Passage – Capturing The Spirit Of Tintagel Castle | Feat. Artist David Mankin

Passage – Capturing The Spirit Of Tintagel Castle | Feat. Artist David Mankin


It’s such an honour to be selected out of
so many artists to make this painting of such an iconic ancient Cornish landmark. My main external source for my work is the
Cornish landscape, very much the sensory experience of being in the landscape. My name is David Mankin and I’m an artist
in a small village in the wild west of Cornwall called Perranuthnoe. The kind of things that really excite me are
the flux and the change in the landscape the shapes, the textures, the moods of the landscape
that we all respond to in our own individual ways. When I come into the studio it’s more about
the process and the paint, and almost like remembering with paint what I’ve experienced
in the landscape so I tend to start off with a kind of explosion of mark making and gestural
marks, they’re almost like sensory fragments that I’ve picked up in the landscape and then
I’m using those on my canvases on my paper trying to build a composition. Today for example – those colours – that was so
strong and all that beautiful golden seaweed on the beach that you saw against the grey
rocks and those little sparks of colour from the fishing lines and so on, that kind of lodges in my
mind and that’ll come back somehow. It’s those things that I might think ‘that
shape that I saw on that – I’ll do that’ maybe huge on a canvas and just see where that takes
me and that’s the exciting thing because it’s like you’re taking that fragment and then
you’re exploding it or taking a risk with that fragment in a sensory perspective and
then something else happens so then that whole creative process develops. I start off in a very gestural way which to
me is a kind of reflection of the landscape there’s so much change and movement in the
landscape that I try and replicate that in some of my pictures. That’s why I change the
paintings, I move the paintings forward it’s almost like mimicking the action of the landscape. It’s all those things that I find really interesting,
the ebb and flow, the rhythm out there the pulse of the landscape. When I received the brief it was a very, very
exciting prospect for me because Tintagel is beautiful and I was very, very
taken with the site. The patina of age and drama that you can’t not be inspired, and it certainly did inspire me so I took probably over a hundred photographs that day. I brought those back to my studio and started
sketching small black and white sketches, really looking at texture and line and structure
for the brief which gave me a sense of the site and what I was after and then I decided
to do six works on paper at A3 size. There was two or three that I really, really liked
and I put those forward and luckily one was accepted so it’s very, very exciting to be
working on this amazing project. This bit I found the other day. I just love
that, I just love the shape of it, the mystery of where this bit of wood has travelled. That
texture has been achieved by years of the sea buffeting that. That texture you can only
achieve that by working on it and that’s what I try and do. Peter Lanyon, a famous Cornish artist, made
this quote: “Beachcombing is a favourite activity of mine and for me a painter is a kind of
beachcomber”. Originally I was brought to Cornwall by my
parents when I was very young, and then I came back to Cornwall in the late seventies I suppose,
early eighties with some university friends and we had a wild weekend and that was near
Tintagel actually and I just love the spirit of the place and I’ve always loved the spirit
of Cornwall. And when I met my wife and we came back to Cornwall when our son was one
and we stayed in Mousehole I kind of fell in love with the art of Cornwall and particularly
the kind of abstract artists of the fifties and sixties, people like Roger Hilton and William
Scott and Peter Lanyon, and I really love that art and I could see in it their real love
of the landscape and the freedom of expression that came out. I spent a lot of time studying
art and artists and over the last five or six years I’ve developed my voice which is
what you see now. When we first moved to Cornwall my dream was
to become an artist, that’s always what I wanted but life got in the way a bit as it does, so. But
I made these paintings at Porthmeor – a friend had the studio, you can rent the studios at
Porthmeor which overlook Porthmeor Beach in St Ives and I spent several weekends there
making paintings and that really kind of ignited my desire again and it set me on this journey. I seem to have found my kind of what I want
to do and I’ve found the place where I love to be and that’s quite special really. Arriving at Tintagel Castle was almost like
entering a different country. The topography is completely different. I was struck by the
soaring Cathedral-like cliffs, the deep divide where the land had fallen away between the
mainland and the island which had created this kind of natural chasm. When you’re here
you can really see and feel the layered history of Tintagel, not only of man’s impact over
the centuries but also the way the fury of the Cornish weather and the relentless pounding
of the sea has shaped this spectacular headland. There’s a brooding, rugged, mysterious beauty
to Tintagel. My process is all about gathering information
and the feeling about a place. The experience. By being somewhere, I absorb the mood and atmosphere – collecting and recording shapes, colours, textures, sounds and the relationships between them.
I take all of this back to the studio and allow it to spill out onto the canvas in an
expressive way to try and capture the essence of the experience. Tintagel was certainly an all-encompassing
experience for me and one I was very excited to capture and remember through paint. There
were so many things that inspired the painting. Luckily when I visited Tintagel, the sun was
shining and the colours were mesmerising. The sea was this intense, vibrant jade blue and
from a distance the grass that covered the surrounding headlands had a lime green velvety
quality. The orange lichen edged the castle walls and the jagged stones of the remains
created these intricate geometric shapes. You turn a corner and suddenly through the stones
there was a perfectly framed view of the sea below, a rich umbre ocha colour resonating
against the deep turquoise sea. On the island, I felt a great sense of elevation. All these
details and more found their way into the painting, which I’ve called Passage. At the beginning of this process I was very
excited to be chosen to make this painting but to be honest also quite daunted by making
a piece that would be seen by so many people. Although there were some ups and downs with
the painting process, I’m thrilled with the final result. It makes a striking handbook
front cover and I hope members will be intrigued to find out more. At first glance I hope the
painting gives a sense of place, a sense of the spirit of Tintagel Castle but on closer
inspection and over time I hope the viewer will be rewarded with new perspectives
and connections. Wow! These look fantastic, they really do. So
interesting to see them in this context having been so deeply involved with making the painting
and the ups and downs the painting went through. It really brings it to life, and I’m particularly
fascinated that the members’ card… there’s a small element of the painting’s been selected
for the members’ card which is fantastic because it really reflects the way I work by collecting
fragments of information and using that in my work, so that’s really lovely to see. Oh I’m absolutely thrilled.

