How to Make 2D image to 3D in 3 MINUTES ! – After Effects & Volumax TUTORIAL

How to Make 2D image to 3D in 3 MINUTES ! – After Effects & Volumax TUTORIAL


Hello! In this video I’m going to show you how to achieve these nice 3d animations in After Effects especially on portraits in this video and for this I’m using a template called Volumax photo animator. You can find it on Videohive or on the link at the bottom of this video in the description. Ok so I’m going to open my template VoluMax Pro in After Effects and I’m going to import a picture and start watching how long it
takes to animate it and you’re going to see it’s gonna be super fast. I’m going
to drag and drop it in the comp and make it match here and then I’m going to go
in the other comp called displacement map and using the new 3d portrait tool
in VoluMax. Here I’m going to match a wireframe of a face you can choose
almost any angle for a portrait going from side views, bottom and almost top
views okay so now I’m going to use the distortion tool You can see this is quite simple and fun to achieve. We are pushing the 3d mesh to match on the 3d portrait on the picture. So I’m moving
the ears the eyes the nose, mouth everything… You don’t need to be super
precise in this process because volumax is going to to work nicely even with maps not super sharp. So I’m going to take a smaller brush now to do a bit of details on the mouth. So once again this is not the complete tutorial you can find in the package. This is a fast overview of the 3d portrait tool included in VoluMax. Okay so we’re going to finish with the shoulders with some large brush here I’m going to do this super fast because it’s not very important, VoluMax is going to just know that there is a volume here okay so I’m going to finish this wire
distortion and I’m going to show you the black and white depth map. I am taking off the wire mode and the depth map is showing the black and whites volume of the
object. I’m going in the main comp of VoluMax and I’m simply going to move the null object here and I’m going to see that the 3d effect is
working really nicely ! I’m gonna add some dirt so you can see some dirt here. Small adjustments on the relax and boost Once again you can see all this in the full tutorials included. I’m going to put a keyframe at the beginning and a keyframe at the end on a left right camera pan. And that’s it ! We did this in 3 minutes.
I’m going to take a look to the preview. Okay this is nice ! So it took 3 minutes to do this and you can see the final result with some text. Thank you for watching this very fast tutorial of the 3D Portrait Tool. You can take a look to my channel to see some other templates and some tutorials. Thank you, bye !

InDesign How-To: Insert Photos and Images (Video Tutorial)

InDesign How-To: Insert Photos and Images (Video Tutorial)


