Karabo’s TOP 5 WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY images. The Chobe River. Botswana.

Karabo’s TOP 5 WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY images. The Chobe River. Botswana.


Hello! My name is Karabo. Welcome to Chobe. I am with Pangolin Photo Safaris. Today I would like to talk about my 5 best shots out of the Chobe. Before we get started, please
don’t forget to subscribe to our channel. Thank you. Hello everyone. I’m back again here at the Pangolin Chobe Hotel. As promised, earlier on, when we were on the Chobe River, I had said we would talk about our top five best
shots from The Chobe. So I am back here to take a
look at some of our images. I was using my Canon EOS 5D Mark III
for all the images that I took. Now it’s time to take a look at
the images and let’s see what they look like. Let us take a
look at our first image. I have a, an image of a Cape Buffalo here with an African darter. I think what contributed to this shot
being in my list is.. We are looking at a few factors. We’re looking at the light. The light was perfect for this sighting..and then also the interaction between the two species. A big mammal and a small bird. It was amazing to see the two
having this kind of interaction. We also parked the boat nicely, and then
went down on the side of the boat to take your low angle shot. I then also tried to drop my
f-stop to blur the background. The end result
is what you see here. Our second image. An image of this huge elephant. Normally in The Chobe we get good
sightings of elephant crossings… they cross from one side of the river to the other. So there’s always a nice spot to park our boat. Um, take our cameras out and
then we can do variations. We can do detailed shots, or just do
wide angle shots if you have a wide angle lens. So for this shot, we looked at the
lighting…we looked at the setting …the elephant was
crossing right in front of us. And then I used my Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS II USM lens for this shot. I actually went down again to try
and take a low angle shot. As you can see, the elephant is elevated. It’s a little bit higher. And then we took this
shot from a low position. Okay. The third image is a picture of a leopard. I’ll go back to the issue of
lighting, because it’s important. Without light you can’t
really take nice images. So, for this leopard here, we
found it lying on this old tree. It had some
nice light on it…as you can see. We used our zoom lens,
the Sigma 150-600mm lens to capture the image. And then the other important thing that
I did was just to shift my subject to the left hand side of the frame. As you can see, the image
looks a bit creative. You can see the branches are also forming part of the image as some leading lines. So, the issue here was
lighting and then composure. Our fourth image….in photography, there’s always good things to look for. And also you need to have a high sense of observation as a wildlife photographer, Because sometimes…. nature has a way of
surprising us. On this day, as we were heading out of the park – it was late in the evening – we saw this lion. …and then our guide told us that the
lion will go down to the river to drink. So we parked yet again, a nice position,
where there was juuuust the last bit of light on that day, and then the lion
came down to the river to drink. So in this image here, I was trying
to get a reflection shot, which I successfully managed to get, as you can see. And then we waited for the lion to
look towards me, and then I got the shot. So, the result is this…this
nice reflection on the water. And then last but not least, we have a shot of this hippo. Again, we work hand in hand with
our guides in our activities… we either see the sighting, or our guide sees the sighting. So in this scenario,
our guide spotted this hippo. So we are able to get this a cool shot. And then later on I loaded the image to Lightroom. I edited the image and then converted
it to a black and white shot. As you can see. Thank you for taking time to
take a look at our videos. I am sure you can agree that the Chobe is
indeed is a place of choice. It’s very lovely out here, and
then we hope to see you soon. Don’t forget to subscribe to our channel. Thank you.

