Photography tips – Steps to becoming a happy photographer

Photography tips – Steps to becoming a happy photographer


– What is up, guys. Welcome to my YouTube channel, where we talk all things photography. I’m up, right and breezy, this morning, We’re down by Tara Hill,
and I’m gonna shoot some cityscapes, to see how we get on. Hold on, this isn’t what
my YouTube channel’s about. I’ve been trying to force
the issue, this morning. It’s a kind of proven model. YouTuber, photographer,
B-roll, this and that’s that, but I don’t enjoy shooting cityscapes. I’m just kinda forcing myself to do something that I don’t enjoy,
because I see others do it. So on that note, let’s get into the video. (classy downtempo music) So this morning, I went
out to try and shoot some cityscapes, and
that’s normally what I do. I do what YouTubers who do that, and who have big
audiences, and I am trying to grow my YouTube channel, so I felt this pressure to go out
and try and recreate that. I live in London, there’s
some great buildings, the sun hadn’t risen, it
was a perfect opportunity. But the more I walked around, the more I felt this pressure on my shoulders, and it really reminded me of this pressure that I used to feel when I first took up photography, when I was in college, and they gave me a camera, and I had to go out and take
pictures around the street. I felt so self-conscious, this was almost before mobile phones had cameras on them, this was 10 years ago, so
no one was really using ’em, but I felt so self-conscious
with that camera. I had in my head this idea that, wherever I’m pointing the camera to, someone’s gonna stand
behind me and look at it, and just think, that’s a shit
photo, why are you doing that? That’s kind of rubbish, you’re
not a good photographer, so you’re wasting your time
(multiple voices talking). Now, this is when I just
picked up a camera in college. And actually, on that note, I didn’t pick up a camera again, ’til sort of midway through uni, which was three years later. So I started to feel
this pressure on myself, this morning, to do something, and I’ve not felt that in awhile. I shoot stuff out on
location all the time, whether that’s people
running through the streets, or any sort of fitness
thing, or in central London, or in cities, or outside, and
I do enjoy taking landscapes. But landscapes, not cityscapes. And yeah, I just started
to feel this real pressure on myself, to the point where I just put my camera away, and thought,
I’m not gonna do this. But what it did do was inspire me to make this video,
because there’s one thing that I want to cover a bit more of, on my video, and that’s the mindset of photography, as well as giving tips and tricks on how to use your camera, and how you use Photoshop,
and Capture One. I want this channel to bring
value in a different way. There’s plenty of other
channels, tutorial channels, out there, but I think, especially if you wanna be self-employed, especially if you wanna do photography, or anything art-based, freelance, as your own business, there’s a lot of pressures and stuff
that come with that, and I can only speak to
what I’ve experienced. But hopefully, it can
kinda reassure people who are going through the same thing, that they’re not alone, and
it can maybe warn people just beginning their adventure as a self-employed photographer, it can maybe kind of warn you
of the potential pitfalls, and stuff, that you might come across. Really, that’s something
that’s kind of dogged me for the whole time, since I’ve lived in London, really, the
last sort of six years. I’ve always felt pressure from myself, to the point, upon viewing others, that I need to be shooting certain things. And authenticity is what
people can relate to, so in the end, I put my camera away, and that kinda brings
me onto my first point, about caring about what
other people think. I’m not shooting photographs
for the sake of others. Really, you have to find something that is genuinely you, and then
it will become much easier. So something I’ve found,
in the last two years, is, I’m really honed in on,
is sport, and athletes, and the athletic lifestyles,
and storytelling. So whether that’s
getting across the effort that someone’s putting in, in a workout, or the process that it
takes to make a product. So really, my first point to becoming a happier photographer
would be, assess yourself. You can do that in a few, various ways. One of them would be
what I just said, there, make sure you’re shooting
stuff that you enjoy, that you are about, that
you’re enthusiastic about. Shoot stuff that you enjoy doing, and not stuff that you think
you should be shooting. And that’s really easy
to get caught up in that. I’ve got caught up in
that plenty times, myself. Yeah, you can get nice photographs, but is your heart really in it? That’s really what you
have to be questioning yourself about, and if
it’s not, don’t do it, and don’t worry about the interest, that may or may not be there,
in your chosen subject. If you really like shooting plants, or any ass random thing, then don’t worry. Just shoot it, because
ultimately, the happiness is your number one goal, and that’s
what you have to focus on. Just shoot in what you enjoy. Wow, that was a ramble, jeez. In assessing yourself, take real stock of what you’re consuming. I can’t remember what YouTube channel it was, or what I was
watching the other day, or who it was I was listening to, but they said, when
you’re scrolling through your Instagram, if an
account isn’t filling you with warmth, or
bringing something valuable to your life, then click Unfollow. And I am so guilty of this. I follow so many different photographers, and originally, I thought I
was getting into operation, the people, either in
the same field as me, or more successful than me, or, I would scroll through Instagram, and all you see is a
congregation, an aggregation, of everyone else’s work. So you scroll through Instagram, and it gives you this false impression that everyone is super busy, every day, shooting stuff, and if you’re freelance, and you’re not busy every day, it’s really easy to get dragged
down by that, being like, oh, hey, I’m not working enough. I’m not doing enough, look at
all these people doing work. Whereas actually, that
guy who just posted that, it’s the first thing
he’s posted in a month. He’s going through this, or she’s going through the same struggles as you, and be brutal, and don’t
worry about offending people, but really kind of have a bit
of a cull, on your Instagram, and really only follow
things that, follow accounts that are bringing you value, and making you feel good about yourself. So that would be my point,
just follow accounts that make you feel good,
and not the accounts that you maybe feel that you have to. I’m only speaking from experience. So for example, shooting sport, and being around athletes, makes me happy, but like I mentioned earlier, I felt like I needed to shoot fashion, because I was surrounded
by people in fashion when I was working at studios,
and for other photographers. So I felt like, ah, this
is the way it needs to go. I know I really love doing this stuff, but everyone else kinda says I should go this way, so I’ll go that way. So try and realize what it
is that makes you happy, what it is that makes you happy shooting, and don’t worry about
other people’s opinions, or whether you feel there’s
a market there, or not. There is always a market for something. Your happiness is your own responsibility, and once you take ownership of that, you start putting into place the actions which will bring about your own happiness, and others around you will
start to feel the benefits. So I guess what I’m trying
to say is, regardless of what you may or may not think you should or should not be shooting, if it makes you happy, just do it. And that might be simple advice, it might be a bit cliche,
but it’s the best thing that I’ve been trying to get through to my head in the last 12 to 24 months. This has been a really
difficult video for me to make. I hope it’s kinda got my point across, or they’re not points,
they’re just thoughts on things that I’ve encountered recently, chains of thoughts, ways of thinking, and the kinda mechanisms that I’ve tried to put in place, that
help you kinda navigate your way through life, as a photographer, or a freelancer, because it’s not easy. It’s difficult, especially without wanting to sound too cliche, but especially with the ever-apparent pressures of the Internet, whether
that’s social media, or otherwise, everyone else’s success and failures are kind
of put on a platform. And it’s very difficult to watch everyone else’s success,
even successes, even though everyone goes through the same struggles. And it also kind of makes
you wanna hide away, ’cause you don’t want
people to see your failures. But hopefully, with some of the things that I’ve explained, and gone through, and talked about, here,
in this video, you can at least find way of shooting
things that make you happy. And ultimately, if you’re shooting happy, you’re gonna shoot more,
and you’ve got more chance of successes, unlike my speech today. It’s been horrendous. That was a bit of a ramble, today. I hope it brought some value to you guys. I’m trying to implement more videos of this style into my YouTube. Ultimately, I want my
YouTube to be a reflection of what I think, and
go through, in my life, so whether that’s, say,
behind-the-scenes videos, photography tips or tricks, or methods of thinking, and
practices that you can put in place, to ultimately
help you be a better, but more importantly,
happier, photographer. Thanks for watching, guys, and
I’ll see you in the next one. (introspective music)

