How to Edit Your DJI Mavic 2 AERIAL HYPERLAPSE Raw Images


Hey, this is Matt with Blue Mantle Films, and today I’m gonna go through my post production workflow for making hyperlapses. This video is a follow-up to my last video, which I released a week ago. This one is how to take the raw images that the Mavic 2 captures, and to post process them until you get awesome-looking hyperlapses. Now the response to last week’s video was really, really positive. There are 1500 new subscribers since last week, which is easily the fastest this channel has ever grown, and so I just want to take a moment to say welcome to all the new subscribers. Thank you for being here. So, I don’t use Lightroom very often, other than to process these hyperlapses and so I’m sure there are more efficient workflows out there. But I’m hoping that regardless that there’s some value in this. Hey guys, so I just hyperlapsed a storm that is off in the distance, I don’t know how it’s going to turn out, but I think it looked kinda cool when I saw it on the screen. So I chose the wrong hyperlapse to use for this video. There are definitely a lot cooler ones, but unfortunately I already spent hours and hours editing this video to this, what ended up being a pretty mediocre hyperlapse. The process is still the same, so as you watch this video, just know that this applies to cooler-looking hyperlapses also. One little tip, overarchingly, is that I think it’s a good idea to be aware of keyboard shortcuts. Using shortcuts can really speed up your workflow, and help you to get through these edits faster so that you can get more videos done. Okay, so let’s go through a daytime edit! I’ll load up Lightroom. We’re going to import a new one. Here. 172. These are the ones we’re importing, so go ahead and click “Import”. And then even though it’s still importing, I’m just going to start this. So press “D” to go into “Develop”. Okay, now obviously this is overexposed. We’re gonna bring the exposure down. Also going to bring the highlights down, so we can get rid of this glare that’s up here in the upper lefthand side. We’re to bring the shadows up a fair bit. Let’s add at a little bit of contrast. This gives you an idea of why it’s so, so valuable to shoot in raw. You can pull so many details out of an image, by processing it from the raw files. I feel like this is too warm so we’re gonna cool it down just a tiny bit. Command Z to undo, Command Shift Z to redo. And then you can see the difference. Okay, I’m also going to add a little bit of Clarity. Not too much, that can easily be overdone. And the other thing too with Clarity is that it affects images differently, depending on what is in the image, and so it can make your image flicker over time, so you have to be pretty mild with how much you use that one. Maybe even just a tiny bit of saturation. Okay so I like that so far. This image by itself is pretty boring. It doesn’t have good composition right now, but it’s the full movement that I’m hoping ends up looking good as it goes through and kind of circles around this little island that was right here. Alright so now we’re gonna go down here, We’re actually going to do some lens distortion correction. I think around 8 gets rid of some of that barrel distortion. And then “Constrain Crop” so that gets rid of the white that you see on the edges. Also going to zoom in and take a look at noise reduction, see if there’s anything that we needed to do for that. Maybe just a tiny bit. You can see some noise in the sky. And then I also I want to do a tiny bit of sharpening. Okay, now this one’s going to be interesting, and one of the reasons why I chose this one to process is because the light changes pretty significantly from the beginning to the end. So we’re gonna have to see how to find the happy medium, and split the difference. So we’re gonna go back to grid mode, press “G”. Select this one. “Command Shift C” copies the settings. Hit “Command A”, And then Command Shift V. will paste the settings to whatever you have selected, so in this case to the whole sequence because we have the whole sequence selected. Now we’re going to go to the end and see what those edits look like on the end. Way too dark. Holy cow. Now I will say this is gonna be kind of interesting, this may be one that I end up using LRTimelapse for. LR Timelapse is something that allows you to keyframe your metadata of these raw images, which means that from, say, from the beginning of the sequence to the end of the sequence, I can have exposure set at a negative, 1.2 at the beginning of the sequence, and then by the end of the sequence I can be increasing the exposure slowly, throughout the whole sequence, until I get a much more proper exposure by the end of the sequence. I don’t want to use LRTimelapse in this tutorial. I