Meet the Artists | Mickalene Thomas

Meet the Artists | Mickalene Thomas


The gaze in my work
is unapologetically a black woman’s gaze
loving other black women. You know, that’s the gaze. I’m Mickalene Thomas,
I’m an artist, filmmaker, sometimes curator, collaborator,
and you’re in my studio. One of the things that really
is a constant in my life is Jet Magazine and the Beauty of the Week. Jet Magazine was sort of this
black American cultural media bible for, you know… It was like… everything. And then there was this page about the Beauty of the Week, which was fascinating. Who are these women?
The description of who they are and thinking about Janet,
who’s from Atlanta and who does horseback riding and who goes to Spelman
or whatever. And they’re in these
bathing suits, sort of like
these pageantries, but that was like for me this first notion of beauty. I started as a rogue… I would say
like an AbEx painter. All-over painting, the physicality of it. Thinking about Clement Greenberg and all of those conceptual,
theoretical ideas about painting
and formalism and like… I wanted to be
a painter’s painter. But even working abstractly,
I collaged. I was using different fabric
and cutting things and putting them on surfaces. But I didn’t really
call it collage. Once I got to graduate school I was really encouraged
to take a photo class with David Hilliard – incredible photographer. Once I took this photo class
I started looking at and thinking about
the black body and media and particular stereotypes related around
notions of beauty. I started thinking
about my own body. And then I started
to look at my own life in relationship to my mother. I went to New Jersey and started photographing her
as Pam Grier. And while photographing her
I was also photographing myself. And the need
to see myself more in my work… I couldn’t deny it. I just remember one day starting to paint myself. And that began
by photographing myself dressed up as Mary J. Blige, or dressed up as women
that I grew up idolizing. Like for instance Naomi Sims who was a black model
in the late 70s who was really one of the first for her time to really speak
for black women and their wellness. These women
were defining another way of how we will look at
what is beauty. Because it’s not necessarily
just the surface, it’s also the action, you know? How they define themselves and how they persevere. And how they withstand circumstance and obstacles. That’s always been something
that I looked to for women that I’m celebrating in my work.

