Business Portrait On-location Photo Shoot (behind-the-scenes & Photoshop)

Business Portrait On-location Photo Shoot (behind-the-scenes & Photoshop)


So we’re on our way to a shoot at a car
dealership. I was hired to take pictures of all of the employees there for their
website. So I’m bringing my 5D Mark III, and what do you have there, Tony? -this is the backup camera it’s a 5d mark
II and you have the 70-200 which is perfect for
headshots. This is a 24-105 the nice Sigma f/4 and
again it’s just a back up, we shouldn’t ever need this. We also don’t plan to use the flash, but
if everything else fails if that Cyber Commander fails to trigger the strobes.
we can use the optical slaves from the flash here. -It’s always good to have a back-up, plan
on something failing. So we’re going to load up our car here
and just tell you what here we’re bringing as we load it up. This is our large Paul C. Buff
collapsible soft box so that will give a nice diffused light if there isn’t
adequate lighting in the dealership. -This is the Paul C. Buff Einstein E-640
which will attach to that soft boxe, this will be our main light. Here I have just a
bracket on the stand, it’s just useful to have one of these, you can attach
anything to it. -These are our Vagbond Mini by Paul
C. Buff and they’re batteries to hook our strobes up to/ -That way we don’t have to attach or have power
cords running everywhere where people might trip over it, it’s a little easier
outside of the studio. This is a reflector and we have
diffusers inside as well. Getting pretty crowded in there. -And this
is going to be a hair light or background light as we need it, just a
second light. It will be triggered by the Cyber Commander just like that Einstein
light and will run it from the other Vagabond. -I was told there would be a nice
background there but you’re never sure, we didn’t scope out the place yet so I
was going to use the white side of this backdrop in case their background wasn’t
very appealing. Throw that in there. I also brought a
lint brush just to make sure everyone is nice and clean. I have some painters tape to mark the
spot where everyone can stand so that everyone’s in the same location. And… some tape to hold the backdrop against the wall. -And this is a Panasonic
GH2 on a tripod, this is just going to be a b-roll camera for the
behind-the-scenes. The GH2 is a micro four thirds camera and it’s a little bit
old now but records great 1080p video and it runs forever, it doesn’t shut off
after 30 minutes like most DSLRs do. -I think that’s it. We just have to grab our coats and head
out. -Let’s go. -Alright. You might be able to find an angle where
we could get this line of cars in it, we have to stand up a little bit to look
down but we might be able to do that. -I was thinking this is a little too
colorful. -Yeah it is. You want to do it in my office then? -I have that, the other side is white. -yeah
the wall might be easier, I don’t know how much room there is in there. -yeah -The one other thing for this Tony, is that
we don’t have the nice natural light. -Yeah the lightning is, uh… rough. -We’ll have to use this.. -it’s a little tight to bring
lighting in. And I think we’ll just have one of us
stand behind him with the reflector -Yeah, I think it’ll be easy, so let’s get one more,
I’ll get my settings I’ll put a mark on the floor and we’ll get it done. You guys ready? Yeah will you be my model one more time? So I’m really glad that we picked a spot
that has natural light because a lot of the people here are different heights
and I would have had to adjust the softbox with every different person, it
would have been a lot more set up. So my recommendation for you would be to look
for natural light and bring a flash for fill light. -But be prepared in case it
doesn’t work out and you have to have artificial light. One of the reasons we
picked the 5D Mark III for this job is it takes two memory card slots and it can
write to both cards simultaneously. That way if one of the cards has a
problem we have another copy and we don’t have to go back and reshoot
everything. Yeah there you go. I didn’t think that it was the best I
could have done, I would have preferred if they came into the studio. I mean I know that that wasn’t possible. So now I’m back in my office and i’ve uploaded my pictures. I’m going to show you how to sort
through them, rate them and even edit them. Now that I have my photo in
Photoshop, I’m going to start by cleaning up my subject’s skin. So I have a filter
called portraiture and I love it and it does a really good job. It smooths out the
skin without taking away all the pores, which can kind of leave people looking a
bit lifeless and doll-like. So i’ll zoom in a bit more on his face so I can see
exactly what Portraiture is doing. I don’t want to lose any of these fine