How To Make The 3D Pop-Out Photo Effect In Photoshop – Out of Bounds Effect

How To Make The 3D Pop-Out Photo Effect In Photoshop – Out of Bounds Effect


How To Make The 3D Pop-Out Photo Effect In
Photoshop Welcome back to another very exciting tutorial
here at the PhotoshopTrainingChannel.com. My name is Jesus Ramirez and you can find
me on Instagram @JRfromPTC. In this video, I’m going to show you how to
create the 3D Pop-out Photo Effect in Photoshop. If you want to follow along, you can download
the watermarked previous or license the full resolution files from Adobe Stock. You can
find the links to these images right below this video in the description. We’re going to start out with these two layers,
the Photo frame background and snowboarder. I have them on two separate layers, of course.
And what we want to do is we’re going to isolate this black area here. We can, of course, create
a selection around the black area to isolate it, but I like working with vectors better
because they give you smaller file sizes and they’re easier to edit. So we’re going to
create a vector around the frame. So I’m going to press Z on the keyboard. I’m holding the
Z key. I’m not letting go of it, and I’m going to Zoom In to the corner here and release
the Z key, it will bring me back to the Pen Tool, which I had selected. Make sure that
you have Shape on the Options Panel on this drop down. Click on one corner then click
on the next, hold the space bar, pan down. Click on the bottom right corner and then
click on the bottom left corner. I’m going to hold the space bar, again, click and drag
to pan up, and complete that path. Now, the color and the shape doesn’t really
matter, so I’m just going to make it red, just so that you can see it. There it is–red.
What I’m going to do now is enable the layer of the snowboarder. I’m going to click and
drag her up to the top of the layers panel, and I’m also going to double tap here on the
Zoom Tool, just so we can see the image at 100%. And, actually, now that I’m looking
at it at 100%, I’m actually going to right-click on it and choose Fit on Screen so that I can
see the entire composition. Then I’m going to press Ctrl J, Command J on the Mac, to
duplicate. So now I have two copies. I’m going to disable the one on the top by clicking
on this I icon and the one in the bottom here, I’m going to clip to the shape below it. So,
with that layer selected, I’m going to press Ctrl Alt G, Command Option G on the Mac. Then,
I’m going to enable the layer right above that and I’m just going to make a selection
around the snowboarder. So I’m going to click on the Quick Selection
Tool and I’m simply going to click and drag around her. Now you don’t have to be very
precise at this moment. You can just click and drag, and we’ll worry about the details
later. So we’re just going to select her as quickly as we can. So I’m just clicking and
dragging, and notice that my selection is not very accurate. You shouldn’t spend too
much time at this moment. If you select an area like this part here that is obviously
not going to be a part of the selection, I’m going to hold Alt, Option on the Mac, click
and drag just to refine that selection just a little bit more. You know that I have the selection active
around the snowboarder. I’m going to select that top layer and click on the Layer Mask
icon to create a mask around the snowboarder. So what I’m going to do now is click on this
top layer, hold shift and click on the layer below it, so they’re both selected, and I’m
going to click on this chain link icon here to link those two layers. What that allows
you to do is when you move one of those layers with the Move Tool, it moves both, and they
can be in different groups and they can be separated. So that allows us to keep those
two layers together. What I’m going to do now is press Ctrl T,
Command T, to Transform, to scale this and adjust it accordingly. If you can’t see the
corner handles that you want to click and drag on, you can press Ctrl 0 (zero), that’s
Command 0 on the Mac, for the bird’s-eye view that allows you to see all four corner handles.
Then, I’m going to click and drag on this one here to scale it down by holding Shift
Alt, That’s Shift Option on the Mac. Now, at this point, we can go back and adjust the
layer mask if we need to, so I’m going to Zoom In just so we could see the areas that
we need to work on. So we need to work on this area, and then, the blue outline around
her body. So we can adjust that by clicking on the layer mask in the Properties Panel.
You can click on Mask Edge. If you don’t see the Properties Panel, you can go into Window,
Properties, click on Mask Edge, and then, maybe shift the Edge with a negative value
and see how that has adjusted so. And keep adjusting it and making sure that that line
is gone, but we don’t lose any detail that we want to keep. Also, with this brush selected, I can click
and drag here on the hair, and hopefully we’ll get a better selection. I didn’t do that good
of a job here, so I’m just going to leave it like this for now and I can come back with
the brush tool and fix that in a moment. So I’m going to press OK, click on the Brush
Tool, paint with white in areas that I want to keep, so I’m just going to paint with the
white in these areas here, and I know I’m selecting some of the sky, but that’s okay.
I’m going to get rid of that by pressing X in the keyboard, which swaps the foreground
and background color. And with black, I’m going to paint on that layer mask to get rid
of the sky here, and I’m not going to take the time to do so now. I will do that after
the tutorial and you can see the final image, but I’m just going to go around the entire
image and just make sure that everything is masked out accordingly. And in most of these
areas, everything seems to be okay. I know we got to work on this area here, and like