Part 2 of 7: Steve Thornton and his very personal style of lighting

Part 2 of 7: Steve Thornton and his very personal style of lighting


and none of that worked he was unusable light basically unless you want to shoot something gray with with no details whatsoever just the shadows was blocked up it was just it was just horrible especially dealing people who are going to move so you can’t use long shutter speeds so when I went to start using the strobes we had an assistant hold a reflector up and we attached the arm that some bounce now makes and I put a strobe head on it there’s a battery power stroke and we just adjusted to power up and down a little bit until it overpowered the light that was shooting into I was actually shooting into the Sun or where the Sun should have been he was brighter than we were had but i had to overpower that so i was running about f8 and i was using about 12 was seconds of power to get them and it overpowered the sun and you really came up with a stupendous image sorry the one good thing about yesterday morning as I learned a new trick Peter yes thank you yeah what I thought was I wish I had a lot earlier the Sun had been up for 45 minutes and the clouds were solid there was no edge the light it was gray it was ugly this is a commercial job i’m shooting for a client and i’m spending thousands of dollars every few minutes the very good people of California Sun bounce dragged out something that I’ve never seen before something that allow me to attach a strobe head to any of the reflectors and put like where it did not exist before it’s very controllable it’s incredibly lightweight if you use a portable flash or battery-powered flash you can have an assistant walk wherever the models going or moving on a little bit or move out a little bit and quite honestly for that portion to shoot it probably saved my keister because it was new I could do nothing absolutely nothing at all I’m thinking you’re right I look at every project as an individual there are some clients want me to do the same thing over and over and I try not to do that clients come to me for a photograph but I don’t give this photograph I give them my vision of the photograph my perspective on what I think that client is going to need to grow and to make money so as a result when I do is I will maybe follow the storyboard makes all the layouts they have and shoot that they now almost always go and shoot what I want the way I would have shot it before they even open their mouth I work very hard on locations locations are one of the teams I take the time to scout locations of the project I just finished up I’ve spent three days scouting and doing prep work finding out where I needed to be in what needed to be there in terms of elements whether it was just models or models and horses or models and horses and cowboys and longhorns at sunrise at sunset I spent a lot of time finessing every image I’ve already got in my mind what the photographs going to look like before I shoot it because I know the player is going to be brought to the shoot I know what the lights going to do I know what the location is going to give me I know what my wardrobe

Photography Tips: How dedicated to photography are you?

Photography Tips: How dedicated to photography are you?