lines or anything like that because it would make him look unnatural. So you can see, I can up the threshold
here and it smooths them out way too much. Looks like a boudoir shot or something
and this is a professional photo so he’s definitely not going for that. These
sliders here control the details. So this would control the large details and
smooth it out less if you were to bring them down and I actually think that looks
pretty good. Let me turn down the fine details a bit so
play around with it, it’s definitely to taste. And my only suggestion would be to
not smooth out people skin too much. Not even women. If you notice any residual marks, you can see there are a few just little
pores you can leave them in and use other tools in Photoshop to take care
of that. So i’m satisfied with this for now and then i’ll zoom in and use my
other tools to take care of any other small imperfections. So I want my spot
healing brush and i use my left bracket. I don’t want to remove too many things
because once again it will look just too unnatural and smooth. I think that looks pretty good the one
other thing I’m going to do is in person I didn’t see that his brow is furrowed at
all so I’m going to take the little furrow out of his brow. And I’ll just
use my lasso tool, circle it, delete and then use content
aware fill, that usually does a good job. And then use Ctrl D to deselect the area. I like to just zoom in to make sure it
looks natural and that actually doesn’t look too great. So I’m gonna try it again. That looks much better. The next thing I’m going to do is just brighten his teeth a little bit. They look great,
they are nice and white, but we’re used to seeing very white teeth in in the media so it’s
nice to just kind of brighten them up a tad bit. And here i added a new layer and i use
the overlay layer I select my paintbrush and use bright
white. You’re going to think this looks insane
but you just fill in just the front teeth. This is really bright, but once i’m done
i’m going to turn down the opacity and it will look natural. We’ll see I don’t want to whiten them them too much. So I’ll zoom out and make sure it looks natural. You can even turn down your opacity on
your brush a little bit it to get these back teeth, but remember that the back
teeth are usually a bit darker, so if you make these really bright, let me show you what I mean. I can’t really because i have the
opacity down, but if you make these too bright it won’t look good. Ok. So the teeth look nice and next I’m
going to just brighten his eyes a tad bit. So i’ll use my Dodge tool, I have the
mid-tones selected and my exposure down to thirty percent and I just do a little half circle. Let me see And the next thing I’m going to do here,
just because he has fair skin is just fill in his eyebrows a
little bit. They’re in the midtones, so I have the mid-tone selected and my
exposure is really low, it’s only sixteen percent, and i’m just going to define
them a little bit. Lastly I’m going to brighten up the
background. I’ll do that by selecting the background
and i’m going to use let’s see, I think I’ll use my magic wand tool
to fix the areas that it’s selected that I don’t want selected I can use this
tool to subtract from the selection but I usually like to press alt, the alt key,
and then it does it for you. You can also use this button here to add to the selection, but i’m actually going to use
layer masks and i’ll show you how. If you aren’t great at selecting by hand, you can
also use the mask tool which i think is easier. So i’m going to show you how to
select the background better using the mask tool. So i will go to the
brightness and contrast and i’m going to raise the brightness of the background,
you can see i missed a big chunk, but that’s not a big deal because then I can
go into the mask and use my paintbrush with either black or white to add or
subtract to the selected area. So white is going to add to the selected area, so I
will make my brush bigger by pressing the right bracket and then just paint it
in. And I selected the wrong parts here, so i’ll use black to get rid
of that. So you can see this is the before and it
still looks natural just a bit brighter and better and this is the after. Since they’re professional photos, you
don’t want them to look too glamorous or touched up that can actually be
embarrassing if they’re going to be meeting with a client and in their
picture they look 40 years younger, that’s going
to be off-putting to the client. So make sure that it looks like they
look in real life but just the best version of themselves. That’s it, pretty simple! If you like this
video please subscribe to our channel and if you like our lessons and teaching
style you can check out our book Stunning Digital Photography. Thank you!

