Katherine Hattam: the history pictures

Katherine Hattam: the history pictures


(pencil scraping) – These are bunny tails from the beach. We used to, these little things actually they don’t have
round things like that but they become round in mine. My daughters pointed this out to me, she said it’s like a way, it’s kind of a version of mindfulness. My drawing and planning
these things are a way of, there’s some kind of,
it’s not like therapy but they’re very kind of restorative. I do really, I really do like making work. I mean it’s something contains me. It’s like a, it kind of
feels like a necessity. I find it a little scary if
I’m not going to be able to. I actually do a lot of like,
these kind of sketches, like this actually in, like
as I go to sleep as night and things too and I also
make some of them just where they’re with my eyes closed, whether I was trying to think
how to draw William Buckley and I thought I’d just
do it with my eyes shut and see what happens. This was done with my eyes shut and it was the idea of
trying to get away from, I really don’t like realism and I was really trying
to get away from it. I mean I don’t think I
have too much trouble with being realistic but it’s like I wanted to kind of
try and free myself up, and I do actually like the
fact that this fish is swimming into the fish trap which would
be totally unintentional. And then it’s like these are
reminders of the blue sea, him being pink and then
red here and then the blue. The Indigenous woman being
blue with black hair, and then the baby being blue. And I just, instead of having black and white I wanted pink and blue. It’s like me developing a vocabulary. So I’m, yeah I’m just doing
little notes for myself. It is interesting to look back. I did these, I don’t know,
like two years ago I think, I’m trying to work out, I don’t
know why he’s got shorts on. I also do it with my
other hand and I do both, but I mean these are just done straight, but they still don’t look
that different from that but it’s a really rough sketch. So that I’m not getting bound
up with like how to do it, but thinking where I have things. No idea, oh that’s saying
the canvas in the kitchen, that’s saying where I should, what picture I should do it on. There’s probably about 10 of these books for this particular project. So, and then I go from a decision as to whether it’s going
to be oil on canvas or if it’s going to be a kind of collage, which will be charcoal and gouache and book pages or on paper. I started and I actually
worked this out the other day, so in 1994, I made a picture from the age, deaths, age, births,
deaths and marriages page, because my father died. So, then I started the book pages a bit. A bit then but then I really, really went on with them in
2004 when my mother died. So, it was like when she
had, she was a massive reader and there were like, lots
of books that we all, we laid all the books out in the house, right through the house
upstairs, down everywhere and all chose them and then,
and actually what happened was you got a lot of books
that you already had. So I recycled them, is how I put it, and then that ran out,
and so then I buy them. But I’ve been doing them for a long time. (pencil scraping) The thing, the decision I make
during this is also to like, what I was thinking
about this with this one, is this one will be like, negative space. And I like the fact that he, Trevor Jones, who used to own the book, is in there. It really, really gives
me a lot of pleasure. And there’s some books
I’ve got where it says, happy birthday mum and
it’s from me to my mother. I like doing those, those little emotional
connections in there. Book pages I mainly choose
so that I want text, no text. Like, I don’t want too much text so like, if you have too much text it’s like really a different surface to work
on, so I like having it, it’s like what I really like
are the pages that aren’t as, don’t have too much written on them. So you only get a few
of those in each book. So you need to be able to
find some, like really, kind of cheap, crap old books
that are, you can tear up. So then I, this is one of the things that I really enjoy doing,
is putting some things into some of these spaces, which I’m trying to think if there are, there’s not so many in
this picture but here, there’s a space which I’ll put some in. Like, I’ll choose an image, I think I’ll put the Great
Tradition in there, maybe. And the other thing, when I’m doing this, is I choose between a
torn edge or a cut one and this one I will make a torn edge, so I’ll just put that in there. I have to get rid of… And in here, there’s some,
so Home is the Prisoner. I don’t actually really, I
don’t know if I like that, so I’ll probably put
something else over that. And then I kind of
manipulate the accident. So, I’ll go over that. But maybe Home is the
Prisoner might be useful, maybe that might make
sense for William Buckley. So I’ll put that there, no,
I think I’ll put that there. I’ll spend a bit of time
thinking about that. So, I like this one, like
To my three sons, Ian, Douglas and Gordon,
victims of the principal. Herein described in this book
is effectively dedicated. What the hell does that mean? This is the point where I kind of decide the palette because, if I’m
going to go with like, blues, I’d probably use blue book spines, but I think I’m probably going to go with the orange ones, but
I still can have like, a blue one in there or two, but I think this one I’ve
been waiting to use this, the go-between, because
that is what he was. So, probably there. So, I’ll probably at
the moment I’ll do that and then I’ll work out later if that’s… I might take one of them out. But, I also do like these
two different blues. Like, there’s the blue
sort of these really, that’s like a phthalo blue and white and this is like an
ultramarine blue and white. So it’s like I have… There’s also the different oranges like these ones, I probably
would swap this one around. So, it’s like a little work
within the work kind of thing and then, the next stage
is I would seal this and then I work with gouache into that. It really works for me, work,
having my studio at home and, it always has. Like, I worked all through
having small children. I used to get up at five
and I’d just get two hours or something and I mean, I still do that. I like being able to go for
half an hour, or an hour, or a day, or go back at night
or I mean, it just suits me. I like the two things being
connected but separate. It feels like a great privilege, to me. The thing about these
two spaces is that, like, where we were, the domestic
space and where I cook and live and all of that, is that
that is also a thinking space for me, it’s where I
draw and plan pictures and have ideas like all the
