Part 2 of 7: Steve Thornton and his very personal style of lighting

Part 2 of 7: Steve Thornton and his very personal style of lighting


and none of that worked he was unusable light basically unless you want to shoot something gray with with no details whatsoever just the shadows was blocked up it was just it was just horrible especially dealing people who are going to move so you can’t use long shutter speeds so when I went to start using the strobes we had an assistant hold a reflector up and we attached the arm that some bounce now makes and I put a strobe head on it there’s a battery power stroke and we just adjusted to power up and down a little bit until it overpowered the light that was shooting into I was actually shooting into the Sun or where the Sun should have been he was brighter than we were had but i had to overpower that so i was running about f8 and i was using about 12 was seconds of power to get them and it overpowered the sun and you really came up with a stupendous image sorry the one good thing about yesterday morning as I learned a new trick Peter yes thank you yeah what I thought was I wish I had a lot earlier the Sun had been up for 45 minutes and the clouds were solid there was no edge the light it was gray it was ugly this is a commercial job i’m shooting for a client and i’m spending thousands of dollars every few minutes the very good people of California Sun bounce dragged out something that I’ve never seen before something that allow me to attach a strobe head to any of the reflectors and put like where it did not exist before it’s very controllable it’s incredibly lightweight if you use a portable flash or battery-powered flash you can have an assistant walk wherever the models going or moving on a little bit or move out a little bit and quite honestly for that portion to shoot it probably saved my keister because it was new I could do nothing absolutely nothing at all I’m thinking you’re right I look at every project as an individual there are some clients want me to do the same thing over and over and I try not to do that clients come to me for a photograph but I don’t give this photograph I give them my vision of the photograph my perspective on what I think that client is going to need to grow and to make money so as a result when I do is I will maybe follow the storyboard makes all the layouts they have and shoot that they now almost always go and shoot what I want the way I would have shot it before they even open their mouth I work very hard on locations locations are one of the teams I take the time to scout locations of the project I just finished up I’ve spent three days scouting and doing prep work finding out where I needed to be in what needed to be there in terms of elements whether it was just models or models and horses or models and horses and cowboys and longhorns at sunrise at sunset I spent a lot of time finessing every image I’ve already got in my mind what the photographs going to look like before I shoot it because I know the player is going to be brought to the shoot I know what the lights going to do I know what the location is going to give me I know what my wardrobe

DIY Photo Props! | Tay from Millennial Moms

DIY Photo Props! | Tay from Millennial Moms


(sweet guitar) – Hey guys, welcome
back to Millennial Moms. I’m Tay, and that means that it’s Tuesday. (smooching) Alright guys, today I’m
gonna be sharing with you another fun prop we made for
Landice’s tenth birthday. This is really easy, and it’s inexpensive, so let’s get going. (cheerful strumming) (camera click) Alright, so we’re gonna start
by cutting out some images, picking out what we want, lips, bow ties, hats, all that is good. I’m using my Cricut,
because Cricut design space has all of these already,
although you can go onto Google and find all the images you want, print them out, and then
cut them out onto paper I found these stir sticks
in the Target Dollar Spot. And I just cut all my pieces of paper out, and then glued the pieces together. For some of them, I cut
out two different sizes, so that I could layer them, so that they were more sturdy, and had a fun little pop
of color behind them. And then I just glued all the
little pieces, well actually, Landice glued all these
little pieces together. So we had ties, bow tie, lips, masks. Just make sure that you
make them nice and big. So you can also cut them
out onto regular paper and trace them onto card stock. So then I took the stir
sticks that I found, and you can just buy, like chopsticks, or any type of stick that you can find, but I like these because
they had a big base that I could use to hot glue to the back. And then a way to decorate them, I used chalk pens for some of them, and I just used the hashtag that we were gonna do for the party, #PartyLikeAPanda animal. Most of these girls
don’t have social media, so this hashtag really didn’t get used. And then the other ones, I
used glue and some glitter, because you always have to have
a little glitter at a party. You just have to, it’s
just one of the rules. So my favorite way to do glitter is just to make, like,
a crazy mess with it, dump it out onto a paper towel, and then fold it in half
and dump it right back into the glitter container so
you don’t waste any glitter. So then I went and I embellished
all of the little crowns and things like that that I did. Just made ’em really cute. And these’ll be nice, because
you can store them away, and use them for more parties later on. And they’re always good to have on hand. (casual guitar) If you guys want to see yesterday’s video, check out right there. If you guys want to see more
from me at Millennial Moms, check out right there. And if you guys want to subscribe to Millennial Moms, Millennial Moms, check out right here. Alright you guys, thanks for being a subscriber if you’re
already one already. I love you guys. Don’t forget to check out my own personal channel, Auntie Tay. Love you guys, bye. (smooches)

I Noticed Him In All The Pictures I Make. What Does He Want?!

I Noticed Him In All The Pictures I Make. What Does He Want?!