Hi, I’m Erica Gamet with InDesign Secrets.
In this video, I’m going to show you how to place an image into your InDesign
document. When you place anything into InDesign you use the same command and that’s
the Place command. It’s up here, under the File menu, under Place. You can also use
the keyboard shortcuts Command- or Control-D. I’ll click Place and it brings up
the Place dialog box. You can navigate to wherever your images are sitting. A
couple of options I want to look at before we import anything is down at the
bottom, we have a Replace Selected Item already selected.
I want to deselect that because what that does is, it will put the image that
we choose into whatever we have selected on our page. And if you’re like me, you
may have forgotten you’ve got something selected on another page. Also, we can
click Show Import Options. Selecting this option will bring up a second dialog box
where we get to choose options. Now we won’t have many available to us in this
case, but depending on what you’re importing, you may want to have that
turned on. So I’ve selected that. I’m going to go ahead and just select an image…and click Open. And because we have those options selected, it came up with a
second dialog box, and as you can see most of my options are grayed out.
I’m gonna leave everything as is and just click OK. Now we have our loaded
place cursor. And this is just the image ready to be placed. We have a couple
different options for actually placing this image onto our document. I can
simply just click and let it place the image to size on my page. And as I can
see, that runs off the right and the bottom of my page. I can’t even see the
edges of the photo, so that’s probably not the best option. I’m gonna undo that—
Command- or Control-Z—and get back to my loaded place cursor. A better option is
to click and drag while holding down the mouse button…and it will drag out a
frame to the size that it needs. It will also maintain the orientation and the
proportions of your original image. When you’ve got it to size, simply let go and
the image is placed inside that frame. I’m going to take another step backwards (Command- or Control-Z to undo) and get back to my loaded place cursor. Because sometimes you want a frame that’s a different orientation than your original image. To
do that, I need to use the Shift key. I’m going to click and start
to drag and then hit the Shift key and now I can play with the proportions of
that frame that I’m drawing out. When I have the size I want in the shape I want,
I’m going to just let go of the mouse key. I’m still holding down the Shift key
while I’m doing this at the moment. As you can see, the frame is the size I
wanted it to be but the image doesn’t fill up the frame like I had hoped. A
quick fix for this is to go up to the Object menu, down to the Fitting menu, and choose Fill Frame Proportionally. Now the image completely fills the frame that I
created. From here you’ll probably have to make more adjustments to the image
and the frame, but we’ll cover that in more detail in a future video. Now when
you go to place your image you may already have a frame on your page and
have it selected and you want the image to go directly into that. With that image
selected we’re going to go back to the Place menu (File>Place), choose that same
image…but we’re going to make sure that we click Replace Selected Item. I’m also
going to turn off Show Import Options. If this is de-selected, it will automatically
use the options you chose last time. So I’m going to de-select that and click
Open, and it automatically dropped that image into that particular frame. I’m
going to step backwards again, hit Undo, Command- or Control-Z, and hit Escape so I
get my loaded place cursor gone. I just want to go back to the point where I had
this frame selected. I have it selected. Go up to the File menu, choose Place and
maybe we have that Replace Selected Item turned off. Because again, that’s a good
safety feature to not have that on. So I have that off, select my image, and start
to place it and I realized I really did want to put that image inside that frame. It’s no big deal. I can just roll over that image—and it’s
really hard to see, I know—but when you do that, the little brackets around that
place cursor icon become these rounded brackets. And when I do that, it says, “Oh,
you must want to put that image inside that frame.” So simply roll over it and
click and the image goes inside that frame. And lastly let’s say you already
have an empty frame and you don’t intend to put that image inside there. We do the
same Place command (File>Place)…I’m gonna choose that same image and click Open. And we drag it out and we think that’s good. Then we realize we
really wanted it inside this existing frame. I can do that as well without having to
replace it. I just need to select the image that I’ve placed, copy it (Command-
or Control-C) or I can cut it (Command- or Control-X), select the empty frame, go up
under the Edit menu, and choose Paste Into. Now that image is sitting inside
that frame. Well I certainly hope you found this tip helpful. Be sure to check out InDesignSecrets.com for thousands of InDesign articles and tutorials and to subscribe to our monthly publication, “InDesign Magazine.” Thanks for learning with us!

How To Size / Crop Images For Instagram Stories

How To Size / Crop Images For Instagram Stories


welcome to a tutorial on cropping your photos to be the right size for Instagram stories. please like the video if it helps you. Lets begin. first we need to download a photo editing app. my favourite is called pixelr. open the app store and search for pixelr. it is available for both IOS and android. download and install it. open it once its finished. select photos, and choose the photo you want to use. now select the tools button. it is the button that looks like two circles. in the tools menu, select crop from the preset photo options. choose 16:9 16:9 is the aspect ratio used by Instagram stories. if the 16:9 you chose is showing it in landscape mode, tap it again and it will convert to portrait mode. now you can drag your crop around to the position that looks best. when you have your desired crop, tap on the green tick at the bottom. to save your image, tap done. now tap Save Image, and the image will be saved to your camera roll. now open up instagram and we will post our new image to our story. as you can see the crop fits perfectly on Instagram stories. and that draws and end to this tutorial please give the video a like if it helped you , and subscribe to Foxy tech Tips for more social media tutorials!

Sony RX100 VI review: overpriced?

Sony RX100 VI review: overpriced?


