How to Photograph a Shirt on a Ghost Mannequin

How to Photograph a Shirt on a Ghost Mannequin


We’re gonna have a look at styling a
shirt on a mannequin. This is a fairly simple process but there are
a few key things to look out for. With this we would like to see the back
of the neck so I can remove these two pieces. What I’m gonna do is start buttoning, and I’m
gonna leave the top one open because it’s quite a casual shirt. I’m gonna button evenly
all the way down even out the arms. Bring the shirt out front, tuck the sleave behind, what that does is just
reduces the creasing in that area. I might just add a little pin down here as
well just to keep this fastened. I wanna do the pin from behind just to keep it out of sight so we’re
not getting it in our final picture. I’m going to to make sure that
these cuffs stay out. I could add a little bit of tissue paper and
stuff them we could have them straight like this or we could fold them up like
this to show with more detail. Now to me it looks a little wide so
I’m gonna spin him around and I’m going to add a couple of clips – now when
you’re clipping it’s very important to stay symmetrical. Pull evenly, don’t pull too tight, that can change the
shape of the garment and add more creases. If we just fold gently here in the middle
of the shirt, add the clip. I’m gonna work my way down a little bit
further now add another clip Let’s have a look. It’s pulling in a little bit on this
side so I’m just going to loosen the clip on the back is just pull the
fabric out – looks good! We’er gonna do exactly the same process on the
back so we’re just going to rotate around Hopefully these clips haven’t added too much creasing
into the shirt but we may need to re- steam if they have. It’s looking a little bit wide now. Again I’m gonna turn it around, and exactly the same process
I’m just gonna pull in a little bit, clip, and down low as well. It’s a little more even now. Again, just tucking those creases in the side. Just going to bring that collar out a little bit,
and there’s our back shot. So some things to remember when photographing
a shirt on a mannequin. Make sure that you pin and
clip nice and evenly, don’t over tighten it to create creases
around front or back. Watch out for the area between
the arm and the body, you can tuck a lot of excess fabric in there
and get rid of some creases. Look out for the details
like the collar and cuffs with these With these hints in mind you should
come away with a really nice picture.

Abelardo Morell and the magic of the camera obscura


Works out that if you have a little opening in a dark room looking out through that opening an image of the world comes in upside down on the opposite wall It’s just a given It’s been around for, well since the beginning It’s the physics of optics That’s how all cameras work, except cameras use lenses My first camera obscura images were just openings, little holes, 3/8 inch, which gives you a kind of rough idea of how things look Eventually I started using lenses because I wanted them sharper Camera obscura images of houses across our street was actually the first one I made So I didn’t know exactly what to feel, except that I felt like some kind of inventor Like I had discovered photography again or something So it felt very new and thrilling And after this living room picture I made a bedroom picture It took a few days to work it out but our bedroom was covered with black plastic And our neighbors must have thought weird stuff about us, the satanic cult, living next to us or something Lisa and I would wake up in the morning and see this upside down world with squirrels walking across the walls It really was in the territory of dreams, It’s potent It’s very reminiscent of real magic It took me six months or so to figure out, how do I make an exposure And that’s what’s different about this work, that I actually made a picture inside a camera obscure It felt like there was a revelation of the process, like keeping magic while showing the trick at the same time The photographs of sun spots on the table were done in Umbria in Italy It’s covered with vines and olive trees So what we’re looking at, in fact, is sort of camera obscure In this case, it’s what happens when small openings are created by the crossing of branches or leaves, making small openings And then in the shade, which is sort of the dark space, what we’re seeing is the sun actually defining itself very clearly on the table Dapple sunlight is basically camera obscura naturally So that happens all the time Van Gogh has a great number of paintings where it’s just dapple sunlight and you can sort of see these circles So I want to make pictures about this natural occurrence in two cases I don’t know why I made two, but I think it makes sense to have one being raw, just the table, and then the pleasure of eating with a tablecloth Photography, like any other medium, can be an avenue to refreshen the world I don’t want to just repeat the same old news I’m always trying to figure out new ways to look at stuff And I think there’s some embedded sense of hope in that If you make the world interesting, if you make a paper bag look interesting, then the world is interesting And I think that’s not always the case in art, but I think for me that’s one of the agendas

SHARPEN IMAGES and REDUCE NOISE in Adobe LIGHTROOM. Tutorial for wildlife and nature photographers.

SHARPEN IMAGES and REDUCE NOISE in Adobe LIGHTROOM. Tutorial for wildlife and nature photographers.