feel like I’m already throwing enough at you with Lightroom and Premiere, so what I’m going to do is I’m going to try to split the difference, and then in Premiere, once I have a fully-exported video, then I will increase the exposure. So we’re gonna put the exposure at -0.5, and we’re gonna take a look at that. So that’s obviously dark and we don’t want it to be that dark at the end. But we’re going to see how it turns out. Let’s try increasing the shadows a little bit. There. So, “Command Shift C”, “Enter” to select everything. “Command A” to select all of them I’m gonna go back into grid mode. Okay, and then “Command Shift V”, or “Control Shift V” if you’re on a Windows. All right there. I pasted all of the settings across all of them. We’re gonna go to the top, and look at the first one. Let’s see how this turned out. Definitely too bright. Okay we’ll try -.75. That’s — that’s acceptable. I’m going to increase the contrast a little bit. It’s not quite what I want it to look like but that’s acceptable. So then again… Now we’ve pasted the settings across all of them and now we’re going to go to the end one. Hmmm… I think that’s the best we’re gonna get without using LRTimelapse. The light changed too much between the beginning and the end, and so we will keyframe in Premiere to try to get the exposure right. So go back to grid view, and then I’m going to export. Choose our location. Choose. I’m going to save them as JPEGs. At this point I’ve already done the post processing, I’ve already pulled out the digital information that I hope to pull out of it, and so I don’t mind as much saving this as a JPEG. It’s still not perfect. If I had a faster computer I would try to do a better one, but for this, a JPEG is is sufficient. And then we’re going to export. So I’m going to skip ahead and I’ll pick it up again once it finishes. Okay so it has now finished exporting out of Lightroom. So we’re gonna import Downtown Sarasota 2, just the first, one make sure that “Image Sequence” is selected. Okay, now we drag this to a new sequence. You go down into the effects panel, and you type in “warp”, so that you can load that up, and drop that on there. Now again this is gonna take some time, so while that is processing I’m actually going to get started already on trying to keyframe the exposure, because you can still look at the frames, even while it’s analyzing. So we’re gonna go to the beginning of the sequence. We’re going to go into the “Color” panel. So we actually are going to adjust this just enough so that it makes Lumetri active on the clip. And go back into “Editing”, go down here to “Basic Correction” And we’re going to keyframe the exposure. Make sure you add a keyframe. Let’s go to the end of the clip. Yeah, so this is where it’s really dark. So we are going to keyframe the exposure up significantly. Let’s try 2. That’s closer. I’m gonna bring the highlights down a tiny bit. And then maybe 2.3. Alright, so that’s how we’re going to do it. Let’s go back in here, Let’s see how Warp Stabilizer is doing. Okay. So what I want to do is, I’m going to change the smoothness down to 25, and what I’m looking at is this Auto-scale. I want that to be — there we go — around 102% or less. Because I don’t want a lot of distortion in the corners of the image. So I’m gonna hit “Preserve Scale” and that will keep it consistent across the whole clip. Alright there we go. So this point depending on what you want to do — once you get to this stage — what you want to do with the clips, One possibility is that you just want to export individual clips, and save them out as their own individual video files. Which I do sometimes. I do for the sake of stock footage, and then I do also for the sake of having, sort of a clean, finished version of the hyperlapse. But if I know that I’m working on an edit, and I just plan on using the clip in that edit, I have it here in the timeline. These are technically their own sequences, but they act like clips, and then I can drop them into my edit wherever I would like them to be. Okay, so that’s it! If there are any suggestions that you guys have for this workflow — ways that I can improve it — I would love to hear that. Just tell me in the comments below about some of the things that you do as part of your post-production process, your post-production workflow. As I said, Lightroom is something that I’m still kind of learning. And so I know that there must be ways that I can improve this process. I think that’s all. I’m going to cut this here — I probably have an hour and a half of footage for this tutorial now. So please like, comment, subscribe. All the normal YouTube stuff. I’m really hoping that this channel can keep growing, that we can keep building this community. So thank you for watching, and I’ll see you in the next one.

