A photographer’s take on analog documentation in a digital world

A photographer’s take on analog documentation in a digital world


JUDY WOODRUFF: Tonight’s Brief But Spectacular
features artist Uldus Bakhtiozina. The award-winning photographer explains her
vision of documenting dreams. It’s part of our ongoing Canvas series. ULDUS BAKHTIOZINA, Photographer: I’m not a
documentary photographer in the common sense, but I am a documentary photographer in a different
sense. I document dreams. My photography is widely exposing theme of
escapism. All of us struggle sometimes to escape in
order to analyze our reality. I love complicated personalities. And, actually, real life inspires me to create
my images. I choose to work with people who are survivors,
who are fighting everyday routines that are not always full of color. What I really find exciting is the ability
to make people’s dreams of being someone else a reality. Sometimes, it take months to actually prepare
everything for the shoot. This process, like, of getting ready is 95
percent of the time. And 5 percent is actual just the shooting. Real life inspires our escape. And, sometimes, that escape is very needed. Irony is still the key in what I’m doing,
because I believe that, in our life, it’s a lot of sadness. We need a little bit of irony to art as well. Digitally manipulated photograph is not really
true for me. It doesn’t capture anything real. That’s like, instead of going traveling, you
just look at someone else travel photographs. I work with analogue. In spite of the fact that, nowadays, digitally
you can create pretty much everything, I don’t like this path. I see the beauty in authenticity of making. And that’s impossible without flaws. I see the future of photography 95 percent
is digital, and I’m very happy about that, because that makes me special. My name is Uldus Bakhtiozina. This is my Brief But Spectacular take on documenting
dreams.

Getting a Camera Shoved Up Your Butt – Jim Gaffigan

Getting a Camera Shoved Up Your Butt – Jim Gaffigan


I would do anything for my wife,
I’m aware of that. But there are people
that are more romantic. Prince Edward abdicated
his right to the English throne for the woman he loved. Isn’t that unbelievable? He was forced to choose between
the woman he loved or being King of England, and that idiot… chose the broad. Now I’m sure in that moment
it was the right decision and I’m happily married, but even in
the best relationship, each person has thoughts
where they go, “I’ve made an enormous mistake.” But we never thought, “I could’ve been
King of England.” Do you think Prince Edward
really ever got over that? Every time he had
to empty the trash, he was like,
“A King of England doesn’t have to empty the trash! The King of England can chat
with his ex on Facebook!” Can you imagine
what kind of news event that abdication was
in the U.K.? There must’ve been,
“He’s gone mad. We should get him
to hospital.” “Jim, your British accent
is getting worse. Why wouldn’t you take
five minutes and learn a good accent? It’s just lazy.
It’s just lazy.” My wife’s pretty amazing. She is better at things
and I’m not ashamed to say that. Like, her guilt trip,
legendary. My wife is half Catholic,
half Jewish, so her guilt trip is like
a superpower. I walk in a room,
she looks at me, and I feel horrible. And that’s called love. We’ve been together so long
I will get angry about a guilt trip
she hasn’t even given me yet. I’ll be like, “I’m gonna watch
the football game.” She’s like, “Okay.” And I’m like,
“‘Cause I want to!” I’m always in trouble
with my wife ’cause I’m selfish,
I’m lazy, insensitive, and a bunch of other stuff.
She rattles on. And I understand being
in trouble for stuff I’ve done, but sometimes I get in trouble
for stuff other men have done. Once I got in trouble for
something a guy did in a movie. I was watching a movie
with my wife and in the movie there was
this married guy with children who left his family
for a 20-year-old woman and I knew in that moment
I should sleep on the couch. [laughter] And the movie ended
and my wife looked at me and she was like,
“Why would someone do that?” And I was like,
“Uh, it–it was in the script?” I didn’t say that.
I just said, “Where do you want me to sleep?” I hope it doesn’t sound
like I’m picking on her ’cause I’m grateful to have her
in my life. It’s nice to have a partner. Someone looking out for you,
you look out for them. Like I did two weeks of shows
out of town in December and when I came home,
my wife informed me that she made me an appointment
for the gastroenterologist. If you’re unfamiliar,
that’s the doctor that sticks the camera
up your butt. I mean,
they do other things, but that’s what
they’re famous for. That’s probably how they
attract people to the field. “You like photography?” [laughter] “Then I got a job
that you’re gonna love!” I didn’t ask my wife
to set up this appointment. I wasn’t sick.
I didn’t have any symptoms. She just did it ’cause
she was looking out for me. So she casually brought it up.
She goes, “Just so you know, I made you an appointment
for the gastroenterologist. And I said, “Just so you know,
I won’t be going.” She’s like,
“Why wouldn’t you go? It’s just a consultation.” I said,
“Well, it’s the principle. I’m an adult.
I make my own decisions. Thank you.” Anyway, so I’m at
the gastroenterologist… [laughter] The doctor starts to describe
the procedure and I said, “Look,
I should probably let you know, I don’t really enjoy
getting my picture taken. I would be open
to an ultrasound, I think a lot of men
are curious what the jelly on the belly feels like.” Anyway, the doctor,
he didn’t think it was funny. [chuckles] And I knew it was
precautionary, so I agreed. So he went over
to his computer and he goes, “All right,
my next available appointment is in three months.”
I was like, “Three months?!” This was in December. I didn’t know if I wanted
this procedure hanging over my head
during the holidays. “Jim, you want
another piece of pie?” “No, I’m getting
a camera up my butt. I don’t want some
team of doctors to be like, ‘Wow, this guy loves pie. Barry, get out here.
He’s got half a pie up there.'” I didn’t know what could delay
this important procedure, but part of me
didn’t want to find out. I didn’t want the doctor
to be like, “Well, the real delay is finding
someone to clean the camera. That takes forever. Turnover in that position
is insane, you know? People do it once
and they’re like, ‘You know what?
I’m going back on food stamps.'” Then I was thinking,
maybe it’s the doctor. Maybe he’s like, “Dude,
I can only do this procedure once a month.
Then I gotta take a week off, sit on the beach,
and ask myself ‘Why keep sticking cameras
up people’s butts?’ I could’ve been a dentist.” “Again with
the dental reference.” But in February
I had the procedure and I think every man in here
should get a colonoscopy because I had to. It’s not an easy decision
’cause the best news you can find out from getting
a camera stuck up your butt is learning you didn’t need
to have a camera stuck up your butt.
That’s the best news. “Yeah, we didn’t need
to do that. We can just chalk that up,
one for fun.” And the day before
the procedure, you can’t eat anything. And I’m a total pig,
so I was terrified. but after I was awake
for five hours and I hadn’t eaten anything,
I wasn’t hungry. I was suicidal. I was so bored.
I was like, “What am I supposed to sit here
and feel feelings?” And then at noon
and at 6:00 p.m. you have to drink this serum that I believe is made by
a collaboration of ex-lax and Taco Bell. Printed on the side of the serum
it should’ve just said, “Drink this in the bathroom. Might wanna grab a pillow
and a book.” ‘Cause I tell ya,
I’ve had diarrhea before… This is the point where everyone
acts like they’ve never had diarrhea. “I don’t even know what
Jim’s talking about. Do you?” Yeah, I’m the only one
who’s had diarrhea… in a hotel hot tub.
Okay. [laughter] Like we’re at the same hotel. No, I’ve had diarrhea.
I don’t wanna brag. No, I’ve had diarrhea,
but calling what this serum did to my body “diarrhea” is
an insult to the word diarrhea. My body made noises
I didn’t know existed. At one point I thought
I stepped on a puppy. [laughter] I was
in the bathroom for hours. For hours.
Checking email– ignoring phone calls
’cause serum or not, you can’t answer the phone
in the bathroom ’cause you can’t hide the fact
you’re in the bathroom ’cause there’s an echo. “Are you in a well?”
“Yes! Yes, I’m down here in a well.
No kids in this well! Making sure no kids
fell in.” But I kept getting this call
from the doctor’s office and I thought there might be
important information like someone saying,
“Do not drink the serum!” So I answered it
and it was just someone confirming the appointment
and I don’t know how someone’s supposed to sound
when they confirm a colonoscopy, but this person
was really casual. They’re like,
“Hey, how are you? So, we’re gonna
see you tomorrow?” I’m like, “What?
Are we having brunch? I thought I was getting
a camera up my butt.” She gave me the address.
The next morning I went there. It wasn’t at a hospital
or a clinic, it was at some building. Just picture where you imagine
the black market would harvest human organs. “What am I doing here?” And I took an elevator
to the basement. There was this huge space
with all these makeshift rooms with shower curtains.
And I was let into one. There was all this talking–
You know when you’re nervous and you think you hear things?
I thought I heard someone go, “I can’t believe he’s here. I want his kidney.”
And I was terrified. And then eventually
an anesthesiologist walked in, he gave me a shot
and he goes, “Just wanna go through
what’s gonna happen. Right now I’m giving you
some medicine which will knock you out and when you wake up,
you won’t remember anything. You okay with that?” And against every instinct
in my body, I just went, “Okay.” And the last memory I had
is just watching the anesthesiologist leave
the room as I heard someone go, “I want his spleen.” And I woke up
and I was fine. I mean, I’m pregnant,
but I’m fine.