Hi! I’m Patrice but my friends call me Patty. I’ve always had a dream to become popular,
you know. Like a real superstar or something, so that
everybody would see me and whisper “Hey, that’s the girl…” and stuff. I’ve been working so hard for my dream come
true for the last year and it did come true… sort of. Everything started when I saw the first bloggers
on the internet. I was amazed by their lives and their abilities,
like financially I mean. For me, it seemed to be the easiest way to
success and fame, so I’d decided to become a blogger myself. However, I faced my first problem as soon
as I started, because I didn’t know how to blog. I would just post pretty much everything. It was like “Here I am going to school”
or “Hey! Look at my lunch today” and so on. Of course, I had some followers, about 500
people I guess, but they were either my friends and family members, or some advertising accounts,
so it didn’t satisfy me much. I even tried once to devote my blog to my
hamster Polly, but she seemed to be a totally unsocial animal and that idea failed. Once I was sitting at home and looking through
my blog page and all the posts on it. I could feel how pathetic my blogging efforts
were because my photos were far from being like those I’d seen on my favorite blogger’s
pages, and my texts were definitely not a philosopher’s thoughts. I had almost decided to give up my idea when
I suddenly realized that somebody somehow showed up in almost every photo and video
of mine that was taken at my place, except for me, of course. It was my creepy neighbor Alan who lived across
the street from me. He had recently moved to the neighborhood
with his parents and he was totally weird. He wore the same long sleeve shirt whenever
I saw him in real life. Nobody talked to him at school, as far as
I knew. Some people even thought that he had some
mental and psychiatric disorders. Of course, he seemed to suddenly get caught
by my camera’s lens, either appearing from around the corner or staring from his garden
at me while I was taking a selfie in my own garden, but I felt strange about it. I shared my thoughts about probably being
stalked by a local weirdo and that was it. My followers seemed to want to share my page
with their friends or something, because I got a couple of hundred more subscribers that
following week. Of course, the majority of my fans, so to
speak, were from our town, but it didn’t matter – my fame had found me. Once two girls had even come up to me at the
local mall to say hi and they said they knew me because of my weird neighbor. I kept posting my regular photos but this
time it had turned into a quest for my followers to find a stranger in them in the comments. This excitement over me being famous lasted,
for me, no more than two weeks, when I suddenly realized that my neighbor Alan had been actually
stalking me. And this time, everything was done on purpose. I will give you an example. Once, I was in the kitchen trying to cook
dinner when I noticed that Alan was staring at me from his window. I would think that this was a coincidence,
but when I went to my bedroom and looked out the window, I once again saw him in his attic
window still looking straight at me. I got a little scared and worried, but tried
to calm myself down, thinking that my eyes were just playing tricks on me. And you know what? I couldn’t sleep well because of all that
stuff. I had really bad nightmares that somebody
was watching me, like 100 percent of the time and I had even woken up in a cold sweat a
couple of times. This almost drove me completely nuts, so I
decided to go and talk to this strange guy and ask him why he was stalking me. I thought he’d deny that fact, but he didn’t
even try to. He told me that he noticed me trying to film
every step of my life on camera, he’d gotten interested in it, and just wondered why I
would want do this. But then he came across my blog page on the
internet, saw my post about him, and had gotten offended. After that, he started to follow me on purpose
as a sort of revenge. I don’t know why but I became really angry
and started to shout at him that he had no right to do that, because he scared me a lot. Then I fired a warning shot saying that if
he doesn’t stop doing what he’s been doing, I’d call the police. I turned away from him and set off for home
when I heard him say that he didn’t see the difference between letting people follow
you online or in real life. I entered my house so furiously, that even
my mom, who was in the kitchen, noticed how nervous I was. I didn’t want to tell her the whole story
so I just said that I hated that creepy guy who lives across the street from us. She said she just so happened to meet Alan’s
parents, like for a welcome tea or something. And it turned out that Alan was their adopted
son. His whole biological family had died in a
big fire less than a year ago. That’s why he was so strange and why he
would wear long sleeve clothing all the time – he’d been trying to hide his scars. And that was definitely the reason he was
so distant from everybody else. I kept thinking over that situation for the
rest of the day. From time to time I’d even look out my window
at Alan’s house, but I didn’t see him anywhere. I tried to find him on the internet, but I
couldn’t. I was looking through my blog page again and
felt ashamed for my posts about him and for the comments people were making. I felt the need to do something to help this
guy. So I just deleted all my previous posts and
made a new one that was completely different. I told his story there and asked my followers
to be more kind to strange people that they think are weird. You can’t even imagine the number of well
wishes and supportive phrases in the comments that I received over the next couple of days. Some of my followers who had known my address
even sent postcards for Alan, asking me to give them to him. I was really inspired and grateful, so I immediately
went to cheer Alan up with all the stuff. I rushed to his door and just left all those
postcards and comments I printed out earlier with a letter of apology from me on his doorstep,
‘cause I thought he wouldn’t want to talk to me anymore. But I was happy to be wrong. Now Alan and I are good friends. I no longer strive for popularity, because
I finally understood that there are things in life that are more important than that. If you guys were attentive enough, you picked
up on the exact number of followers that I had before noticing Alan on my posts and after
that. Be the first one to write the correct answer
in the comments below this video. Feel free to share this with your friends
for them to subscribe to this channel, just like you did.