a couple weeks ago I was sent a
question by a lovely guy calledf peter and he asked me, hi Mike does it happen with photography like music, that you could be a professional and/or great
photographer if you start at an early age? does age matter when it comes to
becoming an excellent photographer? Well the thing is, how much do you want to become an excellent photographer, is it
something you want to do or is it something you’re going to do? But what’s the difference? well I’ve been running my photography
business for a long time and many years ago I chose to turn my
hobby which was photography into my income and that’s a whole other
story but part of that was I wanted to be able to travel and to see
some of the wrold to sort of experience some of the amazing things that go on out there in the world, but it was always something
I’d like to do and time passed and the business started to grow and i was having a good time, i didn’t have to work terribly hard to cover my expenses and i could play on my motor bike and then last year something happened, my brilliant, awesome, inspiring, funny and witty incredible mum died last september, and it was very devastating despite the
fact I knew it was coming but something in me changed then. I kinda realized how old i was, i kinda realized that hey you’re in your fifties now and you’ve always wanted to go off and see some more of the world but that’s all it was, i wanted to. When my mum died it changed from i want to, to I’m going to, you may have already
seen there’s some workshops starting to appear in other countries and many of you
wonderful people have been inviting me to come in your country, but it’s because i got committed I got dedicated to doing whatever it
takes to make that happen, now whether that’s in what sort of photo’s you’re taking or wanna take, you wanna take great amazing pictures well you need to become dedicated to
doing it and that means giving yourself the time
it means dedicating time to doing it not sort of saying ok, i’ve watched all these videos on youtube that mike does or serge does or many of the othere awesome photographers put out there into the world, or going on courses, you have to become dedictated to giving yourself time to go and put
into action the things that you’ve been taught about.
last year I was teaching at a local nights school, i was just teaching an adult education to a bunch of people who were all paying a fairly reasonable fee to come on a photography course, and it was for the college it wasn’t me doing it at the college , i was employed by the college to do it for a short time. But something which really amazed me was that i would give poeple some homework to do which was assosiated with the leson which we just done and then the following week quite a large percentage of people would say I didn’t have time this week or I could see that they had sort of
come home and they maybe had half an hour before they jump in the car because they had to go and they sort of done their homewo because mike would grizzle at them. Well i don’t mind if they do their homework or not, and i don’t mind if you guys did the homework or not, i don’t mind what you do so long as you’re happy, but here’s the key if you want to take excellent photographs well or maybe become a professional photographer you’ve gotta do the homework, you’ve gotta put in the hours, you’ve gotta dedicate some time to doing stuff you have to get out there
and practice and get experience now when I say
dedicate and put time into it you know what time you can dedicate to it I mean when I dedicated time to becoming a
professional photographer I did it in a slightly unusual way as in I went on income support I told my
local a employment services office what i was
doing because i didn’t want ant trouble i wasn’t gonna sort of like try and defraud anyone and they were amazingly helpful, they gave me access to various courses and
training so I spent a year not working and everyday i was reading books i was practising, i was going out there i was taking pictures, wondering why it didn’t work and then trying something else until eventually I got to a point where
I could take pictures that people would pay me money for, and that was an amazing feeling but it’s within the dedication so whatever that may look like for you now that could be maybe an hour a week
because I know normal people they have jobs to go to every day they have to pay
their mortgage they have to pay their rent, their electricity bills and all that
kinda stuff. They’ve possibly gots kids and they’re mega expensive things to own aren’t they. So you’ve got calls on your time already but in order to get the experience that’s needed for you to take the excellent photographs or to become a
professional photographer that any of you guys not just peter you do have to dedicate some of your time in order to do the exercises to practice
stuff so that you get the experience because
photography’s experiential learning most things in life are you have to
experience it and get experience so that you know what
to do in a given situation much as I would love to be able to put
my hand up here and a clip unplug knowledge and then insert into your head for you for a
fee of course then it would be awesome but i cant do that wouldn’t that be easy I wouldn’t
have to webmaster the site, i wouldn’t have to keep thinking up new ideas for
films and shooting stuff and having lorna stand out in the cold and rain and all that kinda stuff while
we’re making films the thing is it’s a dedication thing so what
ever that may be for you I would suggest it’s a case of go on a
training course if you know you’re going on a training course, book some time into the diary the next day so that you can go and practice whatever it was because if you put it off and think oh we’re going on holiday i a couple of weeks in a couple of weeks time you would have forgotten all about it. It would have just kinda vanished into thin air like scotched mist. if you watch a video on YouTube, one of my videos make some notes maybe? go outside and then practice that and kep practising. dedicate time to it until you have your
head around that particular technique or building block as i like to call
them, there’s a whole new course on that coming fairly soon. Because that’s where you’re gonna get the knowledge you need to be fulfilled as a photographer and
become excellent and/or professional.subscribe to our
YouTube channel to be notified each time we upload one all cool
photography videos orfor more great photo tips workshops
and training come and see us at our website photographycourses.biz

THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE UPGRADING YOUR CAMERA | PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS HINDI

THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE UPGRADING YOUR CAMERA | PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS HINDI


