A Guide to Printing in Paint 3D

A Guide to Printing in Paint 3D


Under the menu, you will find options for
printing. Paint 3D supports both 2D and 3D printing. If you choose to 2D print, you will be taken to
the standard Windows print dialogue panel where you can select options such as Orientation,
Paper Size and Colour mode. The image being printed is taken from the 2D
viewing angle. If you choose to 3D print, you will be taken to
the 3D Print Dialogue panel which will guide you
through the 3D print process. Here you will be able to adjust the size and
layout, fix any issues the model might have, choose from available material types, and preview any required support structures. 3D printing will include all the 3D content in
your scene but will not include the canvas or any
flat 2D images. If you don’t own a 3D printer, you have the
option to order the prints online. Watch the next video to learn more about Paint 3D.

Turn your scanned negatives into positive images. Easy photo converter

Turn your scanned negatives into positive images. Easy photo converter


Hi Everybody, Today, I will show you how to convert your
scanned photographic negatives to positive images that you can print or share over the
internet. If you have pictures in photographic negatives,
you can digitize and turn them into positive images. First, have the photographic negatives scanned
or in the absence of scanner, photograph it with backlight. When the scanned negatives are ready, open
Contenta Converter PREMIUM and use the button “Add Photos” to add a whole folder full
of them. Click Next. In the Convert tab, select an
output format. For this tutorial, we’ll use JPEG. Now, go to the “FX” tab and under “List of
all effects”, click on “Invert” Click “Start” and let the program process
the negatives into positives that we can print and share with friends. Thanks for watching. Also, Subscribe to our channel so that you
don’t miss any future videos.

A Guide to the Canvas in Paint 3D

A Guide to the Canvas in Paint 3D


This button opens the canvas tab, which is where
you can control the size and rotation of the 2D
workspace. When in this tab – resize handles will appear on
your canvas. Resizing the canvas can either crop your content,
or using this toggle, you can opt to resize the
content as you resize the canvas. You can also enter a precise dimension here,
either as a percentage or the number of pixels. Ticking Lock Aspect Ratio means changes to one
side will automatically update the other. Use these buttons to rotate or flip the canvas. If your image contains transparency it can be
revealed with this toggle. The outline shows the canvas is still there but
is now transparent, allowing you to save images
containing transparency. You can also select content with transparency to
use as a 3D layer or a sticker. Finally, you can always turn the 2D canvas off,
leaving just the 3D content. Watch the next video for more Paint 3D tips. Or
head to the playlist for the full Paint 3D guide.

A Guide to Saving and Sharing in Paint 3D

A Guide to Saving and Sharing in Paint 3D


Within Paint 3D, there are a variety of ways you
can save or share your work. If you want to save your work to edit again
later, then we recommend to Save As a Paint 3D
project. Paint 3D projects will retain all your 2D and 3D
content without any compression meaning you can reopen them and pick up exactly
where you left off. If you want to take content out of Paint 3D, to
share or use in other applications, then you have options to save a copy as a 3D
model or an image. If you choose to Save a 3D model, then you will
be taken directly to the Windows save panel to
choose your desired location. The Save as Type drop-down menu gives you options
for different 3D file formats. If you choose to save an image, you are taken to
the Image Preview window Within this window you can choose to rescale your
image. Ticking Lock Aspect Ratio means changes to one
side will automatically update the other. Here you will see some details of the file size
and resolution of the output. Additionally, there is an option to adjust the
Angle and Framing of the image. You will be asked to turn on 3D View mode if it
wasn’t previously enabled. You can choose preset framing or set a custom
frame size. In the preview window you can now control the
angle by orbiting, zooming and panning. Click the help icon for a reminder of the view
controls. When you’re happy with the framing click ok to
return to the Preview window. There is also a checkbox to retain Transparency.
This will only be available if the selected
file-type supports it. Finally click Save to select a desired location
for the file. If you have opened existing content and only made
simple changes that are supported by the
file-type, then clicking Save or using the shortcut Ctrl-S
will simply update the image or 3D file in its
current location. A great way to share your content with others is
by uploading to Remix 3D – our online 3D Library. For more details watch the relevant video guide. You can also share to other apps by clicking
Share. If you already use social apps in Windows, this
is the fastest way to get you creations onto
those platforms. Simply choose the desired platform and a
screenshot of your scene will appear there. Watch the next video for more Paint 3D tips.