Should I Study Photography at College? #askVENTH EP51

Should I Study Photography at College? #askVENTH EP51


Olá Brian Olá Cassandra Cassandra: My Olá just annoys me so much, my voice is so high pitched Olaaaaaa Cassandra: I have a question for you That was classy Cassandra: That was sexy, do it again Pure class, that’s what I am Cassandra: Well I have a question for you from Twitter, from PsyopTechniques and they say: Quick question, what are your thoughts on
a program such as this? And then they link to a photography course. So what are your
thoughts on photography courses? On photography courses in general, or this specific one?
I actually do remember getting this tweet and I did have a look at it when it came through,
I actually offered I’m pretty sure some quick feedback at the time for this specific person.
But I would like to talk about a little bit about my thoughts on I suppose education in general,
now I think that there is a little bit of over-emphasis on how or where people learn
how to do anything that they do. At the end of the day, the thing to me that seems the
most relevant is actually acquiring the skills and the knowledge to do the things that you
want to do. The actual methodology that you utilise to achieve that is totally irrelevant.
If you learn well in a formal education environment, then absolutely you should definitely definitely
go and do some kind of photography degree, or degree in whatever it is that you want
to do. You want to work with and learn from the best people that you can and if the environment
for you is formal education then rock and roll, enrol in that and start the learning
process today. If however you are more of a self-learner and you like that methodology
of discovery, then there’s nothing wrong with that. If you can read a book and you then
have that knowledge and can apply it in the real world and can get the result of someone
that had to go and have someone demonstrate it to them in a formal education environment,
then who cares? It’s all about having the skills and developing those skills. I really
wish that people would focus so much more on what gets them to the place they need to
be, rather than the vehicle that gets them there. I’m still to this day yet to have anyone
ask me for a copy of my college degree or something like that in photography in order
to get a job, all they ever want to see is a portfolio of work and demonstrated ability
to do the job that you are applying for. At the end of the day, even when you graduate
any degree in any different field, great you’ve proven that you have a base level of knowledge,
but still people hire based on experience, knowledge and ability, rather than your piece
of paper. That actually just proves that you turned up and didn’t totally suck, the actual
proof comes after that when you enter into the “real world” so to speak and start to
prove yourself in that capacity. I do recommend that anyone that’s involved in any kind of
formal education doesn’t wait until they graduate to enter the real world, I think you should
start acquiring that experience straight away. It’s so important, especially in photography.
If all you’re doing when you enrol in these courses, which I think can be good for some
people from the perspective of, you know they give you assignments and push you out of your
comfort zones and that sort of thing, but if all you do is your coursework then you’re
not trying hard enough. You need to actually develop your portfolio outside of this structure
as well, you need to be out there experimenting, you need to be making mistakes, at the same
time as developing and learning your technical abilities in this way. I would actually throw
this challenge to you, and I actually say this to a lot of my workshop participants
who have done or are doing formal education in photography, I honestly believe that if
every assignment that you hand in gets crazy amounts of praise from your instructors, you’re
not trying hard enough, you’re not pushing your boundaries, you’re not developing your
own uniqueness. This can be done in tandem with learning to do things “the right way”,
but it’s never too early to start challenging the way things should be done and learn new
things for yourself. Never ever just stick to one idea or one methodology of learning,
pick the one that works best for you and then supplement it with the other avenues. In the
world that we live in, knowledge is so readily available that if you can’t find it, and you’re
not constantly adding to your toolbox let’s call it, then you’re just being lazy. Don’t
rely on this kind of formal structure to give you everything you need because it won’t,
it’s just giving you a base to start from. It’s never too soon to start adding to your
skills. I have one extra thing to say and I probably shouldn’t because I’ve been talking
for a while, but on top of this, I want you to consider other options as well. So I mentioned
earlier that you want to learn from “the best” people you can so to speak. There are other
options than just going to a course that you find has good instructors and things like
that, you can literally seek out people in the world and contact them, and say I would
like to learn from you. You have to pay to go to college, why not invest that same money
in travelling to meeting the people who really really inspire you, and contact them directly
and learn directly from the source. This to me is a kind of smarter thing in many ways,
because you’re going to learn exactly what you need to know, you’re going to get on the
job style experience, you can offer to intern for people, don’t just expect people to throw
things at you for free though ask them to do workshops, offer to pay for their time
and learn from the people you respect and admire. It’s definitely achievable, I’ve even done
this myself, and one of the smartest decisions that I made was seeking out individuals who
I believed could help me the most, rather than just hoping that a broad thing could
help me out. I had no interest in shooting weddings and events and things, so I didn’t
seek out photographers with that kind of experience to learn from. That’s basically all I’ve got
to say I think, I’m just staring creepily at Cassandra right now. Anyway, thank you
very much for your question I hope that helps a little bit, I know it might seem a little
bit like I have said it’s great but it’s crap, and that’s exactly what I’ve said, because
everyone has a different learning style and I think understanding the way that you learn
the best is what is going to help you make these decisions. So if you out there in internet
land have a question, feel free to ask it of me you can use the hashtag #askVENTH on
Twitter, or use the comments down below, please do like, share and subscribe to the channel,
I don’t know why but there’s a really creepy long pause there but anyway, hope you have
a great day as you can see, I don’t know if you can actually see this or not, but I’m
dressed a little bit weirdly for today because I’m actually planning on heading to the gym
quite shortly. So I’ll speak to you, again with the clicking, I’ll speak to you shortly,
bye!