Hi! My name is Charl. I am with Pangolin
Photo Safaris. Today I would like to talk to you about how I sharpen my images
and do my noise reduction in Lightroom. If you like our content, please don’t
forget to subscribe, and press the bell button to be notified about our next video. Okay, so let’s get started… I’ve selected this beautiful young leopard
I took in Botswana. So I am going to just indicate
how I do my noise reduction and sharpening. If you look at my readings – the settings – you can see that I was shooting at quite high ISO – 4000 – and this is why I have a little bit of noise in the background. I am going to show you how we get rid of this noise and then do a bit of sharpening on my leopard. So, let’s start off…if you come into the detail… so I’ve already done my editing
on the picture. I am just going to show you the noise reduction and the sharpening. So let’s start with the sharpening…if you come to the column here in ‘Detail’. If you press ‘alt’ on Mac or ‘ctrl’ on
Windows – keep it in – then click on the slider… and then you can move it left and right.
If you move it to the left side you will see the image is getting quite white. All
the way will be completely white. If you move it slowly to the right, you
will see that the background becomes black. So, Lightroom applies sharpening only
where you see white. So, I am moving my slider to the right until you can only see the profile of the leopard, and some of the areas which I would like to sharpen. The amount of sharpening I would like to apply here is between 10 and 20. I don’t
want to do more than that, because I am going to apply more sharpening later,
which I’m going to show you. So that is only the amount of sharpening that I want to do on this image – on the edges. Now I am going go to my ‘Adjustment Brush’. On the brush you will see sharpening. I don’t want to do sharpening
now. We are going click on here, and go to my texture slider. So I am going
go on minus on my slider, to make it nice and soft in the background So here is my brush of colour in the background. To maybe make it a little bit easier and to see where you’ve brushed. Not by pressing ‘o’ for overlay. Or, you can underneath here your show
selected mask overlay. Click on it, and then you can also activate it or deactivate it. So, I am just going to quickly brush the background. This is of course
just for demonstration purposes, so this will be quite quick. You can maybe
just take a little more time to do a better job. Also, make sure when you apply,
or work with the brush, to make sure in this case that your ‘Auto Mask’ is on. Got to do the feather as well a little
bit – bigger here. So auto masking will help if there’s a bit of contrast between your subject in the background. That will help selecting the edges much easier. If it goes over, it’s not a problem. I am going to show you now how we can just get rid of that. So, this is just quickly. If you press in ‘alt’ again, you can see on the brush there now a +. If I press it in or keep it in as a – it will go to + again. So, I am going to keep it in, and
then just erase the edges. There where you can see the pinkish colour/reddish colour where I went over on the leopard to apply the texture or my noise
reduction. There we go. Maybe just do this area a little bit
more. Here on the top of ear I can still see a little bit of pink. Let’s erase that. I am going to press ‘o’ again to get back to the main image. So my ‘Texture’ is 80. If you zoom in you can see it is going soft. I will also apply a little bit of noise on this side – noise reduction on a noise slider – going +. Now you can see it is getting really nice and smooth…when I zoom in. So, for the noise, I like between 70 and 80. Of course you can go a lot further if you want. I like just around 70% to 80% percent…that’s where I like to go. To go quickly to sharpening. How I do my
sharpening? I will go to ‘New’. Click on ‘Texture’ and select ‘Sharpness’. My sharpness is about 60 at the moment. I will select 60 as well. I like to use
around 60 to 70. Just colour in the Leopard. Again pressing ‘o’ for overlay, and it
will show you exactly where you have done your masking. Let’s go over the
ears as well. There we go. There as well. Press ‘o’ to see where it is. There we go. You can of course – if you like to apply more – you can just go to ‘New’ and maybe apply 30 in this case. I would just like to sharpen the eyes a little bit more. There we go. Okay, I am just gonna show you quickly the before and after. On the left side is before, and the right side is after. I am gonna click here so that you can see the noise. Quite a big difference between left and right. Let’s see the
sharpening. You can also see the before and after.. on the sharpening. I am going to quickly show you another image that I have already edited…. with a high ISO. So, in this image, you can see that my ISO is quite high – 40,000. I know this is not really an ISO that is recommended, and what we shoot, but just to show you in this image with high ISO, what can be done. I am going quickly zoom in on the background, so you can see where I
applied the same method. I am going to go to the before and after, so you can see quickly how different it is before and after, just by brushing out the background with
the texture slider, if you go to the negative side. So here is the before and
after. So, this is the way I do it. I hope this helped you? Maybe you can try on some of your images, and see if it makes it different for you. I hope these tips that I gave you, will help you in your Lightroom. If you have any questions, please leave them in comments below… and don’t forget to subscribe! Thank you for watching

Photography Books: Stories Behind The Images

Photography Books: Stories Behind The Images


hey what’s up guys welcome back to my
channel and as always thanks for watching this will be a quick video I
just got done making my aperture MC Lyte video it’s a really cool inexpensive
light that packs on a ton of features and it’s RGB so if you haven’t checked
out that video I’ll link it up above but that’s not what this video is about this
video is about what are you guys doing this winter maybe you’re traveling
visiting family painting it at home because the kids are out of school and
you just want some home time maybe you’re chilling by a fire because it’s
cold outside so you probably no matter what you’re doing need a good book to
pass the time well as videographers photographers we’re all about capturing
images and sometimes we want to know the stories behind the images we see well
this new book that I picked up is one you’ll love it’s by Corey rich who’s an
adventure photographer his book is entitled stories behind the images this
is a really awesome book not about the images he captures but the stories
behind them what so for him to become a venture photographer how does he get
motivated and you know not really about technique but again about the stories
behind the images he captures it’s a really interesting read and the cool
thing is you don’t have to read it from chapter 1 all the way to the end you can
kind of skip around to whatever you know story catches your eye anyway thought
I’d recommend it check it out stories behind the images I’ll link it down in
the description as always thanks for watching and I’ll catch you in the next
video