Have you ever thought that the camera that you own is probably outdated? Probably its time for a new camera I hope I had that expensive, beautiful camera but then with the budget constraint I am unable to buy that… 🙁 If you own a camera already, is it the right time to upgrade? is there a need to buy a new camera , right now? Do you feel you will improve on your work with your new camera? Lets discuss on that..! 🙂 Firstly, let me tell you I was very confused if I should make videos in English or Hindi then, I created a poll and based on the result of the poll I have planned to make videos in Hindi, but you may find me speaking in English.. here n there… Coming back to the topic, let me share with you.. until some days back…. I have been thinking about upgrading my current DSLR to something really new and expensive one.. like.. Canon 1DX M2 OR Sony A7RIII with which I could make more beautiful pictures and videos with them….!! I used to get these thoughts consistently so, i thought that I need to have very strong reasons to either BUY them OR drop my plans of upgrading….!! So, when I thought of upgrading , they were technical advantages of the new Camera…. but when I thought about it logically I felt, probably its not the time for me and then I decided NOT to… Now let me share the reasons why it was not necessary for me to upgrade and I feel these reasons are going to help you as well to decide for yourself if you indeed need an upgrade..and eventually you may cancel your plans …. Why I thought about this….. I figured out there were so many things in my own Camera that I did not know very well… the reason could be that, I have not yet completely exploited my Camera..!! and even before I exploit my camera to the fullest, i am falling for new and expensive ones… So, the thought of going for a new camera is not great… My 2nd question was have I applied all possible techniques and skills in my genre of photography and then decide that the only thing to pending is to buy a new advanced camera? there are many things actually that I can do with this camera..! 3rd important question was … its a general tendency to think about a new camera for getting good quality photos…. but is there anything SPECIFIC that I am missing out on this camera, related to my interest/ work which I see in the new one? I had a 500D canon DSLR camera I had upgraded it to 5D M3 5D M3 was so important for me because I was into wedding photography…. I desperately needed a full frame camera specially to exploit my wide angle lens. I also needed a Camera with 2 card slots obviously because I did not want to change cards during an event and miss out on any important moments.. 5D was the only camera that was having 2 card slots those days… I rented 5D for around 10 weddings I really liked it ad I thought I should buy… So, even you need to think if there are any SPECIFIC TRIGGER POINTS which is compelling you to upgrade If the answers to all the 3 questions are ‘YES’ then you can go ahead and get a new/ expensive Camera If not..! its high time that you start exploiting your current camera.. Let me tell you… when a beginner photographer looks at a picture clicked by me and asks me ..” which camera? actually the question is wrong the question is irritating and invalid if the questions would have been could you let me know the settings…. which time of the day you did this shoot? whats lens did you use to get these result? All these are important questions…! In fact DSLR body’s contribution is negligible… except for clicking the picture and saving it to your memory card..! this can be done by any DSLR…. Yes, we can differences in ISO sensitivity, colour range and dynamic range… but its very negligible…. Potato jet- is a youtube channel, this guy is a film maker… he has compared Canon 80D , a mid range DSLR with ARRI ALEXA a Hollywood film making camera… If we look for differences we don’t find much.. Of course, we see differences … but nothing that can make a difference to you creativity …. the link for the video is in description, look for yourself….. One more important information…. Photographers find it difficult to handle flash after watching a lot of youtube videos, after a lot of trial and error, after experimenting in a lot of different lighting conditions…. I learnt how to use and so will you…. you will slowly understand the relationship between the flash power and shutter speed…. but without understanding the concept , if you just go for a high end flash for a better light… I can assure that you will not have it… the result will not be good…. So… expensive flash, expensive cameras, expensive accessories won’t help you… Then… What will? Its always about techniques, knowledge, skill and experience …. you need to develop this.. if you develop a skill today or understand a technique no better investment than that…… By using your knowledge and skills, you can even make beautiful photos out of a 7 year old camera… And … keep on thing in mind… Best camera is the one … on which you have maximum expertise.. And even big budget Hollywood films have used cameras like 5D M2 and 5D M3 in many of their sequences If a 1 – 1.5Lkh camera can replace 5+ lakh body…. then we can definitely use our old, existing heap cameras to make very beautiful pictures.. Parker walbek – one of my fav youtuber he shows in his video how a simple room can look cinematic when recorded with a mid range simple camera.. this happens with experience and understanding of light….! the full video link is in the description… do have a look.. Today, I have shared enough instances/ examples, given you some reasons.. to give a second thought on buying a new camera body…. Do expensive cameras really make a difference well, we will see a difference… but very little…. Major difference is made by your knowledge, technique, skill and experience … rather than thinking I wish I had an expensive camera…. Please give a thumbs up and let me know if you have liked this video… 🙂

Toronto Wedding Photographer –  Collective67 –  Wedding Photography Toronto

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Landscape Photography – A beginner’s guide to woodland