Pinterest For Photographers | The Hidden Social Media Marketing Tool Trailer

Pinterest For Photographers | The Hidden Social Media Marketing Tool Trailer


– Pinterest is a place that people go to discover, to be inspired. And if you’re the type of photographer that creates inspiring images, well, then it’s kind of where you need to be. A lot of people think that Pinterest is only for mommy bloggers
and DIY craft experts. However, it’s incredibly misunderstood. 250 million people use the
platform every single month to create mood boards and to curate ideas for their next photoshoot. For a lot of photographers,
what’s blocking them is that they don’t understand
how marketing on this channel could help them grow their business. The secret of Pinterest is
that you’re using images you’ve already created. It’s only gonna take you
a couple of hours a month, once you set up your strategy. And that’s what we’re gonna teach you, how to market your
business with the platform. First, we’ll sit down with
a commercial photographer. We’ll show you how to take
your existing content, and show you how to connect
it to your target market to what they’re looking for
when they go on Pinterest. We will also sit down
with an event photographer and talk to them about the
successes that they’ve had on Pinterest over the last year. We’ll define all the confusing terms. We’ll talk abut how to
use a scheduling tool so that you don’t have to
be pinning every single day. Pinterest was made for photographers. It rewards imagery at its core. For you to gain more
visibility for your brand, more traffic to your website, to continue to grow and
expand your presence. I encourage you to take advantage of the step-by-step process
we put together for you.

