a good brand. They make a large variety of monitors from the very low-end
to the very high-end. Some monitors are more geared towards things like spreadsheets. While some are more geared towards things like graphics. So, this might not be
a solution for everyone but this could get you started out in the tethering market if your budget doesn’t allow for it. (serene techno music)

23 Studio Shoot Introduction With Clay Cook | BTS of Shooting Tethered Photograhy

23 Studio Shoot Introduction With Clay Cook | BTS of Shooting Tethered Photograhy


(electronic music) – I’m Clay Cook, an editorial
and fashion portrait photographer based in Lowell, Kentucky. Today, we’re gonna walk
through step-by-step my workflow for tethering. Tethering is a process
that takes your image from your camera to your computer. And so, it’s a very
vital and important part of what we do on location and in the studio. Today we’ve set up a test
shoot with our model Kaylin and our hair and make-up artist Bethany and we’re gonna create a really
natural looking portrait. It’s gonna be shot on this
elephant background behind me and I’m gonna show you
step-by-step of how we tether in the studio today. Tethering is a vital asset
to how I work in the studio and so, right in front of me, I have all this tethering equipment. This is what we use in the studio and on location. I’m gonna walk through this step-by-step on how to build our tethering workstation and the tethering workstation
used in both the studio and on location. But before I build the set-up, I want to talk about why I tether. There’s a few reasons why. Number one, is a client preview. I like to have a client preview
because I work with teams. I work with hair, make-up,
stylists, art directors, creative directors, and my client. So it’s important that
I have a big preview, a big screen where all my clients and my entire team can
see what I’m shooting at the same time while I’m shooting. So, it gives the entire team the ability to check their own work. So I can check my composition, the hairstylist can check the hair, the make-up artist can check the make-up, so on and so forth. So, it’s a collaboration. Everything we do is with a team. So this tethering workflow
gives us the ability to collaborate and make sure that we have the greatest image possible. Another important facet
for having that preview on a big screen, is that my client is
standing there making sure that this photograph is within
those creative parameters that they first set out. So we wanna make sure that this photograph is something they initially envisioned. And that’s a very important
aspect of shooting tethered and why I shoot tethered. Also, you don’t want a
bunch of these people, your creative team, to be huddled around you staring into a 3.5 inch LCD screen on
the back of your camera. It can get very crowded, very hectic, and it’s just a very annoying process. So by having this tethering workstation, you can provide a nice, comfortable and creative environment for
your team and your client. The second and most
important facet of tethering and why I tether, is that it really slows me down. I think if you shoot with just a camera and you’re spraying and
praying all over the place, you’re gonna be shooting a
significant amount of images and it’s not nearly as precise
as if you were tethered to a laptop with a slowed down workflow and collaborating with a team. So obviously shooting
untethered without a cable is gonna allow some freedom. It’s gonna allow you to move around a lot and, you know, shoot all sorts
of different compositions. But the problem with that
is that you’re gonna shoot a significant amount more imagery. But when you’re tethered to a laptop, it’s gonna slow down that workflow. You’re gonna shoot less, which is gonna really
speed up your workflow and post so that you can
go through these images a lot more and they’re a lot more precise. They’re a lot more exact
to what that vision is so you don’t have to go
through all these random images of something that’s experimental. It’s a much more precise process. Also, when I shoot tethered, I’m using a program called Capture One Pro and that software allows
me to apply a color grade that’s gonna be very
close to the final vision and that’s something
my clients love to see. They love to see something that’s closer to that final product and so Capture One allows
me to apply a color grade which is gonna automatically
apply to every single image that I shoot that flows through
this tethering workstation. Another reason why I love
tethering is ’cause you don’t have to rely on one
single source of memory, a memory card. Instead, you’re backing up to a laptop, which is backing up to an
additional external hard drive. So you’re gonna keep your files organized, you’re gonna make sure
that you have a backup of all these files that
you’re importing as you shoot. And so, with Capture One
Pro, you can name these files and you’re gonna keep your files organized to go to any additional
software such as Lightroom, if you want, or you can go
ahead and start the post process with Capture One on site or on location. So that’s why I tether. So now I’m going to take
you step-by-step through all this equipment and how we build
this tethering workstation in the studio.