A Guide to the Text Tools in Paint 3D

A Guide to the Text Tools in Paint 3D


The T icon is for the Text tab. Within the text panel are the options to create
both 2D and 3D text. Both work in the same way. Start by dragging a
text box. This defines the area in which the text will
write. It can be rescaled and rotated using the
bounding box. Text can be formatted in all the ways you would
expect, with fonts, size, colour, style and
alignment. With 2D text you have the additional option to
background fill the text box with a colour. When you are happy with the formatting, simply
click outside of the text box to apply it to the
canvas. Once applied no further changes can be made. With 3D text, clicking out of the text box will
create the 3D text model. Again, you will no longer be able to retype or
reformat the text. However, because it is a 3D
model, you can reselect it to resize and
reposition. 3D text can be an inventive way to make new 3D
shapes. Different characters and fonts can be useful to
create new primitive 3D objects to use in your
scenes and models. So give it a go and get creative with text in
Paint 3D. Follow the link for more tutorials.

Adding Picture Frames to your Photos in PaintShop Pro

Adding Picture Frames to your Photos in PaintShop Pro


In this tutorial we’ll show some of the
many picture frame options in PaintShop Pro. Start with PaintShop Pro open in
the Edit workspace and open a photo you’d like to frame. The frame options can be found under
Image>Picture Frame. Click the picture frame thumbnail to
open the list of preset frames. For a simple example choose the black torn
frame. The preview window shows how the final framed image will appear. If you
choose to frame inside of the image the frame resizes to fit within the image
canvas. Or you can frame outside of the image which means the canvas size
updates to accommodate the frame. Now we have a new layer called picture frame
and because this frame was applied to the outside and the canvas size was
updated, the extra canvas appears using the background color. I’ll use Ctrl + Z to undo this frame so I
can try another one. This time I’m using Cyanotype, which
applies a thick blue hand-painted looking frame. I can use the flip, mirror,
or rotate options in order to control which frame edge appears along which
image edge. I’m applying this frame inside the image so this time there was
no extra canvas added to the original background layer. I can also turn off the picture frame
layer, choose another frame option like this
transparent one and use layer visibility to compare
options. Subsequent frame layers are assigned
default names but of course you can click a layer name to change it. Some
PaintShop Pro frames have transparency options. I’m undoing again to return to
my unframed photo. This time I’m choosing the Platinum
frame. If I choose a frame background color by clicking this box, that color is
applied to areas defined in the frame as transparent. Or I can opt to keep these areas
transparent, which means the canvas background will show through. We’ll look
more at transparency in the next example. In addition to the frames provided in
the PSP installation there are also many more you can download. At the top of the
window click the house icon and on the left side of the Welcome window click
Get More. Scroll down past the various collections
available for purchase to find several free downloads including this one: Creative Content Pack. You can click
Download to automatically install this set of line styles, mask shapes and
frames or click its name or thumbnail to see more details. There’s a download
button here as well which also enables you to install. After the installation is
complete the list of available frames is many times larger.
You can also find more picture frames and other PaintShop Pro add-ons in the
Discovery Center store at shop.learn.corel.com. Now we can take a closer look at layers and transparency. For this example I’ll use 3 photos that I want to assemble into one collage image. I’m choosing File>New, and in the Paper preset group I’m creating an 8.5 x11 new image. I’m switching width and height for a landscape orientation, and I’m unchecking Transparent and giving the image a solid color here. To bring each photo onto this new canvas
I’m going one by one, selecting the image dragging its background layer onto the
canvas and using the Pick tool to move the
images the way I want them arranged. To crop the canvas to the size I need,
I’m using a Selection tool to mark the area I want to keep and choosing Image>Crop to Selection. To frame just the kangaroo I’m using the
Pick tool to select it and its layer becomes active. I’ll choose the picture frame called
Heart 01. If “frame canvas” is selected this frame
goes around the entire collage, but I can change this to “frame current layer” to
frame just the kangaroo. The original heart is oriented vertically but it
widens to accommodate the image size. I want this frame outside the image but it
will still need some adjusting. Without a transparent background
I’ll get this solid color around the frame to fill the rectangle. But if I
choose to keep the transparency, the light blue color of the canvas will show
through. Because the image and its frame are on separate layers, I can select each
and adjust sizes and placements. And if I want to erase the parts of the kangaroo
photo that fall outside the frame, I can pick just that layer, click the Eraser
tool and sweep over what I want to remove. I can assign a different frame around
each layer making adjustments as needed For the bird photo which is oriented
vertically I can choose a frame that has a
landscape orientation, such as this blue one with the flowers. And the frame will
rotate automatically to fit. And for the beach photo I can choose a
vertical oval which rotates the other way. To move both the photo and frame I can
select both with the shift tool and move them as one object. Finally, I can apply 3D effects to these
frames. I’m selecting the oval frame and choosing Effects>3D Effects>Drop Shadow. Here’s the bird frame with a chisel
effect. And the heart frame with an inner bevel
effect. All of these 3D effects have options you can adjust such as depth
color and angle. If you’re watching this video on YouTube, you’ll find a link in
the description below that will take you to our tutorial page on the Discovery
Center. Here you can download a written copy of this tutorial and the sample
images use so you can follow along step by step. And don’t forget to visit the
Discovery Center store at shop.learn.corel.com to get more picture frames and other add-ons for PaintShop Pro.