Smog Almost Killed New York City, Here’s How

Smog Almost Killed New York City, Here’s How


For those of us raised in the digital age,
it’s not everyday we get to look at images this way. Each of these tiny translucent photos hold
a moment in history… and in this room… there are thousands of them. This is environmental photographer Arthur
Tress. And if Instagram was around in the 60s, Arthur
would be its king. I like showing people in relationship to the
world around them even if I’m doing a portrait or city scape or the effect of man’s relationship
to nature, how he modifies it and changes it. Arthur grew up in Brooklyn and he used his
camera to show the changing landscape of New York. And during his twenties, the city was pretty
much unrecognizable from what it is today. The entire waterfront was just piled with
junk. There were huge garbage landfills that were
spilling all these toxic water into the areas, neighborhoods. These great chimneys belching out black smoke,
it gives you an image of hell or the apocalypse. New York City wasn’t always so ominous. In the 1940s, New York City saw a great deal
of post-WWII prosperity. Buildings rose from concrete to clouds as
the skyline took shape, and industry was thriving. But in the decades to follow, the city began
showing the negative effects of its industrial boom. When you’d go to your window sill, it’d
be covered with dust and dirt. People would have a lot of cases of asthma
and coughing and your eyes would burn. It was like what they have now in China, that
big smog. And that comparison probably isn’t that
far off. During the 50 and 60s, New York City looked
a lot like Beijing does today. Toxic smog has besieged this city for decades. On some days, residents can’t even leave
their homes and there are documented widespread health problems among its population, akin
to the problems felt in 1960s New York. Now, the ill effects of toxic smog come down
to these little guys… Particulates, tiny microscopic solid particles
or liquid droplets, suspended in the air commonly created by burning fossil fuels or wood, as
well as power plants and industrial facilities. Particulates suspended in the air vary in
size but essentially, the smaller they are, the deeper they can penetrate your respiratory
system or even your bloodstream. The EPA considers any particles smaller than
2.5 micrometers in diameter extremely hazardous to breathe. And if you can’t wrap your head around how
small that is, then think about a human hair which is around 70 micrometers in diameter
– that’s 30 times larger than fine particulates. Today these fine particulates are monitored
and measured by an air quality index or AQI for short. Where a range of 0-50 is considered safe. To put Beijing’s pollution crisis into perspective,
over the past five years, the city saw readings as high as 755… that’s so bad there isn’t
even a AQI category for it. However, in the 1960s air pollution wasn’t
really measured in this way… which does make it difficult to draw a quantifiable comparison. What we do know is that scientists in the
1960s did report extremely elevated levels of damaging air pollutants such as Carbon
Monoxide and Sulphur Dioxide in New York City. In 1966, during a period of elevated air pollution,
known as the “killer smog”, researchers found an increase in death rate of 24 deaths
per day. The medical community acknowledged the toll
air pollution was taking on people’s health with one city medical examiner remarking “On
the autopsy table it’s unmistakable…The person who spent his life in the Adirondacks
[Mountains] has nice pink lungs. The city dweller’s are black as coal.” But for those who lived outside of the city,
some of the most impactful evidence of the hazardous pollution that plagued New York,
were photos… like Arthur’s. in these areas, you’d find old dolls and
the carcasses of dead animals and birds. … It was almost like a warzone. And these photos became an important catalyst
in the fight to clean up the city. the movement for doing that began with…
me actually in the 1960s. The images I created like a thunderstorm over
New York Cemetery or the man coming through the smoke became very well-known as kind of
environmental imagery. Arthur’s photos were published in magazines
and put on posters in hopes that they would be seen by people who had the power to enforce
change. “We must act and act decisively, it is literally
now or never.” In the 1970s, President Richard Nixon introduced
a slew of environmental policies and programs intended to clean up America. The Environmental Protection Agency was launched
and the companies dumping toxic waste into waterways and releasing pollutants into the
air were held accountable. When the EPA came along and said, “No, you
can’t keep doing that. We have Clean Water and Clean Air Standards,”
it wasn’t easy. It took time because these corporations fight
back as much as they can but eventually, it did turn the tide. Over time, New York City transformed into
the metropolis we know today. And throughout the past six decades we’ve
learned just how fragile the environment really is. The photographs were not only important for
themselves at the time but became a reference for the future in a way As we face an uncertain future… Arthur’s images will continue to help remind
us how easily we could revert back to a toxic world. It may come as a surprise that President Richard
Nixon… a Republican… helped created the Environmental Protection Agency. But environmentalism wasn’t always a source
of GOP contention. To learn when protecting the planet became
political, watch our video here. Thanks for watching Seeker, make sure to like
and subscribe for new videos every day.

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY with Nikon Z6 | camera settings, camouflage, permanent photo blind and coffee..

BIRD PHOTOGRAPHY with Nikon Z6 | camera settings, camouflage, permanent photo blind and coffee..


Bjørn, you have to be quiet when they come… It’s still quite dark outside and too dark to
photograph. I arrived here before sunrise, around an hour and a
half before sunrise, just so that the birds would not see us come here.
I’m here with Bjørn, and he’s very excited. I have to make him pull his head in very soon when the birds start to be able to see. I think they’ll be here in about an hour
if they come, so it’s just a wait-and-see. Bjørn, get that head in. Bjørn! I’ll just let him do it because for the
rest of the day he has to lie over there and sleep so he doesn’t scare them away. So now, it’s his little free hour. It’s so nice to be in the photo blind. A lot of
things have been made – a little table, a good friend of mine made a table, some hangers for
the bags and stuff I want to show you, and outside there’s also been some
improvements and I’m going to make even more. But more about that later. Right now it’s
just really, really nice to be here. It’s just to spend the day here waiting for the
birds and yeah, it’s awesome. So now, I’m going to set up my camera, make sure the
settings, everything, is perfect and I think this is the perfect
opportunity for a cup of coffee! A cup of coffee! You don’t want coffee! You don’t want coffee! Ok, are you done?
Because then I’m going to take this off. Okay let’s get that coffee! But first, set up the camera! The Jay has just been here, and I really
hope he comes back so I can show you. I got a few photos, and some video, and then the magpie came. I think he saw the lens
or something. Oh, I hope he comes back. He didn’t seem
that shy – he just basically landed on the stick and then jumped down, took some seeds,
and then off he went again. Yeah, let me just show you… It’s so nice with the grass, and in this
low position I can shoot through the grass to make it very blurry – it’s
really nice. There’s not a lot of things happening out there today… I was lucky to get the Jay, and I can’t
wait to see the photo on the big screen at home, and also looking forward to showing
you what I got. But it has been really quiet out there. There’s been some
magpies, some crows, far away in the trees but… yeah. I’ll say this is a typical day
in the photo blind. It’s not always that I’m so lucky that I get buzzards, and
magpies, and jays… It was a jay! The jay was landing out there, out of nowhere! And then it flew straight
towards me. That was fast! And then it landed up there on the
roof! I don’t know why I’m whispering because it’s not there anymore so I can
just talk and they’re not super sensitive for sound. I don’t know
why I have the habit of whispering all the time! It’s just because you get so excited when… Time for a coffee! That was good! It’s gone now, no birds. So, I’ve been waiting for quite a
long time now. It’s been about six hours since I came this morning and only a few times
I’ve seen the jay. It was crazy that he just landed on the roof in here
but he hasn’t been back since, so now Bjørn has been sleeping for a
while, and now… he’s still sleeping and now I’m going to pack my gear,
go home and look at some of the pictures. I’m looking forward to showing you what I got
today. It was not a lot but this, I think this was what I was about to say
say before, this is a typical day down here – it’s not always I just see
buzzards and magpies, jays and crows and ravens. Most of the
time I go down here I spend 10 hours, 15 hours, in the blind and if I’m
lucky I get a picture of a bird. If I’m not lucky, I come home with no
pictures at all. But it’s also the nice thing about nature photography
and wildlife photography that we can’t always just predict. Even though I
have a nice blind, even though I put nuts out for the birds and small seeds it’s
just you know there are other things they can eat in nature, they don’t have to
come here to eat. It’s wild animals! I can hear the magpies but they don’t come. So yeah, I think I’ll come back tomorrow. I don’t know if I have the time… I’ll come back if the weather is nice. I’ll come back. And when I say nice, I mean no sun. Today is perfect with clouds and stuff and when it’s sun it’s too hard, the light down here. But yeah,
looking forward to showing you some of the photos of the jay from today. So, see you out there!