Cecil Williams Civil Rights Museum | Palmetto Scene

Cecil Williams Civil Rights Museum | Palmetto Scene


♪ Cecil Williams is perhaps the most well known photographer of South Carolina civil rights. His
pictures which have been featured in books,
magazines, newspapers and even movies have captured
many of seminal events which helped to shape
this history. Although he has himself published
books of photos documenting South
Carolina’s civil rights activities, this active
octogenarian has a new mission, to create the Cecil
Williams Civil Rights Museum. The mission of
the museum is not only to display, collect, and preserve the memories of these years but also to
re claim our rightful place in civil rights
history. So much about our history is unknown and
not in the history books. The subtitle is the south Carolina Events that
Changed America. I felt that this reflects the
mission of this museum what we’re trying to do
to bring to South Carolina some of the events that
really helped to make this country what it is.
We were involved in many things that are unknown.
And most history books don’t recall them
faithfully. Most people don’t know about them.
But we certainly did not want this era. This
great period of bravery on the part of South
Carolinians to go unfinished and unrecognized. The museum concept and it’s
beginning really was easy for me to do. 36
years ago the museum site which was at
one time my residence and another time partially my
residence and my studio came about
as a result some really having nor the place and
within my means an income to really put it. But it
seemed to be very ideal where in the structure
for side and the room 3600 square
feet was just really quite adequate. It was
almost as if it was just something laying there
waiting to be done. And it seemed just come all
together. The first station in the
museum is really the entrance to the museum where
when visitors come they will see that I have
dedicated an entire room to the Briggs, Delaine
and Pearson families of Clarendon county.
Some of the exhibits are biographical in nature.
Well I have a direct relationship with almost
all the exhibits I have created. I was very
fortunate to at the age of 13 to 14 to be involved with the Briggs people in
Clarendon County as the result of my mentor E.C. Jones, a
photographer from Sumter South Carolina, who owned
the most prominent photography studio of
those decades, Majestic Studio. So I had
early beginning there and reflected on again that
pioneering that was done by that family in
Clarendon County only 30 miles from where
we are today. And then the other events happened
as results again my destiny. At 14 years
old I’d become a correspondent for JET
magazine. And then I covered just about every major
civil rights event that happen in state South
Carolina by virtue of that. Even from the days
when I was a high school student, those were
some of the events that I covered. You can imagine
what the situation it was went
as a correspondent for a national publication I
had to sometimes come back down to earth and
ask dad for the family car go do an assignment.
Matthew Perry, an attorney who worked with the NAACP
was responsible for getting thousands of
students out of jail. So this
is called the Matthew Perry Media Center.
In my opinion, one of the bravest
persons in South Carolina. The most prominent
exhibit in this area would be the 50
pictures that depict the most prominent people
that played a part in the civil rights movement.
Everyone Thurgood Marshall of
course again from the national standpoint plays
a party in the pictures displayed here, but also a
lesson on people that might be not not might
not be known nationally or as well known as
many of the people are. But
then of course as visitors come to the
museum, it is in this room that we give them like a
15 minute preview of what the museum’s
all about, in case they don’t have time to go
through and no read each and every
caption in the entire eight room museum.
Orangeburg really has also
been left out of so much. It was here that the
students engaged in very early student activism.
For example, Greensboro, North Carolina mostly
gets the attention recognition for the early
sit-ins. We did that in the 50’s here in Orangeburg. And so many other things
that happened in Orangeburg that are not reflected in
history books. In addition to Williams’s photos, the
museum boasts several prized and some unexpected
artifacts, a Confederate flag that actually flew
over the state capitol, a gift from senator Brad
Hutto, a bowling pen from the All
star bowling alley, the site of the melee which
preceded the Orangeburg Massacre.
The prized Briggs family Bible which is
well over 100 years old,
a Klu Klux Klan vignette, depicting an
incident in Elloree, South Carolina,
and even a model train set representative up
Thurgood Marshall’s travels by train and his
fascination with model trains.
The other fascination that
Thurgood Marshall was caught in of course was
that his like for model trains. There’s a
picture from Life magazine that I have on
exhibit showing him playing with his Lionel passenger train set. Hopefully,
this is the one of the the exhibits that
we hope that younger people will relate
to when they come to visit the museum, we’ll
have this train depicting his fascination with
trains in motion, smoking and blowing the whistle
and so forth. And we want students and young people
to relate to things in the museum.
History books, people should remember really
written by people. Like you and I, they’re not any
super humans. And a lot of times they really just
include what has already been covered. So much of
South Carolina’s history really just wasn’t
does not appear in books and hence it just keeps
like dominoeing forward that we are not included. I’m trying to change that.