Artist Vs. Beauty Lover • Makeup Challenge

Artist Vs. Beauty Lover • Makeup Challenge


I’m feeling extremely confident. Good, I don’t. Hi, I’m Sara, and I’m okay at makeup, but I’m a pretty good artist. And I’m Nina and I’m
pretty good at makeup, but I’m a really, really bad artist. I do my makeup day-to-day, but I don’t usually do a
lot unless I’m going out, and then I just kind of make it up. That is not how I think. So today we’re doing a challenge to see who can come up with
the best creative look based off of a theme. It has to cover 40% of
your face, at least, and it can’t just be a
going out, normal look. It has to be something a
little bit more creative. We’re gonna be judged
by a jury of our peers, AKA people we find around the office. (rousing trumpet music) What is fall? What does that mean? Am I gonna just do an orangey-red look all over my face? Or am I gonna draw a
turkey leg on my cheek? – [Sara] The idea behind my look today is the transition from fall to winter, so I’m gonna use a lot of autumnal shades, but also a lot of nice
wintery shades as well. I’m not 100% sure what I
want to do for my look, but I know I want to use fall colors. I know I want leaves, and I know I want some sparkly gold in there. There’s already shit happening over there, I haven’t even started. I don’t even know where to start. What does a leaf look like, you know? (contemplative humming) I’m feeling extremely confident. That’s good, I don’t. This is very fun. I’m glad you’re having fun. My contacts, they’re getting dry! (rhythmic jazz music) This might have gone off the rails. That’s what I like to hear, I’m ready. I think I’m ready too. (old time music on record player) We’re two fall babes and we’re about to go get the final judgment from our coworkers. I really have to itch my face, so I hope that this goes fast. (upbeat music) I’m scared I have to choose a winner. Is that what? Oh no, I don’t want to. I really like how you both have leaves, but this little accent is cool. And also it looks like you have almost like trees coming out of the sides? But I think you look amazing too. I think it’s so close. – [Nina] Thank you, we’re done here. Yours is more leaves, okay,
it has more fall colors. Sara’s looking at me
like, you better pick me. Sara, I love you. Nina’s gives me more of a fall vibe. I’m gonna go with Sara, so tie. I’m gonna go with Nina. Nina, yours is really beautiful, and I love the gold with your skin, but I just keep looking
at Sara’s leaf forehead, and I just love it. I like Nina’s gold look, it
just feels fall and festive. I’m gonna go with Sara. I’m gonna go with Nina. I’m leaning towards you. – [Sara] Ooh, why? Yours has got a little bit more sparkle. Nina’s! It perfectly frames my
favorite part of her face, and she uses her cut-crease eye. I’ve seen it, ’cause she’s done it before. Oh my gosh, no, I like Nina’s. Yours I like, kind of
like deer/small pox chic around the cheeks, it’s cool. Yours looks more like flowers, and I feel like leaves? – [Nina] Yeah. Autumnal leaves? Sara, yours is way, it’s top-notch. I have to say, I like the
sort of gold look on Nina’s. I’m sorry Sara! She wins. We are tied, so we need
to visit one more person, to be the deciding vote. We need one more vote. And if they don’t pick
me I will murder them. The battery on the phone
is about to run out, so we have to find somebody tout suite. Guys, can you guys come
out with a tie right now, and just be like… – [Sara] No. This looks great, eyes
on Sara match her hair, which is doing a lot for me. Is this gonna get assisted in? Sara’s has a concept, I
feel like that puts it over. (victorious orchestral music) I won! I think that it was
really interesting to see that even though we both
had different advantages, and different experiences, I feel like we kind of came out equal. Did we? Did we? I mean, I won, but. I think what we should really do is let the people of the world decide, the people of the YouTubes decide. Should we? Who truly won. (upbeat rhythmic music)