Graciela Iturbide :: The Artist Series

Graciela Iturbide :: The Artist Series


a long time ago back in the 1980s I had a dream and in that dream I saw a man with a plow as he moved the earth birds were released and the man said “in my land, I shall plant birds” and the next day I’d forgotten the dream I went to an island of birds in Nayarit and there was a man who took care of birds I took a photo I call The Birdman there I remembered the dream because it was the same gentleman they looked alike sometimes I have premonition dreams about photography, with respect to life but I want to talk about some things that I later learned from Brassaï Brassaï says photography has more to do with intuition and with dreams its not exactly what he says but what I remember for Brassaï dreams were very important for example I have a series on birds
and it helped me a lot to read San Juan de la Cruz – a mystical poet who speaks of the conditions of the “solitary bird” – one, it flies very high two, it does not enjoy any company
even of its own species three, it has no particular color four, it aims its beak at the sky and five, it sings softly apart from San Juan de la Cruz about the birds I read a Sufi poet, Attar, a very old poet from Iran where he speaks of “the language of the birds”, which is a very beautiful story it is very difficult to tell it all but
all the birds gather to make a journey to find God on that journey they come and find eachother I studied cinematography and was lucky enough to meet Manuel Álvarez Bravo at film school the students did not go to Manuel’s classes no because they wanted to be film directors then, one day I found him and asked him if I could go to his classes I only had one of his books this was 1969 and he had made a book in ’68 during the Olympics, but a work on Mexico so I took him my book, he signed it and he said of course, you can be my ‘achichincle’, which means like a ‘workers assistant’ I said, of course! I will be very happy and as I was assisting him little by little I left filmmaking to work with him and for me more than a master of photography he was a master of life because he was a very poetic man who loved to read listen to classical music, contemporary he talked to me about popular art and we started going out to towns where I would assist him once I said to him maestro
quisiera saber como revela usted los I would like to know how to develop rolls of film and he said:
its very easy Graciela go to a store buy a roll and read the instructions how its done
…and perfect he was a perfect teacher because he never told me
your work is good, your work is bad never nothing but I knew I understood
when I liked what I’d done as a teacher for me, perfect Claudia, my daugher died in ’71
and it is to death all this time in towns I’d photograph little angels but this happened in ’77
because I lost a little girl when she was six years old
I had this obsession to photograph the “little angels” we call them in Mexico
who are the babies who die and those who are going to bury them in boxes made from Chinese paper in the village
they use colorful Chinese paper sometimes they include their food and…
and then one time I was in Dolores Hidalgo, near San Miguel Allende I saw that there was a whole family with the little angel in his box I asked permission of this family
if I could photograph them because these things have to be done delicately
and the gentleman said yes that they were going to bury the boy in the cemetery
and I followed this family with the little angel and at one point the man turns around to me
and sees that I am scared I saw a man who was half skull and half dressed
I took some photos but quickly, because I was commited to the gentleman
to photograph them and when we started to bury the angel
there were thousands of birds in the sky and they were the ones that had eaten
the skeleton of the man but here I felt that death was telling me, enough
enough enough because it was evidently and obsession of mine to be able to
forget about my daughter’s death from that moment forward
I did not photograph dead children again that photo I don’t like really to
put in exhibitions, because it is very strong they are not good photos, they are a report
but there is death and the birds which I call Birds of Death e Francisco Toledo, who was born in Juchitán
I did not know him at the time and he called me on the phone because he was doing a series
with different photographers to photograph Juchitán and then he gave me several prints of a lizard that he made
so that I could sell them and with that money I could travel to Juchitán
but when I arrived in Juchitán, I went to the market
to sell tomatoes with the ladies so I would not be aggressive
and to be able to gain their friendship when I arrive at the place with my camera
for example, in Juchitán or with the Seri Indians and I ask permission at the beginning
and if its obvious that they’ve said yes because I explained why I was going etc but when someone did not want to be photographed
no but then the people of Juchitán
invited me to photograph all their traditions tradición and in the first days that I was there
a lady arrived with iguanas on her head and I said, please please don’t remove them let me make a portrait and I have the contact sheet
where the iguanas sometimes move sometimes not because those (live) iguanas are sold to be eaten now the fantastic thing that happened with that photo that was casual is that it has become an icon
in Juchitán I call her Our Lady of the Iguanas but they call her the Medusa Juchiteca and when the House of Culture
celebrated ten years that Toledo founded it they put the photo that I took
on posters in all the houses of Juchitán and now, at this moment
Sobeida – who is the lady of the iguanas has made a sculpture of it in Juchitán
and on all of the signs telling you which road is my photo
and also in Los Angeles there are murals of the lady of the iguanas and they also make a mezcal with the photo
without asking me permission but it’s the only case
I’m going to make a little book
with Clément Chéroux Chéroux is a researcher of how an image flies by itself
without you doing anything because it is in the United States
all over the world why Juchitán in the 1930’s was very important because it was (Sergei) Eisenstein who filmed part of his movie ¡Que viva México!
it was Henri Cartier-Bresson
he had a Juchiteca girlfriend she later wanted to go with him to France
but he already said no and there was also Diego Rivera
Tina Modotti… many very important characters but after that nobody went
until Toledo invited us as photographers and for me it’s like my second home I take self-portraits in a very unconscious way
the portrait I have a dead bird and a live bird
I had a little crisis and I had a dead bird here in my house
I went to the market and bought one that flies and I took the photo
but I do not know why but the photo is called Eyes To Fly With
as a question then the other day I found a fish in the market
and put it in my mouth but I do not know why
but the snake I did know why because when I was seeing a therapist
about Claudia I told my psychoanalist
I feel snakes coming out of me when I talk to you and there I went and looked for snakes
and put them on I love Dadaism, Surrealism but you can not be in this time
neither Dadaist nor surreal or anything that is a stage where the artists
formed those groups – nothing more so when they sometimes tell me
your work is surreal, I say no surrealism belongs to Dalí, to all of them, to Bretón but not now, there is no surrealism I get angry
because also when I get asked in France about… ah “magical realism”
I said no magical realism you invented for García Márquez, Vargas Llosa
for the ‘boom’ of literature and to be able to better sell books
I am not magical realism, surrealistic, nothing I am Graciela Iturbide e él

