The Truth Behind Instagram Pictures

The Truth Behind Instagram Pictures


(bell rings) (slow music) (camera clicks) – I’m just gonna take a nap first. (dramatic music) (bell rings) (dance music) – Woo hoo. Get a pic. Uh, you know what, this
really isn’t my aesthetic can I borrow your sunglasses? Okay, there. (camera clicks) Yes, perfect photo. – I’m done. (bell rings) (dramatic vocal music) (slow music) (bell rings) – Okay, okay, move the pillow. Move the pillow. Good.
Alright, don’t smile. Big eyes. Open your eyes,
but give me the eyes. Chin up. Okay, not that much up. Bring it down. Good. Okay, hair. Need more hair. Alright, I think we got it. – Okay. Oh, you know what, let’s
just take like 20 more, just 20 more. (bell rings) – Oh my God, shut up. Eww, these trash cans stink. That’ll look good on Instagram. (bell rings) (breathy music) – Oh shoot, I forgot to
post something today. – We’re gonna be late for dinner. – We’ll just take a
quick selfie. It’s fine. Actually, you take it. Okay, look like we’re really happy. (bell rings) (dance music) – This looks terrible. This isn’t gonna work. (silly music) (horn and bell music)

Samsung Galaxy S8 vs LG G6 camera test | Last Cam Standing IV

Samsung Galaxy S8 vs LG G6 camera test | Last Cam Standing IV


LG’s g6 just beat out the Google pixel
in our testing to become the king of smartphone cameras it didn’t have too
much time to rest though because here comes the Samsung Galaxy s8 it’s time
for another head-to-head showdown this time in Las Vegas first let’s talk specs
LG g6 is main shooter sports a 13 megapixel sensor and F 1.8 lens and
optical image stabilization Samsung’s camera is largely the same from last
year with a 12 megapixel sensor and F 1.7
lens and dual pixel autofocus all the specs look good on paper but that’s why
we take them out to test in real-world scenarios I’ll also add that I’m testing
these cameras the way most people use them in auto mode that means straight
out of the pocket using the stock app with HDR set on auto the only setting
I’m changing is megapixel count going for the full resolution of each camera
now that we’ve covered that let’s move on to the test results the main areas
I’m focusing on are color clarity and range first up is color and what I’m
looking for here is accuracy vividness and how the camera balances color
temperature Samsung has a history of really pushing saturation and while it
can happily say they’ve eased off on it the s8 really stumbles with color
temperature SFO is too blue on the si yet accurate on the g6 even in this
complex lighting scenario LG still gets it right allowing for both the cool
table light and warm ceiling lights to show up whereas the s8 is all orange
since we’re in Vegas for the NAB Convention there were color charts
everywhere and once again the s8 was inaccurate on color temperature but this
last example is important yes the s8 takes a more pleasing photo but
the g6 is more accurate even if a bit dull the g6 is able to capture more
variations of color in the grass and the s8 and that’s key so even though Samsung
improved its image processing since last year’s model it’s not good enough this
category goes to the LG G 6 let’s move to clarity and here I’m looking for not
only the overall crispness of the picture but how the phone uses its
sharpening and no reduction this category was a closer
competition with both phones holding their own in bright light I only give
the slight edge to the g6 because of the more a patterns on these shutters
present in the s8 photo checking out this macro shot reveals a bit of a
different story with the SH showing clear text on the chips in lower light
the s8 pulls even further ahead retaining more texture in the dark area
and to my surprise even after the g6 blew way the Google pixel in low-light
test it really struggled with this super dark scene as great as the g6 as optical
image stabilization is Samsung’s is just better even though it’s close in bright
light I have to give this category to the Samsung Galaxy s8 the last category
is range here I’m looking for how much light information the camera is able to
capture and how it chooses to expose for the scene the histogram is our friend in
this category and here’s the basic way to read it all the information on the
right side of the histogram represents the bright areas of the image while the
left side represents all of the dark areas of the image you want the exposure
to fall somewhere in between otherwise you start to lose information this first
photo is pretty simple but shares an overarching theme I notice between the
two phones looking at the histogram we see the dynamic range is pretty similar
but the s8 exposed a bit higher than the g6 not necessarily a bad thing for the
shot so let’s move on here again the g6 is a bit darker than the SI and we can
see that in the histogram but we also start to see that we’re losing
information in the highlights once again not horrible for the shot but it’s
starting to worry me we move on to this next scene and we finally start to see a
problem zooming in on the table here we’re losing the objects that have a
spotlight on them whereas the g6 is protecting those highlights while still
retaining enough info in the shadows and we keep seeing this trend play out both
phones are very close and how they expose but the s8 pushes it a bit too
much and loses highlights blending these TVs together but it’s this last shot
that really shows the dynamic range of the g6 the s8 actually underexposed here
but still wasn’t able to retain the highlights the g6 handles the scene like
a champ holding info in the highlights and the
lowlights so I’m giving the range category two the LGG six well the
results are in and the G six takes the color and range categories while the s
eight takes it in clarity with two out of three the LG G six is the winner I am
really impressed by how much Samsung has improved their photo processing making
it not only visually pleasing but technically adept but LG shines in too
many scenarios really nailing the balance between appealing the people who
just want to shoot and post a photo and professionals who desire more
flexibility all while featuring a second lens and having an awesome stock photo
app so LG’s g6 continues to be our smartphone camera King and will go on to
defend its crown against another smartphone be sure to subscribe so you
don’t miss the next fight you