Landscape Photography – A beginner’s guide to woodland

Landscape Photography – A beginner’s guide to woodland


If you’re interested in woodland
photography and you’ve always struggled on how to compose your images within
the woods and the forests, this is the video for you. My name is Julian Elliott
and I am a professional landscape and travel photographer. If you want to keep
up with my exploits as a professional landscape and travel photographer make
sure you click on the subscribe button just down there The absolute first step when it comes to
woodland photography is to go to somewhere that you know and that you can
practice. Why? Because you know it. And if you’re familiar with your surroundings,
like this woodland here which is about five minutes drive from where I live in
France, then you’re going to be able to create more successful images from that
particular area and also you’ll get to know the intricacies of this particular
woodland. So for me for example I know when it rains heavily where I’m stood
floods. I’ve had images, I think it was back in April or so, whereby this
whole area was flooded I had a really nice sunny day with blue sky white
fluffy clouds and I was able to get the reflections all in this woodland plus
the reflections of all the tree stumps here. So that is the first step to
creating your successful images within woodland. Get to know one of your local
areas. The next step to think about when
creating your woodland images is the light and the quality of the light.
Woodland is great in that it works both in flat light and also sunny light and
also when you have that low mist and there is the sun breaking through the
mist in the early morning creating those really nice ethereal looking images.
Absolutely wonderful soft light in the morning. You can’t beat it. So as I said
it works great in flat light. Today we have flat light. It’s a very overcast day,
there’s no long shadows anywhere and it pretty much works as you will see, not
necessarily here, but certainly in the next location
that we’ll be working on further on into the video.So that’s the next step you
must think about is light and the quality of the light in your woodland. Once you’ve got to know your local
woodland, and you’ve thought about the quality of the light that you want in
that woodland, the next step to think about is lens choice. Obviously we have
wide-angle; 50mm; short telephoto and long telephoto. Each of those
lenses will work in a particular area of woodland. Wide-angle, for example, is great
if you’ve got some foreground interest. We don’t really have any foreground
interest in this particular woodland so the next step up is to think about is it
somewhere around 35 or 50 millimeters that we’re going to work in. Here, because I
visit it very often, I know that around 50 mil and above works. Why? Because it
helps to compress a lot of the trees together and create a very nice
composition. Telephoto it kind of works in here but it brings things maybe too
close. So here, for example, I’m always thinking it’s around 50 to 70
millimeters. So 50 millimeters how our eyes see and then 70 millimeters so it starts
to compress things just a little but not too much. But what I’m going to do is I’m
going to take a picture.The same picture, the same composition and show you why
each of them does and doesn’t work so you can see what it is that I’m talking
about here in this particular woodland. I’ve set up my camera and I’ve put on a
zoom lens which is 28 millimeters to 70 millimeters and that’s because it gives
me most of the focal lengths that I would use in this particular woodland
specifically for me 50 millimeters and 70 millimeters. At the moment it’s set at
28 and you can see it’s it’s okay is probably maybe a little bit too wide. But
what I’ve done is I put this central trunk here in the middle this is what I
really want to focus on and you can see on the third’s here there is actually a
trunk and a trunk as well and the foreground is maybe just off the bottom
of the third and going toward the middle but not quite. But it’s just too wide and
especially on a day like today there’s nothing in the sky and it’s just white
and it’s going to be blown out so that’s 28 millimeters wide angle and that for
me is why this particular scene doesn’t work at wide-angle. If I turn live view back on again and I
go into 50 millimeters you will see, if I slightly adjust my composition just a
little bit, just around here that things start to become more compressed these
trunks in the background are becoming more prominent whereas they were quite
far away because of the wide angle of the lens so they’re starting to become a
lot more compressed into the scene and it’s how we see it with our eyes as our
eyes see around 50 millimeters focal length. So you can see there on the 3rd
we’ve got these trunks here so they’re starting to come in nicely. The
foreground is dropping down just a touch we’re losing the sky so when losing the
emphasis on what’s going to be an overexposed sky. Things are starting to
look that lot nicer. Let’s go in just a little bit more so if I go to roughly
here, and what I’m doing if I just turn live you back on, I’m paying very close
attention to these corners here. So this here this branch, this trunk here is
frustrating for me so I’m zooming in just to remove it from the frame then
I’m going to push this down just a little bit and then what you’ll see is that we
have an image that’s starting to look a lot more composed and a lot more
organized and we’re starting to see the wood for the trees so if I take that
image then you’ll see the difference between this image and the wide-angle
image and how using 50 millimetres and longer in the woodland can help
emphasize those tree trunks. Bring things closer together. Compress them and help
to create a more balanced image. As I said, you can use wide-angle but I think
you’ll find a lot of the time you’re probably working 35 millimetres and up
where you’re starting to get more of an emphasis on bringing things together and
creating a more balanced image. For the composition of our images it’s
good to start somewhere like this and the reason is because it’s an orderly
wood. It’s actually a man-made wood everything’s been planted in an orderly
fashion and so you can work things out a lot quicker than if you were to go in
just to a woodland, in your local woodland that’s been there for hundreds
of years. Because everything’s planted we can start to find compositions a lot
easier and then we can take that knowledge and transport it into a normal
woodland that’s been there for hundreds of years and it’s just a tangle of branches,
trees, trunks and whatever else. So I’ll just
explain some of the compositions that you can do here in this particular type
of woodland so you can get an idea how we’re going to transport it back
into a proper woodland and that’s been there for a few hundred years or. So this
is the first type of composition that you could do in this managed woodland.
You can use the avenue here and here to create a line of interest going in and
in to go back towards here. The only slight problem with this is there isn’t
really anything back here to create any interest. There is some moss or something
up there in the tree I think it might be mistletoe back there it’s lying on that
third. Detail-wise what I am looking at, and I might do in a bit, is just here
there’s a huge mushroom which I might go and take a shot of. It looks quite
interesting. But that’s the kind of first kind of composition that you could do
here in this managed woodland. This is another example of a composition
that you could do here in this managed woodland. It’s similarish to when i was
demonstrating the focal length in that the tree trunk is in the middle and