A Guide to Using Magic Select in Paint 3D

A Guide to Using Magic Select in Paint 3D


Pressing the Magic Select button will reveal
handles that you can use to select the part of an
image that you want to cut out. When you have made your selection, press Next and
the tool will intuitively highlight an area to
cut out. Use the Add and Remove brushes to help refine the
selection. Once you’re happy with the selection, press Done,
and that segment will pop out as a new 3D layer. The area behind the content is intelligently
filled in to hide any gaps. If you insert an image and use Magic Select right
away, then we will make both the selection and
the background 3D layers. This means you can choose to remove the
background or you can use Magic Select again to
separate out even more layers. Any time you press Magic Select, we will hide all
other content to help you focus on your
selection. When you have multiple cut out images in your
scene, you can use the depth slider to arrange
which is above or below. Whether you’re enhancing 2D images or creating
layered 3D scenes, Magic Select makes cutting out
images easy, fast and fun. Click here to learn about selecting and moving 3D
objects

A Guide to Using the 3D Library within Paint 3D

A Guide to Using the 3D Library within Paint 3D


Within Paint 3D you can access our online 3D
Library called Remix 3D. There you can browse through thousands of free 3D
models to use in your creations. Use the search bar to find specific content. Click on a thumbnail to add that model into your
scene. Below each thumbnail is the name of the model and
its creator. Click on the creator’s name to see
more of their models. Use the plus icon to add a model to a board. If you have not already signed in you will be
asked to at this point. Boards are a great way to collect your ideas. You
can quickly make a new board or add the model to
an existing collection. Any time you’re signed into Remix 3D you can
access your boards by heading to My Stuff. Clicking on the eye icon reviews a model in more
detail. In the preview panel you can orbit around the
model to view it from all angles. Click on this
help icon to remind yourself of the navigation
controls. Show some love by liking models that you think
look great. Below the model preview you will see some details
from the author. At the bottom of the preview panel, you can see; ways in which the model has been remixed, the
individual parts that were used to create the
model, different boards that model has been added to and
other models by this creator. At the top-right you will see your profile image
which you can click to access your account. Use this icon to upload your current scene to
Remix 3D. Watch the next video for more details on
uploading models to Remix 3D.

How to rename many pictures quick and easy. Batch photo rename

How to rename many pictures quick and easy. Batch photo rename


Hi everybody, today I will show you how to rename many pictures
quickly and easily. Open Contenta Converter PREMIUM and use the
button “Add Photos” to add a whole folder to the selection. Did you know that if you go to Options->General
Options, you can choose to see the file selection as “Thumbnails”? Click Ok and now you
have a better overview of your selection. You can use the slider below to increase or
decrease the size of the thumbnails. Now click “Next”. In the Convert panel on top, make sure that
“Do convert to format” is unchecked. This is to make sure the program will not convert
any photos. We just want to rename and organize right now. Go to the Rename panel and check
“Do rename”. There are few standard options for file names
such as: “Filename – Counter” this will add a counter
after every original filenames “Date – Filename” will prefix the date
of when the photo was taken to all original filenames. It can be useful to sort easily
a lot of pictures by dates. See how the “Pattern” will use the tags %y% for the year, %m% for
the month and %d% for the day. and “Custom” that offers the maximum flexibility
and shows you all the available tags. We will choose this option. Observe how the preview of the final results
will change depending on the pattern entered. We will start with by entering in the pattern
field the following text: %name%.%ext% In the preview, you can see that this is just
the original filenames generated by the camera. We need to improve that. In the field pattern,
I will now type: 2015_Summer.%ext% You see in the Preview that all of the photos
will now have the same filename. They will overwrite each other in the computer. We need
more variation and different filenames to avoid that.
In Tags available, I will select Counter and click on Insert. Now the %counter% tag has
been placed first, I want it moved just after 2015 so I will just cut and paste using CTRL+C
(or command C) and CTRL+V (or command V). Now all filenames are different but we will
set the “start value” at 1 and the “number of digits” at 2. Now the filenames are much
nicer, don’t you think? If you have a selection of photos taken by
different cameras or taken with different settings, it can be interesting to use the
tags “Exposure time”, “Camera model” or “ISO” to create even more informative
file names automatically. Then click Start!. Now the program is working
and is soon finished with this renaming task, click on “Open file location”. You will
then see your photos properly renamed. Please note that these are copies located in the
“ConversionOutput” directory. The program never changes anything to your originals.