Shooting Sony with Off Camera Flash: The Breakdown with Miguel Quiles

Shooting Sony with Off Camera Flash: The Breakdown with Miguel Quiles


Hey what’s up everybody? Miguel Quiles here and in this episode of The Breakdown I’m going to walk you through how I set up my Sony cameras to shoot off camera flash. Hey what’s up everybody? Miguel Quiles here. Welcome to The Breakdown. One of the questions that I get most often, whenever I’m teaching workshops, or I read the YouTube comments that you guys leave on my videos and one that keeps popping up all the time is, “Miguel how do you setup your Sony A7 cameras to shoot off camera flash?” So what I’m going to do today is to walk you through every single one of my settings to make shooting with off camera flash very very simple. So I’m going to be using my Sony A7 RII and I’m actually using a brand new lens from Sony, which is the 100mm 2.8 STF lens. I’m going to do some demo shots with you with that but we’re really going to be focusing primarily on the settings. So we’re going to go ahead and I’m going to take you into the camera menus and show you how I do that. Alright, so let’s go ahead and dig into the menus here. So I’m actually going to go ahead and start by hitting the Function button on the back of the camera and so when you hit the Function button on the back of the Sony camera, you have very fast access to a variety of different settings. So the very first thing that you want to do is go over to your Flash Mode and the menu there. You want to make sure that it’s set to WL or Wireless. Many times whenever people try using off camera flash for the first time and it doesn’t work, chances are they have it set to either Fill Flash or they’ll have it set to one of the other flash options. So you want to make sure that it’s set to Wireless. That’s the first thing we’ll hit or the Function button one more time, the next thing that I do is the Focus Mode and this is another question that I get quite often. As far as what modes do I use for focusing what I’m shooting portraits in the studio. So I typically will use Single-shot Auto Focus if I’m shooting a static subject. From trying to focus on anything that is fast-moving, I may actually change it to Continuous Autofocus but typically, 99.9% of the time, I’m in Single Shot Autofocus. So we’ll dial that in and then as far as the focus area, this is what’s very important because you want to make sure that when you’re focusing on people, when you’re doing portrait, you want to make sure that their eyes are in focus. Far too often I see portraits where people use the wrong focusing mode or the wrong focusing area on the Sony cameras and they’ll get portraits where the eyes are out of focus and it’s very off-putting for the viewer. So getting the eyes in focus, of course you have Eye autofocus, which I talked about that in a prior video of The Breakdown but let’s just pretend like you don’t have Eye Autofocus or maybe it’s just not your thing. What I will end up doing for focus area is one of three things. So primarily I will either use the Center focus area so if I’m focusing at let’s say f/8, f/9, f/11. Any of the higher f-stops. What I’ll do is, I’ll actually use the Center focus and I’ll focus and recompose. Which means and I’ll actually show it to you here in a few moments but you take the Center focus dot, you place it over the person’s eye, you push the shutter halfway down until you hear the beep that it’s confirmed, that’s in focus. Recompose your shot and then finish pushing the shutter the rest of the way down. So that’s typically how you use that but you have to use it at a high enough f-stop because if you shoot it wide open, let’s say at a f/1.4, the focus recompose method will end up giving you portraits that are out of focus. We don’t want that. So Center focus if you are doing any aperture, whether it’s wide open, or a higher f-stop. The one that I really like to use is Flexible Spot and you actually get three different flavors of Flexible Spot. So you get kind of a small, medium and a large setting. And the nice thing about this is that, you can move the box, the focus area, anywhere around the screen. So one of the cool advantages to shooting with Sony is that you have, on say the a7R II, you have many focus points, it basically covers almost the entirety of the frame. As to where with some other DSLRs, it’s really kind of centered around the center of the screen. So here you could actually move your focusing point anywhere within the frame which is kind of nice. You could change the size of it. So if you’re trying to focus on, let’s say, a person’s eye, I might actually want to use focus areas small and place that right over the iris, push halfway down to get it in focus, and then take the shot. So you can choose whatever size the situation calls for, but the other one that you can use it, for example, on the a7R II is Expand