4 Lessons in Creativity | Julie Burstein | TED Talks

4 Lessons in Creativity | Julie Burstein | TED Talks


Translator: Joseph Geni
Reviewer: Morton Bast On my desk in my office, I keep a small clay pot that I made in college. It’s raku, which is a kind of pottery that began in Japan centuries ago as a way of making bowls for the Japanese tea ceremony. This one is more than 400 years old. Each one was pinched or carved out of a ball of clay, and it was the imperfections that people cherished. Everyday pots like this cup take eight to 10 hours to fire. I just took this out of the kiln last week, and the kiln itself takes another day or two to cool down, but raku is really fast. You do it outside, and you take the kiln up to temperature. In 15 minutes, it goes to 1,500 degrees, and as soon as you see that the glaze has melted inside, you can see that faint sheen, you turn the kiln off, and you reach in with these long metal tongs, you grab the pot, and in Japan, this red-hot pot would be immediately immersed in a solution of green tea, and you can imagine what that steam would smell like. But here in the United States, we ramp up the drama a little bit, and we drop our pots into sawdust, which catches on fire, and you take a garbage pail, and you put it on top, and smoke starts pouring out. I would come home with my clothes reeking of woodsmoke. I love raku because it allows me to play with the elements. I can shape a pot out of clay and choose a glaze, but then I have to let it go to the fire and the smoke, and what’s wonderful is the surprises that happen, like this crackle pattern, because it’s really stressful on these pots. They go from 1,500 degrees to room temperature in the space of just a minute. Raku is a wonderful metaphor for the process of creativity. I find in so many things that tension between what I can control and what I have to let go happens all the time, whether I’m creating a new radio show or just at home negotiating with my teenage sons. When I sat down to write a book about creativity, I realized that the steps were reversed. I had to let go at the very beginning, and I had to immerse myself in the stories of hundreds of artists and writers and musicians and filmmakers, and as I listened to these stories, I realized that creativity grows out of everyday experiences more often than you might think, including letting go. It was supposed to break, but that’s okay. (Laughter) (Laughs) That’s part of the letting go, is sometimes it happens and sometimes it doesn’t, because creativity also grows from the broken places. The best way to learn about anything is through stories, and so I want to tell you a story about work and play and about four aspects of life that we need to embrace in order for our own creativity to flourish. The first embrace is something that we think, “Oh, this is very easy,” but it’s actually getting harder, and that’s paying attention to the world around us. So many artists speak about needing to be open, to embrace experience, and that’s hard to do when you have a lighted rectangle in your pocket that takes all of your focus. The filmmaker Mira Nair speaks about growing up in a small town in India. Its name is Bhubaneswar, and here’s a picture of one of the temples in her town. Mira Nair: In this little town, there were like 2,000 temples. We played cricket all the time. We kind of grew up in the rubble. The major thing that inspired me, that led me on this path, that made me a filmmaker eventually, was traveling folk theater that would come through the town and I would go off and see these great battles of good and evil by two people in a school field with no props but with a lot of, you know, passion, and hashish as well, and it was amazing. You know, the folk tales of Mahabharata and Ramayana, the two holy books, the epics that everything comes out of in India, they say. After seeing that Jatra, the folk theater, I knew I wanted to get on, you know, and perform. Julie Burstein: Isn’t that a wonderful story? You can see the sort of break in the everyday. There they are in the school fields, but it’s good and evil, and passion and hashish. And Mira Nair was a young girl with thousands of other people watching this performance, but she was ready. She was ready to open up to what it sparked in her, and it led her, as she said, down this path to become an award-winning filmmaker. So being open for that experience that might change you is the first thing we need to embrace. Artists also speak about how some of their most powerful work comes out of the parts of life that are most difficult. The novelist Richard Ford speaks about a childhood challenge that continues to be something he wrestles with today. He’s severely dyslexic. Richard Ford: I was slow to learn to read, went all the way through school not really reading more than the minimum, and still to this day can’t read silently much faster than I can read aloud, but there were a lot of benefits to being dyslexic for me because when I finally did reconcile myself to how slow I was going to have to do it, then I think I came very slowly into an appreciation of all of those qualities of language and of sentences that are not just the cognitive aspects of language: the syncopations, the sounds of words, what words look like, where paragraphs break, where lines break. I mean, I wasn’t so badly dyslexic that I was disabled from reading. I just had to do it really slowly, and as I did, lingering on those sentences as I had to linger, I fell heir to language’s other qualities, which I think has helped me write sentences. JB: It’s so powerful. Richard Ford, who’s