Photoshop 101 For Photographers | An Essentials Tutorial To Adobe Photoshop

Photoshop 101 For Photographers | An Essentials Tutorial To Adobe Photoshop


(smooth music) – My name is Pratik Naik, and I am an editorial and commercial retoucher. So, the type of work that I usually do is stuff like commercial projects, like advertising billboards, brands, editorials, fashion magazines. The reason why I worked on this
Photoshop For Photographers is at the moment, there’s nothing really out there that encompasses
what photographers wanna learn in a 101 Photoshop course. We wanted to make a tutorial
for the Photoshop beginners, something someone new to the software could pick up and learn. But in doing so, we
found that this content is valuable for experienced users as well. Understanding the
fundamentals of this program is something every user can benefit from. We were really intentional
with what we kept in this tutorial because
everything included is what you need as a photographer. With this tutorial, I actually made everything easy to understand. From the hardest principles and concepts, like the pen tool, to the
simplest things, like the layers, everything becomes easy to follow. The reason why this course is better than anything else you can get online because it has everything there for you from start to finish. There’s no hunting or seeking. You don’t have to go through and look up tutorials and
mine for specific tools, everything is there in categories for you. And because it’s in video,
if you ever forget something, you can always come back
and look at it again. This tutorial is for every
photographer out there. I feel like if you understand
the fundamentals of Photoshop, you can really take your
business to the next level. It’s easier to learn Photoshop today than it was ten years ago
because you have people, like me, who went
through the grind to find all this information, put it in a package, and allow students to learn in a way that becomes really sufficient. The fundamentals are really
important for photographers because you can learn a lot of techniques when it comes to Photoshop, but you need to understand the core basics in order to think outside the box. Because if you think about it, the people how are making amazing images already have a great
understanding of the fundamentals. Without understanding how Photoshop works, you can’t develop your own style. Even if you don’t intend
on being a photographer and you wanna get into retouching, this would be the first step
in order to master Photoshop. There’s over 20 sections in this tutorial, making it very easy for people to take it at their own pace. It doesn’t have to be frustrating anymore. I’ve taken the last 15 years of knowledge and put it together into one tutorial. The concepts are the core
of what this program does. The principles never change. With this tutorial, knowledge of Photoshop and its fundamentals
will finally allow you to take full advantage of the software and make the most of your images. (smooth music) This tutorial is available at RGGEDU.com.

NY Yankees’ Didi Gregorius: When Art and Baseball Collide

NY Yankees’ Didi Gregorius: When Art and Baseball Collide


For me taking pictures, it’s like a
distraction. The job is already hard, you know, so you need something to relax
the mind and enjoy. I don’t want to get stuck just the guy that plays
baseball and that’s the only thing he can do. My name is Didi Gregorious,
shortstop for New York Yankees, photographer on the side. For me I
always liked taking pictures because I want to see a different
perspective of everything and when I travel, I mean just like memories and since
that time I started getting deeper and deeper in and getting spending more
money on cameras, get a better camera and then better lenses and stuff you know, and I’ve stepped my picture game up with that So right now I got a Sony a9 and a Sony
a73 the reason why I pick Sony, I mean they’re good in low light, so I like like
night photography and all that stuff I wasn’t a big fan of it until I got the
Sony so I was like I’m definitely taking pictures at night now and I like doing a
cool long exposure shots so those are the things that really got me into
Sony. So these last couple years it’s actually been funny during spring
training now because we have picture day so like the headshots and all that
stuff and when I get there the guys want to be in my group because they see me
walk around with my camera and they want some behind the scene shot so some of
the players had their pictures that I took as a profile for Instagram and
Twitter and all that stuff so it’s fun stuff so everybody wants to be in my
group and they always see me walk around with my camera and this girl walk up
to me said I got a got a surprise for you that’s like, what surprise for me
I’m not doing anything right now and yeah well I got it I got you a camera
pass so you can be on the field and take pictures now it’s like all right I can
do that and as it’s that day I’ve been like rehabbing, I’ve been on the field,
in the dugouts, just taking pictures, what other photographers can’t get so
that’s like well this is a good behind the scenes so I started
taking pictures you know go to the stadiums and take pictures too now while you’re playing or doing your sport you know of course you need it
100% you just stay focused on your job but there’s also personal life because
for me, the way I took it I don’t want to be stuck 24/7 just on baseball
baseball baseball baseball but I got life on the side that I want to
do like I got personal stuff I want to take care of like all that stuff
so that’s how I take the art and learn something new with digital drawing and
all that stuff this year so that’s something new that I’ve been trying to
learn for a while and with the injury that I had and all that stuff when I was
out so I got time to learn all those things so for me it’s it’s a way to
express myself doing the drawings and something different that people don’t
get to see It was something really cool for me to
get this opportunity to be with B&H, so it’s uh it’s like a dream come
true I mean I spend I spend a lot of money on camera and all that stuff, it’s one of the biggest stores I’ve ever seen so, it’s a really good stuff