Your first travel camera and lens [Fuji x-t20 & 18-55mm f2.8-4 review]

Your first travel camera and lens [Fuji x-t20 & 18-55mm f2.8-4 review]


– Hey guys, in today’s episode I’m gonna take you
through two national parks and over 300 miles of motorcycling to bring you some photography captured specifically with some of my favorite gear for travel and adventure photography, the X-T20 and the 18-55
variable aperture zoom lens. But before we get into things I just wanted to remind everyone that next week we’ll be giving this guy, the X-T20, away, so it’s not too late to enter the drawing for that. So we’ll announce the winner to that early next week, as soon as we have our grubby paws on the new Fuji X-T3 to replace it. So anyway, look forward to that, and I hope you enjoy today’s episode. (“To the End” by Falls) Alright so you’ve got a trip planned, you’re super-excited about it, it’s something you’ve been planning for months and months. It’s gonna be special and maybe you’ve got an iPhone or a point-and-shoot of some kind but this time you think, because you want this
trip to be so special and have a special place
in those memory banks, you think maybe it’s time to invest in a camera that can really deliver something with a little bit more oomph, so you think maybe it’s
time to up your game. What camera do you choose? Well guys, the options really are endless and you’re going to get a lot of advice and opinions. But you’re here for my opinion and I definitely have opinions. I’ve done a lot of adventuring with a lot of different gear and my personal choice, right now anyway, which is end of summer, 2018, is this guy right here, the Fuji X-T20 with just one lens, the 18-55 F2.8 to F4 variable aperture image stabilized zoom lens. Now of course, Fuji is not the only manufacturer who makes a superb offering
in a small package. But for travel there are some specific reasons why I personally choose Fuji, and like all things these are all going to be controversial. Others will disagree with me and choose to leave nasty comments because, for many people, photography has become religion. To you people I say, “Watch less YouTube and take more photos.” For everybody else, let me explain why I love
Fuji for travel photography. But to do so I’m going to take you on a little photo adventure with me. I’ll give you a sampling of what this little guy can do and why I like it so much. So strap on a helmet and
let’s go take some photos. (“To the End” by Falls) So first let’s talk about why Fuji. There are several reasons why I like Fuji as a travel or adventure platform and the first and most obvious reason is the size and weight. To illustrate this I’m gonna draw in the sand here. On one hand you’ve got IQ, that’s image quality, right. And then you’ve got your continuum. And on this side we have size, I’m just gonna put S, size and weight. I guess I could put C. C for convenience. The X-T20 is right here. That’s why I love it. Over here we’ve got the GFX, or something like that, where the sensor is the size my hand. Over here we have a GoPro, a tiny tiny sensor that’s super-convenient. The X-T20’s right here where it’s pretty good image quality and really convenient. The second reason I love the X-T20 and the Fuji platform in general is the wonderful shooting experience. These are cameras that are as fun to look at as they are to shoot with. The buttons and dials provide a tactile experience that are nostalgic of a time when photography felt more pure and less processed. These cameras appeal to people who see their camera not just as a tool but also as a companion. The other the thing I really like about the X-T20 is it’s interval timer. I’m here at Canyon Overlook looking out over Zion and it’s the middle of the day. It’s not the the greatest
lighting in the world. On the other hand there is a lot of cloud movement. So that can be interesting. It can lend itself well to a time lapse where I’m not actually that interested in a photo, per se. So the X-T20 does a great job there as far as giving you a time lapse to remember your moment. The next reason love Fuji is maybe a reason that’s
a little less obvious and that is Fuji’s sublime color science. (blues music) As a brand with a strong legacy of superb film engineering, Fuji has put together not only a strong base color science but also some spectacular film-like color profiles for JPEG shooting that after years of shooting I personally feel can’t be rivaled. And I know this brings up a whole can of worms, this whole discussion on JPEG verses RAW which is the stupidest argument ever. Those us who don’t mind shooting in JPEG know when and why we do it. For me personally I love shooting in JPEG on Fuji when I’m traveling because those photos come out spectacular straight out of the camera with that filmic, documentary look I know I wanted before I hit that shutter button. Look, there’s nothing
wrong with shooting RAW and spending a lot of time poring over every hue and saturation value if that’s what you love doing, but for many people that’s not why we love photography. – You’re welcome. – Yeah, thank you so much.
– I’m Bill Spencer. – Alright Bill.
– Your name is? – Andrew. – Branch?
– Uh huh. – Okay.
– Yeah. – Glad to have met you and you’re always welcome. – Thank you, thank you. Bill was nice enough to let me meander about his car cemetery. I don’t know, he calls it his junk yard. I could spend all day here. Seriously, this is like my photographic heaven. Guys it’s the act of photographing and documenting a place-time that is most significant. It’s far more important than what RAW photo editor you use, and as far as color is concerned I don’t mind trusting that job to the hands of color scientists who’ve spent decades perfecting a pleasing set of defaults to work from. Fuji really has nailed it, and so many others, in
comparison, haven’t. With many other brands it feels like their attention to JPEG color profiles are an afterthought at best or gimmicky at worst. So I realize, at the end of the day, that color is going to be something that is personal. It comes down to personal preference. But again, you came to me, and I’m just gonna give