iPhone 8 Plus vs LG V30 & Pixel 2 XL camera test | Last Cam Standing VIII

iPhone 8 Plus vs LG V30 & Pixel 2 XL camera test | Last Cam Standing VIII


Apple’s iPhone 8 plus just beat the LGG
6 in our latest smartphone camera showdown but now there are two new
challengers Google’s pixel to excel and LG’s v30 let’s put these phones to the
test in a threeway comparison to see whose camera comes out on top our camera shootout series has been
going on for a year now and this could be the biggest match up to date as
always it’s a winner-take-all showdown and the camera that takes the top spot
continues on to battle the next hot smartphone that comes along our current
choice for best camera the iPhone 8 plus delivers a major performance boost
compared to last year’s iPhone 7 plus and most of it is thanks to Apple’s new
proprietary image processor but Google’s pixel 2 improves upon the awesome
computational photography that the original pixel gave us last year with
modest off-the-shelf parts google taps into what it knows best machine learning
in order to make a great photo as for LG its G 6 held our top spot for a number
of camera showdowns until it just barely lost to the iPhone 8 plus but now LG’s V
30 is ready to take back the crown with great camera specs and an amazing camera
app this fight will be broken up into four sections color clarity exposure and
user experience and all the phones will be tested using the stock camera app in
full auto mode the way most people shoot I’ll focus mostly on the main camera of
each phone but any extra features will be covered under user experience and now
let’s go over the results first up is color and what’s important here is
accurate color reproduction and white balance in this vivid street scene each
camera looks to handle white balance effectively but further inspection of
the yellows reveals a wider variation of colors in the pixel and the iPhone the
pixel 2 is a little washed out not necessarily a bad thing but the iPhone
is a tad more accurate to the eye this next close up of a plant shows just how
well the iPhone handles colors compared to the v30 nonetheless the pixel keeps
up and all three are still fairly accurate when it comes to color temps
but this morning shot stirs things up a bit here the V 30 is more vibrant but
really goes too far and the pixel misses the mark on white balance resulting in a
dull sky the iPhone is easily the most accurate of the three the same spot at
sunset paints a similar picture the iPhone is accurate and has good
saturation low-light shots are hard to nail especially in mixed lighting
environments the pixel portrays a greenish hue while the v30 leans into
the tungsten and although the iPhone isn’t perfect it’s by far the closest
thing to accurate this last shot with plenty of white wall is where the
comparison really brings it home in almost every scenario the pixel leans
towards the cooler side of color temperatures with the iPhone leaning
warmer the v30 comes in last for this category never really producing
consistent results and yes I know the V 30 features a 10 bit sensor with a wider
color gamut but that doesn’t mean much if it can’t accurately capture those
colors color temperature can be a matter of personal preference but there’s no
denying that the iPhone has the edge in depth and separation so the Apple iPhone
8 plus takes our color battle next up we’ll cover clarity what I’m looking for
here is the sharpness of the overall image and how well it stays sharp in
different lighting scenarios here at the train tracks I’m pretty happy with how
each perform at full resolution but zooming in is where the rubber meets the
road and I’m disappointed with the v30 it doesn’t really seem to improve upon
the g6s sharpness issues the iPhone is better but the pixel just blows both out
of the water so much fine detail can be extracted from the pixels image I’m very
impressed moving to this shot across the bay
zooming in on the Oakland docks shows that the iPhone in the fee 30 both lose
the necks of some of the cranes but the pixel does not with a higher resolution
sensor I was hoping for more from the V 30 and here we have a brick wall one of
my favorite camera testing tools zooming in reveals so much about how
each camera processes texture the pixel is once again killing it with detail the
iPhone holds up pretty well and the fee 30 is a mess check out another wide shot
this time with less hates punching into the distance shows a close race between
the pixel and the iPhone but there’s more texture in the grass on the pixel
and I still have no idea what’s up with the V 30 switching gears over to some
low lighting scenarios we’ll really see how each camera handles longer shutter
times here I was really hoping the V 30 would kick some ass with its F 1.6
aperture but surprisingly that’s not the case it’s not as noisy as the iPhone but
it should have a clear advantage in this shot the pixel performs very
well the next shot has similar results but reveals a weakness of the pixel the
autofocus and low-light just isn’t as good as what’s on the iPhone when the
pixel nails focus it’s great but when it doesn’t it’s a lost shot the V 30 isn’t
too bad in this shot so that’s nice but the LG love doesn’t last long since I
can’t even compare how clear the images are in this super dark shot between the
pixel and the iPhone the pixel has way more definition on the fire extinguisher
so despite its hiccups in low-light the pixel still takes the clarity category
the third category is exposure and here we’ll go over how each camera exposes
for a scene and just how much exposure information each camera retains I’m
including histograms on each of the images so you can see the results as
well this first shot is basic but helps me bring home a point the pixel is
flatter which looks washed out and the iPhone cranks up the contrast providing
more punch without editing and the fie 30 is somewhere in the middle but like I
said in previous shootouts this comes down to a matter of preference do you
want an image with punch or do you want the freedom of a flatter image so you
can add more punch later each phone deals with most lighting
scenarios very well but where breaks down is in high contrast scenarios like
this hotel the pixel is a bit underexposed compared to the iPhone but
Google’s HDR is super aggressive and holds on to highlights way better than
the iPhone and the b30 but is it at the expense of the shadows no I was able to
recover more from the shadows on the pixel than the blown out highlights on
the iPhone in b30 the same thing happens on this street scene and there’s so much
more information to work with on the pixel the iPhone has way more punch but
in extreme situations like these I’d rather have the dynamic range to work
with in editing the v30 does a good job as well but it doesn’t hold as much
information as the pixel and this last dynamic shot hits home the point the V
30s HDR just doesn’t do enough to keep the shadows usable and the iPhone has to
overexpose in order to hold the shadows resulting in some blown out bricks the
pixel has the perfect balance of holding dynamic information but also delivering
a punchy photo before head it’s a close contest as each camera
performs great but I’m going to give a slight edge to the Google pixel to the
last category is user experience and here we look at all the factors that go
into using a camera daily apple gives you a simple and straightforward user
experience and snappy operation the iPhones autofocus system is also a huge
advantage it’s fast and reliable but the iPhone 8 plus does have some glaring
problems first off compared to the other phones it just takes too long to unlock
the camera app from a sleeping phone second why the hell can’t I get to the
settings from inside the camera app that makes no damn sense I’ve also been
holding out hope for a manual mode but Apple must think I can’t handle it and I
doubt it’s coming on the Google side the pixel twos camera unlock speed is super
quick and I’ve been loving Google’s version of portrait mode both
implementations have their shortcomings but there are plenty of situations where
the pixel is as good if not better than the iPhone in this department this year
Google also included optical image stabilization in addition to electronic
image stabilization but it’s not as powerful in photo mode as it is in video
and Google like Apple didn’t include a full manual mode they did take a few
steps in the right direction with features like exposure locking and if
you know me you know how much I love LG stock camera app it has plenty of fun
features to play with and also has a powerful manual mode that includes a
real-time histogram I also found way more use for the super
wide angle camera on the V 30 as opposed to iPhones telephoto lens this is the
third generation of the super wide angle lens that LG has worked on and it’s the
best yet and even though I’m focusing on the photo features here I have to give a
shout out to some of the huge improvements LG did on the video side
from custom color profiles to zoom control to deeper editing options there
is plenty to keep you busy but the camera launch speed on the V 30 was
inconsistent which is a change from the g6 and overall I ran into way more
interface hitches on the V 30 than I’m happy with that said I’m still a huge
fan of LG’s experience so the V 30 is taking this category
so now we’ve gone over all the testing it’s time to crown a champion overall I
was very disappointed with the photo results from the b30 it’s a solid camera
with great usability features but LG isn’t keeping pace on the processing
side the iPhone 8 plus takes amazing photos and if you need a camera that’s
reliable and has a great kick without editing you will be very happy with it
but with great color accuracy top-notch clarity stunning exposures and a solid
camera app the Google pixel to excel is our new champ what Google has been able
to do with computational photography is a huge achievement that is going to be a
big part of photography going into the future they have a solid base to work
with and if they decide to lean into custom hardware to complement the
software Google will be unstoppable and whether you pick up the smaller pixel 2
or the larger pixel 2 XL you know you have the best camera around so what do
you think of the results do you think the iPhone 10 can get the crown back for
Apple tell me about your experiences with the pixel 2 and be sure to
subscribe to our youtube so you don’t miss the next camera fight