I said, I’ll do that after I’m done with the tutorial and you can see my final result.
But for now, we’ll just leave it as is. I’m going to press Z on the keyboard, right click
and choose Fit to Screen. And what we’re going to work on now is extra
elements that are going to help our composite look much more realistic and much more interesting.
So, from the Adobe Stock Library, I downloaded two elements that we’re going to use. We’re
going to use this shovel with the snow, so let me just double click on that to open that
up. And, by the way, the links to these files are on the description. You have to download
them from Adobe Stock. They’re not free, but you can use a watermarked preview to practice
on. So I would recommend you doing that, just so that you can have a way to practice and
learn. So, the first thing I got to do is get rid of the shovel. So I’m going to click
on the Lasso Tool and I’m going to make a selection around the shovel, and as you can
see, it’s not very accurate. That’s okay. Then I can hold Shift and Backspace or you
can go into Edit, Fill to bring up the Fill Menu. Under Contents, choose Content Aware
and press OK. And Photoshop will Fill In those pixels and make the shovel disappear. I’m
going to press Ctrl D, Command D on the Mac, to Deselect, and this is what we’re going
to work with. The first thing that we need to do is mask out the snow from the ground. So I’m going to go into the Channels panel
and I’m going to look for the channel that’s got the most contrastóin this case, the blue
channel. I’m going to click and drag on the blue channel and drop it here in the new channel
icon to duplicate it. Now with the duplicate channel, I can start making adjustments to
it. The first thing I’m going to do is fill with white the areas I want to keep for sure,
so with the Lasso Tool selected, I’m just going to click and drag and make a very rough
selection on the areas for sure I want to keep, which is all this top part here. Now
that I have a selection active, I can fill with white. White is currently my foreground
color. To fill with the foreground color, you can hold Alt and Backspace, Option Backspace
on the Mac; then Ctrl D, Command D on the Mac, to Deselect. Now we got to work on this bottom part. There’s
a feature in Photoshop called Apply Image. If we go into Image, Apply Image, what Apply
Image allows you to do is to take an image and apply it onto itself using a Blend Mode.
In this case, we’re taking the blue copy, apply in the Screen Blend Mode into itself,
so notice what happens here on the snow on the edge. It essentially turns white, which
is what we want. You could, of course, apply a Multiply Blend Mode and it will give you
a different result. In this case, I think I’m going to go with Screen, and then, I’ll
just work on the edges in the next step. So I’m going to press OK and what I’m going to
do now is go into Image, Adjustment Levels, and bring the levels to the rightóthe dark
values to the right. So we have more contrast between the snow and the ground. And remember,
we’re going to be making this selection; anything that is white in the screen will be selected.
Anything that is black will be deselected. So I’m going to drag this one over to the
left a little bit. I’m looking at the edges here and, maybe, drag this one to the left
as well, and press OK. Now, what I’m going to do now is click on the Brush Tool, select
black as my foreground color so I can paint with black. I’m going to increase the size
of my brush by clicking on the right bracket key on the keyboard and I’m just going to
paint with black. And, again, you don’t have to be very accurate. As long as you get close
enough, you should be good. And I’m just painting these pixels away which represent the floor.
And, once again, I’m going to go into Image, Adjustment, Levels, and darken up some of
the darker pixels and brighten up the midtones a little bit, and press OK. So this selection
looks like it would work, so I’m going to press Ctrl, Command on the Mac, click on the
blue copy icon to make a selection around it. Go back into the Layers Panel and the
Background Layer, which is the only layer that we have on this document. I’m going to click on the New Layer Mask icon
and notice now that the floor is no longer there. Now, it’s not a perfect selection but
it’s going to work because the color of the floor and the color of the table are very
similar colors and I think we’re going to be able to get away with it. So what I’m going
to do is I’m just going to simply click on the layer, select the Move Tool, click and
drag the layer over onto the other file by hovering over the tab, and then, coming down
and releasing, and there’s our file. It’s a really big layer. So we’re going to need
to scale it down; Ctrl T, Command T on the Mac, to Transform. We can’t see the corner
handles, so I’m going to press Ctrl 0 (zero), Command 0 on the Mac, there’s the corner handles,
and now, I’m going to adjust them accordingly. I’m holding Shift as I’m clicking on these
corner handles to keep the file constrained. The angle is not really matching my scene,
so I’m going to right click on it and choose Flip Horizontal, and from here, I can match
the scene a little better. I can even distort it if I want to, maybe right click on it and
choose Distort, just to get a better perspective of the scene that we’re working with, maybe
something like this, and press Enter when you’re done. Now that we have this file in
place, I’m going to press Z on the keyboard, right click, Fit to Screen, then I’m going
to press V on the keyboard to get the Move Tool and, maybe, I can move it around if I
need to, and I’m going to click on the New Group icon to create a new group. I’m going
to click and drag this snow layer in there. I’m going to collapse it and now it’s in that