WHAT MAKES BEING AN ARTIST GREAT

WHAT MAKES BEING AN ARTIST GREAT


Hey everyone, it’s
Nicholas Wilton at Art2Life and it’s a few days after Thanksgiving, so obviously I’ve been thinking a lot about what I’m thankful for, and one of the things that
I’m kinda thankful for is that just I get to be an artist and like we all know what’s
hard about being an artist, but there are some really
great things that we all share and so I just started talking
about a few of those things that I love and these are the things that I see in artists, in my
friends and I remember once, in San Francisco we have
this thing called Fleet Week and it’s this military holiday, I’m not exactly sure why we have it, but it’s called Fleet Week,
and it’s near San Francisco and one of the things
they do during this week is they fly these, they
are Blue Angels I guess, those super sonic atomic jets
all over the city super low, like they’re screaming across the sky, I mean to me it feels like it’s, it reminds me of what it would be like if you were being invaded by America, it’s pretty scary I think, you
know for a lot of people it’s you know it’s fantastic and amazing, but it’s super loud and
it’s kinda scary to me. But that’s not, most people love this week and they go and they watch these jets scream across the sky and everything, but I was, I remember one time, on that particular day I was having lunch with an artist friend
of mine, Adam Wolpert, and I’ve left a little link
below, you can go see his work, and we were having lunch
you know in San Francisco, I think it was at the Art Academy and these jets were screaming over and I could tell that he
kinda felt the same way, it was really agitating and it just, it wasn’t something that he liked either and I knew that he felt the same way and we were eating lunch and
I was feeding this seagull, I was throwing bread out on this patio, and this, it was windy,
it was really windy, and this seagull came in
and it did this really cool, kind of like pivot flight
thing where it landed, and spun as it landed and
it picked up the bread and it did it all in one
beautiful dance move, and it was so cool and
Adam said, you know, he thought that what we just
witnessed this seagull do was so exquisitely
beautiful and so far beyond, so much more nuance and
graceful and artistic than these billion dollar jets that were just ripping across the sky and blasting us all with
noise and bravado, you know, and it was just, I just
loved that, because that’s, you know artists are sensitive people and that was just such a
perfect example of that and I just, I love that
cause I feel like I’m that, and mostly I bump into people, regular people in the world
who are not as attuned to that, I’m not saying people are
insensitive, but it’s just, they, the things that I notice, I just notice that other artist notice, I’m sure you know what I’m talking about. And the other thing is, you
know, artists pay attention, like they just pay attention to things, they’re paying attention to you know the details of guacamole, the color of pea soup, I had dinner the other night
with some artist friends and we were eating sole, this fish, and he had this air flown
in from England, and it was, he’s a chef, and we were
looking at this gorgeous fish and the color of it,
and the texture of it, and I just know that, you
know this is just something that artists do, they just
gasp on the way things look and the texture of things and
the subtlety and the nuances, and you know it’s not just
something you’re eating, it’s something you’re really
consuming with all your senses and that’s just really, really cool, I love that and definitely
in that way, right, you know. The other piece of this is that
artists are really curious. Artists are some of the most
curious people in the world. And I love that because
that’s what creates the wonder and there really isn’t
necessarily always a reason for the curiosity but it’s just
curiosity for curiosity sake and so much of the time when I’m working and making my work I don’t really, I’m not even sure why I’m
interested in something, but to just finding your way as you go based on what interests
in finding that pathway, and I mean art making is that, but it’s not something that
everybody has the ability to do and I love that and I love
experiencing that in other people I know I do a lot of hiking with friends and when I go with my
more regular friends, who are not artists, more you know, kind of like muggle people, you know, and I have lots of friends, you know different kinds of friends, but the people who are just
on the hike for the hike, they are always waiting for me
because I’m taking pictures, and I’m stopping all the
time, and I know that that’s, I’m always feeling a
little anxious cause I’m, I know they want to keep moving, you know, but when I go with artists,
they’re just right there with me they are taking pictures of spider webs, they are looking at things
and they are just curious, and I don’t know, that’s
another cool, cool thing. So I don’t know, I just
thought I’d share these few little great attributes
about us and about you know, I’m just so thankful that
I get to be an artist and more importantly I get
to hang around with artists and you, and I’m just really thankful for this community and
all of you, so thank you. I don’t know, it’s pretty cool subject and so maybe leave a comment
about why you are thankful of being an artist in the comments below and I hope your vacation and your break, your Thanksgiving break
was nice and restful. Thanks a lot. Hey everyone! If you found this helpful I have a whole lot more to teach share and inspire you with every single week. so please, join the Art2Life Youtube channel by clicking the subscribe button below. Ok, great! Le’s do this!