How to get more photography clients – #askVENTH Show EP 22

How to get more photography clients – #askVENTH Show EP 22


Guten tag Brian Guten tag Cassandra Cassandra: How are you today? I’m great, thanks for asking Cassandra: How would you like to help some people today? Swell! Cassandra: Now with some enthusiasm… That was enthusiasm, what more can I do? Cassandra: Where are we today? We’re on a train, again, still… I feel like I live in trains now Cassandra: Your life is so hard It is so hard Cassandra: It’s so hard being me I’m so glad someone’s finally noticed how hard my life is We’re currently on a train from Vienna to Budapest.
Vienna was actually quite enjoyable, I’ve never been there before, and I’ve never been
to Budapest before either, so I’m quite looking forward to that. I have a couple of shoots
lined up in Budapest as well, I think I might get to take people behind the scenes of the
one on Sunday, so watch out for that, might Periscope or Meerkat it or something if you’re
lucky. Cassandra: I’m quite looking forward to the snack cart coming The snack cart, yeah I’m surprised,
what a shock. Cassandra: That’s what I’m most looking forward to Is that because you’ve eaten all the muesli bars you put into your purse? Cassandra: I’ve eaten all the good flavoured muesli bars, and I don’t want to eat the bad ones By bad you mean banana? Cassandra: I mean banana, yes I love those ones, more for me Cassandra: So let’s get into it I’ve got a question from Ascendant Imaging Hi Ascendant Imaging, that’s a funny name Cassandra: Well I’m assuming he means his photography name Gotcha, I thought your mum just didn’t like you Cassandra: So he wants to know, Brian can you ever
do an #askVENTH on finding clients, I’m in a tiny market looking for a way out! Can I ever do an #askVENTH on this one, apparently I am because Cassandra just asked me your
question. That’s a really good question by the way. I’m going to be slightly mean to
you my friend, just for one second before I’m nice to you. So you’ve already answered
your own question haven’t you? Think about it, you’re in a tiny market, how do you get
customers? Think, has it come to you yet? That’s right, you need to move to a bigger
market, crazy! It’s actually just one of the options, I feel exactly where you’re coming
from man, I used to be based out of Perth in Australia, beautiful place and I really
enjoyed living there. But the market for photography is quite small, which makes it very very competitive.
People might think that going to places like New York or London or Paris, anywhere like
that is going to be more competitive, because it’s a bigger market but it’s crazy. It’s
actually less competitive, because it’s a bigger market that means that there’s a broader
range of jobs and more people requiring your services. It’s better to be a small fish in
a huge pond than to be a medium sized fish in a tiny little pond, okay? Think of it this
way, let’s simplify it, if there’s ten jobs and one hundred photographers, there’s a very
low percentage chance that you’re getting that job. If there’s say one hundred photographers,
but there’s one thousand jobs, I just did that the wrong way around… it doesn’t matter.
Anyway, the maths says go to a bigger market, there’s more chance that you’ll get hired.
Obviously there’s other things that you can be doing as well, the other things that you
need to be doing is that you need to be making yourself known in the places that you want
to work, and don’t forget that you don’t just have to move move, you can travel as well
so to make connections with people in other cities or countries, go there for a short
period of time, make the connections before you go and then try and gain work. The best
way to gain connections these days is straight through social media channels, so jump on
Instagram if you want to network with models and things like this, jump onto Twitter to
expand your network, obviously you are on Twitter at the moment because this is where
this question came from, but you need to leverage these platforms better to help you grow your
market. Basically the more you get your name out there, the more you build awareness that
you actually exist, the more likely it is that you’re going to get hired. On top of
this, within the city that you currently live in, you need to find out who are the key players?
Who are the people that you need to network and make friends with? What I would encourage
you to do is actually start making friends with everybody, don’t look at other photographers
as your competitors look at them as your potential friends. Look at what they’re doing well,
look at what they’re doing bad, emulate everything that they do well, don’t do any of the stuff
that they’re doing poorly. Become their friend, learn from them, help them as well, offer
your services to them, refer clients to them when you can’t service them. Then when they
can’t service a client, they’re going to refer them to you, so that’s another way of helping
your business along. Make as many many friends as possible I can’t emphasise this enough,
all that business is, is building networks and relationships. There’s no such thing as
too many friends. So I think I answered most of it, hope that helps man. So to summarise,
point one: diversify your marketplace. So you’ve got to look into potentially moving,
either permanently or temporarily and step two: network, network, network, network, then
network some more. Every single day you should be calling, texting, emailing, going in to
see people, do all the hard work, do the stuff that no-one else can be bothered doing and