you my personal opinion. The third reason that I love shooting Fuji, third, fourth? I don’t remember what, I don’t know number we’re on. But, it’s the lenses. If you need a system that’s going to give you But the reason, but the reason I like Fuji lenses as opposed to all the others is that they’re small and Fuji’s invested heavily in trying to build sublime top quality glass in a small package, that APSC package. And they nailed it. The sharpness, the build quality, the color, the contrast, the ease of use. Fuji’s high-end APSC lenses are probably the most important reason why I don’t ever want to switch away no matter how many advances in camera body technology
Sony makes, for instance. It’s those small, spectacular Fuji lenses that keep me from selling it all and jumping ship like so many other people. This is beautiful, by the way, right here. But anyway, this lens is is no different. Maybe it’s not considered by some to be a pro lens, but I use it for pro level stuff as well as travel and I have no issues with it at all. (chill electronic music) Guys, this is Fuji’s kit zoom lens, and in the world of photography the kit lens typically has serious negative connotations. It implies low quality,
beginner photography. That stop-gap choice you pick up until you can afford the really good lenses, quote unquote. If you look back at the video where I first tried this lens, I wasn’t even sure at that point if I wanted to keep it or not. But a year has passed and I have to say this lens has been on my camera body as much as any of my pro lenses have. Some of my favorite photos came with this lens. There’s several really
good reasons for that but I’ll have to tell
you about those tomorrow because it’s after sunset and I don’t know where
I’m staying tonight. I need to find someplace to stay. So, talk to you tomorrow. 5:45 AM. The way I feel inside right now, this is why I could never be a full-time landscape photographer. But this morning I’m
doin’ it for you guys. So let’s go to Bryce Canyon. (motorcycle starting) As a lazy landscape photographer, the thing I really love about Bryce Canyon is that you can just drive up and get out and walk a few hundred feet and you’re there at
these spectacular vistas. None of this fussing about with hiking and, naw, none of that. Now last night I was talking about this lens. And I have a few things to say about it but first I wanna say that if you’re new to photography, for more general use I would strongly recommend actually sticking to a prime lens or two. Prime lenses are important for beginners. They teach you more about composition than you can ever hope to learn by zooming around with a zoom lens. But having said that, for travel, it’s really hard to have
the flexibility you need with a fixed focal length. There are people who are really attracted to the Fuji X100 series, for instance, that have these fixed
23 millimeter lenses. And in all fairness, those are very attractive and very small devices, but when I traveled with those guys I felt like I was missing a lot of shots, that reach that I needed, that a zoom lens can provide to really get what I was after. So, I mean, if you’re
doing a lot of travel I’d say don’t give in to the draw and the romance of the X100 series before you’ve tried this system. When your traveling you just never know what sort of scene you’re gonna want to capture, and this lens provides you with enough flexibility to capture it. (chill electronic music) Of course there are wider Fuji lenses and some will say these are better for
landscape photography, but for those times I find it works great to just a stitch several shots together into a panoramic. As long as you have a
tripod or steady hands there really is no need
for a super-wide lens. What I did not realize is we’re about, I don’t know if you can see that, you probably can’t. We are about half way from where I stayed the night and where I would like to go, and I did not realize this, but apparently, the pavement ends. (blues music) It looks like I’ve happened upon some sort of motorcycle
event or something. Might as well get some shots while I’m here, I guess. So I mean, it’s not a sports action camera and lens by any stretch of imagination, but, I mean, on the other hand, it did okay, you know. Continuous autofocus
on the XT20’s not bad. I just love the
versatility of this camera. It can do just about
anything you need it to, in a pinch. A lot of people will say, well it doesn’t have a
wide enough aperture, you can’t really get that strong bokeh. That’s definitely true. It’s not going to compete with the 1.4, or even 1.2, of other Fuji prime lenses as far as getting that blurred, out-of-focus background for that really nice subject separation. But on the other hand, in travel photography you rarely need that level of separation. In fact, often, you want everything to be a focus. But if you really want bokeh the trick is to zoom out fully to that 55 millimeter max focal length and they get as close as possible, keeping your subject in frame. This will maximize the bokeh ability of the lens and sensor. (“To the End” by Falls) The other thing I like about this lens is that it has image stabilization. That means that you can get sharper images at lower shutter speeds. It also makes this lens perfect for video. And when I travel it’s nice to be able
to capture video also. The other thing about
video and this platform, is it has this little auto mode that’s meant probably for beginners, which is nice if you
happen to be a beginner. You don’t want to fuss about with all the various dials and what not that are associated
with shooting manually. Since I’m a vlogger I like to be able to, if I’m shooting normally, I’ve got everything set up for video or for photo stills for cinematic settings, ideal for the the correct
frame rate and shutter speed. But if I want to pull that camera around and start videoing myself I don’t want to have to worry about getting the exposure wrong. And you know what, if I’m filming myself it’s not as important that those cinematic type
settings are in place. So I just flip it onto auto mode and turn it around and I can vlog and not have to worry so much about if my exposure is locked in just right because I can’t see this screen. So guys those are all the reasons that I can think of right now why I like this set up. I sort of like it, if you can’t tell, and I highly recommend it to you for your next vacation experience. If you’ve enjoyed coming along with me consider subscribing and definitely check out my other videos on my motorcycle photography adventure. In the meantime, remember: Kindness before cameras. We’ll talk to you again real soon.