other things start dropping in behind it. However this time the grass is more
along the top third but it’s another example of something
that you could do here in this managed woodland when you’re starting to see the
wood for the trees. Hopefully you’ve seen in this managed
woodland how I started to create compositional elements to be able to
bring some kind of order into a final image. So what I’m going to do from here
is decamp into an ancient woodland and we’re going
to see how we can manage that and bring some kind of order to the chaos of an
ancient woodland. So we’ve swapped managed woodland for chaos. Ancient woodland. Where do you look? Well if you take some of those elements of composition like
the rule of thirds or like the managed woodland where we placed the tree trunk
in the middle. If you start to look around and start positioning yourself;
the tree trunk here or here and just move so when you move here you’ll see
behind in the background that the other tree’s move. Try to position things in
such a way that you order the chaos of this ancient woodland. So I’ve found
something it’s taken me about 15 minutes or so just wandering around in here just
to have a look see what it is that I could find and I’ve started to pick
things up. I’ve never actually walked in this woodland. I’ve driven past it many
times. It’s only five minutes from my house. But I’m taking the time today just to have a look; see what’s here and see what
I can do with the chaos of this ancient woodland. As a first composition and the
first time here this is something that I’ve found just wandering around as I
said to see what it is that I could come up with. So I’ve placed this tree here not
it’s kind of on the third but not really is actually off the third itself and
then I’ve placed the foreground so it’s just up shy of the middle and then
there’s a color here and the background from all the autumn leaves. As well as
that I’ve started to try and make some sense of the background. So I’ve used a
corner up here for one of the branches that’s going off and up here as well. It
could possibly be just adjusted slightly there and the very simple reason is so
I’ve got this branch going up in this corner here and also here I’m creating
some separation which I didn’t have before. So that it’s not just a tree trunk in the corner here there’s actually some
color going here so you’ve got these bands of color and the tree trunks
themselves. Down here you have this new tree that’s growing up which is creating
interest on the third. So that’s the first composition that I’ve done here. I’ll
just take a snap and then you can see when the image pops up in a minute how
that looked when we were here in this part of the woodland. Let’s move on to
something else and to show you how to bring more order to the chaos that you
see in front of you. There’s two more elements that I want to
add into composition within your image. The first is leading lines and as you
can see that’s running through me there’s this path that’s probably just
been created by animals such as deer and boar that we get here in central France.
They’ve created a pathway through the woodland. And that is another
compositional element that you can add in. Leading lines will always take your
viewer from the edge and bring them into the image let them look around and let
them explore. The next thing that I want to talk about and it’s extremely
important in woodland is the polarizing filter. And what that does is it
removes any glare from the leaves so yesterday it was raining a lot here so
there’s a lot of water on the ground. A lot of water on the leaves in the trees.
That polarizer filter is going to cut through the glare and be able to add
in more saturation to the image. So I will just show you what it is that I’ve
set up at the moment to give you an idea of how it is that I’m looking at this
scene and what you might be able to take away from it and be able to put into
your own images. This is the image that I’ve set up. I saw this path here while I
was walking along the main path. It’s not the main path obviously as I said it
looks like it’s been made by animals as it’s indistinct but it’s distinct enough
to give us an idea of a compositional element. And as you can see I’ve started to
arrange things here so this tree here the trunk is on the bottom third then
which is going out and then up to the top. I’ve cut out a lot of the sky as
it’s distracting and I’ve just started to arrange everything else so I’ve made
sure that there’s no trunks that are intruding on the edges here of the frame
and there’s no unwanted elements there at the top. So that for me, it starts to
create some order again out of the chaos that we have here in the woodland and
also as I said there’s a polarizer on the front which is taking the glare away
from the water that’s on the leaves that was from the fallen rain
yesterday so that’s helping to saturate the image a lot more than it is. So I’ll
take it a photo with the polarizer and without the polarizer so
you can see the difference and why it is that you should actually make sure you
have that polarizer with you and that it’s not just for those blue sky days. For this last sequence on woodland
photography, I want to use a blue sky day combined with the color in the trees to
help enhance the composition because very often all we hear about is the rule
of thirds; leading lines and s-curves. All these kind of things in composition.But
we never really hear about color. So if you look at a color wheel you’ll see
that yellow and blue are near to one another on the color wheel
thus they complement one another in any composition that you might
choose to use them in. The other thing that I’m going to do is I’ve changed my
lens to a wide-angle lens. So here I’ve got a Canon 17-40 millimeter lens. So
very, very wide angle of view. And when I look up, which is the last thing
that I want to do, it’s actually going to help the trees loom in above me while
looking up at the blue sky and the golden colors of the yellow leaves up
there. All the autumn color. So let’s take a shot and then see what it is that I’m
doing with that shot. So what am i doing when I’m looking up at those trees
trying to get an image that pleases me? Well the first thing that I do is I put
my camera in aperture priority and that’s very simple. The only reason I’m
doing that is just to take a few things off my mind what I’m composing my image
handheld. And in aperture priority I’m then adding in around one stop of
exposure compensation just to open things up a bit. The 6D has enough
exposure latitude that I know it will give me what I want for around
two-thirds of a stop or a stop over the the middle point on your exposure meter.
The next thing that I’m doing is I’m enabling the back button focusing on my
camera so that when I’m looking up my thumb is doing the focusing so I press
where I want to in the image to focus the camera and then when I’ve got what I
want my index finger then clicks the shutter to get the composition that I
want. So that’s it for this tutorial on
woodland photography. Hopefully you’ve picked up a few things here and there
and see how I finely compose some of my other images although it’s done in
woodland it might give you an idea as to how to really look at what it is that
you’re doing when you’re composing your images on the back of your camera. Will
there be more tutorials? There will be more tutorials! There’s going to be a
tutorial on a 10 stop ND filter very soon. As well as a few others so
make sure you click the subscribe button down there in the bottom right hand
corner and you’ll get notification whenever it is that I upload any videos.
So thanks very much for to all of my subscribers. See you again soon!