group. Next I’m going to hold Alt, Option on the
Mac, and click on the Layer Mask icon to create a black layer mask which hides everything.
Then, with the Brush Tool, I can paint with white on this layer mask to start revealing
some of that snow. So I’m going to use the bracket keys on the keyboard as I work to
increase and decrease the size of my brush. So I’m just painting with white. Just bring
in some of that snow. And if you make a mistake, you can press X on the keyboard to paint with
black and, maybe, shape the snow a little bit better, so, maybe something like that.
What we’re going to do now is work with different elements, so I’m going to open up the Libraries
Panel and I’m going to open up this file here, which is these snow elements that were also
downloaded from Adobe Stock. By the way, if you don’t have Photoshop CC, you won’t have
the Libraries Panel, but you can still download the watermarked previews onto your desktop
and bring them into Photoshop as you would any other image. So you can still work with
the previews. So, what I’m going to do now is just select
one of these elements and bring it over to the file that I’m working with. So I’m going
to click on the Lasso Tool and I’m going to select this element first. So I’m going to
select it, go to Edit and Copy, or you can press Ctrl C. I’m going to deselect that element,
Ctrl D, Command D on the Mac, go back into the file that we’re working with and I’m going
to paste it here, Ctrl V, Command V on the Mac, and there it is. As you can see, it’s
a high resolution file, which is good. I’m going to change the Blend Mode to Screen,
so the black pixels disappear and we only keep the bright pixels, in this case, the
snow. Then, I’m going to press Ctrl T, Command T to Transform, Ctrl 0 (zero), Command 0 for
bird’s eye view, and I’m going to scale this element down. I’m going to press Ctrl 0, Command
0 again to zoom back in, and I’m just going to rotate it and make it fit accordingly. Now, in this case, I’m going to flip it horizontally.
So right click on it, flip horizontally, and keep rotating it, so maybe something, something
like this. And I can, you know, scale it more if I need to, or rotate it more if I need
to. So whatever distortions I need to do for it to work, so, maybe something like that.
So I just press Enter to accept that transformation, and I’m going to use one more element. I’m
going to use this one right down here. Again, Ctrl C to copy and paste that in here. Change
the Blend Mode to Screen, Ctrl T to Transform, that’s Command T on the Mac; Ctrl 0 (zero),
Command 0 on the Mac, and scale this one in as well, and I’m going to zoom in and rotate
this one into position, maybe right about here or so. But I want this one to be in the
back, so I’m going to click and drag this one and place it way back here. And I’m going
to press V to select the Move Tool and I’m going to move it around just to fit it into
position, so maybe something like this. And, actually, I just realized that I made
a mistake. Notice how this element gets cut off right in this area? That’s because this
element needs to be right here. It needs to be in-between the layer that’s popping out
the subject and the layer that is clipped to the vector, so right in-between those two.
So, now the snow follows through into the frame. Now the last thing that we’re going
to do is we’re going to work with shadows. So, first, with the snow here on the table,
it needs a shadow. So I’m going to open up this group, double click on the snow layer
here and click on Drop Shadow. Notice the little drop shadow there. You can use the
settings that I have here if you like. Notice that I’m not using black. I’m using the dark
burgundy color, which is similar to that color you see right there, right under the frame,
and just brought the Intensity down to about 25% using Multiply, and notice the light is
coming from the right. The light on her face is coming from the right and so is the light
hitting the frame. So you sort of want to match that with the shadows, so the shadows
will be on the left side, sort of like here, behind the frame. So this is what this is
showing. So if I were to bring it up to 100%, this
is what that looks like. Obviously that’s too much, so leave it at about 25% or so.
And what I’m going to do now is right above this snow element here, I’m going to create
a new layer and I’m just going to paint with this color here under the board, so you can
click on the Eyedropper Tool. Select that color and maybe make it a little bit darker
because it’s too light, something like that, and just continue that shadow that’s coming
off the board. And, actually, let me drag this layer up on top of the group and just
continue painting that shadow that’s coming off the board, so maybe something like this.
And then, change the Blend Mode to Multiply, and bring that shadow way down, so, maybe,
something like that. Now, the only difference between the final image that you saw in the
beginning and this one is that with the final image, I took a little more time working with
the mask a little more time placing the elements, and moving things around so they fit a little
bit better. But these are the techniques that I use to create this effect. If you decide to create an image using tutorial
or any of my tutorials, then upload it to Instagram with the hashtag #PTCvids. Every
so often, I do a search for that hashtag, and if I find your image, I’ll leave a comment. And that’s it for this tutorial. I hope that
you enjoyed it and that you learned something new. If you have any comments or questions,
leave them down below. If you enjoyed the tutorial, don’t forget to click that Like
button and share this video with a friend. If you haven’t already, subscribe to the Photoshop
Training Channel now. Thank you for watching and I’ll talk to you again soon.