Flexible Spot and this particular option will basically work very much like the Spot Focusing, but it also sometimes will pick other areas that are nearby. So this could be something that could come in handy as well, but again, same theory, you want to place this box over the person’s eye, so the biggest difference between Flexible Spot and Expand Flexible Spot and let’s say Center is that, with Center you have to focus and recompose; With the Spot Focusing features you actually will compose your shot. You’ll frame it the way you want it and then you just move the focusing dot over to the person’s eye and they get them in focus that way. All right so we’ll hit the Function button one more time to go back into the menu and the next thing is, if you’re shooting with off camera flash, one of the big advantages is that you get to shoot at a very low ISO. That gives you the best quality images. So you want to shoot at whatever the lowest ISO is on your camera. Which on the a7R II is going to be 100ISO and your metering mode is not really going to matter so we’re not going to talk too much about that. The other question that comes all the time, I mean I get this often, “Miguel what white balance are you using for shooting your portraits whenever you’re using off camera flash?” Really I only use one of two. I’ll either have it on Auto because, again, if you’re shooting raw you could actually change your white balance in post. So even if you shoot with Auto and let’s say you want it to be sunlight, or rather daylight, or a shade, or tungsten, or whatever, you could actually set that up in post afterwards. So typically, 99% of the time, I’m using Auto White Balance. There will be some times when you shoot Auto White Balance and the image comes out looking kind of blue. So in those types of scenarios, even though I can change it in post, it makes it a little bit difficult for me to show someone the back of my screen because they don’t get to see the post result. They’re looking at the back of my camera, so any time it shows up blue I will go to daylight and that’s really the only two that I will use. If I’m using off camera flash is to either set it up to daylight, or to Auto White Balance, unless I’m trying to go for some sort of artistic effect which, again, I tend to do that in post. But if you want to see it out of the camera the way that you’re hoping it’s going to look, you can choose one of these other White Balance options but for me Auto White Balance, that pretty much gets the job done. All right, so now those are all the settings that I really play around with, as far as the fast menu options that you get by pushing the Function button on the back of the camera. Now I’m actually going to go ahead and press Menu to go into the cameras menu and I’m going to show you guys how I set it up from here. So in the very first menu you have your Quality again. You want to shoot these in raw, cause this gives you the most flexibility to be able to manipulate your images in post. If for some reason, let’s say, you are shooting an event where somebody says, “Hey I need these photos right away.” Then what I will often do is shoot raw and JPEG so that way have the option afterwards to post-process an image further if I need to, but I’ll still have the JPEGs being saved on the card so that I can deliver that to my client. But most of the time it’s going to be raw. Your raw file type, it can be uncompressed, it can be compressed, to be honest, for off camera flash, for most portrait work you’re really not going to see the difference. I’ve never been able to see it but there are certain scenarios where you may want to choose one or the other. I will tell you that the file size is much much bigger when you’re shooting uncompressed, it’s almost double the size so you’re not really seeing that big of a difference to really warrant having double the hard drive space being taken up. So oftentimes I’ll shoot compressed but I’ll just leave it for uncompressed for now and from there everything is set up. My camera is ready to go as far as for shooting off camera flash so I’m going to go ahead and actually demo this for you. We’ve got a little studio light setup here and I’ll talk you through the setup and show you the results using these menu options. OK so we set up everything in the camera I’ve walked you through all of the different settings for being able to use your off-camera flash and so I’m going to go ahead and just demo this here for you. I have my a7R II like I mentioned before, got the newly announced 100mm 2.8 STF lens, I’m actually going to shoot wide open for these shots so that you guys can get an idea for what this lens is capable of producing, one shot wide open. For my off-camera flash lighting I’m using a ProPhoto Air remote which gives you high speed sync in TTL which is really awesome and I’m really excited I actually just upgraded my