sketches and things that I never do any of those in here. They’re always down either
as I’m about to go to sleep, or while I’m having dinner
or sitting at the table. It’s like they’re in that space. And I would never paint in that space. It’s like, so and then
in here, this is divided, so this is the area for gouache. Then I know this pink is a really, so it says Very Good Pink, it’s
like it’s really nice pink. So that’s for gouache here,
so that I don’t accidentally dip a brush with turps on
it into and then in here, over here I work on the oil, I either work up against the
wall or on the table and I do actually, a bit of both.
– Yeah. I work flat and then I put it upright and it looks very different. – [Tai] You don’t use an easel though? – I’ve got an easel out
there, but I haven’t used it for about 10 years.
– Yeah, interesting. – I use it to kind of
put, store things on. So, we decided to call the
exhibition, The History Pictures. – [Tai] Where do you want
to put it, over there? – Maybe over here. It turned out to be a better
title than I’d imagined, it’s like, I thought of that
specifically as relating to William Buckley but
it’s actually worked out that it does in different ways describe the three aspects of the show. So, the first, how I now see it, is like the first aspect
of history is like, my personal history. The second will be like,
history of William Buckley, and the third will be revisionist history. So, it’s like the third is
a more directly feminist, there’s a kind of feminist
subtext to all of them, but that it’s like they move from the personal out towards it. This is like the initial, like the most personal version of it. This is the autobiographical version. It’s like my history, so
it’s my first phone number, the dogs which were my
son Charlie’s that have, they’ve been in my work for a long time. And this is like, the
landscape of the holiday house that we went to, it which
where you’d look through the trees to the sea. And nearly everyone I talk to goes, oh yeah, I remember my first phone number. – [Tai] I don’t know if I do. – [Katherine] But maybe
your generation don’t because you’ve…
– 9, 5, 2. I, no I don’t, I can
probably remember the first four numbers but. – [Katherine] No, I can easily, WF4570 is what I remember
and it’s like, it’s really– – [Tai] How old were you when you first– – Well it was partly that my
father was an obstetrician and so, the phone was
very important to him. People would ring and
say my waters have broken or whatever.
– Yeah, of course. And so he had to sit by the
phone and we always used to say if the house burned down, what
we would do is take the phone and I thought, what a ridiculous thing. So the phone was very important, but it’s also pre-mobile, y’know. It’s like, I remember quite a
few of my early phone numbers but not yet.
– Wow, that’s amazing. – [Katherine] But it was like,
that’s also that I wanted this text in there that
wasn’t like saying, I believe this or that or whatever. – [Tai] Or literal description. It was almost just like a memory. – Yeah, and that’s also something
where things just come as like, an idea and you think yeah, I’d like to make a picture about that. – [Tai] I think colours are
kind of like that, don’t you? – Yeah, definitely. The thing about William Buckley that, it’s been a long interest of mine because, partly because we lived, we
holidayed and then we lived down that West Coast of
Victoria where he spent a lot of time, and I could
really imagine where he was so, that kind of helped me, I don’t know, paint my way of seeing it. He was a bricklayer in London who committed some kind of minor crime and was sent as a convict
to Australia and he escaped and he finished up spending 32 years living with the Wathaurung, to the extent that he
forgot how to speak English, which is something that
is fascinating, I think. So, it’s a bit, it’s a story
about he became a go-between, it’s about language, and it’s also, for me, it was like, what I was interested in was
these women who were invisible, was like the Indigenous
women he lived with, and apparently had a child with one. I mean, these stories are hard to confirm. But then, and then later
when he left, he married a white, he left, he was given pardon, and he married a white woman and I always wonder
what she thought about. Asked him about what he’d
done in those 32 years, how he’d, what was that life like? So that, I’m interested in kind of, trying to make visible the invisible. So it is to do with me
thinking about what is my understanding of being alive. We can see in the paintings
like, I’ve wanted to paint him not as this solo figure, looking,
like in a group of people where, and there’s,
y’know the things they, baskets and that kind of thing there. – But then you’ve got
this as the sort of like, contemporary life here,
with the mobile phone and I mean, is this sort of– – That’s a very intentional thing, because I didn’t want,
in the thing of it being The History Pictures, I
didn’t want it to be me pretending I was there, I
wanted like this is where I’m, this is my perspective and
it’s now with my computer, my phone, my camera, my hairbrush, all these things that
kind of matter to me. And so, that was an
intentional thing of saying, that’s me looking back to that. William Buckley talks
about seeing a bunyip at Waurn Ponds and Waurn Ponds is where there’s all these shopping
shops and things in Geelong and my son Charlie lives there and I said, what’s Waurn Ponds like? And he said, you can’t
tell now, it’s just built. You know, but I always used to shop there, so I love the idea that they
saw a bunyip at Waurn Ponds. – [Tai] Just in Aldi or something. – Yeah, and so, so what
I was trying to work out how would I draw. It’s like trying to think how
would I draw William Buckley? And then I thought, how
would I draw a bunyip? And then I thought, actually,
I’ll do it as a self portrait. Then the next is the Philip Guston. The Philip Guston is
like seeing a painting, the painting of Philip
Guston is called My Pantheon, which is a painting of the light-bulb, which is characteristic
with his studio and the part of the easel and then a list
of the artist that he admires, which were like he takes in
his head into the studio. The ones I take into
the studio, on the whole are more recent and also, are women. There’s the Philip Guston, my version of the Philip
Guston painting, My Pantheon, and there’s my version of
it, My Pantheon, and then– – [Tai] which is an existing painting, put into the painting. – Yep, that’s right. And then, this painting here is, this one where I’ve come round to thinking I don’t want to do
something about a pantheon and it’s like I, this is not
finished, but it’s like a list. So, I said not so much