won the Pulitzer Prize, says that dyslexia helped him write sentences. He had to embrace this challenge, and I use that word intentionally. He didn’t have to overcome dyslexia. He had to learn from it. He had to learn to hear the music in language. Artists also speak about how pushing up against the limits of what they can do, sometimes pushing into what they can’t do, helps them focus on finding their own voice. The sculptor Richard Serra talks about how, as a young artist, he thought he was a painter, and he lived in Florence after graduate school. While he was there, he traveled to Madrid, where he went to the Prado to see this picture by the Spanish painter Diego Velázquez. It’s from 1656, and it’s called “Las Meninas,” and it’s the picture of a little princess and her ladies-in-waiting, and if you look over that little blonde princess’s shoulder, you’ll see a mirror, and reflected in it are her parents, the King and Queen of Spain, who would be standing where you might stand to look at the picture. As he often did, Velázquez put himself in this painting too. He’s standing on the left with his paintbrush in one hand and his palette in the other. Richard Serra: I was standing there looking at it, and I realized that Velázquez was looking at me, and I thought, “Oh. I’m the subject of the painting.” And I thought, “I’m not going to be able to do that painting.” I was to the point where I was using a stopwatch and painting squares out of randomness, and I wasn’t getting anywhere. So I went back and dumped all my paintings in the Arno, and I thought, I’m going to just start playing around. JB: Richard Serra says that so nonchalantly, you might have missed it. He went and saw this painting by a guy who’d been dead for 300 years, and realized, “I can’t do that,” and so Richard Serra went back to his studio in Florence, picked up all of his work up to that point, and threw it in a river. Richard Serra let go of painting at that moment, but he didn’t let go of art. He moved to New York City, and he put together a list of verbs — to roll, to crease, to fold — more than a hundred of them, and as he said, he just started playing around. He did these things to all kinds of material. He would take a huge sheet of lead and roll it up and unroll it. He would do the same thing to rubber, and when he got to the direction “to lift,” he created this, which is in the Museum of Modern Art. Richard Serra had to let go of painting in order to embark on this playful exploration that led him to the work that he’s known for today: huge curves of steel that require our time and motion to experience. In sculpture, Richard Serra is able to do what he couldn’t do in painting. He makes us the subject of his art. So experience and challenge and limitations are all things we need to embrace for creativity to flourish. There’s a fourth embrace, and it’s the hardest. It’s the embrace of loss, the oldest and most constant of human experiences. In order to create, we have to stand in that space between what we see in the world and what we hope for, looking squarely at rejection, at heartbreak, at war, at death. That’s a tough space to stand in. The educator Parker Palmer calls it “the tragic gap,” tragic not because it’s sad but because it’s inevitable, and my friend Dick Nodel likes to say, “You can hold that tension like a violin string and make something beautiful.” That tension resonates in the work of the photographer Joel Meyerowitz, who at the beginning of his career was known for his street photography, for capturing a moment on the street, and also for his beautiful photographs of landscapes — of Tuscany, of Cape Cod, of light. Joel is a New Yorker, and his studio for many years was in Chelsea, with a straight view downtown to the World Trade Center, and he photographed those buildings in every sort of light. You know where this story goes. On 9/11, Joel wasn’t in New York. He was out of town, but he raced back to the city, and raced down to the site of the destruction. Joel Meyerowitz: And like all the other passersby, I stood outside the chain link fence on Chambers and Greenwich, and all I could see was the smoke and a little bit of rubble, and I raised my camera to take a peek, just to see if there was something to see, and some cop, a lady cop, hit me on my shoulder, and said, “Hey, no pictures!” And it was such a blow that it woke me up, in the way that it was meant to be, I guess. And when I asked her why no pictures, she said, “It’s a crime scene. No photographs allowed.” And I asked her, “What would happen if I was a member of the press?” And she told me, “Oh, look back there,” and back a block was the press corps tied up in a little penned-in area, and I said, “Well, when do they go in?” and she said, “Probably never.” And as I walked away from that, I had this crystallization, probably from the blow, because it was an insult in a way. I thought, “Oh, if there’s no pictures, then there’ll be no record. We need a record.” And I thought, “I’m gonna make that record. I’ll find a way to get in, because I don’t want to see this history disappear.” JB: He did. He pulled in every favor he could, and got a pass into the World Trade Center site, where he photographed for nine months almost every day. Looking at these photographs today brings back the smell of smoke that lingered on my clothes when I went home to my family at night. My office was just a few blocks away. But some of these photographs are beautiful, and we wondered, was it difficult for Joel Meyerowitz to make such beauty out of such devastation? JM: Well, you know, ugly, I mean, powerful and tragic and horrific