Landscape Photography – A beginner’s guide to woodland


If you’re interested in woodland
photography and you’ve always struggled on how to compose your images within
the woods and the forests, this is the video for you. My name is Julian Elliott
and I am a professional landscape and travel photographer. If you want to keep
up with my exploits as a professional landscape and travel photographer make
sure you click on the subscribe button just down there The absolute first step when it comes to
woodland photography is to go to somewhere that you know and that you can
practice. Why? Because you know it. And if you’re familiar with your surroundings,
like this woodland here which is about five minutes drive from where I live in
France, then you’re going to be able to create more successful images from that
particular area and also you’ll get to know the intricacies of this particular
woodland. So for me for example I know when it rains heavily where I’m stood
floods. I’ve had images, I think it was back in April or so, whereby this
whole area was flooded I had a really nice sunny day with blue sky white
fluffy clouds and I was able to get the reflections all in this woodland plus
the reflections of all the tree stumps here. So that is the first step to
creating your successful images within woodland. Get to know one of your local
areas. The next step to think about when
creating your woodland images is the light and the quality of the light.
Woodland is great in that it works both in flat light and also sunny light and
also when you have that low mist and there is the sun breaking through the
mist in the early morning creating those really nice ethereal looking images.
Absolutely wonderful soft light in the morning. You can’t beat it. So as I said
it works great in flat light. Today we have flat light. It’s a very overcast day,
there’s no long shadows anywhere and it pretty much works as you will see, not
necessarily here, but certainly in the next location
that we’ll be working on further on into the video.So that’s the next step you
must think about is light and the quality of the light in your woodland. Once you’ve got to know your local
woodland, and you’ve thought about the quality of the light that you want in
that woodland, the next step to think about is lens choice. Obviously we have
wide-angle; 50mm; short telephoto and long telephoto. Each of those
lenses will work in a particular area of woodland. Wide-angle, for example, is great
if you’ve got some foreground interest. We don’t really have any foreground
interest in this particular woodland so the next step up is to think about is it
somewhere around 35 or 50 millimeters that we’re going to work in. Here, because I
visit it very often, I know that around 50 mil and above works. Why? Because it
helps to compress a lot of the trees together and create a very nice
composition. Telephoto it kind of works in here but it brings things maybe too
close. So here, for example, I’m always thinking it’s around 50 to 70
millimeters. So 50 millimeters how our eyes see and then 70 millimeters so it starts
to compress things just a little but not too much. But what I’m going to do is I’m
going to take a picture.The same picture, the same composition and show you why
each of them does and doesn’t work so you can see what it is that I’m talking
about here in this particular woodland. I’ve set up my camera and I’ve put on a
zoom lens which is 28 millimeters to 70 millimeters and that’s because it gives
me most of the focal lengths that I would use in this particular woodland
specifically for me 50 millimeters and 70 millimeters. At the moment it’s set at
28 and you can see it’s it’s okay is probably maybe a little bit too wide. But
what I’ve done is I put this central trunk here in the middle this is what I
really want to focus on and you can see on the third’s here there is actually a
trunk and a trunk as well and the foreground is maybe just off the bottom
of the third and going toward the middle but not quite. But it’s just too wide and
especially on a day like today there’s nothing in the sky and it’s just white
and it’s going to be blown out so that’s 28 millimeters wide angle and that for
me is why this particular scene doesn’t work at wide-angle. If I turn live view back on again and I
go into 50 millimeters you will see, if I slightly adjust my composition just a
little bit, just around here that things start to become more compressed these
trunks in the background are becoming more prominent whereas they were quite
far away because of the wide angle of the lens so they’re starting to become a
lot more compressed into the scene and it’s how we see it with our eyes as our
eyes see around 50 millimeters focal length. So you can see there on the 3rd
we’ve got these trunks here so they’re starting to come in nicely. The
foreground is dropping down just a touch we’re losing the sky so when losing the
emphasis on what’s going to be an overexposed sky. Things are starting to
look that lot nicer. Let’s go in just a little bit more so if I go to roughly
here, and what I’m doing if I just turn live you back on, I’m paying very close
attention to these corners here. So this here this branch, this trunk here is
frustrating for me so I’m zooming in just to remove it from the frame then
I’m going to push this down just a little bit and then what you’ll see is that we
have an image that’s starting to look a lot more composed and a lot more
organized and we’re starting to see the wood for the trees so if I take that
image then you’ll see the difference between this image and the wide-angle
image and how using 50 millimetres and longer in the woodland can help
emphasize those tree trunks. Bring things closer together. Compress them and help
to create a more balanced image. As I said, you can use wide-angle but I think
you’ll find a lot of the time you’re probably working 35 millimetres and up
where you’re starting to get more of an emphasis on bringing things together and
creating a more balanced image. For the composition of our images it’s
good to start somewhere like this and the reason is because it’s an orderly
wood. It’s actually a man-made wood everything’s been planted in an orderly
fashion and so you can work things out a lot quicker than if you were to go in
just to a woodland, in your local woodland that’s been there for hundreds
of years. Because everything’s planted we can start to find compositions a lot
easier and then we can take that knowledge and transport it into a normal
woodland that’s been there for hundreds of years and it’s just a tangle of branches,
trees, trunks and whatever else. So I’ll just
explain some of the compositions that you can do here in this particular type
of woodland so you can get an idea how we’re going to transport it back
into a proper woodland and that’s been there for a few hundred years or. So this
is the first type of composition that you could do in this managed woodland.
You can use the avenue here and here to create a line of interest going in and
in to go back towards here. The only slight problem with this is there isn’t
really anything back here to create any interest. There is some moss or something
up there in the tree I think it might be mistletoe back there it’s lying on that
third. Detail-wise what I am looking at, and I might do in a bit, is just here
there’s a huge mushroom which I might go and take a shot of. It looks quite
interesting. But that’s the kind of first kind of composition that you could do
here in this managed woodland. This is another example of a composition
that you could do here in this managed woodland. It’s similarish to when i was
demonstrating the focal length in that the tree trunk is in the middle and