lights here in the studio so I have a ProFoto D2. One of the brand new 1000 watt strobes and that also offers high speed sync in TTL. So make sure that you check that out. I’ve got it paired up with a 5ft ProFoto octa which is one of my favorite modifiers to use in the studio for my backdrop. I have a really awesome collapsible backdrop from Savage. It’s called the Lakeside Collapsible, so it’s double sided, one side is green, and one side is kind of a beige color. Looks really, really beautiful and if you’re seeing this on the screen so that’s really what I’m using for the shooting part of it. What I wanted to do is I wanted to actually show you what I see through my electronic viewfinder as I’m looking to take these photos. So I’ve also connected this here within Atomos Ninja Assassin and this is basically just hooked up through HDMI to record what I’m seeing through the electronic viewfinder. So this isn’t part of the shoot, in so much as it is just the record, and show you guys what I’m actually seeing through the viewfinder. Hopefully this gives you a little bit of an almost like a POV perspective of what I’m seeing when I have the camera up to my face. So we have all of our settings dialed in and I’m going to go ahead and take a couple of shots and show you guys how this looks. I mentioned before that you have a couple of different options when it comes to using your focus areas and one of the ones that I really like using is the Flexible Spot. Where you actually will frame yourself up, so Noel stand very still right there. It’s perfect. I frame the shot up the way I want it, and what I’ll do is I use the joystick on the back of the camera to move this over her eye, I push down half way and we’ll do one more… Perfect. So that’s how I’ll go ahead and basically frame up all of my shots. Now you guys are seeing it here through the recorder, so it’s a little bit slower but we’ll go ahead and do that one more. Very nice, excellent stuff. Like that. So you’ll see that if I keep it around the area where her eye is going to be, you really don’t have to do very much in terms of framing it. I just follow her around and the shots will come out really nice and sharp and in focus. Now I mentioned before using Expand Flexible Spot which is another one and do the same thing. You’re going to notice that you’re going to get results that are very, very similar using both options. Very nice, excellent. One more. There we go. Perfect, Awesome! So very simple, very easy way. You notice every single one of these shots. All I’m doing is, I’ll find her eye, frame up the shot, and then take it. Or I could leave it like this, move the box, and then take the shot. So it just all depends, you know. I’m shooting this at an aperture to where I could, kind of, follow her around and I’ll be assured that I’ll get a shot nice and in focus. But really the easiest way is just to compose a shot in the camera, move the box over to where you’re trying to focus and then take the shot. Very quick, very easy. We have the Flash set up right now in manual mode I have the Profoto D2 set up to a power of 3.2 and that’s pretty much it. I’ve got the lights feathered a little bit forward so that, it’s actually not pointing directly at her, and that’s what gives you this really soft, beautiful quality of light. There we go, I think we got some pretty awesome shots. Alright everybody, hopefully you found that helpful. These settings are the ones that I use all the time for shooting all of my portraits. So anytime you see a video, if you’re wondering what White Balance I’m using, or what Focusing Mode, again, 99% of the time it’s going to be what I just showed you in this video. So if you have any friends that use Sony and they’re struggling with their portrait work, make sure that you share this video with them. Also, while you’re here on AdoramaTV, subscribe lots of videos. I come out with videos every other week. But every single day there are amazing videos being dropped on this channel, so make sure you subscribe. Also, check out the Adorama Learning Center where there’s more amazing content for you to read. Thank you guys so much for watching The Breakdown. If you guys enjoy the video leave a comment in the comment section below and again if you have any questions, make sure you leave that in the comments as well. Thanks for watching The Breakdown and before I go follow Noel, make sure that you follow her as well on Instagram. What’s your Instagram? It’s Noely1224 There you go. Follow me on instagram as well @miguelquilesjr I knew you guys were wondering am I going to forget about her. No I’m not going to forget, not again! It’s not ever going to happen. Hopefully you guys enjoyed the video today. I will see you in the next episode of The Breakdown. Bye everybody. That’s really awesome. Just like that, yes perfect! Work it girl, amazing, oh my gosh! That’s what really goes on.