Fujifilm X-T3 Mirrorless Camera | First Look Review

Fujifilm X-T3 Mirrorless Camera | First Look Review


Hey there, Jake with B&H. Back and better than ever, It’s Justin from
Fuji with a brand-new camera the X-T3. What can you tell me about this guy? Everything is brand new on it. So, we got a new sensor, we got a new processor,
the housing looks the same. But, there’s lots of changes in there too
with buttons and dials and where things are located. Everything else, it’s all about speed. Speed is the name of the game. Let’s start with the sensor. Tell me about that. So, it’s a 26 megapixel. So, small jump from the the previous generation sensor. It’s the X-Trans CMOS 4. It’s a 4th generation sensor that were up
to. And its backside illuminated which gives us
more speed more flexibility. Lowers our base ISO down to 160. It was 200 in the previous-generation sensors
now 160. But then, all that data is fed through the
new processors. So, it’s been into the X-Processor 4. Which is a quad-core processor that has basically
3x more processing power than the previous generation processor in the X-T2. So, it’s got more capabilities for processing
auto-focus, data for passing file data through the camera. Everything about the cameras meant to do it
quicker, faster, easier. There’s 2.16 million pixels that work as phase-detection
autofocus. The cover 100% of the sensor. Before we really were, we’re pretty broad. Like 60-80% of the sensor was covered before. Depending on vertical or horizontal. Now, we’re a 100%. So, you want to run phase detection and want
to run out to the corner. Yeah, we can do phase-detection autofocus. Track objects from the corner of the frame. Does it have to be in the middle. That’s all good. 425 different AF points that you can select. Also, with the phase-detection algorithms
that’s all redesigned too. So, there’s new algorithms for face and eye
detection. So, for continuous auto focus tracking that’s
all improved in this camera. You were telling me that within the pixel
that they can move independently of each other vertically/horizontally? Explain how that works? Well the autofocus system, the actual in a
phase-detection autofocus point, the way that it looks for focus. It actually has more data points than the
previous generation sensor uses, and it can actually use those points independently. So, we can search horizontally, vertically
or an independent pixel actually hunting for focus by itself. But not only that but now, exposure is working
independently of the autofocus? In the past, the sensor actually had to do
a autofocus calculation, kind-of stop, do an exposure calculation, go back to autofocus
and do these things together. Kind of like they were they were together. They were tied at the hip. Now, they’re independent. So, the exposure can be changing while the
autofocus is tracking and it doesn’t miss a beat. Sportsfinder mode. Tell me about that. Sportsfinder mode is a 1.25x crop. It actually gives you a bright-line frame
on the EVF. So, you can see what’s happening outside your
frame. And it’s 16-megapixel. But, it allows us to shoot up to 30fps. First, so It’s upping the speed of the camera. Increasing your focal lengths, a little bit. But, it’s giving you that capability similar
to high-speed crop mode. Kind of a fun, throwback feature on this is
the digital microprism? Yeah, we’ve added some kind of new little
tweaks of features. We’ve now added a digital microprism to the
camera. So, in the old days used to have on some SLR
cameras that little, like, diamond cut area that kind of sparkled. So, you can use that now to just focus if
you want to. Enough about photos, let’s talk about video. 4K internal? Tell me as little about that. Okay, 4K we can now do 60p. So, external out to a recorder we’re 4:2:2
10-bit and internal were 4:2:0 10-bit. Still 10-bit though. It’s a 1.18x crop. At 60p. So, it’s a little bit of a crop. When you go to 30p, it’s the full sensor