Photography Self Assignments – Motivate Yourself to See Progress

Photography Self Assignments – Motivate Yourself to See Progress


Hello, I’m Helen Bradley. Welcome to
this video tutorial. Today I’m going to talk about photographic self-assignments. What is a self-assignment. Self-assignments are short self-assigned
photo projects that you shoot just for the sake of shooting. And typically they shouldn’t require you
to go out and buy anything special or to go anywhere special to do them. They are the sort of thing you could go and do
immediately after you’ve finished watching this video —
grab your camera and you’re ready to start. It’s a good idea to do self-assignments
regularly and when you are not under pressure to capture anything at all
worthwhile so you’d never undertake one when you
are the main photographer at a wedding for example. Self-assignments are generally quite short
so you can spend as little as a few minutes at a time on them — but of course they can consume a lot
more time if you have it available. Self-assignments technically have a
topic — you’re not just out to shoot, you’re out to shoot a something
or to practice something — you’re not aiming to shoot ‘keepers’ so
much as you are aiming to learn something. Self-assignment should take you out of
your comfort zone and help you see things or experiment
with techniques and your kit. Preparing for a self-assignment When you’re preparing for a self-
assignment, firstly you need to allocate the time to work on your self-assignment. Often you can find it by repurposing
time you already spend doing something such as walking to the bus
station — make this the time that you work on
your self-assignment. Or you could park a few blocks from your
office and walk there, walk at lunchtime or walk when you get
home at night and, as you walk, you can photograph for
your self-assignment. If you don’t get out a lot
then photograph inside your house or your backyard or spend the time waiting at an airport
or train station catching shots
for your current self-assignment. You will also need to take a camera with
you — everywhere. It doesn’t have to be your good camera
but it’s good if it is. It might seem strange to carry your
camera with you all the time but the more you do so, the less uncomfortable you will feel and
you’ll really notice it when you don’t have your camera handy.
Topics and subject matter Plan your self-assignment —
You’ll need a topic or a focus for your shooting. It should be something that challenges
you and forces you to learn something new or to look at the world a little
differently. Some topics which you might want to
pursue are: saturated colors, circles,
paint marks, streetlights, the color blue, doors,
shadows, repetition, food, street art, reflections, or alphabet which is a great one for the airport. Don’t expect to always nail the project on
day 1 — so if you’re shooting something like
circles — it’s worth going over the same territory a couple of days in a row —
notice how many more circles you see on day 2 than you did on day 1. Your assignment might also be
related to a piece of your kit — perhaps you have an unused or little
used lens in your case — unused because you really don’t know
how to use it — and because you can’t trust yourself to use
it for important situations the cycle becomes self-repeating so you
never use it. Set yourself a self-assignment to
shoot with the lens for a couple of weeks. By the end of the two weeks you’ll know a
lot more about the lens and how to use it. If you’re someone who always uses
the Auto mode on your camera now is a good time to start using Aperture
Priority or Shutter Priority mode and start learning what creative
possibilities they might offer. Determine the topic or focus of
your self-assignment and a timeframe to work in. Once you’re done with the first assignment
you’ll ready to start on the next but don’t be surprised if you continue to
shoot these self-assignment themes in other situations. Assess the results When you are working on a self-
assignment, download the images as often as you can and view the results. Assess how you’ve gone in your project. How easy was it for you to ‘see’ things
that matched your topic. Assess the technical aspect of your
shots — are they in focus, is the depth of field used appropriate for the subject matter — how would you improve the shot next
time and what will you do differently tomorrow? If you’re working on a self-assignment
to learn how to use a piece of kit, ask yourself what have you learned about
it. What worked and what did not work. Analyse the results in front of you to
determine what you’ll try that will be different tomorrow or the next day. What you’ll gain Self-assignments are creative learning
projects so approach them with a sense of wonder and enthusiasm for your topic — reward yourself when you see something
you wouldn’t have noticed if you hadn’t been doing your self-assignment. Self-assignments can help you see the
world different and they’re guaranteed to make you a better photographer. If you are a creative person who wishes
they could photograph more but have to juggle photography with
other commitments then self-assignments provide a creative
outlet that can be fit into even a few minutes of your spare time. I’m Helen Bradley. Thank you for joining
me for this video tutorial. I encourage you to subscribe to my YouTube channel and visit projectwoman.com for more
photography tips and tricks.