a pantheon, more a list. – [Tai] It’s good to make a list. – Well, it’s also not hierarchical. So, it’s like, it’s a different thing. But it was also a conscious exercise of thinking of, like,
naming women artists, so that they’re not rather
than them being invisible. – But so that other
people can name them too. Like, people might come and
take notes or, you know. – [Katherine] The thing
is that it dawned on me, quite late, was that it’s not that women artists have not existed, it’s that they’ve been invisible. They’ve been invisible, it’s like, and they’ve been invisible to me. I did not go to art
school being taught that. – No, we live in a time now
where we are rewriting a history through a female lens and it’s almost like that has to happen
through painting as well, which is quite an interesting
way to look at your work. – Well, I still think that we do live in a patriarchy and I
think I’m part of it, so it’s kind of like
having to un-think that. It’s like stuff dawning on me, really, and it’s like for that took me a while. – With lots of paintings that
I love, and with your work, it’s a way of working
out what you see, y’know? And sometimes literally
working out what you see, but also just making sense of what you see in your environment, but
also in your mind, like, your sketch of William Buckley’s
partner with her blue face, it’s like, she obviously
didn’t have a blue face, but you’re working out what you see. – Well, I was just thinking,
how do I depict this? And the thing is that I thought, I’ve thought about this
later is that my husband has, was very red haired and
pale, and kind of freckly, and worked out in the boiling
hot sun in Broken Hill and did get melanoma,
that’s what he died from. – Yeah right. – And so I think it’s like,
and also he was much older than me so it was like, this sense where my experience connected
with that, whereas– – You identified with her.
– Well, he went to Oxford, the year I was born,
and I remember thinking, I used to think, so what happened? What was that bit of your life? There’s a whole chunk of
his life I didn’t know, which is much. So I think there’s that. It’s like I think all
these things combine. – And so that layering of
history is really interesting, I think that ties back to the
title, The History Pictures, because you’re layering your own history in your relationship, over that. – Well I’m realising it after the fact. I did not plan that.
– No, it’s unconscious. It’s really interesting, but
it’s why you’re attracted to a certain story. It’s quite interesting.
– Well, why I stay, yeah, you can’t, you’ve got to have some really deep connection with it, I think. It’s something. I think a lot of the really
interesting stuff that happens in making images is in the
making, and it’s like where you are concentrating on making it and you don’t realise what’s, you know. That’s why the whole thing
of an artist’s statement is kind of nonsense. (pencil scratching) The thing that I find slightly, it’s interesting and it’s
also slightly horrifying is how long I stay with images, and I… the window has been like a
looking from the inside out has been something in my work
for a really, like for years. For all sorts of reasons,
I see the world through a psychoanalytic lens, and
so I see that the inside and what’s going on inside
your head affects how you experience the outside world. What’s happening in the outside
world affects your head, so there’s a porousness
between those two things. And I think the pictures were about that, like for a long time, they were about the table as the inside world, and that was actually
where my real interest was, and then the outside world would be like, a more general kind of landscape. I mean, maybe sometimes
it was a bit more specific but it wasn’t really. The real drive of the
thing for me was depicting and kind of celebrating the
domestic, like the interior. The domestic as it made concrete, like my interior life,
so it wasn’t just like, but it was about focusing on the, y’know, the teapot, the coffeepot, the computer, all of those things that made up my life. And I notice in them, my first phone number, the painting, is the window is slightly
starting to recede, because I deliberately kind
of cut it out at the halfway and then, in the other paintings, most of the rest of the
paintings, it’s not there at all. And the table is the
other image that, like, part of my language, which is seeing the landscape over the table, and the table has become something
that kind of floats more, and between the two spaces, so it’s like, for me it’s like where making the work tells you something about yourself, rather than the other way ’round. You kind of realise things
from how the process works. I think it’s told me that, I don’t know how much, I mean, I think it’s in part to do
with fact of my husband dying, and like, we had a very
happy 40 year marriage, and I think it’s been, like this sense that I am now more out in the world, it’s like by force of circumstance. But also I’m kind of
ready for that but yeah, I think it tells me
that my life is changing and I see the world differently. I think the, I don’t, it’s
not all autobiographical, but the life and the work
do affect each other. Well, the life affects the work. Really, inflects the work. – I love all those women
that took a long time to get there because I think
that that’s a realistic kind of way of looking at the practice. – I think everybody does it
differently, but I think that that is the, I kind of,
feels like that to me, and that is partly that
I’ve had two marriages and three children, and it’s like that it does feed into the work
but it also slows it down. I feel like things happen and then, I don’t feel like I think,
oh, so I’m gonna have this late starting, slow. I don’t feel like that, I just think, oh. I look back and think, that’s what happened.
– Yeah, it’s cool. – It’s like, and you’re
just doing it day by day, you know, what do you want to do and what you think you
should do, and it’s like and you don’t always get it right. I think the hardest thing is for me is gonna be with this show, is to stop. It’s like it’s going to be like I’m gonna go.
– Well, you’ve got more to choose from.
– Oh I have to let the rest ’cause I push a lot of
life away to do this. I think everyone is different, I mean, every artist is
different, but in general, and it’s certainly been my experience, is that it takes a long
time for an artist to form. I feel like now, things
are beginning for me and it’s been a long,
yeah, it’s a long process. It’s been a long and
windy path and it’s all, but I don’t, it’s not
path where I look back and regret it, I think
that’s how it has happened and it feels like a good
moment for me at the moment.