and everything, but it was also as, in nature, an enormous event that was transformed after the fact into this residue, and like many other ruins — you go to the ruins of the Colosseum or the ruins of a cathedral someplace — and they take on a new meaning when you watch the weather. I mean, there were afternoons I was down there, and the light goes pink and there’s a mist in the air and you’re standing in the rubble, and I found myself recognizing both the inherent beauty of nature and the fact that nature, as time, is erasing this wound. Time is unstoppable, and it transforms the event. It gets further and further away from the day, and light and seasons temper it in some way, and it’s not that I’m a romantic. I’m really a realist. The reality is, there’s the Woolworth Building in a veil of smoke from the site, but it’s now like a scrim across a theater, and it’s turning pink, you know, and down below there are hoses spraying, and the lights have come on for the evening, and the water is turning acid green because the sodium lamps are on, and I’m thinking, “My God, who could dream this up?” But the fact is, I’m there, it looks like that, you have to take a picture. JB: You have to take a picture. That sense of urgency, of the need to get to work, is so powerful in Joel’s story. When I saw Joel Meyerowitz recently, I told him how much I admired his passionate obstinacy, his determination to push through all the bureaucratic red tape to get to work, and he laughed, and he said, “I’m stubborn, but I think what’s more important is my passionate optimism.” The first time I told these stories, a man in the audience raised his hand and said, “All these artists talk about their work, not their art, which has got me thinking about my work and where the creativity is there, and I’m not an artist.” He’s right. We all wrestle with experience and challenge, limits and loss. Creativity is essential to all of us, whether we’re scientists or teachers, parents or entrepreneurs. I want to leave you with another image of a Japanese tea bowl. This one is at the Freer Gallery in Washington, D.C. It’s more than a hundred years old and you can still see the fingermarks where the potter pinched it. But as you can also see, this one did break at some point in its hundred years. But the person who put it back together, instead of hiding the cracks, decided to emphasize them, using gold lacquer to repair it. This bowl is more beautiful now, having been broken, than it was when it was first made, and we can look at those cracks, because they tell the story that we all live, of the cycle of creation and destruction, of control and letting go, of picking up the pieces and making something new. Thank you. (Applause)

How to Paint a Vincent Van Gogh Background in Acrylics  by Ginger Cook

How to Paint a Vincent Van Gogh Background in Acrylics by Ginger Cook


Hi, this is Ginger Cook and today, I want to talk about how to get a really interesting model background for a still life. Now this particular painting is a slight replica of one of Vincent van Gogh’s paintings done around 1880. But you’ll see that if you look at countless pictures of still lives, you’ll see this very interesting background that’s multicolored and put on in layers. I’m going to show you an easy way to do it and A lot of people wouldn’t think you would do it this way particularly with acrylics. It’s very effective, so this is what we’re going to learn today. So I’m going to move over here and take this out of the way. And what I’ve done is going to show you a couple different ways to get it. This is a canvas that I’ve done; I’ll put it sideways so you can see it and I’ve taped it down the middle with some tape. So I’m going to show you two different kinds of backgrounds. So this first background that we’re going to use is the, it’s done with burnt umber and so, the second one is done with burnt sienna. So what you want to do whenever you’re doing any kind of background really doesn’t matter what it is, when you’re trying to do a background like this, multicolored, I’m going to just show you here. Start here and down and across down and across. Don’t keep doing this way make sure that you’re weaving a pattern. This is very important, your brushstrokes make a difference! This is one of the tricks that I want you to guys to get. It’ll aid you a lot. So you see, I’m going down and across down it across and I’m using quite a bit of paint and That there’s quite a bit on this brush and using quite a bit of paint going down and across, down and across like that. Okay, so that’s our first layer. Now, this has to be really dry. We’ve got burnt umber on this side because really, the whole idea was is to show you a couple different ways; what happens when you use different background color, background layers. This is the burnt sienna and this one is burnt umber so one sort of a lighter reddish background. So you can use, I’m going to back this camera a little bit, you can use, they both look pretty dark from here. But when I close up on it for you, you can see it’s, you can see it’s a little bit lighter than you think so take a moment and just dry the background. Make sure they’re really, really dry. Now this is just a technique. You can use all the time. But you have to have a dry background, maybe you need to wait overnight to make sure it’s dry, but make sure you have it dry. All right now okay, so this is the background we’re going for here. This is the background we’re going for here! It’s all these multiple colors. So you see you can almost see what’s behind it. Whenever you’re trying to do that, now I’m going to