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Make a Personalized,  3D Pop Out Photo Effect!

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Make a Personalized, 3D Pop Out Photo Effect!


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
I’m going to you show you how to make your color photos more engaging, fun and personal.
You can apply these techniques to virtually any photo. Open a color image you’d like to
use. I downloaded this one from Shutterstock.com. The first step is to convert it into a Smart
Object, so we can make adjustments to it non-destructively. It’ll also allow us to replace the photo with
a different one without having to redo all the effects. To do this, click the icon at
the upper, right of the Layers panel and click “Convert to Smart Object”. Make a copy of it by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + J. Click off the eyeball next to the copy to hide the layer and click the thumbnail of the bottom layer to make it active. Go to Filter and Filter
Gallery. Open the Texture folder and click “Grain”. Make the Intensity: 20, the Contrast:
50 and the Grain Type: Clumped. Then, click OK. Go back to Filter and Lens Correction. Click the Custom tab and drag the Vignette Amount all the way to the left. Then, click OK. Click the Adjustment layer icon and click Hue/Saturation. Drag the Saturation all the
way to the left to remove all the color. We want to make new layer below the adjustment
layer. To do this, Ctrl-click or Cmd-click on the New Layer icon. Open your Rectangular Marquee Tool and drag a rectangle over the general area you’d like to revert back to color. Go to Edit and Stroke. I’ll make the Stroke: 30 pixels, however, depending on the
resolution of your photo, you may want to use a different amount. Make the Location:
Inside and click the color box. Pick white. Then, click OK on both windows. To deselect it, press Ctrl or Cmd + D. To angle your frame, open the Transform Tool by pressing Ctrl or
Cmd + T. Go to a corner and when you see a curved, double-arrow, rotate it to angle you
like. To reposition it over the area, go inside the Transform and drag the frame. Then, press Enter or Return. Ctrl-click or Cmd-click on the thumbnail of the frame to make a selection of its shape. Press “Q” to make it into a quick mask. Open your Paint Bucket Tool. Make sure your foreground color is white and “Contiguous” is checked. Click outside the frame to delete
the quickmask, leaving just the quick mask inside of the frame intact. Press “Q” again
to revert it back into a selection. Invert the selection by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + Shift + I. Make the top layer active. Keep in mind, the photo in this layer is in color because
it doesn’t have an adjustment layer above it that desaturates its color. Click the Layer Mask icon to make a layer mask of the selection next to it. Make the layer visible. Ctrl-click or Cmd-click on the thumbnail of the frame layer again to make a selection of its shape. Press “Q” to make it into a quick mask and click the Paint Bucket Tool inside the frame
to delete the quick mask. Press “Q” to revert into a selection. Make the frame layer active,
fill the selection with white and deselect it. Because we filled the selection with white,
this layer is no longer a frame; it’s a white box. Double-click on it to open its Layer
Style window. Click Drop Shadow. Make the opacity: 40% and uncheck Global Light. Make the Angle: 138 degrees, the Distance: 50 pixels and the Size: 20 pixels. Then, click OK. Next, we’ll enlarge the color photo. To do this, Shift-click on the top layer to highlight
the top 3 layers and open your Transform Tool. Zoom out by pressing Ctrl or Cmd and the minus
sign on your keyboard. Go to a corner and when you see a diagonal, double-arrow, press
and hold Alt or Option + Shift and drag it out to a size you like. Then, reposition it and press Enter or Return. To fit it back onto your canvas, press Ctrl or Cmd +0. We’re ready to add text. Open your Horizontal Type Tool. Choose a font. I using a handwritten-style
font called, “MT Matto Script Normal”. If you’d like to use it, as well, I provided
its link in the video description or project files. I’ll make the size 70 points, Sharp
and Left Alignment. Click the color box and click a color on your photo that you think
would work well for your text. You can always change it later. Then, click OK. Click on your document and type your text. Double-click on an empty area of your text layer to open the Layer Style window. Click “Outer Glow” and change the Blend Mode to Normal. Click
the color box and pick black or white or a grey tone that will make your text pop more
depending on the background behind the text. For this example, I’ll pick black and click OK. Make the Size 50 pixels and click OK. Open your Transform Tool to rotate, position
and resize it. Then, press Enter or Return. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. Thanks for watching!