other things start dropping in behind it. However this time the grass is more
along the top third but it’s another example of something
that you could do here in this managed woodland when you’re starting to see the
wood for the trees. Hopefully you’ve seen in this managed
woodland how I started to create compositional elements to be able to
bring some kind of order into a final image. So what I’m going to do from here
is decamp into an ancient woodland and we’re going
to see how we can manage that and bring some kind of order to the chaos of an
ancient woodland. So we’ve swapped managed woodland for chaos. Ancient woodland. Where do you look? Well if you take some of those elements of composition like
the rule of thirds or like the managed woodland where we placed the tree trunk
in the middle. If you start to look around and start positioning yourself;
the tree trunk here or here and just move so when you move here you’ll see
behind in the background that the other tree’s move. Try to position things in
such a way that you order the chaos of this ancient woodland. So I’ve found
something it’s taken me about 15 minutes or so just wandering around in here just
to have a look see what it is that I could find and I’ve started to pick
things up. I’ve never actually walked in this woodland. I’ve driven past it many
times. It’s only five minutes from my house. But I’m taking the time today just to have a look; see what’s here and see what
I can do with the chaos of this ancient woodland. As a first composition and the
first time here this is something that I’ve found just wandering around as I
said to see what it is that I could come up with. So I’ve placed this tree here not
it’s kind of on the third but not really is actually off the third itself and
then I’ve placed the foreground so it’s just up shy of the middle and then
there’s a color here and the background from all the autumn leaves. As well as
that I’ve started to try and make some sense of the background. So I’ve used a
corner up here for one of the branches that’s going off and up here as well. It
could possibly be just adjusted slightly there and the very simple reason is so
I’ve got this branch going up in this corner here and also here I’m creating
some separation which I didn’t have before. So that it’s not just a tree trunk in the corner here there’s actually some
color going here so you’ve got these bands of color and the tree trunks
themselves. Down here you have this new tree that’s growing up which is creating
interest on the third. So that’s the first composition that I’ve done here. I’ll
just take a snap and then you can see when the image pops up in a minute how
that looked when we were here in this part of the woodland. Let’s move on to
something else and to show you how to bring more order to the chaos that you
see in front of you. There’s two more elements that I want to
add into composition within your image. The first is leading lines and as you
can see that’s running through me there’s this path that’s probably just
been created by animals such as deer and boar that we get here in central France.
They’ve created a pathway through the woodland. And that is another
compositional element that you can add in. Leading lines will always take your
viewer from the edge and bring them into the image let them look around and let
them explore. The next thing that I want to talk about and it’s extremely
important in woodland is the polarizing filter. And what that does is it
removes any glare from the leaves so yesterday it was raining a lot here so
there’s a lot of water on the ground. A lot of water on the leaves in the trees.
That polarizer filter is going to cut through the glare and be able to add
in more saturation to the image. So I will just show you what it is that I’ve
set up at the moment to give you an idea of how it is that I’m looking at this
scene and what you might be able to take away from it and be able to put into
your own images. This is the image that I’ve set up. I saw this path here while I
was walking along the main path. It’s not the main path obviously as I said it
looks like it’s been made by animals as it’s indistinct but it’s distinct enough
to give us an idea of a compositional element. And as you can see I’ve started to
arrange things here so this tree here the trunk is on the bottom third then
which is going out and then up to the top. I’ve cut out a lot of the sky as
it’s distracting and I’ve just started to arrange everything else so I’ve made
sure that there’s no trunks that are intruding on the edges here of the frame
and there’s no unwanted elements there at the top. So that for me, it starts to
create some order again out of the chaos that we have here in the woodland and
also as I said there’s a polarizer on the front which is taking the glare away
from the water that’s on the leaves that was from the fallen rain
yesterday so that’s helping to saturate the image a lot more than it is. So I’ll
take it a photo with the polarizer and without the polarizer so
you can see the difference and why it is that you should actually make sure you
have that polarizer with you and that it’s not just for those blue sky days. For this last sequence on woodland
photography, I want to use a blue sky day combined with the color in the trees to
help enhance the composition because very often all we hear about is the rule
of thirds; leading lines and s-curves. All these kind of things in composition.But
we never really hear about color. So if you look at a color wheel you’ll see
that yellow and blue are near to one another on the color wheel
thus they complement one another in any composition that you might
choose to use them in. The other thing that I’m going to do is I’ve changed my
lens to a wide-angle lens. So here I’ve got a Canon 17-40 millimeter lens. So
very, very wide angle of view. And when I look up, which is the last thing
that I want to do, it’s actually going to help the trees loom in above me while
looking up at the blue sky and the golden colors of the yellow leaves up
there. All the autumn color. So let’s take a shot and then see what it is that I’m
doing with that shot. So what am i doing when I’m looking up at those trees
trying to get an image that pleases me? Well the first thing that I do is I put
my camera in aperture priority and that’s very simple. The only reason I’m
doing that is just to take a few things off my mind what I’m composing my image
handheld. And in aperture priority I’m then adding in around one stop of
exposure compensation just to open things up a bit. The 6D has enough
exposure latitude that I know it will give me what I want for around
two-thirds of a stop or a stop over the the middle point on your exposure meter.
The next thing that I’m doing is I’m enabling the back button focusing on my
camera so that when I’m looking up my thumb is doing the focusing so I press
where I want to in the image to focus the camera and then when I’ve got what I
want my index finger then clicks the shutter to get the composition that I
want. So that’s it for this tutorial on
woodland photography. Hopefully you’ve picked up a few things here and there
and see how I finely compose some of my other images although it’s done in
woodland it might give you an idea as to how to really look at what it is that
you’re doing when you’re composing your images on the back of your camera. Will
there be more tutorials? There will be more tutorials! There’s going to be a
tutorial on a 10 stop ND filter very soon. As well as a few others so
make sure you click the subscribe button down there in the bottom right hand
corner and you’ll get notification whenever it is that I upload any videos.
So thanks very much for to all of my subscribers. See you again soon!