Jim Carrey Paints a Picture for Ellen

Jim Carrey Paints a Picture for Ellen


– I KNOW YOU’RE AN ARTIST. I WOULD SAY
YOU COULD HAVE, LIKE, PAINTED SOMETHING LIKE THAT. I’VE SEEN YOUR ARTWORK.
YOU’RE VERY TALENTED. – I DO LOVE TO PAINT.
YES, I DO. – YOU DO?
– YEAH. I BROUGHT SOME STUFF
TO PAINT WITH IF YOU WANT TO SEE ME
PAINT A LITTLE OF SOMETHING. – WHERE ARE YOU GONNA PAINT? – UH, PRETTY MUCH ANYWHERE. I COULD DO SOMETHING
OVER HERE MAYBE. – ON OUR FLOOR?
– YEAH. WHY NOT? – WITH WHAT KINDA PAINT?
LIKE, PERMANENT PAINT? – UH, I DON’T KNOW.
COULD BE. COULD BE.
YOU NEVER KNOW. – ALL RIGHT.
– YOU NEVER KNOW. – WHY NOT?
LET’S PAINT IT. WHAT ARE YOU PAINTING?
HOW LONG– WELL, WE HAVE TO GO TO BREAK. CAN YOU START
AND CAN WE COME BACK? – YEAH, SURE.
– NO, START. – OKAY, I’LL STAY HERE
TILL WE GO TO BREAK. – NO, NO, NO. [cheers and applause] – DON’T WANNA BREAK THE FORM.
– NO, YOU START. – OKAY. OKAY, I’M JUST GONNA– OKAY, THIS LOOKS LIKE A– – SO WE’LL GO TO BREAK,
AND WE’LL SEE WHAT– OH, LORD. – THIS IS MY FAVORITE PART! [cheers and applause] WHOO! – HE’S NOT KIDDING.
ALL RIGHT. ALL RIGHT, WE’LL–
WE’LL TAKE A BREAK. I DON’T– – SORRY. – WE’LL BE BACK
WITH JIM CARREY AND SEE WHAT HE’S PAINTING. [cheers and applause] [upbeat music] [cheers and applause] THAT’S JIM CARREY’S
ARTWORK ON OUR FLOOR. THAT WILL BE THERE
FOREVER NOW. – THAT’S RIGHT,
FOREVER AND EVER. – ALL RIGHT.
– YEP. – AND SO IT IS
THE CHARACTERS. IT’S “DUMB AND DUMBER TO.”
– THAT’S RIGHT. – YEAH.
– IT’S ME AND JEFF. THAT’S RIGHT. YEP. IT’S JUST ANOTHER
SHAMELESS PLUG. – THAT WILL BE THERE
FOREVER. I DON’T KNOW WHY MORE
PEOPLE HAVEN’T THOUGHT OF THAT WHEN THEY COME ON THE SHOW.
– REALLY.

CGI 3D Animated Spot: “Adalat” – by Mikros Image

CGI 3D Animated Spot: “Adalat” – by Mikros Image


alien : I … am a customer of yours, I need help robot : hello sir Adalacorme, how can I help you ? A : I just got back from a galactic voyage and I don’t feel well R : What are your symptoms? R : Ha I see, I immediately consult our 250 affiliated hospitals A : Uh, hurry up R: what planet were you on? A: Geminus 5 R : in the constellation of the swan? A : yes R : According to the specialists I have online, you would be suffering from geminidrakstolerahom (?) disease A : What ? R : would you have consumed during your stay a small violet flower R : that grows along the manymany (?) river ? A : Uh, that’s right R : would you allow me to inject you with an antivirus? A : With pleasure R : Can you turn around, please A : Yahou, thank R : Is there anything else I can help you with ? A : Uh yes , I’ll take advantage of this to get some cash, 500! R : You’re in overdraft, sir. A : Uh, I’ll be back at the end of the month then. Thank you R : You’re welcome

Unspeakable images: When words fail | The audacity of Christian art | National Gallery