A Guide to 2D Selection and Cropping in Paint 3D

A Guide to 2D Selection and Cropping in Paint 3D


Regardless of which tab you are in, this toolbar
contains global tools that are always available,
and this is where you will find the Select and
Crop tools. To select 2D content, press the Select button and
drag a selection box across the desired part of
the canvas. This will automatically reveal the 2D selection
side panel as well as adding some handles around
your selection. Drag the handles to resize and hold shift for
uniform scaling. At the top is the rotation handle, use this to
spin your selection and hold shift to snap to
increments. You will find several additional edit tools in
the side panel, including Rotate and Flip. As
well as Cut, Copy, Paste and Delete. You can of course drag the content around to
reposition it. This will reveal the canvas below. When you are happy with your changes, simply
click off the selection to implement it. Remember, this is not a separate layer, so once
implemented the content cannot be reselected. To turn the selection into a reselectable layer –
click the Make 3D button. This puts the content into 3D space separate from
the canvas. This means that it can be reselected
to be re-edited or removed. Pressing the Crop button will reveal handles that
can be moved to adjust the crop size. The side panel previews the dimensions of the
current crop selection and below that are buttons
to accept or cancel the crop. If you have already made a 2D selection you can
press Crop to instantly crop the canvas to the
current selection. Other buttons you will see in the side panel are
Select All which selects the entire canvas. And Magic Select which intelligently selects
content from your image. Check out the Magic Select video for more details
on this tool.

Workshop: Take Better Pictures on Your iPhone

Workshop: Take Better Pictures on Your iPhone


Hey David, how do I take better pictures with my iPhone? That’s a great question. One way to do it is to go to our Facebook page and click on events and sign up for our Take Better Pictures with Your iPhone Workshop we’re going to hold here at Experimax West Houston We’re going to have a lot of fun with it. We’ve had great response to these in the past We go over basic composition and what makes a good photo and then we go over all the controls that you use with your iPhone to improve your pictures once you take them It’s a lot of fun. We do this about once every two months. Come on and see us. We’re doing one in March Go to our website or to our Facebook page for more details. Come and see us at Experimax

A Guide to Using 3D Shapes in Paint 3D


3D content is proven to be more understandable
and engaging and in Paint 3D we are making 3D
creation easy for everyone. Click on this icon to reveal the 3D Shapes tab.
It contains a variety of 3D shapes and objects to
build into your own models and scenes. There is a selection of blank pre-made models to
get you started on your 3D journey. To create one, simply select the model and your
desired colour and tap the workspace. The bounding box will allow you to change the
scale and position of the model. For a larger selection of pre-made models head
over to our online 3D library by clicking Get
More Models. You will also find a selection of 3D Objects.
These are the basic shapes that can be used as
the building blocks to make more complex models. You’ll be amazed at what you can make by just
changing the scale, position and rotation of
these simple objects. To learn more about selecting and manipulating 3D
models in Paint 3D, follow the link at the end of
the video. If you can’t find the shape that you need, then
you have the 3D Doodle tool to create brand new
objects from scratch. To create a 3D Doodle, simply draw the outline of
the shape and it will pop out into a 3D object. If you want a shape with straight edges, then you
can tap points for the corners and straight edges
will form between them. To change the depth of your custom shape, turn
the object to the side and rescale. These shapes have been created with Sharp Edge
Doodle. If you want to create a shape with a soft edge,
then use the Soft Edge Doodle Tool, which is
great for creating softer looking objects like
clouds. Discover easy 3D creation in Paint 3D – today! Watch the next video to learn about selecting and
manipulating 3D objects.