Word 2010: Formatting Pictures

Word 2010: Formatting Pictures


If you’re using photographs in your documents,
you’ll probably want to make them look as good as possible. Word has some very powerful features that
will let you do this. First, click on your picture, and the Format
tab will appear. Let’s start by cropping the picture. Click the Crop command, and you should now
see some black handles around the edge of the picture. You’ll need to put the mouse right over these
handles, and if you’re a little bit off, you may accidentally grab one of the resizing
handles. Click and drag, and the parts that are going
to be cropped out are kind of a dark gray. When you’re done, you can click the Crop command
again, or you can just press Enter. Just below the Crop command is a drop-down
arrow, and if you go down to Crop to Shape, you can choose what shape you want your picture
to be. I think I’ll choose a rounded rectangle. With some photographs, you’ll need to make
adjustments, and these commands can be found in the Adjust group. If you go to Corrections, you can Sharpen
or Soften the image, and you can also adjust the brightness and contrast. As you hover over each one, you’ll be able
to see a live preview of it in the document. I think this one looks good. You can also adjust the color. You can change the Saturation, the Color Tone,
which controls how warm or cool the colors appear, and you can also Recolor the image. But for this picture, I’m just going to adjust
the Color Tone. Finally, you can add an Artistic Effect. You probably don’t want to add one to every
single picture, but sometimes you may want to use them to spice up your document. Depending on what your picture looks like,
some of these effects may look better than others, so just hover over some of them until
you find one that looks good. Word also has a lot of different Picture Styles
that are built in. These are a great way to quickly change the
appearance of your picture. Before you send out your document, you may
want to compress your pictures, and this is also found in the Adjust group. Compressing Pictures will make the file size
smaller, so your document will be easier to email or post on the web. There’s an option to Delete cropped areas
of pictures. When you crop a picture, it doesn’t actually
delete anything from the file, it just hides the cropped areas. So even though you’re not using those areas,
they’re still taking up space in the file. You can delete them by checking this option. You can also change the resolution. The Email setting has the lowest resolution,
so that means it will have the smallest possible file size. Then click OK. You may have noticed that the picture adjusted
a little bit, and that’s because compression lowers the quality of the picture. So there is a tradeoff, and you’ll just have
to decide whether you want to go with a higher quality or a lower file size.

A Guide to Stickers and Textures in Paint 3D

A Guide to Stickers and Textures in Paint 3D


This icon opens our Stickers tab. Stickers are one of the revolutionary ways we are
making it easy to texture 3D models. Within the Stickers panel you will find 3 tabs. This tab contains a variety of fun pre-made
decals that will work exactly like a sticker. Tap anywhere to create your selected sticker.
Stickers can be applied on the canvas or wrapped
onto 3D models. Whilst your sticker has a bounding box, it can be
repositioned, rescaled or rotated. On the side of the bounding box is a stamp icon –
you can use this to apply multiple versions of
the sticker across your creations. If you have finished with your sticker you can
apply a single version by pressing the tick icon. Whenever you’re manipulating a sticker – you will
see additional options in the side panel. These include sticker opacity – which alters the
transparency of the sticker. Or material options which change the reflectivity
and shine of a sticker when being applied to a 3D
model. If you decide not to apply a sticker then simply
drag it off into an empty space or press the
escape key. You also have the option to ‘Make 3D’, which
transforms the sticker to a flat layer in 3D
space. In this tab you will find textures. These are stickers that specially designed to
give material texture to your models. They have a soft edge which makes them perfect
for layering and overlapping. If you cant find what you’re after, then there is
a tab is for custom stickers. Click the button to
add a new sticker from your computer. You can use any image or photo as a sticker. Try
searching for textures online or take photos of
textures that you find interesting. You can also turn images in your scene into
stickers. Try using Magic Select to pop out part of your
image and then hit Make Sticker to use it on a
model. Anything that you turn into a sticker will be
added into your custom sticker collection to use
again later in the session. To learn more ways to texture your 3D models,
check out the Brushes guide.