There isn’t a single image of Christ in the canon of Christian art, which can adequately express what Christians believe about him. However, a painting can point beyond itself to the mystery of the Incarnation and encourage the viewer not to take the image at ‘face value’ but to engage with the paradox it presents. One of the most radical ways in which an artist can do this, is by creating empty, or ‘blank’ spaces within the image, often at the place where divine activity is most indicated. Rather than trying to depict the divine activity itself the artist leaves the image open to the viewer’s imagination and contemplation. In Filippo Lippi’s painting of the Annunciation, we saw how the wall blocks our view of the horizon – of infinity – and shows us that we cannot see into the mystery of the Incarnation. Cima da Conegliano’s painting of The Incredulity of St Thomas also uses a blank space as an indication of divine activity. We’re looking at the resurrected Christ, but his ascension is not far ahead. Cima has left unfilled a large space of blank wall above Christ and our eyes are drawn upwards to the heavenly blue and gold ceiling above, in a trajectory which mirrors Christ’s coming ascension. Cima is pointing us towards the next part of the story in a painting which contains its own future. Such images are rare, but there are other ways in which an artist can create ‘openness’ in a painting. Ambiguity is a form of openness precisely because it defies neat definition, easy answers, or the sense that the viewer ‘knows’ what the painting is ‘about’. Unfinished paintings can have a similar effect. Although this might not have been the artist’s original intention, it might help to explain why unfinished paintings can often be particularly compelling. We’re back in the Conservation Department and this is Michelangelo’s ‘Entombment’, painted around 1500. We can speculate about why Michelangelo left it unfinished but its fascination – at least for viewers today – might actually be enhanced by its incompleteness. The composition and the figures are highly ambiguous, and the unfinished passages emphasise this. It is not clear, for instance, exactly how Christ’s body is being supported, and the forward projection of his legs and their curved position creates an impression of weightlessness completely at odds with the dead weight of a corpse. The body is being carried to the grave but this space is not yet convincingly painted. And in a rocky outcrop on the right beyond the figures we see what at first sight looks like the outline of another tomb in an unfinished passage, but which actually depicts figures carrying the slab to cover Christ’s grave. Both grave and slab are blank. The figure of John the Evangelist in red is complete and that of Christ himself is almost finished but the remaining figures are in various stages of completion. Joseph of Arimathea’s head seems to float above his unpainted cloak, and the figures to Christ’s left have only the outline of hands. the whole painting attains an almost dream-like state because of its incompleteness. The seated Mary Magdalene was probably intended to be shown holding the jar of ointment which is her traditional attribute. But she had already anointed Christ once while he was alive, and in some accounts Christ’s body was not fully prepared when he was first placed in the tomb, because of regulations about the Sabbath. So the absent ointment jar strangely works both as a reminder of the earlier anointing, but also of the unfinished nature of the burial itself. Even more poignant is the absence of the mourning Virgin Mary, her outline on the right seems almost erased by grief. The unfinished nature of this painting is a powerful reminder that Christ’s burial is not ‘the final word’ – his Resurrection and Ascension are still to come. Although it was not intended to be viewed like this, its unfinished state offers its own form of theological commentary on its subject, and opens it to the viewer’s own response. The mystery of the Incarnation is presented here as a mystery. Something we begin to understand – just as we begin to make sense of the figures, their clothes, their gestures – but which, at the point of being grasped, eludes us again. Throughout this series we’ve been exploring some of the ways in which Renaissance artists have responded to the problem of painting Christ’s humanity and divinity in a way that really engages the viewer with this mystery of the Incarnation. And we’ve seen how elements of surprise and ambiguity can prompt us to ask questions about what we’re seeing Religious art, like religious language, can never fully encompass what it tries to express about God. But by disorienting our sense of place, confounding timescales, pulling back the curtains to reveal new depths within an image, or tripping us up with snails, these artists acknowledge the exceptional difficulty of their task. As we wander around the National Gallery’s collection, looking at different artistic schools and periods, admiring the beauty of these paintings, it can be easy to forget just how audacious Christian art is. But if we really want to understand these pictures, we need to remember that they are expressions of religious faith, and that they are attempting something truly extraordinary. Whatever one believes about Christ, the idea that it might be possible to paint a figure who is both a human being and God is an astonishing one. And whether we’re thinking about the original viewers for whom these paintings were made, or contemporary visitors to the National Gallery, we’re being challenged to look more deeply into the paintings. And, ultimately, we’re being brought up against the limits of our own comprehension.