Rain Photography  “Masterclass”

Rain Photography “Masterclass”


all right so today I thought I’d tell
you guys my secret settings to shooting with the phone so believe it or not I
get this question a lot and the answer the secret that’s going to make you
better than everyone is there isn’t a secret you just push the button you take
photo all right and yeah I don’t even know why I’m making a video about this
but many people ask me how you take photo in the rain and there’s really
nothing to it besides just taking the photo in the rain I mean that’s it it’s
not a setting that’s gonna make you better than anyone else and there’s no
secret editing technique you just take the photo and it’s a phone I mean you
just push button there’s no aperture – ISO dial or whatever but I mean I guess
there are some apps and do it but I’m really worried about that if you are
worried about how to do all that what I have a tutorial where I just show you
how to shoot with the phone but it’s nothing more than me pushing buttons so
I hope that helps someone because people keep asking but you know what can you do
just keep repeating the message and hopefully people catch on

Huawei Mate 10 Pro vs OnePlus 5T camera test | Last Cam Standing X

Huawei Mate 10 Pro vs OnePlus 5T camera test | Last Cam Standing X


Chinese manufaturer OnePlus makes damn good
mid-range phones for enthusiast Android users, but their phone cameras have always fallen
short. So how does their newest phone, the 5t, compare
to our current phone camera champ, Huawei’s Mate 10 Pro? Let’s put them head to head in Last Cam
Standing! Last Cam Standing is PCWorld’s video series
that determines the best phone camera for still images in a King-of-the-hill style battle. Whichever phone wins moves on to face the
next major smartphone release. Last year, the Mate 10 from Huawei finished
at the top of the smartphone pile. It’s impressive optics and AI-powered scene
recognition help it to take captivating photos. But OnePlus has once again reconfigured its
camera setup, and on the 5t they pair a standard camera with a secondary low-light sensor. On paper these specs appear similar, but I’ll
let the results of the testing speak for themselves. As always, we divide the testing into 4 catagories:
color, clarity, exposure, and user experience. All our testing mimics how people use phones
in the real world. I just pull the phone from my pocket, and
use the stock camera app with HDR processing set to auto. Now some of you have asked ‘why not shoot
in manual mode on a tripod saving to raw files?’. Well, first, that’s not even close to real-world
testing. Second, we aim for tests that reveal how the
phone companies have tuned their camera settings for auto use. So while I’m confident in my ability to
take a good photograph on a tripod in manual mode, I’m more interested in seeing if the
phone can without those things. But I’m always open to hear about different
testing ideas so subscribe and drop a comment or shoot me a tweet. With that out of the way, let’s get to the
results! The first category is color, and here we’re
going over color reproduction and white balance. This first shot of grafitti appears very close
in terms of color reproduction. There’s plenty of variation in each color
but we’re starting to see differences in white balance. The Mate 10 skews cooler, while the 5t is
skewing warmer. But this next shot of a plant switches things
up. Huawei’s intelligent algorythm accurately
identitifed this scene as a plant and boosted the warmer tones.The 5t on the other hand
kept things cooler but lost contrast and vibrancy. Neither of them is accurate to the eye, but
both phones are tuned to respond to scenarios in different ways. This next scene is also very interesting – check
out the yellow curb and red pole. The Mate 10’s shot feels natural, while
the 5t produces almost pastel-looking fake colors. Now look at the grey curb in the backgroud,
the 5t exhibits some serious green tint that affects the whole photo. This hallway in the Wynn at Las Vegas has
a heavy mixture of natural and artificial light. The Mate 10 Pro once again leans cooler and
the 5t warmer, but the 5t really floods the background in a heavy handed deep oragne. Lets finish with a landscape shot of San Francisco. By looking at the white clouds, we can see
how tinting can affect the overall mood of a photo. On the Mate 10, a purple tint and cooler color
temperature gives us a chilly winter day. But a warmer color temp and a green tint on
the 5t feels more like a warm summer day. I say it time and time again, but color is
a matter of personal taste. Personally, I found the Mate 10 to be more