ART/ARCHITECTURE – Johannes Vermeer

ART/ARCHITECTURE – Johannes Vermeer


The wrong things in our world are glamorous:
fast cars, tomato throwing contests, actors – instead of the
right things: going to bed early, long walks observing the sky at dusk, kindness…
It’s not that nothing at all is glamorous, it’s just that we need to direct our admiration
and excitement more wisely; we need to turn it upon the things which genuinely deserve
prestige. Artists can help us. One of the fundamental
things art can do for us is turn the spotlight of glamour in the best – and most helpful
– directions. Artists identify things that we tend to overlook but which, ideally, we
should care about deeply. And through the Serving women, bread, and milk were not especially exciting in the late 1650s,
when Johannes Vermeer painted this picture. [The Milkmaid, 1657-8]. She wasn’t a celebrity; he isn’t showing
us someone who was already highly admired. Yet Vermeer saw in the serving woman pouring
milk something that he felt deserved prolonged contemplation and admiration. He thought something
really important was going on. By worldly standards, it’s a pretty humble situation.
But the care with which she works is moving. Vermeer is impressed by the idea that our
true needs might be quite simple. Bread and milk are really rather satisfying. The light
coming through the window is beautiful. A plain white wall can be a major source of
delight. Vermeer is redistributing glamour by raising
the prestige of the things he depicts. And he’s trying to get us to feel the same way.
The milk maid is a kind of propaganda (or an advert) for homely pleasures. Or consider the painstakingly skilful – and commercial – business of lace-making [The Lacemaker, 1669-1671]: Vermeer
paints the self-employed businesswoman with the usual devotion and care that would be given to a military hero or a great political leader.
Vermeer was himself unremarkable in many ways. He was born in 1632 in the small but beautiful
city of Delft, where his father was a modestly successful art dealer-cum-innkeeper. He stayed there most of his life. He never
travelled away from Delft after his marriage at age 20. He hardly even left his pleasant
home. He and his wife, Catharina, had 11 surviving children and he did much of his painting from the rooms on the upper floor.
(Modeled after Catharina:) Vermeer was a slow painter, partially because
he was not only a painter. He continued the family businesses of art dealing and innkeeping and he also became the head of the local guild of painters. In contemporary terms, his career was not a huge success. He wasn’t especially famous and he didn’t make a lot of money.
He was in fact an exemplary member of what was,in those days, a newly important kind
of person: the middle-class individual. Vermeer was in his teens when Holland (or technically
the Seven Provinces) became an independent state – the first ‘bourgeois republic’
in the world. In contrast to the semi-feudal aristocratic nations that surrounded it, Holland gave honour
and political power to people who were not at the pinnacle of society: to merchants,
administrators, prosperous artisans and entrepreneurs. It was the first country in the world to be recognisably modern.
In this era, a great insight of Christianity – one which is easily detachable from
the surrounding theology – became increasingly relevant: that everybody’s inner life is
important, even if on the outside they do not seem particularly distinguished. Vermeer paints ‘The Girl with the Pearl Earring’ with the same kind of consideration. [The Girl with the Pearl Earring, 1665]
She isn’t anybody famous or important She isn’t rich. The earring
that she wears is nice, but it is a minor trinket by the eye of the fashionable
world. It is the one pricey thing she owns. Yet she’s not in need of justice – she’s
not downtrodden or badly treated. She is (for want of a better term) ordinary. Yet,
she is (like everyone) not in the least ordinary: she is uniquely, profoundly, and mysteriously, herself. The picture which best sums up Vermeer’s philosophy, The Little Street, has become
one of the most famous works of art in the world. It has pride of place in Amsterdam’s
great Rijksmuseum; it is insured for perhaps half a billion euros and is the subject of
a mountain of learned articles. Yet the painting is pointedly out of synch with its status. Because, above all else, it wants to show us that the
ordinary can be very special. The picture says that looking after a simple but beautiful
home, cleaning the yard, watching the children, darning cloth – and doing these things faithfully
and without despair – is life’s real duty. It is an anti-heroic picture: a weapon against
false images of glamour. It refuses to accept that true glamour depends on amazing feats
of courage or on the attainment of status. It argues that doing the modest things, that
are expected of all of us, is enough. Vermeer did not live long. He died in 1675,
still only in his early forties. But he had communicated a crucial – and
hugely sane – idea: much of what matters to us is not exciting, urgent, dramatic or
special things. Most of life is taken up dealing with things that are routine, modest, humble, and (to be honest) a touch dull. Our culture should focus on getting us to appreciate the average, the ordinary and the everyday. When Vermeer painted his hometown
he didn’t choose a special day; the sky is neither very overcast nor especially sunny. [View of Delft, 1660-1]
Nothing is happening. There are no celebrities around. Yet it is, as he has taught us to recognise,
all very special indeed.