Spheres of Meaning: An Exhibition of Artists’ Books| Art Loft 807 Segment

Spheres of Meaning: An Exhibition of Artists’ Books| Art Loft 807 Segment


As the books’ demise is mourned and discussed,
it seems that more and more people want to make books by hand. Artist books are their own art form, just
like photography, or sculpture, or painting. My name is Amy Galpin, and I’m the Chief Curator
at the Frost Art Museum. I was thinking about books in terms of literature
and how books can function as a portal, as a pathway to new experience, new travels. And I was thinking about this relationship
that could be applied to an artist book. I think an artist book can be a sculpture,
it can have text, it can look completely different than we might think a book should look. Or it can have strong connections, like the
work of Margarita Cano with illuminated manuscripts, medieval manuscripts. I used to go a lot to New York to the Morgan
Library. So I was very familiar with books done with
parchment, and gold, and gild, and all that. I started painting in 1993 just after I retired. The first thing I did was an Adam and Eve
being told that they had to leave Paradise. And the Paradise was Cuba, and the tree, instead
of an apple tree, it was mangoes. I thought it made a statement for people to
think about the sufferings of people who have to leave their country. That accordion books, you know, that you open
up, and then I have these little pieces inside, sort of like the mirrors. So when a person grabs one of my books and
starts opening and looking at it, all these things start falling to the floor and it’s
very irritating, but that’s part of what I wanted to cause. I wanted that to be an effect, because the
Cuban situation is so irritating. As some artists are very much dedicated to
the form, I don’t think that either Carol Todaro or, for example, other artists in the
show like Donna Ruff or Rosemarie Chiarlone consider themselves to be only artist book
makers. But they definitely make many artist books. I really enjoy experimenting with media and
pushing the kind of media I can use with artist books. I think a lot about display when I make a
book, I think about where it will be shown and how it will be seen. So this is a group of six artist books that
work together as an ensemble. And it’s called Villanelle. The pages are made of a translucent material
and the images and words are hand-printed on in a very simple method of transferring
text from an actual laser print. And a villanelle is a type of poetic form. It came from a French song form. Therefore, these books, which are a kind of
analogy to the poetic form, are mounted on music stands. The music stands do two things: they provide
a way for the books to be displayed as sculpture, and they also cue us that music is a part
of the content of the piece. So the words are all fragments of poems. This one begins with the words “as if”. So, when you go down to the side, it says
“forming a galaxy”, and on the other side, “becoming a graveyard”. So I’m going from the cosmos to below the
earth in this one segment of the poem. It’s not really a story but more images and
texts that the viewer is invited to put together and make their own meaning from. I think for, you know, most people think of
Diego as a painter. He’s someone who really interrogates, “What
does a painting mean?” But I was really taken with his elaborate
sketchbooks, these deconstructions of other magazines joined with various drawings. And I thought he brought a really fresh perspective
to the exhibition. For me, the artists books came just as a way
of necessity, of just making. And luckily, I work in a lot of art institutions
and what I decided to do was just incorporate a lot of the materials that was around me. They had a lot of catalogs that they were
always throwing away. I didn’t really think about it as like, any
different than painting. I just needed to make. So during my break time I would be making
it, and even during the time when I was working I would be walking around and if there was
like, an interesting page because of the material I thought it would be interesting, I would
just grab it and put it into these, like, artist books. And yeah, I learned a lot from that. And after I made the book, I felt like I couldn’t
make the same type of art again, what I was making in grad school. It just didn’t make sense for me. I’m always thinking about that sense of awe
that a viewer might have, but then simultaneously, what is the resonance? You know, what does the work mean to them
after they leave the museum?

Gel Image Transfers


In this video we will be transferring an image
using the indirect transfer method using Golden acrylic gel. First we need an image. Got it! Edited your photo to suit your needs and then
print it. Inkjet printer inks can smear when coated
with water based products, so use either a laser printer or photo copier. We’re using
a laser printer for this demo. You can cut your image down to a manageable
size if you want, but leave some extra edging to trim later on. Next coat the image with a thin layer of acrylic
medium to minimize any wrinkling of the paper. Here we’re using GAC 500. Brush this layer
out as thinly as possible, so that the minimum amount of moisture comes in contact with the
paper. Allow this to dry. Next tape the image down to a work surface
to help keep the image flat and in place. Now coat the surface with a layer of Gloss
Acrylic Gel. We will use Soft Gel Gloss for our demo but
any Gloss Gel or medium is an option. Use a large palette knife or spatula to smooth
out a moderately thick layer of gel. Allow this to cure until it has clarified,
usually overnight. You can remove the tape either by peeling
it off, or to reduce any chance of tearing carefully cut around the edge using a sharp
knife. Now it is time to remove the paper backing. Place your transfer face down into either
a shallow tray or sink basin. Saturate the paper surface with water and begin rubbing. As the water saturates the paper it will start
to become pulp. Be patient when rubbing as it takes some effort to remove all of the
paper from the gel surface. Now you can see we have “see through”
transferred image, but it gets even better! Allow this to dry on a non absorbent surface
such glass. Working on the back side of the image we can
add color very loosely and still maintain the detail of the lines. Here we are using some GOLDEN Fluid transparent
red iron oxide and titanium white. Notice how loosely we are brushing on the color. After the paint layer has dried, the transfers
can be incorporated into artwork by gluing them down with soft gel gloss or another medium.

Testing a Tik Tok ART Trend?! Painting a POLAROID CAMERA?!

Testing a Tik Tok ART Trend?! Painting a POLAROID CAMERA?!