accurate and its scenes are better suited to what I look for from a camera. So the color category goes to the Huawei Mate
10 Pro. The second category is clarity. We’re looking at the sharpness of each image,
and how well each camera handles dark environments. Here we have a shot of fake plants at Ikea. Disregarding the dynamic range (we’ll get
to that later) we see a bit more noise from the Mate 10. BUT we also have a clearer image overall,
despite the higher megapixel count of the 5t. Checking out this long shot in the warehouse
shows the 5t faring even worse. The individual packages on the shelf have
good separation on the Mate 10 pro, while the 5t just doesn’t come close. So where does the 5t shine? How about outside in full sunlight? Nope. Alcatraz island is clearer on the Mate 10. Maybe when we get a little closer? Eh, not really Zooming in on this beer list reveals an odd
ghosting around the edges on the 5t’s shot. It’s not camera shake, and the photo is
in focus, so I can’t really explain what happened. But, surely the 5t is great in low light,
right? That’s the whole point of the second sensor? As we head into a dark garage I’ve lost
all hope in the 5t—the zoomed in results are rough. And this is just the main camera on the OnePlus,
as I actually had to try really hard to engage the second ‘low light’ camera. You would hope that’s where the 5t can redeem
itself. Unfortunatly it’s not the case. This shot does engage that second low-light
sensor, and we see a bit more texture quality on the bricks. But zoom into the labels and I wouldn’t
call that a win over the Mate 10. So the clairty category easily goes to the
Huawei Mate 10 Pro. The third category is exposure. We’ll look at the dynamic range of each
image and how each camera decided to expose for a scene. I’ll include historgrams in this section
so you can follow along as well. In almost every lighting situation, I was
pleased with how both phones exposed for a scene. I couldn’t find any extreme examples of
improper exposure, so there isn’t much to report there, and thats a good thing. But when we start to compare dynamic range
in photos with high contrast environments, that’s a different story. Here on Alcatraz there’s a good amount of
information lost in the shadows on the 5t. The Mate 10 Pro is a bit washed out, but I’d
rather add contrast back in in post rather than try to take it out. Same thing here. The Mate 10 feels a bit more processed as
a result, but it’s still holding more information in the extreme ends of the exposure than the
5t. This next shot I took in Vegas isn’t great
looking, but it helps to illustrate a point. The highlights on the 5t are blown out. And there isn’t even as much detail in the
shadows either. So it’s not an exposure problem — the 5t’s
HDR tuning just isn’t as agressive as the Mate 10’s. So while it’s not a huge win, the Huawei
Mate 10 Pro takes the exposure category. The final category is user experience. Here we’ll look at extra features, and what
it’s like to use the camera day to day. Like I said in the last episode of Last Cam
Standing, the Mate 10 Pro doesn’t have the most user friendly interface. But it does offer a whole host of features
like a manual mode, a stunning black and wide mode, RAW file support, and even an apeture
slider for varrying amounts of bokeh. But at the heart of the Mate 10 Pro is it’s
AI powered real-time scene and object recognition. The phone reads every scene, and tries to
tune the processing to match whats being shot. It’s a whole other level of computational
photography. On the 5T side, I was not blown away. The camera app is very close to stock Android,
which means it was straightforward and easy to use, but it lacks any fancy features. It was pretty quick to launch and ran reliably,
but it’s nothing special. Like the 5 before it, the 5t also lacks OIS,
or optical image stabilization. OnePlus’ version of EIS, electronic stabilization,
is not great either so it’s a real bummer and I certainly felt it’s absence day to
day. So Huawei’s Mate 10 Pro takes the user experience
category as well. For the money the OnePlus 5t provides a solid
camera system, but it’s not enough to take the top spot. So, for the second time in a row, Huawei’s
Mate 10 Pro wins Last Cam Standing. The Mate 10 Pro’s dual camera setup, custom
processing chip, and Leica partnership all help to secure the win. The second 20MP black and white sensor not
only helps the main camera take better photos, but also produces amazing shots on it’s
own. It’s a fun camera to use and I have no problem
recommending it. But the Samsung Galaxy s9 is right around
the corner. Will Huawei be able to hang onto the top spot
for long? Subscribe, share, leave me comments, and definitely
come back for the next Last Cam Standing!