– I was going to shoot
this RX100 Mark VI review in downtown Brooklyn and it
was going to be beautiful a work of art, a masterpiece but mother nature had a
little bit of a different plan so it looks like it’s time for plan B. (jazzy music)
♪ You Suck ♪ – How’s that? So this is the Sony RX100 Mark VI When I’m shooting stills
I’m almost exclusively shooting on a 35 millimeter film camera but when I’m not I’m actually using one of these they’re super portable,
they’re really light lighter than DSLR and
most certainly lighter than my 35 millimeter
and the transfer speeds are incredible, I can
quickly put it on my phone and then up to Instagram and its video capabilities
are also amazing which obviously I can’t
do with my 35 millimeter. Now, Sony comes out
with a new one of these just about every year,
which is why we’re already at the mark VI when the
mark I came out in 2012. Now that’s great because
we’ve come a long way but it also means that now that we’re at the later generations,
how much is changing. So let’s figure out why
you probably won’t pay 1200 dollars for the mark VI. So just like its predecessor, the mark VI has a 20.1
megapixel one inch CMOS sensor with 4K video at 24 30 p and at the lower 1080 p resolution you have that HFR mode,
or high frame rate mode, that is capable of 960 frames per second. The ISO spans from 125 to 12800 so I find that it performs
better in the lower ISO range that’s like a 125 to 800 once you get to 1600
and especially at 3200 you’re going to see a
lot of noise and grain you just have to keep in mind that this is a point and
shoot camera after all and with that comes a small flash and small batteries that
can’t really handle hot days or long recording times. Be prepared to own a few batteries especially if you’re recording video. And also like last years model there’s the pop up OLED EVF. God bless the pop up EVF I love it so much, yes, yes! It’s one of the main
reasons I bought this camera and it’s so crisp and so clean there’s something really intimate about being able to look
through a view finder and take a photo. I mean no one else is behind you looking at what you’re getting, it’s just you and your camera and it makes you feel really professional. Now the big difference this year though, is that it’s a single action EVF. So it pops up and instead
of having to pull it out like you did on previous generations it just does that automatically then when you want to close it it’s one single push down. The photo burst modes and auto focus also got a refresh on this model the auto focus is fast and I mean really fast and its facial recognition is on point too even when the face is
super far in the frame or you’re really wide. Burst mode can also now capture 230 shots at 24 frames per second, which is almost a 100 shots more than the RX100 mark V 150 shots for making gifs or
capturing the perfect moment this is really great. For the vertically challenged among us and the foodies, you’re
really going to love the extended range on this screen in previous models you
had that 180 degree screen which it still does, this
is great for vlogging this is great for taking selfies but new this year, is
the 90 degrees tilt down. It typically only when to 45 but now you have that full 90 I really didn’t think this
was going to be super useful but when taking shots of food or at concerts, it actually came in handy. So you pair that with the
touch screen capabilities that are also new this year it’s kind of banging. You can finally touch the screen to focus and to take shots but I can’t navigate the menu or hit okay so in a world where touch
screens are so intuitive they’re on everything we use we didn’t we go one step further and make it completely usable via touch, we’re so close but speaking of close, hello’s eye is 24 to 200 millimeter lens. For tourists or festival
goers or bird watchers or a parent in a high school event this is really a great feature and it’s clean, it’s crisp and it actually flattens out the image and gives you depth of field much like the Canon 7200 millimeter would it made me feel like a great photographer even when I was just on the fly doing something really quick the problem is, we gave
up F 1.8 aperture lens and those built in NDs, which I use all the time I loved being able to get down to 1.8 especially at night and the ND was so easy
and quick to slap on it was much easier than
adjusting the shutter and when doing video the ND is like absolutely valuable so this might be the difference
between buying this model and a previous cheaper model that ND and F1.8 is a little bit more valuable to me. Overall the RX100 continues
to be a great camera with better video options and way more models than Canon’s G7 or Lumix LX line and with all these models have
come incredible improvements I mean this is a super
powerful point and shoot, it has great HDR features and with added S-Log 3 support, this model can even step
up as a V cam on shoots with an A7S, very comfortable. The real problem though is the total and complete lack of a mic input and the price. I mean for 1200 dollars there really should be a mic input especially for how many
vloggers use this camera. Just put it in! So if you had the money, go for it you’ll absolutely not be
disappointed by this camera, but if you’re looking
for bang for your buck you might want to look
at the RX100 Mark IV or V I had the IV and I bought
it on craigslist last year and it stills works really well and with that extra money, you could buy an external audio recorder. So thanks for watching if you like this video and you like watching
my hair slowly deflate be sure you like and subscribe also shout out to this camera that is currently doused in water, alright we’ll see you next time.