Discover The Best Monthly Baby Pictures To Take In The First Year Of Your Baby’s Life

Discover The Best Monthly Baby Pictures To Take In The First Year Of Your Baby’s Life


Discover the best monthly baby pictures to take in your baby’s first year of life In this tutorial I will show ideas for the best baby pictures that you can take
monthly in the first year of your baby’s life so that you can remember your baby
the way he was Monthly picture ideas Your smiling baby Take a picture of your baby smiling in the same location every month Later in life this will make for a great reminder and it provides an awesome monthly
comparison of the growth process in the first year Your baby’s milestone of the month Take one baby picture each month which shows a milestone in the development of
your baby You can buy pre-printed milestone cards or you could get creative and make something yourself A good milestone moment to capture is if your baby says mommy for the first time or turns over for the first time You can either make something yourself or you can have your baby hold one of the
pre-printed cards that says what milestone has been reached Baby picture with a growing ruler When your baby is old enough to stand you could start marking your baby’s growth on a ruler on the wall Take a picture of your baby’s growth every month and be baffled later by how fast your baby grew in this period Before your baby can stand you can start this off by taking a picture of your baby lying next to a ruler Babies date with daddy Take a picture together with daddy every month This is a great idea to do from
birth until preschool age Daddy is always going to be there for his little wonder and these baby pictures will be proof of that later in life Your child may not remember a thing from the first years of his or her life so these pictures will be a great way to show the amazing times your baby had with his daddy A kiss from mommy Pick a location and kiss your baby in that spot every month This way you will capture the unending
and timeless love you have for your baby This loving feeling will immediately
come back to you when you look at these baby pictures later on Baby’s favorite activity Grabbing their feet and putting them in their mouth Taking a bath or standing upside down Your baby has a favorite activity every month and this favorite activity changes
rapidly So be sure to take a baby picture of your baby’s favorite activity each month Many people consider these baby pictures to be their favorites because it immediately takes them back to that special time with their baby New things your baby has learned Your baby is constantly learning new things from the moment they are born Try to take a monthly baby picture of what your baby has learned that month and capture the growth of your baby’s intelligence Baby clothing that is getting too small Chances are that your baby received a lot of baby clothing that is too big in
the beginning Take a picture of your baby wearing these items that are too big and repeat this picture every month You will soon find out that your baby
has outgrown the baby clothing It is a lot of fun to look back later on
these pictures and get a good image of when and how fast your baby was growing Favorite comparison Take your baby’s favorite object Position your baby right next to it and take a picture like this every month This is a really fun way to see the growth of your baby You’re sleeping baby Nothing looks more peaceful than a sleeping baby Especially after a tiring day Take a baby picture of your baby sleeping every month If you later combine these pictures they will make for the cutest collage ever Your baby’s hands and feet Take a baby picture of your baby’s hands and feet every month You will be amazed at how
fast they grow and how they get ready to conquer the world Babies mess of the month What kind of a mess did your baby make this month? It might be annoying to have to clean it up But later in life the baby pictures of that mess your little one made are a great memory of that time Take a monthly picture of the mess You won’t regret it Baby with your pets If your pet gets along well with your baby Chances are high that they will end up
being best friends Take a baby picture of your baby and your pet every month and witness how their bond grows There are many great other ideas for baby pictures that you can take every month I hope that my ideas will inspire
you to capture the life and development of your baby in a great way

WhatsApp: How to Take a picture (Android phone)

WhatsApp: How to Take a picture (Android phone)