Neon Noir Lightroom Tutorial

Neon Noir Lightroom Tutorial


all right so I’m gonna show you guys how
I’m going to edit this photo it seems to be pretty popular this style so I want
to show you guys how I do it now like what I said last time is I’d like to
find something that is white try to make sure the white balance is correct that’s
usually the first thing I do and by now this could kind of become like an art to
me so it’s pretty quick so I’m gonna increase the contrast all the way decrease
the highlights I’m gonna increase the shadows the whites just until they peak
you see that red that signifies I overdid it something I’ll scale it down
right about there now increase the blacks all the way but that does not mean it’s
gonna stay this way it just means that’s how I like now I like my pictures a
little soft not always too soft but actually I’m gonna eyeball this actually
I like it like that so I mean this is really to your style it doesn’t have to
be exactly the way I do it if you want to have your clarity like there it’s
fine you wanna jack it up that’s fine too so I like my picture soft
people people usually say that I increase the saturation all the way and
shit like that but it’s not that’s not even the case I actually decrease it
there’s no set number it’s just the way I see it if it looks good to me that’s
the way I’d leave it so that’s looking more or less better the way I want it
now I don’t always change the highlights but I think I’ll add a smidgen of purple
just like that barely noticeable there we go so now I like to reduce the noise little
bit to go to luminance and add a vignette something like this, I’m gonna increase the
highlights in the vignette area actually what I would like the way I see this is
I want this to be lit but I want the area around it to be dark but the
vignette’s not cutting up for me so I’m gonna come to the radial filters over
here I’ma lay a filter right over it and Invert it, I’m a decrease
exposure but not too much like I said I’m just gonna eyeball this and however
I see the photo how I envision it that’s what I’m gonna do it
you guys don’t have to copy me exactly I mean if you don’t like something you can
just do it the way you want to do you know I’m just giving you guys like a
base like this is the way I like to do it and you don’t have to like this
completely now I wish I could increase the contrast so what I’m gonna do is I’m
just gonna slowly add more blacks in there there you see not all the way
now I actually maybe maybe I will deal with that vibrant so up a little bit
more okay that looks fine so I want to see
these signs over here in these cables that’s kind of a big point to my picture
and uh I’m gonna go over here and increase the highlights so we can see the brighter parts
starting to come out over here which is what we want
I’m gonna remove this part I’ll do something else right there
increase the highlights there you go it’s time to add more pop to our photo
which is what we want now I’m gonna make another brush this time I’m just gonna
add to the shadows maybe we can change We can change the brush later so it’s fine so like I said this is to each their
their own so however you want to do your photo and that’s up to you but this is
the way I like it and what else can we do
I want more pop in these lights some do yet another brush this time going for
the highlights so you know toss it in there not too much and we want this kind
of wire to shine a little so yeah let’s see how it looks
okay these lights are a little bit too bright so we don’t want that we want
them bright but not too bright and this is basically what you’re doing you’re
gonna paint your picture you know how you see it how you want it this is the
way I envisioned it and actually I envisioned this being a little bit more
but not too much so I’m going to do yet another brush so this is all a process
you know see let’s try 20 okay looks much better so
I’m just adding highlights to places that should have highlights you know
kind of where all this little white sparkle okay that’s good now I don’t
like them being this saturated so I’m gonna actually reduce the saturation a
little bit with you guessed it another brush yeah we don’t want them to look
like tomatoes and like I said there’s no set numbers
to this I mean you do this the way you want to do it and I really really want
to see the top over here because that’s like the main thing for me so the
brushes are not doing it time to increase the exposure a little bit and
some contrast do we have contrast yeah yeah so I’m liking that much better
already you know it’s good but I don’t want the lights to be too bright either
so there you go you have a noealz style photo and I hope you guys are enjoying
this these kinds of tutorials and videos please be sure to subscribe and follow
me on Instagram and if you have any questions or if you want to share your
photo with me be sure to tag me I’ll check it out for sure and I’ll see you
around you