Types Of Photography Styles | Which is Right for Your WEDDING?

Types Of Photography Styles | Which is Right for Your WEDDING?


– Are you newly engaged and you have no clue how to even start picking the right photographer for you? Today in this four part series, we’re gonna share with you, how to figure that out. And today, I’m gonna share with you, how to determine what type
of shooting style you like. My name is Meredith Ryncarz, and I’m a wedding and a
portrait photographer, and on this channel, we help brides get tips for a
more stress-free wedding day, and photographers to give
a better client experience. Photographers, there’s so many types of photographers out there. And as a bride, I’m sure you
are pulling your hair out trying to figure out what you need to do to pick the right one. Today, I want you just to focus on the type of shooting style, the type of photography that you like. The shooting style is the first thing that you need to consider. There are three types. There is Photojournalistic, Posed, and Hybrid. Photojournalistic means
that your photographer is literally going to
follow throughout the day without instructing or
directing any part of your day. It’s really rare to find
a truly Photojournalistic, a hundred percent
Photojournalistic photographer. Because there are parts
of the day that just, they need to be directed. But if that’s the style that you like, then that is the type of
word you need to look for when you’re searching
for that photographer. Photojournalistic. No direction on the
wedding day whatsoever. The second is Posed. This is a more traditional style, where every part of the day is directed. Everything is posed and manufactured and put in the right place. Every swoop of the dress is perfect. There’s no wrinkles in it and it looks like something that a portrait master would have created. The third style is called Hybrid. It marries the two of the styles, the Photojournalistic and the Posed, really beautifully, in a way that the photographer that is a hybrid of this will step back for
Photojournalistic moments and know not to instruct or mess with the authenticity of the day. When more posed pictures need to happen, they’ll step back in to directing
that portion of the day. Now personally, our favorite
is the Hybrid model, because it allows for the
most authenticity on your day, while still giving you
beautifully directed portraits that feel like they
were naturally composed without being contrived or too fake. So, for the next consideration when trying to determine what type of
style of photography you like, is the Editing Style. Now for each of these we’re
gonna have a picture pop up, so that you can kinda see
a visual representation of what these mean. The first is True To Color. That means that if you picked a lime green dress for your bridesmaids, it is gonna show up as a lime green dress in your wedding pictures. It won’t turn out to be gray,
or purple, or anything else. It’s gonna be true to the colors, the authentic colors of your day. The next is Light and Airy. A Light and Airy
photographer will typically have more brighter whites. There will be less contrast, less detail. So imagine your grandmother’s
lace wedding dress. A Light and Airy photographer will have a beautiful, creamy
background that’s bright, but that lace on your
grandmother’s wedding dress may not be as detailed or
have the light and shadows, the contrast in it that you’d like to see. And that, of course, is
dependent on the style that you, as a bride, really love. The next one is Oversaturated. Now, we talked about that lime green bridesmaid’s dress earlier. But let’s say you picked a sage green bridesmaid’s dress instead, and an Oversaturated style of editing will actually take that sage dress and turn it into lime green instead, making it really, really bright. That’s neither wrong nor right, it’s just a style, and it’s something that
you need to determine whether you like as a bride or not. And the last one is Dark and Moody. A Dark and Moody style
of editing will mean that the shadows are much more pronounced. That there’s a lot more
contrast in the images. And this, of course, can lend itself to a very beautiful edit. But again it goes back
to what is the style of editing that you as
the bride likes to see. The last consideration
that you need to look at when it comes to style of photography is Lighting. Now I’m not gonna get
overly technical here. I want to keep it really simple and easy to understand. And we’re gonna have pictures
to show you up above, so that you can again see
what we’re talking about. So Natural Light photography is a term that gets thrown around a lot. Natural Light photography
just simply means that you’re using the available
light that is around you to create and craft an image. Now the problem with
Natural Light photography, strictly only natural light, is that if it rains on your wedding day, or, if you have a beautiful venue that has no windows to it, a Natural Light photographer
is going to struggle because there is no available good light. And so, the second type of lighting style is Off Camera Flash. Now most wedding photographers are not strictly straight Off Camera Flash. They will use a mixture of both, but when it comes to Off Camera, that means that they’re
gonna be poles set up with lights that flash throughout the day. And you have to decide
if that’s something that you as a bride want to have. The third style is a hybrid style. And that hybrid style simply means that when good, natural,
available light is there that the photographer will use that instead of using Off Camera Flash. Versus, that hybrid photographer will know when there is no available light, or the light is really bad, that they’re gonna be able to go ahead and make that choice, as an artist, to bring in that flash photography, to give you the most
consistent and beautiful images throughout your day. If this has helped you,
I want to make sure that you don’t miss out on any other tips. Hit our playlist. We’ve got more videos for you. And if you’d like to see more, we have bridal and wedding tips coming out every single week for you. So hit that subscribe
button and, of course, if you love the content in this video, leave us a comment below and let us know. Thank you so much for watching.

Model Testing | How To Build A Fashion Portfolio With Talent Agencies | PRO EDU Photography Tutorial

Model Testing | How To Build A Fashion Portfolio With Talent Agencies | PRO EDU Photography Tutorial


(upbeat music) – A model test is an
opportunity for a photographer and a model to build
their portfolios together. If you start in model testing, it’s gonna open doors in the
fashion photography field. The end result that needs to
happen in a great model test is that that model looks
their absolute best. When photographers fail at this, it’s not because they’re
bad photographers. It’s because they just don’t know what agencies and agency
represented models really need. In this tutorial, you’re gonna learn who to shoot and how to shoot them. I think we might do a hair and
makeup change at this point. Exactly. That arm can even like, yes. One foot bent that way, and
turn this foot this way. You’re gonna learn about
working with modeling agencies to shoot quality models. I love that ’cause that
lengthens your lengths, which your agents will love,
so bring that back out. Kick that foot. Good. You’re gonna see me shoot two
different types of models. We’re gonna take one model
that’s considered editorial. Go for it. Yes. And another model that’s
considered commercial. So let’s do that hand. Wrap it around your neck and then we’re gonna lean
in and gimme a little laugh. Perfect. Love that. We’re gonna use simple lighting, some natural light, some strobe. And then you’re gonna
open up your body to me as you come in here. Let’s try it. Perfect. Yes, perfect, good. And simple camera techniques. I love when I come lower with the model and they look like above me. It just exaggerates that. To get the quality that you want in as fast as possible time. Good. I think we’ve got that. With this tutorial, you’re gonna get my
Comprehensive Posing Guide. This is a great resource
to see what types of poses agencies are going to wanna see from a successful model test. Oh gosh, I love that! I’m gonna give you an
email template to send to modeling agencies. It’s gonna have the right
tone and the right language that’s gonna increase your success rate. My favorite thing that you’re gonna get from this tutorial is my
top secret packing list. It’s gonna make your
process so much easier, and it’s gonna give agencies
exactly what they want. Whether your goals are
to build a new portfolio, monetize model testing
or take that next step in your fashion photography career, these resources are foundational so that those things are easy,
seamless and quick for you.