Interview Jake Verzosa – Mérignac Photographic Festival 2017

Interview Jake Verzosa – Mérignac Photographic Festival 2017


[Music] I got my first camera for my dad when I was a kid so from there I really like documenting the culture and also subculture in communities in the Philippines and the best way for me to do it is through photographs for me my friends phone curator yes I think he wants to show different communities through through this exhibition and I did this work with Francois maybe five years ago and I wanted to show them here in this festival the the community of Kalinga and changing perception of beauty through through their tradition I wanted to to show the the changing changing perception of beauty in in the older women and the younger agent younger generation because the younger generation of Kalinga D they don’t want to have tattoos anymore cause for them it’s it’s not beautiful and I plan to change that that perception and I want to share the story here in the festival this particular in the met together the photo fungal because she’s the last tattoo artist and she’s 100 years old approximately and yeah she’s the last artist who’s doing the tattoos and now she’s teaching her niece her younger relative to continue the tradition and it is my favorite photo in particular because she she she represents the whole the whole idea of preservation of the tradition I have contact with them and I grew up in the province next to Kalinga so whenever I come I took their portraits I go back to my developer in the photographs then go up again and bring bring the portraits I wanted to use old technique and also to isolate the the his blacken wife’s I can isolate the the patterns on the skin and so the the patterns can show more and also give the women some dignity and respect well for now I’m inspired by with different stories in the Philippines and in around Asia and mostly in communities and subcultures that are misrepresented and also well my Costa inspires me and also my my family inspires me when daughter

San Diego City College – Photography Program

San Diego City College – Photography Program


>>DAVID KING: We have an incredibly extensive program. We have 40 some odd courses, ranging from the beginning of the film classes up through very advanced studio-based commercial classes.>>DAVE EICHINGER: We try to provide a really wide
variety of fine art classes and commercial classes. Most of the students that
come in as a photo major obviously need the commercial classes and need to understand digital fully and Lightroom and Photoshop. When they leave here, primarily
you’re a freelancer. And if you’re a freelancer you need to wear all lot of different hats.>>Jason Reimer: A student can come in here and learn the in’s and out’s of how to run a photography
business; giving them really good grounding in the fundamentals but also
trying to stay on top of latest trends in the industry so that when they
leave here they’re prepared to be able to hit the ground running in an industry
that’s constantly changing.>>DAVE: We have one of the few programs still
around that have a pretty strong analog darkroom program. We do have one of the
best facilities – maybe the best that I’ve ever seen or one of the very best
that pretty much anybody has ever seen. So we do have a great facility; we have
great studios, great equipment, and great people here.>>MONICA: I’m from Brazil, I came here 15 years ago. I noticed that I needed to improve my English and I went to the Continuing Education. After Continuing Education, I came to City College. The experience that I have
is amazing. Photography is my passion and then with the program the instructors,
they helped me a lot. I’m really happy with the result.>>DAVID: We want them to be the best because if
the students come out being the best and somebody says, “hey where did you learn it” and
they say City College – man, that’s what we need!>>DAVE: For the past 15 years or so I’ve been taking
groups to Europe. They’re getting units – there’s a travel photography class. They’re out doing their own portfolios again, some are digital, some are film, some
are people photographers. I typically do a different itinerary each year. Last year was Barcelona and then northern Italy.>>DAVID: We would like to make City College, here, the
place you come to because that’s where the education is. We have a one-of-a-kind
program here and it would be wonderful if we could get that word out and let the world know about it.

Wildlife Photography 101 | Bean Bag Basics How-To

Wildlife Photography 101 | Bean Bag Basics How-To


Hi everybody my name is John E. Marriott and in this Wildlife photography 101 segment we’re going to talk about one of my favorite camera accessories for wildlife photography when you’re photographing from a car, and that is, a bean bag. So a bean bag is basically a little bag, It could be made out of plastic, cotton, canvas, really any sort of material, and inside is beans, or rice, or lentils, and it just allows the bag to be flexible and moldable so that you can slap it down on a windowsill, and have it form a nice little spot you can stick a lens in and photograph wildlife out of your car. You may be wondering why would I photograph Wildlife out of my car? Using your vehicle as a blind actually allows you to approach a lot of the large predators in particular, quite a bit more closely than you would otherwise. On foot a wolf might only let you get 300-400 meters away, where as in a vehicle with the vehicle turned off and you sitting there quietly putting a bean bag up on your windowsill sometimes wolves will come 25, 50 meters away from you, and you’re able to use those big lenses to photograph really nicely. So when I’ve got my beanbag set up. I can plop the camera in there and it acts just like a tripod. You can actually leave it hands off and have it sit there, or you can rotate it around and follow Wildlife around, very stable and allows you to get much lower shutter speeds than you would be able to get just hand holding out of your window. The other key thing when you’re using a bean bag, particularly on a day like today, where it’s really cold and you’re in the winter, is you got to keep your heat down really low because as soon as you open up this window and put your beanbag on it, you don’t want heat waves coming out of the car and ruining your shot. And then the final tip that I’ve got for using a bean bag, is you’ll notice on here I’ve got a bit of tape on my lens. Well that tape is to hold my focus ring so that when I’m moving my, lens back and forth on the bean bag it’s not changing my focus. So that my autofocus in the camera is allowed to work as it should and stay tracking on that wolf as it walks towards me. Thanks for watching everybody! I hope you enjoyed this little Wildlife photography 101 tip. Don’t forget to go and grab your bean bag and we’ll catch you next episode. Don’t forget to subscribe so you don’t miss it!