Fred Armisen, Art Aficionado: At the Moulin Rouge, The Dance by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec

Fred Armisen, Art Aficionado: At the Moulin Rouge, The Dance by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec


-Fred, especially
on Thanksgiving week, it has just been so wonderful
to have you back, and we’ve been
catching up backstage. Obviously, I have a very —
I hold you in very high regard because there are so many things
you’re good at. You’re a comedian.
You’re a writer. You’re a musician,
so many things. And one thing
I just figured out this week is you are also
an art connoisseur. -Oh, yeah. -And you were saying
to me backstage that you have almost
an art historian’s knowledge of any painting
that has ever been painted. -Yeah, I said that backstage. -Yeah.
[ Laughter ] And you said —
You challenged me to show you a painting
and prove you wrong. -Oh yeah,
I know every single painting. -Okay, so you’re sure
you want to do this in front of everybody?
-I want to. -Okay. Guys, it’s time once again for our new segment,
“Fred Armisen: Art Aficionado.” [ Cheers and applause ] -Alright, buddy. This is Toulouse-Lautrec’s
1890 painting, “At the Moulin Rouge,
The Dance.” -Oh, yeah.
Well, you know, he painted this. -Yeah.
-So he got his paints together, and he just sort of separated
all the colors and stuff. -He had to separate them
in the beginning? They don’t come separated?
-No, they don’t, actually. -Oh.
-It’s a sort of — It’s one big mush of paint,
and he sort of — Okay. You know, this is red.
This is black, et cetera. And so he set it all out,
and he started painting it, and eventually — Well, see, this whole thing here
is supposed to be the signature. [ Laughter ] It’s a very elaborate signature. -Wait, are you saying that if — this basically says
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec? -Yeah, because back in those
days, signatures were like — They didn’t have computers,
so they were very elaborate. This is how he signed
a painting. The actual painting
is much, much larger. And, you know,
it’s a real tragedy that over the years,
we’ve sort of lost all of that and everything just gets — You know, they consider this
the painting. And it’s like, “No, you’ve got
to see the rest of it!” It’s just — -What’s the rest of it
look like? Does the rest of it
look like this? -It’s the atrium.
So, this is an atrium, and it goes up the walls,
goes way, way up, and there’s this wonderful
glass elaborate ceiling, and there’s pillars and more paintings.
-Wow. -And this was his
sort of little — Okay, this was me. I painted it. And this is all
that we have now. -Does the rest of the painting
exist somewhere? -It does. It’s on the floor
of the Sistine Chapel. [ Laughter ] -On the floor, so when you
walk in, you’re walking on it? -Yeah, but no one sees,
’cause they’re all looking up. But, like, on the floor
is the rest. -Yeah, yeah, yeah.
In the end, you realize that’s the worst place
to put something, on the floor
of the Sistine Chapel. -Yes.
-Excellent. And do you want to tell me once
again the year this was painted? -It took a while. This is — [ Laughter ] -I said it
right in the beginning. I said it out loud. So, yeah. -He started in the 1850s, and
he was done by 1879, I think. -Yeah, that’s about right.
-Yeah. Yeah. -Give it up for Fred Armisen,
everybody!