readout. There’s no crop there and also having higher
megabits per second rating. So that the 60p is 200 Mbps. The, 30p is 400 Mbps. 120fps is also on this
camera. 120fps is on this camera, yeah. The previous camera the X-H1 added 120fps. But it was using upscaling to go to 120fps. This camera doesn’t need that. So, it’s not upscaling anymore. It’s a 1.29x crop. But, being able to get rid of the upscaling
to give us better images, less moiré, less artifacts. We’ve got H.264 and we’ve got H.265. We;ve added those 2 codecs, H.265 looking to the future. But, also the 10-bit capability of H.265. Where, H.264 has some limitations internally. It’s only 8-bit. Recording internally to the SD card. External we can run higher out. But, then internal codec limits us to 8-bit. We’ve added the H.265 to give us true, 10-bit
Internal recording. You can shoot ALL-Intra or Long G.O.P.? Or, Long GOP as I like to say. Explain to me, which one for which? All-Intra will work up to 30p. 60p has to
go to Long-GOP. You’ve always had peaking but now you’ve
added Zebra? Yes, we’ve added Zebra functionality to
the camera. So, left and right zebras, and also being
able to set the percentage. So, you can pick and choose to fit
your needs. Hybrid log gamma is coming to the camera. So, it’s coming, just hang tight, hopefully
before the end of the year will have some hybrid log gamma capability to the camera. To the naked eye, it looks pretty similar. But, there’s a few different improvements
on here. There’s lots of little things hidden around
in it. Previously, the diopter didn’t lock. So, it is really easy to accidently bump it. But, now I added it like a watch crown. So, you could pull out on the diopter ring,
turn it and push it back in and it locks that position. So, you can’t indivertibly just spin the
dial and end up with it–feelin’ like you’re blind when you look through the finder. We’ve also made it that the side door comes
off. So, we can actually detach the side door on
the camera. So, if you’re shooting video and you don’t
want the door to get in the way. You know things get knocked around, cables
pulling on it. All kinds of things. The door pops off easy little slider. Just pops in, pops off. We’ve also you notice there’s some different
connectors on the here. We’ve added a headphone jack. On the side of the camera. You’ll also notice a USB-C port on the side
of there. So, for charging the battery in the camera,
for some accessories. But also, if you want to run off an external
battery pack, we can plug into that cable and give the camera additional power. But also, the new hand grips. Still charges with the AC adapter. But, with boost mode now it doesn’t need to
have the hand grip. So, we can use boost without the hand grip. Justin brought a surprise guest: A whopping
200mm f2. Okay, what is…wow! What am I looking at here? Well you’re looking at sort of the longest
prime focal length lens we’ve made so far. Be available later this fall. But yeah, 200mm f2. Big optic—ships with a 1.4 teleconverter
included with it so it’s really two lenses in a box. 5-stops of OIS. Perfect match the X-T3 I feel. The first time I shot an X-T3, I was shooting
rally cars. I was shooting them cresting over the top
of a hill with a T3 and the 200mm f2. Surprise! Another surprise, surprise guest! The 8-16mm f/2.8. This table is getting crowded. What is this I’m looking at? All right, so it’s the new widest-angle lens
in our family. It’s an 8-16mm f/2.8. So, it’s a fixed f/2.8 aperture across that range. Yeah, it’s a little bit of a beefy lens. But, it’s kind of a unique little piece of
glass. 8mm has got lots of depth-of-field even at
f/2.8. But, giving you more flexibility for low-light
shooting. And yeah, you need to be careful where your
feet are with it and how you hold it. It might see you. Look at all these things. All these toys from Fuji. Justin, thank you so much. Thank you so much. Always a pleasure. Jake from B&H, just keep shooting.