Use Snapseed to Create Dramatic Images on your phone | Snapseed Tutorial | Android and iOS

Use Snapseed to Create Dramatic Images on your phone | Snapseed Tutorial | Android and iOS


Welcome to this video where I am
going to show some editing with Snapseed The first thing I do in this
picture is utilize the curves tool to bring down the
shadows on the road here. It really impacts the whole
image but you will see in a moment how we can isolate the curves
to only the dark parts of the road Now that this is done, we can
view edits, click on curves in history And then start masking
in only the effects onto the parts of the image
where we want those changes. The history and masking
in a non-destructive way is one of the features of Snapseed that
makes it a great tool for editing photos Once I’m happy with the curves masking, In this case I’m just going to
put the curves down to 50% and add those details from the curves tool
to the sky and trees above the horizon. There we go… Now you can see the curves is only
affected on the dark parts of the road Next I’ll take the Selective
tool and increase saturation and details of the yellow line in
the middle of the road increase the contrast playing around with the brightness saturation and details settings really gives a striking image. Once completed, I will go into the details tool to bring out more detail on the road and in the trees. Also, playing with the basic editing tools such as changing the saturation the ambiance and
the brightness overall gives a more and
more dramatic effect. Now I’ll take the selective tool and adjust the contrast and detail on the dark parts of the road. I’ll copy from the left over to the right the same selective tool
settings to have balance. There we go… Typically, I’ll use
the HDR-Scape tool to bring out detail
on the whole image Here, I’ll go to history and mask in only changes
from the HDR-Scape tool to the top of the image
above the horizon. There we go…
I’ll also typically use the lens blur tool in
many of my images I turn it to more of
a horizontal pattern and increase the depth of field by blurring the
bottom of the image. It gives a prime
lens focus feeling. And the vignette tool is
another one of my favorite capabilities of Snapseed and this brings out more vividness to the image, decreasing the brightness along the edges. Almost done… Again, bring out more
detail with the details tool. And with the Selective tool, really try to bring
out more detail on the foliage in the background above
the horizon in the trees. and… in this case I didn’t really like the leaves
there in the front so I’m going to use the healing tool to try and remove some of them. In this case, I
don’t do a great job matching the image within
the proximity of the healing tool. but with the blur there,
it’s not a huge problem, and not really noticable
when zoomed out. And I think that’s it… just check the image
one more time… And this is looking pretty good. I think I’m good for now. So this is the original
image, unedited. taken with a Samsung
s10 phone (I think). And this is the resulting image after the edits done with
Snapseed. I really like this. So thanks for watching! I hope you may have learned
something about Snapseed! Cheers!

A Guide to Using 3D View Mode in Paint 3D

A Guide to Using 3D View Mode in Paint 3D


This button allows you to toggle between 2D and
3D view. In 3D view you can move around your content to
see it from any angle. You have the option to orbit around the scene, zoom in and out, and Pan from side-to-side and up-and-down. Select View Controls for a reminder of how to
control the position with different input
devices. Use Reset View to return to the original default
viewpoint. If you select an object in 3D view, you’ll see
our familiar selection box. As you move around, the bounding box will
automatically twist so that it is always facing
you. The angle of the box shows you the direction in
which your models will move and scale. So viewing from a different angle helps you move
objects in different ways. You will also see the selection highlight. This
is so you can always see your models, even if
they are behind something else. Plus, you can continue adding new objects, using the art brushes or putting stickers on your work all while
remaining in this view. 3D view makes 3D editing easier than ever before. Watch the next video for more Paint 3D tips or
head to the playlist for the full Paint 3D guide.

A Guide to Using 2D Shapes in Paint 3D

A Guide to Using 2D Shapes in Paint 3D


In Paint 3D we have a range of useful and
customisable 2D Shapes that make it easy to be
productive. They work in the same way as our stickers and so
can be applied both on the canvas and on 3D
objects. Select a shape from the sidebar and drag it out
to the size you would like. Whilst it has a bounding box you can change the
scale and rotation of the shape as well as adjust
the controls in the side panel. You can choose the colour of the Fill and Line
type, as well as the thickness of the line and
the overall opacity of the shape sticker. When you are happy press the tick to apply. You can also create a shape at the default size
by simply tapping in the workspace. You can then
refine this by dragging the bounding box. Like with stickers, a shape can also be applied
by pressing the stamp button. This applies the
shape but keeps another version available to
stamp again. Our updated Line and Curve tool has handles
allowing you to keep tweaking the precise shape
of the curve until it is applied. Don’t forget that as well as colours you can also
choose from our four material types which affect the reflectivity and shine of the
shape when applied to a 3D object. In addition to applying a shape, you have the
option to Make 3D. This will pop it out into a
new layer in 3D space. As with any 3D object this can then be
reselected, rescaled and repositioned. Shapes are a great way to add precision to your
creations in both 2D and 3D – so give them a go. Continue watching for more Paint 3D tips.