Levitation Photography Tutorial: How to Hover with Multiple Exposures

Levitation Photography Tutorial: How to Hover with Multiple Exposures


Hi, I’m Chelsea. And for our book, Stunning Digital Photography we’re going over levitation photography.
Now there are two ways to take a levitation photograph: the first way you just set a high
shutter speed and have your subject jump and it creates the illusion that
their floating. The method were going to be using is that I’ll be propping myself up with these
books here, taking two pictures and then blending the two exposures
together in post to make it look like I’m floating. The
only hardware you really need is a camera and a tripod, but because
this is a self portrait for us we’re also using a remote shutter release
and a few other pieces of equipment I’ll get into later. The first thing you’ll want to do before you take your shot is make your story. So I had envisioned a couple sitting
together and reading by fire so I got these prop books and I got
Tony, my prop husband and found a nice nook of
the house that would look good on camera. So we set up our camera and a tripod and kind of played around with the crop
and the angle to make sure that we have our fireplace in the shot and the lamp and the chair, everything we
thought would be attractive. One interesting thing that we did was I
really wanted it to look warm I wanted it to look like the fire was
glowing and we were nestled up and comfortable in our home. so we got another light on a tripod,
another flash, put an orange gel over and put it
behind our fireplace which actually goes completely through to the
other side and had it flash through at us so that we had nice
warm lighting like the fire was glowing. To trigger the flash that we set up
behind the fireplace, we used a PocketWizard. We also used the flash on
top of our camera to kinda bounce the light off of the wall and
fill the room with light from the other directions so that the lighting wasn’t too
hard. Next, we set our camera timer to an 8
second delay and just kind of posed for a while. Once you get the pictures that you like,
move out of your frame, take a picture of your background and
then it’s time to bring your photos into post processing. Now that you finished taking your
pictures, load them onto your computer and use your editing software of choice to
start merging your photos. It doesn’t matter which editing
programming you use, I’m going to use Photoshop, but as long as they can blend two pictures, you’ll be all set. I’ve loaded my pictures into Lightroom,
so I’m going to click the levitation photo of my choice and then I’m going to choose a
background picture to blend it with. Using Ctrl click I selected both pictures at once. Once
you have your photo selected right click, then choose Edit In, then go to open as layers in Photoshop. Now that
you have both of your pictures imported into your editing program put your levitation photo on top. So you can see, the background is on the bottom. Select both
of your pictures go to Edit, and auto align your layers to make sure
that they match up. Using the Auto projection option works
just fine. Next select your top layer, your levitation
photo, and create a mask. Click on your mask, select your paintbrush tool and make sure that you’re painting in black, and you can start to erase the books out of
your picture. I like to make sure that my paint
brushe is soft and that my opacity is fairly low I have
it at 48 right now. So let me zoom in here, I’ll make my brush a little bit bigger, and you can
start blending away whatever it is you’re levitating on. So one problem we ran into when we
started editing the pictures is that I noticed that the background picture had cooler lighting than the picture with me levitating and I think
it’s because one of the flashes was bouncing off me and making a warmer
light. So what I did was I selected my
background photo and in the adjustment layers I put a photo filter on with the color orange and warmed up the background a little bit
until the color matched the foreground better. That’s pretty good. And since you’re opacity’s low, you can just
kind of blend the pictures together so that the color differences isn’t so obvious. Once
you have your color adjusted, you can continue taking those books out out. Another problem that I
ran into is that my skirt was falling behind the books at one
point so I can’t just use the layer mask and paint out the books. So what I did was I selected a section of my skirt,
making sure that I had the hemline in there, and create a new layer to paste
the piece of clothing into. Now that you have part of the skirt pasted in, you can move it. Go to Edit, Free Transform and line it up with the rest of the hem. Now that you have the skirt in there, it’s really rough,
you can use an eraser and I will just blend it in. This is kind of a
rough example so I’m gonna do a little bit more tweaking and play around with this to get it just
right and then I’ll cut to the finished product. Next I’m going to reimport it into
Lightroom by saving my photo and finish up the rest of my editing there. Now than I am in Lightroom I’ll click on
Develop to finish editing and crop it down a little
bit. Next I’m going to soften my photo up to
give it a warmer, cozier feeling. By just roducing my clarity just a little tiny bit. I usually like to
just play with my adjustments a little bit to get the get a nice feel going in the picture. So it’s
all just a matter taste. And there you have it! There is our
finished levitation photo. There are a few other pictures that I
played around with it as well If you’d like to see more videos from us,
click subscribe above and if you’d like to learn more about
photography, buy our book, Stunning Digital Photography. You can get it on
Amazon, you can get it for iBooks. All the links will
be down below and don’t forget to LIKE us too. Thank you.

BenQ SW271 4K Review | Perfect Monitor for Photographers (srpski prevod)

BenQ SW271 4K Review | Perfect Monitor for Photographers (srpski prevod)