* Hello there! So first of all, I just want to say that I got a new filming setup so if there are any tech, like, tech prob- *stammers* so if there are any tech problems throughout this video, I do apologize, but for the price of this camera I am really hoping the quality is gonna be good because I could have sent my kids and my grandkids to college probably twice for the cost of this camera. The other day I had a really fun, original, super, like no one’s ever done it before idea. Um, then I was just like, “Wow! So original!” and then I was on TikTok the other evening. Yes, I was on TikTok, don’t judge me. *Laughing stupidly on purpose* *Abruptly stops* I’ve seen loads of people on there doing it so it wasn’t that original after all. It’s the Polaroid camera that is gonna be a future canvas! Yes, you are! So today, this is, this is what I’m going to be doing next week, it’s a toilet plunger. And I thought I would use paint pens on this camera because I’m actually obsessed with Posca markers now because I’ve pretty much just used them all week. And I can’t tell you why. And my friend Zach, ZHC if you go and check out his channel, go and subscribe to him, he’s got a couple really exciting videos coming that I was in, painting with these things *whispering* so check it out! It’s fun! Let’s get started! I don’t know what to paint. Honestly, TikTok just has people mostly painting flowers, which is beautiful, but like, for a 10 minute video, painting flowers probably just is not gonna work. That is such a nice photo of me! You can see my very chiseled non-existent jawline. This bag smells nice. I have an idea! So basically I’ve painted and drawn Starry Night a couple of times recently. I think I might turn this camera into a van Gogh style painting. Okay, I’m gonna put a quick disclaimer in here because just this second as I’m editing and about to export my video, I’ve gone on TikTok and seen that someone actually did Starry Night in the same place that I did, and I did not see this nor was I in any means actually copying this or even inspired by this at all, but I just wanted to mention that and put their video in here anyway because they did a beautiful job and I didn’t want to seem like I was copying someone when I wasn’t, but just, disclaimer. That’s it! I’m ready. Let’s get started and let’s go. Okay, so here are all of my Posca markers. Here is my Polaroid camera. I think what I’m gonna do is start off by taking the back off and then painting that separately. Just drop that. So, I have my Posca in one hand and Polaroid in the other and look! It’s out of bloody focus! The shame of it. I, again, I’m new to this camera, so do forgive my noobness at the camera, but it’s okay, It did go into focus again, as you can see, then it did go kind of out of focus and then in focus again but I’m trying to like, cut those parts out so you can’t see it as much but honestly, it’s okay. Does the sound of the pen, though… *Pen scratches loudly* annoy you or is it satisfying? Personally to me, it completely grates on me so if it annoys you as well, here’s another clip of that. *More scratching* You’re welcome. The key to a perfect Starry Night is 5 million squiggles. I pretty much just colored in the entire back with small squiggles in the darkest blue Posca that I had. You don’t really need a perfect solid blue background, just a loose one because honestly, you’re gonna be filling in the holes with a lighter blue anyway, and you know, it’s just the way that van Gogh did it – van GOTH? Van GO? Van GOGH? How – no matter how I say this, someone corrects me so you know what? I’m just gonna keep saying van Gogh (GOTH) because that’s how I grew up saying it even if it’s wrong. So he used oils and this is just my technique and the best way that I’ve personally found to do it. Hi! Here’s a totally pointless stop motion animation piece of footage for you to enjoy while I also tell you that this video is sponsored by Skillshare. Gonna put the logo in here somewhere. If you’re a human, then you want to explore and find new skills. If you said no, that means you’re an alien in which case please don’t take over our planet, I do have a list of people I don’t like though, that you can take with you, gladly. If you are human though, Skillshare has THOUSANDS of classes in fine art, illustration, graphic design, photography, video, freelance and so much more! I’m completely self-taught. I’ve never had an art class before so sometimes I need to figure out how to do something, I look on Skillshare and there’s an ENTIRE class on it. In fact, one of the best classes I’ve taken recently was this one about color, it was very very interesting and I highly recommend it. So if you’d like 2020 to be the year that you explore and find new skills, check out the link in the description. You can get two months of free premium membership to join Skillshare. Basically, Skillshare is the number one place that I recommend for everyone to learn anything and pretty much everything that they want to learn. How do I learn to cook? Skillshare! Where do I learn to paint? Skillshare! How do I learn to change the toilet paper on the toilet roll holder? Okay, maybe not that one. Why does it look turquoise when it’s blue in person? I don’t understand. It is blue. Actually, I’m gonna color correct this to show you what it actually looks like to me. Wait, this – mmm. I mean… close enough. Now, the thing about Poscas is that they don’t blend because they are paint pens, not alcohol markers. Unless you’re like me and you’re incredibly impatient, you don’t have to wait for the paint to dry, if you’re actually fast you can somewhat blend the pens by putting them over each other when it’s wet. It’s, it kind of works. I mean, you, do you ruin the nib doing this? Yes you 100% do, but it’s worth it. You can actually fix it by putting it on paper. Dry! Please dry! I’m flapping my hand around in the air and it definitely doesn’t do anything, but I do it anyway. I KNOW that it does absolutely bugger all but I still continue to do it. It still wasn’t drying from my hand flapping so I decided to survey the rest of my hard bumpy plastic blue canvas and I spent a while trying to decide what I actually wanted to do with it before actually just, it hit me! I had the idea of painting other classic paintings on it because you know, that seemed logical and fun. Back to Starry Night, more squiggles, more little lines for details, the Posca set I’ve got from Amazon, Amazon, yes Amazon. Everyone makes fun of me for the way I say things but like, I say Amazon. Other British people I know on YouTube say Amazon too. I don’t say AmaZON. AmaZON. It doesn’t sound right. “AmaZON.” Like the Amazon rainforest, Amazon. That’s just how I say it! I just don’t, I’m not, again, I’m not changing for anyone, that’s how I say it. It’s Amazon