GOOD VS BAD Photographers // Don’t Get Scammed

GOOD VS BAD Photographers // Don’t Get Scammed


hey what’s up guys welcome back to my
channel so in this video I want to break down the differences between a
professional photographer versus an amateur photographer especially for
those who are interested in fashion portraits so if your model and you’re
looking to book a photographer but you don’t want to spend so much money
wasting your time and all that with someone who’s not as good how do you
know the difference how do you know who’s a really good photographer and
who’s gonna deliver versus someone who’s not gonna deliver and just waste your
time take your money and then you end up with images that you’re not so happy
with so let’s break it down guys so in this video I want to tell you guys how
to spot someone who’s professional and who you should work with versus someone
who you shouldn’t work with alright guys so one of the key differences to a
professional photographer versus an amateur photographer is that a
professional photographer what most of the time always have a website now a
website is really their main platform this is where they host a lot of their
work and if you’re really a professional a professional should have a website
with their contact details with their portfolio and all of that versus an
amateur most amateurs photographers would claim oh we’ll just look at my
work on Instagram oh I don’t need a website I have Instagram just check that
out but if you’re really a professional photographer booking real clients real
clients are not gonna look at your Instagram accounts I mean they might but
they also need to see a website is something polished they want to see what
publications you’ve been in they want to see if you have media behind you if
you’re represented etc so most of this information will be found on the website
so that’s one way to distinguish it is that a professional photographer most of
the time always has a website an amateur photographer has excuses and other
websites another way to spot a professional photographer versus an
amateur is that a professional photographer would never ever list their
rates so you’re not gonna find their rates on their Instagram accounts you’re
not gonna find their rates on their web they’re gonna actually to contact them
because they need a creative brief they need to know what exactly you’re trying
to shoot and they’ll get back to you with the quotes now an amateur
photographer would post their rates on Instagram I’ve seen amateur
photographers supposed to rate saying hey I’m doing a two-for-one special
right now I’m doing like a special Thanksgiving promotion for my
photography I’m shooting two headshots for 150 stuff like that that’s something
that should raise a question mark when you’re looking at photographers to use
for your shoots another way to distinguish a professional photographer
versus an amateur is their use of light in so professional photographers would
always use flash equipments and even if they’re shooting outdoors they still use
flash equipment sometimes or if they don’t use flash though use a balance
board or stuff like that so amateur photographers they just tend to shoot
with nothing but just the camera and a lot of times they claim well I like to
shoot at natural lights I just want to shoot a natural light natural light
works best for me or they go to a studio set up and they don’t have any flash
equipment or they don’t know how to use the flash equipment and that’s because
there’s a lot of training that goes into lighting techniques and learning how to
use the flash properly and how to like get the right tone and shadows and all
of that so there’s a lot of like training intense training that
photographers has to go through to learn how to really optimize those things so
amateur photographers are gonna stay away from flash as much as possible
professional photographers will welcome flash photography as much as possible
another thing is that a professional photographer would have a set of prime
lenses and what I mean by prime lenses prime lenses are like your 24
millimeters you’re 50 you’re 85 etc and most of the time you wouldn’t see a lot
of professional photographers using zoom lenses I mean they might depending on
the situation but they prefer to use prime lenses because the quality that
you get out of prime lenses are just so much better amateur photographers only
have one lens for the most parts and that’s the lens that came with
camera the manufacturer lens they use this for everything whereas professional
photographers when you go on a shoot with them you see them walking around
with several lenses maybe they have like a bag that where they hold saw your
lenses and they’re changing their lenses constantly during the shoots because
they’re trying to get different angles different perspectives different depth
of fields etc now when it comes to retouching professional photographers
either retouch the pictures themselves or they send it to a professional
retoucher or retouch warehouse to retouch the pictures for them with some
instructions and create brief and all that amateur photographers do all the
retouching themselves always the key difference is that professional
photographers would use professional software like Photoshop Lightroom
retouch Academy whatnots amateur photographers like to use apps
that you find on your mobile devices okay another dead giveaway is that
professional photographers always shoot Camera Raw now Camera Raw this is really
the image in the highest quality without any compression without any
interpretation from the from the camera because when you shoot JPEGs what
happens is that the camera shoots raw or your camera interprets the colors and
the shadow and the light and all that and really compresses all of that
information and gives you a JPEG but when you shoot RAW you’re getting
everything as is and then it gives you the flexibility and creative freedom to
adjust the exposure adjust the color temperature and all of that so so always
actually a photographer is like hey or you shoot it raw or you shouldn’t JPEG
if they’re shooting JPEG then that’s a dead giveaway that’s a red flag you
should not work with this person another dead giveaway is that professional
photographers always always will shoot in manual mode while amateur
photographers would shoot in Auto so a professional photographer would
always love to work with a team they prefer to have a stylist on the shoot
they like to have a makeup and a hair stylist as well and also a photographer
assistants well an amateur photographer and amateur photographer will prefer to
work alone they don’t really suggest you having
other people on the set because one maybe they don’t know what they’re doing
or they’re not so confident and they don’t want other people to see their
process if you guys like this video I always appreciate thumbs up if you have
questions feel free to hit me in the comment box down below, I always appreciate
it you guys I’ll see you guys my next one

PHOTOGRAPHING a NILE CROCODILE on the CHOBE RIVER. Botswana. Wildlife Photography. Canon.

PHOTOGRAPHING a NILE CROCODILE on the CHOBE RIVER. Botswana. Wildlife Photography. Canon.