you will get the jobs. That’s how it works. Cassandra: Sweeeeeeeeet, so we’re going to do TWO questions today Yeah, I would love to do two questions Cassandra: So we’ve got a question from Craig B King Hi Craig Cassandra: He would like to know if you have any advice on finding venues for exhibitions? I’ve got some advice Craig… Have you heard the Yam Story Craig? Cassandra: Exactly where I was going Ah, the Yam Story. Ok Craig, number one: Google. It’s your friend. You’re on Twitter, yes?
So it’s a short trip from Twitter to Google, just type into the address bar G-o-o-g-l-e.com
and press enter, it will take you to Google. Now input in the little search bar, art galleries
in, and the city that you’re in. Press enter, or click the little search button and you’ll
get a big list. You could also type in photographic galleries, that sort of thing, spaces for
hire – well, that’s another option. So these will come up with a bunch of places where
you will be able to contact people by going to their websites and getting their contact
details and contacting them, it’s that simple. The next step as Cassandra just eluded to,
would be to actually set up your own exhibition, so look up spaces for hire in your city, hire
it for an opening or a period of time and create a little pop-up gallery, you may even
get together with a few local photographers or artists, get all of your works together
and have a group exhibition which will help cross-promote each other and that sort of
thing. It’s actually really simple, if you want to do it then do it. Be aware that most
places are going to charge you a fee, it’s not free. You are going to have to pay money,
because they have to promote it blah blah blah. Unless you have built a name for yourself
to the point where they as a business will profit more from just the fact that you’re
going to be there, you’re really actually going to have to pay them for printing and
framing, either you’ll have to pay or they’ll charge you for that and there will be promotion
fees that will go alongside all of that as well. So unless you want your show to just
bomb and have no-one come, you’re going to need to put some money into it, and put some
work into promoting it and yourself, both across all of your social platforms, be increasing
that – woah, shaky. Basically you’re going to need to put a lot of time and effort into
this, but it should be quite simple to find someone to partner with you just need to do
that work, find the venue, find either a gallery that either is willing to host your exhibition, or put one on for yourself. So hopefully that answers your question, cool. Cassandra: Yeah I thought that was a good answer. What I thought would a really good question would be if someone said I’m a photographer, I want to exhibit my work, how could I promote my exhibition? Now that’s a good question! Cassandra: So come back when you’ve got your exhibition sorted out and we’ll give you advice for that Yes, wow, that’s excellent! But I’ll give you a sneak preview of that answer, see how you’re on Twitter right now? Grow, grow your following. Interact,
get your name out there, show people your images, show people your artworks. Do you
know what actually, I’m going to have a little rant right now. There seems to be this craze
at the moment where people don’t want to share their works on social media because they’re
worried about the copyright issues and yada yada yada. The worst thing that can possibly
happen is that yeah fine, you’ve just given up your copyright to your work, you haven’t
by the way that’s ludicrous, but even if that was the case what you have also done is potentially
reached a larger market. If you think that you’re never going to take a good photo again,
then you may as well quit photography right now, because seriously man, if you’re only
capable of taking up to where your portfolio is right now, then you’re not going anywhere
forget about it. What you should be looking at is the fact that even if the cost of getting
your work out there was not getting paid for that piece, or that particular photo, that’s
fine, it’s not a big deal. Just think of it as a cost of doing business. Instead of paying
cash money to get this amazing opportunity to promote your work and expose it to your
potential customers and buyers, you’re literally just giving them your artwork. No big deal,
you don’t even give up your copyright that’s ridiculous, the most stupid thing I’ve ever
freakin’ heard. I honestly believe it’s one of the most misinformed things in the world.
These usage agreements or whatever it is, what do they call it, terms and conditions
or whatever for each platform. They’re not there to steal your artwork, they don’t give
a crap about your photos they’re just covering their own asses so that you don’t sue them,
dickheads. Cassandra: Just to end on a positive note That wasn’t directed at you by the way, that was just a global thing about people complaining about this. Cassandra: We better wrap it up because we have the ticket inspector coming We’re gonna wrap it up, oh speaking of wrapping up, where’s the rap? You got it yet? Cassandra: The ticket inspector’s here! Oh saved by the ticket inspector Cassandra: So thanks for watching and thanks for your questions as always… Are you going to do it? Can I do it? Cassandra: It’s your show Is it? I feel like it’s your show sometimes… *Ticket inspector arrives* That was exciting wasn’t it? So if you feel like you got anything out of the show, then
please do like and share and comment down below, don’t forget to subscribe the button
thing is over there. If you have any questions, feel free to use the hashtag #askVENTH on
Twitter or leave it in the comments down below, email it to me, whatever you want, I don’t
care. Thanks to the two guys who asked questions today, hopefully it was helpful. If not, what
do you expect, it’s free, free! Oh, I think I need more coffee so later, bye!