Hi students. It’s teacher Laura. What’s up.guys? Well today it’s all about WhatsApp. I’m going to show you how to take a photo on your Android phone and post it to your WhatsApp classroom. At the bottom of the screen you type a message. Look to the right. There’s a tiny paperclip, a tiny camera, and a green round button with a microphone. Which button do you touch to record your voice? Yes, the green button. Which button do you think you use to take a photo? That’s right, the camera. Touch the camera. There’s the writing that I did. I want to take a photo. At the bottom there is a circle. To the left of the circle is a little . . . a little funny symbol. Now ‘A’ means automatic. If I touch it again there’s a
line. / That means it’s off. And now it’s on. This is the flash. It’s very important to use this at night, or if you are in a room with very low light. Do you see where it says Hold for video tap for photo at the bottom? Hold for video tap for photo. Before I do that I want to show you one more thing. To the right of the circle is a little camera with little arrows. I touch it. . . and there I am. Hi guys! Now I can take a selfie and post it. But no, I don’t think so. I’m going to . . . . . .take a picture of my writing. This is my assignment. Okay. So I tap the circle, and I have a photo. Now there are two good things you can do before you post your photo. 1: Look at the top of the screen. There’s a little pencil on the right, a ‘T’, a happy face, and a little square that looks like two
corners. I touch the square and I can change my photo. I can make it smaller, so I can take away all that blank paper, and all the parts I don’t want, and just make the photo the writing. When I finish, at the bottom I click done. Number 2: At the bottom it says Add a caption. A caption is a label. It describes the photo. I’m going to type a caption. Now I am ready to post my photo. Which button should I touch? Yes, the round green button. And there it is. Easy peasy

How To Spot A Fake Picture | How To Find The Original Source Of Any Image

How To Spot A Fake Picture | How To Find The Original Source Of Any Image


How To Spot A Fake Picture / How To Find The Original Source Of Any Image The quickest way to find the original source is by right-clicking on your image and selecting “Copy image URL.” Go to Google Images (images.google.com). Paste the image URL. Click the camera icon. Paste the URL again. Click “Search for image.” This shows all the places the image has been linked. You can now find the original image and at the bottom it shows “Visually similar images.” You can apply this for any image you find
online. You can now spot fake images. That’s how to find the original source of any image! Thanks for watching. If this helped you please give it a LIKE, or let me know by commenting below, and don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE for more how-to instructional videos!

How To Crop & Edit Images Inside WordPress

How To Crop & Edit Images Inside WordPress


a great feature of WordPress is the ability to import images to your site and then edit them from within WordPress.This is really great whenever you have a picture that is quite the right size or perhaps you want a different part of the image for the thumbnail than what you use for the featured image on your website. This is also very good if you’re on a computer that doesn’t have any photo editing software installed on it. you can do everything online. Now whether this is a new post or you’re going in from the main menu. You want to get into the media area and either go into your library if you already imported it or go to add new if you haven’t. The interface page is pretty standard whether it’s from within a post or not. Select images. You select the image that you want to import. WordPress imports the image and it gives your page just like this . Below the image you’re going to see the Edit Image button. Click it and this is the interface that you’re going to see. There’s a group of options across the top: its crop, rotate, rotate clockwise, flip vertically, flip horizontally, undo and redo. They’re pretty basic and pretty self-explanatory: rotate… self-explanatory, rotate counterclockwise and clockwise, flip vertically: this doesn’t work very well with people but sometimes for graphics and images and landscapes you might be able to get away with something like this especially flipping it like horizontally might work out better if you want to frame someonea little bit differently and of course undo: takes you right back to where you started from. The feature that seems to be giving a lot of people problem is the crop feature because you click on it —- nothing happens to crop an image. What you must do is first select the portion of the image that you want to retain. Select it. Make your adjustments and then whenever you’re ready then click the crop button and there you go. When you crop the image one thing you’re going to notice is that the thumbnail didn’t change it created the thumbnail. initially that’s not going to change unless you want it to. I’m going to hit undo and below this image you’ll see that there are three buttons: apply changes to all images, thumbnails or all images except thumbnail. This really gives you some flexibility. what I’d like to do is for the thumbnail focus in on Carol Bouquet’s face. So what I want to do is select just apply changes just the thumbnail and hit crop. Now this takes into just a close-up and then we hit save. Now takes us back to the main page and when we go back into edit image and what you’ll notice is that the main image hasn’t changed but the thumbnail has. This is great. This gives you the ability to focus in on whatever you want to focus in on for the thumbnail image. That’s a quick rundown of some of the basic imaging editing tools that are built into WordPress hopefully you learned a thing or two and we’ll see youagain very soon on ONLINE VIDEO STUDENT. Please like and subscribe!