How Photographer Peter Donaghy Went From Busing Tables To Snapping Shots of NGHTMRE

How Photographer Peter Donaghy Went From Busing Tables To Snapping Shots of NGHTMRE


When I moved to L.A., I didn’t know what the path was going to be. I just wanted to create. I just hit Craigslist every day. Starting out, you gotta run through the mud for a while. Then you can, like, step up to the next level. I work with different musicians, DJ’s, pop artists – Porter Robinson, Alison Wonderland, Nghtmr, Slander, Halsey. I’ve literally shot hundreds of festivals in the past couple of years; festivals in Japan, Ultra, Coachella, Glastonbury. Over a year, I might do multiple tours. Even in just this one month, I was in Texas for South-By. I was in South America for Lollapalooza. I have 40 pairs of underwear and 40 pairs of socks, so I can outlast anyone. I’m going to Miami with a couple of artists named Nghtmr and Slander. They have a party they’re going to do on a boat. One of the best things with working with bigger artists is, like, figuring out what their story is and their vibe is and then tell that in the best way. Most of the time, I like figuring out what their story is before I get there. There are so many moving parts that it’s really tough to get them all right. You make sure your batteries are charged, make sure your memory cards are clean, you make sure you have all your gear, you make sure all your screws are tight on the stabilizer. Keeping everything in the same bag helps. What sets anyone apart is the style that they cultivate. You can’t start at the top. I’d worked so many different jobs I really didn’t like. The first one that I got was filming a high school football team and then it just started evolving. After being out here for a handful of years, I bought vinyl with my photo on it, the cover Alison Wonderland’s first album just, like, holding it in my hand. It’s insane. I don’t think as an artist you’re ever fully satisfied. You’re not always ready to start working on the next thing. So, I’m going to keep going.

How Joan E. Biren Inspired a Movement by Photographing the Lesbian Community | Legendary | NowThis

How Joan E. Biren Inspired a Movement by Photographing the Lesbian Community | Legendary | NowThis


– They saw perversion where we see love. My camera was sort of a
barometer of what was happening. Black people or gay
people or disabled people, you want to be reflected. You want to see that you’re not alone. The more of us who are
out, the more safe it is. – This is Joan E. Biren. People strive to see
people like themselves. Representation in art and
media makes us feel real, less alone, seen, and like our feelings, are not something otherworldly or wrong. Joan E. Biren, known as JEB wasn’t seeing lesbians like
herself in any of the images of women circulating in the early ’70s, the height of the feminist movement. So, she decided to take
matters into her own hands. At a time when just the act of being out meant risking losing
your job and your family or even your children, JEB and her muses fearlessly documented authentic images of
lesbians showing the world the true story of the lesbian community. Now, decades after beginning this project that inspired a movement, JEB is installing
versions of her portraits in the windows of the Leslie-Lohman
Museum in New York City, reminding everyone who
might be feeling invisible, that they are never alone. I’m Javier Muñoz, and this
isn’t just our history, this is Legendary. – There were very, very few
images of lesbians at all, and most of them were what
I called faux lesbians. They were people
pretending to be lesbians. Most of those people were young, slim, blonde women, white women. The other kind of image was
that instead of romanticizing and making beautiful in exactly
the same way all lesbians, were the ones that turned them
into vampires and monsters, and were really kind of scary. I decided to make my own images of what I considered real lesbians and I didn’t know that many at the time. So, I borrowed a camera ’cause
I didn’t even have a camera. And I asked my lover to kiss me ’cause I really wanted
to see a kissing picture. And I held the camera out
and took a picture of us, and made an early selfie, before I even knew that
was going to be a thing. And here’s a larger version
of that very picture, my lover Sharon and I kissing. A large part of what I had to do was earn people’s trust because people did not want to be disowned by their families. They did not want to lose their jobs. They did not want to lose
custody of their children. They did not want to be
forced out of the country if they were here on
certain kinds of visas. So, there were all kinds of things that could happen to people if their photographs were
identified as them being lesbian. They were very brave and courageous. And, you know, you can’t do it if people aren’t willing to be out. It was a privilege for me to be able to make these
images of these brave women. My camera was sort of a
barometer of what was happening. As more people came out, more people were willing to
come in front of my camera. And as more of my images
went out into the community, more people saw that it
was safe to come out. Well, one of the things
that happened very early on in my making lesbian images was nobody wanted to buy them. So the way that I supported
myself as a lesbian photographer was to travel around the
country with a slide show, and everybody called it the dyke show. I liked this so I made a postcard of it that I made of myself in Dyke, Virginia. And people would buy the postcard and you know, people put
things up on their fridges, so one of the ways that
people came out to each other was they would go in someone’s house and see this on the fridge, and then they’d know they
found another lesbian. And then, suddenly, a right-winged, bigoted, anti-gay group, the Moral Majority wanted to buy them. So of course, I wasn’t
going to sell them my images so that they could fight
against our having our rights. I think they saw perversion
where we see love. (upbeat music) I’m very excited that in this year of the 50th anniversary of Stonewall, I’ve been invited to be
part of many other exhibits as well as the one at the Leslie-Lohman. One of the great things about
this windows installation is that it’s not just lesbians. It’s lesbians and gay
men, and trans people, and bisexuals and drag
queens, and everything. And I hope what it will do is inspire other people to be active because there are lots of threats to our liberties and our freedoms. And there are people that
would actually like to push us back in the closet. I may not be the one to get us there but I hope we reach the
goal of having all of us, including the most vulnerable
and most marginalized, represented in authentic
ways in mainstream media. One of the things that kept me going then, and that fills my heart now, are the people who write me or tell me how much my images meant to them. People tell me sometimes
that they saved their lives. People tell me that they made them feel like they could be creative. People tell me that they
were just somehow empowered by seeing these images, and it is the reason I made them, and it’s the best part.