Samsung Galaxy S8 vs LG G6 camera test | Last Cam Standing IV

Samsung Galaxy S8 vs LG G6 camera test | Last Cam Standing IV


LG’s g6 just beat out the Google pixel
in our testing to become the king of smartphone cameras it didn’t have too
much time to rest though because here comes the Samsung Galaxy s8 it’s time
for another head-to-head showdown this time in Las Vegas first let’s talk specs
LG g6 is main shooter sports a 13 megapixel sensor and F 1.8 lens and
optical image stabilization Samsung’s camera is largely the same from last
year with a 12 megapixel sensor and F 1.7
lens and dual pixel autofocus all the specs look good on paper but that’s why
we take them out to test in real-world scenarios I’ll also add that I’m testing
these cameras the way most people use them in auto mode that means straight
out of the pocket using the stock app with HDR set on auto the only setting
I’m changing is megapixel count going for the full resolution of each camera
now that we’ve covered that let’s move on to the test results the main areas
I’m focusing on are color clarity and range first up is color and what I’m
looking for here is accuracy vividness and how the camera balances color
temperature Samsung has a history of really pushing saturation and while it
can happily say they’ve eased off on it the s8 really stumbles with color
temperature SFO is too blue on the si yet accurate on the g6 even in this
complex lighting scenario LG still gets it right allowing for both the cool
table light and warm ceiling lights to show up whereas the s8 is all orange
since we’re in Vegas for the NAB Convention there were color charts
everywhere and once again the s8 was inaccurate on color temperature but this
last example is important yes the s8 takes a more pleasing photo but
the g6 is more accurate even if a bit dull the g6 is able to capture more
variations of color in the grass and the s8 and that’s key so even though Samsung
improved its image processing since last year’s model it’s not good enough this
category goes to the LG G 6 let’s move to clarity and here I’m looking for not
only the overall crispness of the picture but how the phone uses its
sharpening and no reduction this category was a closer
competition with both phones holding their own in bright light I only give
the slight edge to the g6 because of the more a patterns on these shutters
present in the s8 photo checking out this macro shot reveals a bit of a
different story with the SH showing clear text on the chips in lower light
the s8 pulls even further ahead retaining more texture in the dark area
and to my surprise even after the g6 blew way the Google pixel in low-light
test it really struggled with this super dark scene as great as the g6 as optical
image stabilization is Samsung’s is just better even though it’s close in bright
light I have to give this category to the Samsung Galaxy s8 the last category
is range here I’m looking for how much light information the camera is able to
capture and how it chooses to expose for the scene the histogram is our friend in
this category and here’s the basic way to read it all the information on the
right side of the histogram represents the bright areas of the image while the
left side represents all of the dark areas of the image you want the exposure
to fall somewhere in between otherwise you start to lose information this first
photo is pretty simple but shares an overarching theme I notice between the
two phones looking at the histogram we see the dynamic range is pretty similar
but the s8 exposed a bit higher than the g6 not necessarily a bad thing for the
shot so let’s move on here again the g6 is a bit darker than the SI and we can
see that in the histogram but we also start to see that we’re losing
information in the highlights once again not horrible for the shot but it’s
starting to worry me we move on to this next scene and we finally start to see a
problem zooming in on the table here we’re losing the objects that have a
spotlight on them whereas the g6 is protecting those highlights while still
retaining enough info in the shadows and we keep seeing this trend play out both
phones are very close and how they expose but the s8 pushes it a bit too
much and loses highlights blending these TVs together but it’s this last shot
that really shows the dynamic range of the g6 the s8 actually underexposed here
but still wasn’t able to retain the highlights the g6 handles the scene like
a champ holding info in the highlights and the
lowlights so I’m giving the range category two the LGG six well the
results are in and the G six takes the color and range categories while the s
eight takes it in clarity with two out of three the LG G six is the winner I am
really impressed by how much Samsung has improved their photo processing making
it not only visually pleasing but technically adept but LG shines in too
many scenarios really nailing the balance between appealing the people who
just want to shoot and post a photo and professionals who desire more
flexibility all while featuring a second lens and having an awesome stock photo
app so LG’s g6 continues to be our smartphone camera King and will go on to
defend its crown against another smartphone be sure to subscribe so you
don’t miss the next fight you