monitor for me is really important tool in photography and today I will be talking about Bank usw 271 professional monitor made for photographers so let’s start hey guys it’s Nemanja and welcome to another fun episode this is review of Bank usw 271 4k uhd professional monitor made for photographers and for videographers too of course for me as a professional photographer monitor is one of the most important tools in a set of tools that I’m using to create my final project my final photo manipulation that I will be later delivering to client so my workflow usually starts by grabbing a camera going outside or in studio to take all the necessary photos that I will later combine and retouch in Photoshop and in that part of my workflow camera is really important tools so I’m using a good quality camera that can produce good quality files high dynamic range raw files and I’m using a good quality lenses to have the best files that I can get to later retouch them in Photoshop after I finish all that I transfer my files on a computer and then in that moment the monitor is really really important to in my peripheral why well because if I’m using a low quality monitor with a bad color reproduction bad luminosity reproduction etc low quality panel maybe I will I will get photos retouched of course but maybe my photos will be darker or brighter than it should be because my luminosity levels are off or maybe my colors will be off because my yellow is not pure yellow maybe it’s going towards the greens etc so that’s why having the great quality monitor is really important to have a great color reproduction color accuracy wide color gamut good screen quality with good sharpness to have all details visible etc right now that we covered why the monitor is so important to let’s talk about some specs this is 27 inch size monitor with 3840 by 2160 pixels resolution with sixteen by nine aspect ratio it has 99% almost 100% coverage of Adobe RGB and 100% coverage of srgb and rec709 so this is really amazing to have almost 100% coverage of Adobe RGB for me this is really important because in my workflow I like to retouch all my images in Adobe RGB color space because I get to play with wider color gamut so I have more colors to work with and to have a monitor that can produce all those colors that you can see all those colors actually is really nice addition this monitor is HDR content support ready so that means that you will be able to enjoy in that high dynamic range content from maybe Netflix or place I’m HDR games so you will be seeing an image more like your eyes are seeing in a real life this monitor is Technicolor color certified so that means that it has the same strict standard for color accuracy used in Hollywood productions this monitor has the 10 bit display and 60 Hertz refresh rate so if you’re a gamer maybe this monitor is not a good choice for you but as I already said at the beginning this monitor is especially made for photographers and videographers too the build quality is really good it’s made out of the metal and high-quality plastic and base the stand of the monitor is nice heavy and sturdy which is really important to me because I don’t have to worry that the monitor will accidentally fall off the table if I accidentally nudge the table that actually happened to me a few years ago when I was using some lightweight monitor and you can imagine the rest the SW 271 comes with a detachable shading hood that effectively reduces the monitor screen glare resulting from ambient lighting so it will ensure superb color accuracy even in those kind of conditions and the shading hood has this really nice hole so you can put your calibrator cable true when you want to calibrate your screen the monitor has really tiny bezels as you can see and it’s really nice for to monitor setups if you’re up to it the screen can be rotated left and right and tilted up and down and of course you can adjust the screen height you can even rotate the screen by 90 degrees clockwise so you can work in portrait mode if you’re up to that and this IPS panel is visible from almost all viewing angles this monitor already comes calibrated with a calibration certificate in the box but you can always recalibrate it using some external calibrator like color monkey or spider Pro etc there variety of AI ports input/output ports on this monitor so on the bottom side you have hdmi 2.0 you have 2 minute DisplayPort 1.2 have USB type-c port which is really useful especially for Mac users because they can connect their laptops with this monitor with just one cable and then they can use card reader and USB ports on this monitor too then there is a headphone jack and of course on the bottom side there is one USB upstream port on the back side of the monitor you have SD card reader with a really nice speed of USB 3.0 and you have 2 USB 3.1 ports but there is a downside having a SD card reader and those USB ports on the back side of the monitor because they are not so easy to read you need to rotate your screen and to see where you need to plug SD card or USB on those ports the better solution will be if they could move all those ports all the way here on the edge of the monitor all the way to the side like they did on PD 3200 you serious which I already did review you can find it right here except that I didn’t found any other cons on this monitor there’s another really useful thing on this monitor and that’s a hot key puck hockey puck is something like a remote control for your monitor you can control all the monitor settings straight from it and you don’t need to reach those monitors buttons ever again and there is another really useful thing that you can do with the hot key back you have three customizable buttons that you can set them to do certain things for example I set mine to switch between Adobe RGB srgb and black-and-white color space and that is really important in my workflow because as I already said at the beginning in Photoshop I really love to work in Adobe RGB color space because I have more colors to work with and I can really easily just be the press of a button switch to sRGB color space to see those colors will look on the web for example or just switch to black and white color space when I’m dodging and burning because basically when I’m dodging and burning I playing with highlights and shadows and I always dodge and burn in black and white color space so before I had this monitor I did that by adding a new adjustment layer in Photoshop a new black and white adjustment layer and just toggle it on and off when I need it or I don’t need it but now I have a possibility just by pressing a button to switch to another color mode black and white color mode in all programs that I want Premiere Pro Lightroom or any other programs that I use switching to black and white from time to time is really important in my retouching workflow because in that way I can rest my eyes a little bit from all those colors on the screen and then when I come back to a color mode I can much easier work with those colors and color grade my image besides Adobe RGB srgb and black and white color mode we have rec.709 we have DCI p3 we have HDR DICOM and darkroom modes we have two another use for modes that’s picture by picture and picture in picture in picture by picture you have two screens side-by-side that you can compare different color space for example you want to see srgb or Adobe RGB or Adobe RGB and black and white color space etc so this is really useful if you want to preview different color spray space for prints for maps etc or if your color grading your video and exporting in rec 709 and srgb and I don’t know some other useful situations this is really really nice you can do exactly the same in picture-in-picture mode this is a little bit different you’ll see here on the screen so the bigger portion of the screen is now black and white color mode and the upper corner is in Adobe RGB so you can change this bigger portion of the screen between some modes and see how this will work one more thing that I didn’t mention is the price of this monitor here so the price basically depends of the country you are in but roughly the price is around 1,100 US Dollars and for that price this monitor is providing really awesome specs so if you want a good quality monitor with a great color reproduction that is Technicolor color certified that has a white color gamut that supports almost 100% of Adobe RGB and has a 10-bit display etc this is a really good choice for you I give a two thumbs up for this monitor and I will continue using this one in my professional workflow but if you’re not in that price range you want something a little bit cheaper but still good thank you has same series SW series made for photographers but a little cheaper model so you can check them the link is down there in the description rid guys and that’s a wrap for this review if you have any questions regarding to this monitor you can ask me down there in comments below I will be happy to answer them have fun and see you in my next one episode bye bye