Learning Luminar 4 Photo Editing Tutorial

Learning Luminar 4 Photo Editing Tutorial


a couple of weeks back Skylum launched
luminar 4 at the time I did a review of the new features and found that the
editing tools and interface had changed significantly since then i’ve noticed
quite a few people struggling to use luminar for especially those who used to
use luminar 3 if this is you in today’s video i’m going to help you get a better
understanding of how to work with the new interface and if you’re completely
new user to luminar you can think of this video as a QuickStart tutorial
let’s get underway by looking at the library module there are two modules you
can work with in luminar there’s the library module where you can organize
and manage your files and there’s the Edit module which we’ll look at shortly
to edit our image in the library module you can see a grid of images these
thumbnails show the images in the folder that you have selected folders only
appear here after you’ve imported them the library also
to create albums an album is a collection of images that
you want to group together and you can select these images from multiple
folders when you want to add an image to an album you can drag and drop it from
the grid the library also has some simple
features to help you better manage your images for example you can add a star
rating to indicate your best images you can also mark images as favorites
using this icon and you can set color labels which have any meaning that you
want to attach to them it’s the then possible to filter your
photos to show only those with a certain star rating or which are marked as favorites or that
have a color label after selecting an image in the library
you can switch to the edit module to apply your adjustments
this is where most of the interface changes occurred to help explain the
changes I’m going to edit this image luminar supports the idea of looks and
these have ready-made presets you can apply to an image you can display the
installed looks by clicking the icon at the top of the interface the different
looks are then organized into categories once you’ve found and applied a look to
an image you can adjust the strength or amount of that look now if you’ve
previously used luminar I’m going to ask you to forget everything you know about
it until we get to the end of this editing luminar supports a layer based
editing system by default every image you open has a base layer which you can
adjust when I selected one of the looks it’s
applied these adjustments to the image now in the old version of luminar if you
wanted to adjust an image you needed to add individual filters from a list of
about 50 in luminar 4 you don’t need to bother adding the individual filters
instead all the filters are available on the base layer and every adjustment
layer you add to the image you’ll find these grouped under the icons on the
right for example we’ve got the essentials notice some of these have the
titles highlighted those are the changes that were applied when I applied this
look each look has its own different changes notice that was completely
different when you’ve clicked one of these icons
you notice all the filters you have available to you in the essentials group
I can see all the adjustment filters that help me correct and refine an image
and these are the ones you should start with once you’ve done that you can
switch to the creative adjustments for a different set of filters here we can see
things like the sky replacement filter as well as filters to add glowing
effects these are all examples of special effects which is why they appear
in the creative category we also have a portrait category and this is to help
you adjust photos of people then there’s the pro filters which contains slightly
more advanced adjustments now having applied an initial look to this image
the next thing I’m going to do is fix a couple of problems and I’ll do this by
clicking the canvas icon first I’m going to correct the lens
distortion in the image and I’ll do this using the geometry controls as I apply
the adjustment watch what happens to the vignette in the corners of the frame I’m also going to take the option to
remove chromatic aberration finally I’ll use the deviating slider to lighten the
edges of the frame where there’s a problem with light fall-off I can also
see some dust spots on my image and I’m going to fix these using the clone and
stamp mode first I’m going to select the area to
use for my repair I’ll then configure my brush settings Now I can paint over the areas I want to
fix when I’m finished I can click the done
button to apply my changes because the clone and stunt layer that
I’ve used creates a new copy of the image if I go back and make any changes
to my original adjustments you won’t see them if I want to make further adjustments I
need to add my changes to the clone and stunt layer or add another layer above
this for this example I’ll continue to work with the clone and
stamp layer I’ll start by adding some adjustments in the essentials group to
refine the light and color of my image note says that there’s also an
Advanced Settings section and this appears in many of the filters this
section contains additional adjustments and quite a few of these have come from
the filters that we’re in lumen are three but aren’t in lumen are four this
is how they’ve managed to rationalize the filters to a more manageable list let’s now add some structure to
emphasize the shape of these rocks in the foreground now because this filter effects
entire image we need to use a mask to limit where the effects applied all the filters have individual masks
that you can use to selectively adjust areas of the image you can also turn the
filter off and on again temporarily I’m now going to use a couple of the
professional adjustments starting with dodging burn and I’ll use this to lighten the rocks
in the image slightly in certain areas next I’ll apply one of my favorite
filters which is the advanced contrast filter once I’m happy with the adjustments I
can export the photo to an image file the original raw file together with any
adjustments I’ve made stays in my luminaire for library
I hope this videos given you some idea about how to use Lumina especially if
you were struggling after the recent upgrade if you found it helpful please
share it with others I’m Robin Whalley you’ve been watching lenscraft I’ll see
you soon for another video