always and forever, it will be Amazon. Anyway, I got the set from Amazon, it had three blues, one light, one dark and one turquoise so I needed just a pretty much a combination of all three and that’s what I did. You do need a lot of patience and a lot of energy drinks- I take it back, don’t use, energy drinks are bad for you. I don’t recommend them. But still, this stuff takes a long time. I mean, this, this area was probably like, what? 4×3, if that, and it took me a very very long time, I actually did something really huge with Starry Night the other day, it must have been like, I don’t know, three feet by three feet, like, it was a big area and I can’t tell you what it is yet, but it was really really cool and if you follow me on Instagram, you’ll see it then. There’s the Starry Night finished as you can see, and now it is time to move on to the side, battery, containment… compartment case cover. For this one, I decided that I would paint The Scream. Is it -? Wait, hang on, it is actually The Scream, right? Give me a second. I’m gonna check. Is it actually The Scream? Yeah, just The Scream! The Scream. It is by Edvard Munch and I just thought that it would be a fun thing to do and I liked the colors of it and it just seems simple enough to do with Posca markers because I can’t really do too much detail and yeah, that’s what I started with. So I really regretted the fact I didn’t have a wider selection of pen nib thicknesses because this took me a really long time on the bigger areas and this one didn’t even take that long because it was like painting on half an egg, it was a small area and it’s a pretty simple painting if you don’t bother putting too much detail into it but my only issue is really that my Poscas kept drying up and as a result, it looked like this, beautiful! Wow. Much loveliness, not at all scratched off and like a three-year-old did it! I then tried to get some lovely close artsy shots, but honestly my hand just kept going in the way and went out of focus a lot so forget I did that. This one was pretty self-explanatory, you know, I drew it, I drew some more, I drew some more, put some different colors down and layered it some more, tried to get rid of the scratched off parts, shook the Poscas for the five millionth time! *Loud shaking* Cause they kept drying up! I then gave him two nostrils and it looked like he had a small face in a giant forehead. I personally found it hilarious, I don’t know about you. I then tried my last-ditch attempt to not make this guy look like Voldemort and I failed. It was a bit small to actually make it super detailed, especially when the nibs of the Poscas were so big, like they were big for certain details, but too small for the bigger ones so it was a bit difficult. So the little Scream Voldemort looking man that I did wasn’t perfect, but it’ll have to do. Hopefully no one’s gonna see it too up close except all of you. Then it was time to ruin, um, I mean PAINT, the front. For this, I decided on the last painting. I always think of famous paintings. I always think of The Scream, Starry Night and I think of The Persistence of Memory, and that’s the one with the melting clocks if you didn’t know. I got super brave and just drew it out with a black marker and hoped for the best. Honestly, I could have used a pencil but at this point I was just like, you know, I’ve drawn a little Voldemort on the side of the battery pack. I think at this point I just need to just go for it. I kind of regretted the choice of having a kind of poo-colored brown on the front of the camera but it looked okay when it was done, but at the time I was a bit like, *sighs* “It looks like poo on the front! It’s just the wrong kind of brown,” but it was all I had so I went with it. I think clocks on the camera worked quite well because cameras capture a moment in time, you know? Ah ha! Thought it was clever. Get it? No? Okay. So I don’t have a huge amount to say about this particular piece, I actually really really enjoyed it and it didn’t take me as long as I thought it would. I think it was maybe 45 minutes at the most that it took me, maybe an hour, but probably about more like closer to 45 minutes. I was really concerned about that brown though, I was so worried that it would just, would not, cause it was SO brown! There was so much brown on there and I was like, arrgh, that doesn’t, that doesn’t look good, but I added a little bit, little bit more black to it, I added the blue of the clocks and I added like, the little cliff thing in the background and I think it worked quite well in the end. Something that was more challenging, I guess was trying to figure out what to put where cause obviously I was putting a horizontal painting onto patchy parts of a camera so I was trying to like, put that in the right place but also figure out how to get the perspective right because obviously I’m not, I’m on a curved surface not a flat one and I was making like, crooked clocks on a curved surface so that was the most challenging part, but overall it was actually not too bad. And I really really enjoyed it. I was initially a little bit like, “ugh, I should have put Starry Night on the front!” because Starry Night’s my favorite, and that probably would have looked more effective, but I actually really am happy with the placement of all of these pieces at the end, still not overly happy with like, little Voldemort, but it was okay. He will have to do as he is. I haven’t sprayed this yet, but what I’m gonna do is try and like, tape everything up and then spray it with a matte finishing spray that I have by Winsor & Newton. Hopefully this will help protect it a little bit but I’m not gonna be heavily using this camera like everyday or anything, so I’m not too concerned, it’s more for decorative purposes, I guess, but uh, yeah, this is how it looks in the end. What do you think of how it all turned out? I hope that you all really enjoyed this video, let me know in the comments down below if you did, let me know also which your favorite piece is on this camera. So thank you so much for watching this video, I hope that you enjoyed it, take care of yourselves and I will see you in the next video. *End music*

CGI 3D Animated Trailer: “For Honor- Thin Red Path” – by Unit Image


Honor What do you know about honor? You Who has never faced true fear Learn what honor is before pretending you are a warrior Know this before you step onto that thin red path when no misstep is allowed Path that only ends when your legs fail to support you And your heart stops beating A path where sadness goes along with pain, and where glory is the color of blood This now our path goes only one way The way covered with enemies and brothers And it will take you without any shame into the hands of death For the name you were given and for your descendants For Honor