Maggi Hambling – ‘Every Portrait is Like a Love Affair’ | Artist Interview | TateShots

Maggi Hambling – ‘Every Portrait is Like a Love Affair’ | Artist Interview | TateShots


Art came into my life as quite a shock.
There was an art exam at school when I was 14 and I did nothing but flick
paint at people and generally draw attention to myself, because I was deeply
in love with the biology mistress who was invigilating the exam, and then I saw
the clock and I realised at half-past three I had to hand in a painting, so I
did one. And when the results came out two or three weeks later I was top of
art, so I thought it’s worth looking into. I took those first two landscapes to
show Cedric Morris and Lett Haines who by then had established the East Anglian
School of Painting and Drawing on the outskirts of Hadley where I grew up, and
that is really where life began, where art began, I worked with Lett. He said,
‘well, if you’re going to be an artist you must make your work your best friend,
that you can go to it whatever you’re feeling. You’re tired, you’re bored, you’re
happy or randy, or whatever it is, go to your work’, and that’s how I’ve lived my
life. This painting began as an attempt to
paint early morning mist. It wasn’t working, and it wasn’t working, and then I
turned it upside down and this image of my father just happened. I mean, it’s to
contradict that whole uncertainty of what you see and don’t see in mist and
certainty, uncertainty about death, that just happened. Well every portrait is a
bit like a love affair, I mean it’s a very intimate thing. Henriette Marez was
a force of nature, you know, she was named as the queen of Soho and she was painted
by Bacon, I think 15 times. She just took over and I suddenly became her subject
rather than she mine. I remember, I mean in one of the paintings of her, she’s getting in a terrible state about it and she stopped posing and looked at it, and says ‘don’t be ridiculous, that’s finished.’ Well, I mean, you know that classic question ‘how do you know when a painting is
finished?’, she said ‘that one’s finished.’ And I believed her and it was. When she began
to drink again, she got in the fury of the said I’d ‘stolen her soul’ and, do you know that drawings of her are a sort of dance of death, I suppose, a sort of battle
between Henriette in the drink and in the end the drink won. You know the thing
Brancusi said, ‘it isn’t difficult to make a work of art, the difficulty lies in
being in the right state to do it.’ Sort of emptying myself of all my baggage
says that the subject, whether it was a person or a wave or whatever it is, can come
through me onto the canvas or into the sculpture. Watch out here. The sculptures began, they were a sort of
aftermath of the War Requiem installation I realised that I’d collected over the
years pieces of wood and suddenly began to see how these could be sculpture.
The pieces of wood in the first place would suggest a head of some kind and I’d work
on it and they were cast in bronze Laugh of the laugh. Laughter, as a means of survival, has come back into the work and that painting has gone on for a
very long while indeed. I think it’s finished, but I might come in here
the next morning and make one mark, which of course can be fatal because once you’ve
made one mark, you’ve probably got to do a few hundred more, but at the moment I’m
pleased with that painting. You know, I live in a state of doubt, the whole thing,
the whole time I can work on a painting for two months, three months, more months,
more months and a painting can come alive and die many many times, but that
painting can happen kind of quickly like in the morning, or less, but it couldn’t
have happened unless you bugger it around for several months, you know. I go working in the hope that I might get a bit better, you know, I mean unlike tennis
players or ballet dancers we don’t have to stop and that’s terrific. you

How the Cosmic Art of Peter Max Defined a Generation

How the Cosmic Art of Peter Max Defined a Generation


I’m Gene Luntz and I’ve been working with
Peter Max since 1987 when I was a gallery director in Beverly Hills. In the 30 years that I’ve worked with Peter,
I’ve seen him challenged many, many times to create things and his creativity is unbelievable. He could create out of thin air without much
thought. It just seems to flow through him. It’s really a surrealistic type of art that
I do and these flying cosmic characters that fly in and out of rainbows and out of skies
and the smiling blue and boats with reflection, it’s very surrealistic except it’s a very
“up” surrealism. Peter took off as an icon of American culture
in the ’60s when he first exploded on the scene with his artwork and his licensing and
television appearances on things like Ed Sullivan and the Johnny Carson Show. He became a household name through the creation
of and transformation of his art on product. But because I somehow was able to manifest
this art form really down into the butter dishes and into the bedsheets and towels of
the people, it now came out of surrealism to realism. The Statue of Liberty is an icon that Peter
created when he came here and landed in Brooklyn and made America his home. He became someone that really loves this country
for all that it gave him, and so painting the Statue of Liberty became a tradition for
him. He’s not only a great artist, not only a great
person, but he is dedicated to making this world a better place in every way that he
can add his color and his light and his touch.