Hi! I am Sabine from Pangolin Photo Safaris. I am out in the National Park in Botswana. I currently have a crocodile in the water right in front of me. I would like to show you how I
go about photographing some details on this beautiful crocodile. To photograph an animal, it’s not always necessary to get the whole animal, or the whole head in your frame. Sometimes it’s nice to really concentrate on some details. Like that
beautiful green eye of the reptile, or maybe even the pattern on the skin. Let’s see what we can do with it. First of all (before I get started) what I will do is go down low to eye level with the crocodile, which will give me a much more intimate perspective. Being right on a level with them. All right, so I am going use those canvas flaps to rest my lens on. There is beautiful sunlight on the crocodile. What I will do is that I will slightly under-expose. Going -1/3 with my exposure compensation, so as to not blow out highlights, because there are strong highlights on the crocodile. I will then use a shutter speed of roughly 1/2000 of a second, which is double my
focal length. I am on a boat and there’s a few waves hitting the boat now and
then, so I just want to make sure the image is nice and sharp. There’s good enough light. I also want to increase my f-stop, or aperture, to a value of about f 10, to make sure the eye is nice and sharp. The crocodile is not too far away from me, so just to get it really nice and sharp. I zoom right in. Frame the eye a little bit towards the top right hand side, because it is looking to the left. …and there we go. Beautiful! Nice contrast between the green eye and the yellowish skin of the crocodile. So,
it is instantly recognisable as a crocodile, although you don’t see the full animal. Another cool detailed shot would be the tail. I see his tail is now and then flipping out of the water, and is being hit by some waves. This time though because the tail is a bit backwards, I will shoot a bit into
the light. So, I am just going to change my exposure compensation to about
+1 2/3, to make sure that the scales are really bright. What I basically do is wash out the water and get a completely
white background behind my crocodiles tail, which will probably (later) look
really cool if I convert it to a black and white image. Yeah! That looks about right. If you are not sure how much + you need, the easiest way is to switch on your highlight alert or ‘blinkies’ in the menu, which is a little bit of a flashing when you review your image. So as you look back – what should be
happening – is that you should have flashing in the water behind your crocodiles tail, or whatever you shoot your subject. You don’t want any flashing to happen on
the subject itself. It means you went a bit too far. You must then dial it a bit back. The whole background behind should be flashing, so you lost all the detail, and you get a completely white background right behind your subject. Thanks very much for watching today. Please don’t forget to subscribe on the link below. Press the Bell button for more info on new videos we send out. Cheers. Have a good day.

The Carbonaro Effect: Inside Carbonaro – Live Photo Mishap | truTV

The Carbonaro Effect: Inside Carbonaro – Live Photo Mishap | truTV


What do we got? Um, this is
for my friend. So, in order to get people
to come over to my counter, the store put on a special
picture framing sale. He walked up with
a yellow coupon in his hands that said “Framing Frenzy,” and it offered
a $10 framing deal that was apparently
too good to pass up. …or too much matting
or anything like that. Okay. Yeah? Here, I’ll show you what this
looks like in here. Okay. Yeah. All right. So when that’s in there, that — lock this up. I think when something’s like
a square size like that, that it looks best just hung
in a square, you know? It looks pretty — Yeah. It looks pretty cool
like that. Seems like it fits. Yeah. I think that looks pretty good. Cool. Yeah. So this would — Oh! Sorry about that. This would go with the $10 deal, this size frame. Something — So I can have them ring it up here, or — I think there’s something — There was like a baby child
in the middle of the photo… Oh, that — …that’s not there
anymore. I don’t — I’m sorry.
I don’t understand. Are you saying you want — I can’t do anything about,
like, coming out farther. No. There’s like, in the original
picture that we took, there was — we were holding a child. Okay. Her nephew. Okay. And that’s not what’s in the frame right now. Okay. I know what it is. It can shift. So if something shifts, it might shift the scale
of the picture within it. So maybe it shifted. But if there was a whole something in there, that’s my fault. I’m sorry. It’s because it was taken
with a camera phone. Something’s not gonna shift out of it,
like, that quickly. Okay. It does have — ’cause a camera phone’s taking a picture
that’s not a still. It’s taking a little mini piece of video. Yeah,
that’s what we did. Exactly. For sure. Yeah. So, when that picture’s
taken with a camera phone, it’s not just grabbing a still like a camera. It’s grabbing a mini piece of video. So there’s — So, we were
just sitting there with those exact expressions and the baby
was coming up — It’s microseconds. Through video? And somehow that’s happening
on this photo right now? Yeah. The pixel information is still there. Okay. [ Laughs ] I don’t — I don’t know
what’s happening right now. This is really weird. Okay. All right. Let me get —
I’ll get my manager. Okay. And they’ll explain it,
but it’s a video piece. But I can get them to — We can — I can fix it for you,
and you’ll be fine. Okay. Okay? I’ll be right back. Thank you. Sorry. ♪♪ ♪♪