take a brush like this, I’m going to rinse it, as I had the red on it. I’m going to start on this side I believe because that’s the driest, and I’ve pinched my brush off in a rag like this: taking a rag, pinch the brush. All right now, let’s take a color say like yellow oxide or yellow ochre kind of a gold color. Now I’m going to put it on both sides of my brush. Now over here you’re going to see a little bit, I’m just going to tap off a little bit extra right there. Now using the side of my brush, the side of my brush, I’m going to start making little circles like this, little tiny circles and moving. Little tiny circles and moving like that. Almost like I’m making clouds. Very similar to clouds except now this is, you’re doing it in colors, you want to still like background. Now the trick is we’re not going to just use one color here. There’s this color, that that’s this pure yellow oxide, but maybe we’ll take a little bit of cad yellow medium with a little tiny bit of cad red medium, alright like see that? Now I’m going to start with this color! And I’m going to come over here, very bright, kind of just put that over this one like this. Now the, if you stay in one place with making circles you’ll dig a hole, just like a tire that’s stuck in sand. So if you’re going to be making these circles you have to keep moving, always working on the wet edges. If I have that color there, I probably want some of that up here. Now what most people end up with, sometimes they’ll end up with a hole or they end up with some sort of scribbled mess. You have to keep layering this. This is what you don’t understand. You have to dry it in between layers! All right, so this is sort of nice! I don’t dislike this. So now I’m going to dry it real quick. Now this is the trick you’ve got to dry between layers, because you’ve got to seal these colors to each other. If you get it to light, you can always add some more dark colors. All right, so now I think I’m going to go, I’m still going for my lighter background here, So I’m going to take a little white and yellow oxide now, and I’m going to wipe off the extra, like that, off my brush. Now I’m going to come up here like this and do this, just come around here like that. Maybe layer some of this on here like this, then I’ll come back into some gold maybe and just that yellow oxide color without any white. See how I’m kind of going over that. Now my brush is flatter. I was on the side before and now it’s flatter and I think this is the key. It’s flatter and I’m working the wet edges. But on the other hand, I still want you to see these wonderful colors that I’ve got underneath. You see that? I want you to see these, you see a little bit of that orange underneath, a little bit of that kind of reddish color. Kind of getting the edges here now. I’ve got something up here so go back into the yellow oxide, then maybe just come up like this. Now when I come to these two maybe I’ll get a little more of this lighter color, kind of blend those together, let’s see. Let’s take a little bit of burnt sienna that might be a good color to have out. You can see, do I have it out here somewhere? Yep, okay, so I used most of it up in this other venture over here on the other side. But I take a little burnt sienna for instance, maybe I’ll put a little vat and mix that with this. Now remember, I’m still layering my backgrounds now my brush is going flatter, less on the side, flatter. And you see how I keep weaving these colors together like smoke and mirrors. It’s like smoke, if I were to tell you that. Now maybe I’ll put a little lighter gold on top of this. Barely touch it, and coming over here into the corners. Now I’m talking about, this is how we’re talking about getting a very nice light background, say for a still life or something you want to do, maybe a portrait. What if you got too much of the light color? Well here’s a little bit of the dark brown, let’s just move some of that back in here. Add some of the burnt umber. You can put it back if you do too much at one time, however, It can start getting [uhm] you can start making holes. So this is why I just sort of suggest drying in-between. But I’m going to come up here and do a little bit of the brown back, because that this is about layering your colors. Now maybe I’ll come back here and just very gently. If I just did a wet paint there I can barely touch this if I want to lighten it, and then I’m back into the side of my brush. Alright you see how we we’ve kind of created all this kind of background. Maybe I think I want a little bit more of a reddish, kind of an orange color down here, and I’ll wipe off the excess paint off my brush, and then I’ll come up here and maybe add a little bit of color here. And this is what I’m talking about, if you get some of those beautiful backgrounds that are very, very subtle, just kind of weave these colors over each other. You think of this, you know, like doing clouds or water mist or something? That’s what I would tell you. Then I’m going to dry this one more time and just cover that up like that. I don’t really want all that orange showing. Then, I’ll just rinse that, my brush again, because I’ve had that orange color on it. Then I’ll come back in with this lighter yellow oxide, kind of using the brush flat now, see that? Barely touch it now because I do want some of that to show through I’m not trying to cover it all up. I want to maybe I want to lighten this background up a little, somewhere, maybe a little more yellow oxide if I got that a little bit brighter than I want. All right, see that, and you can just keep blending this in together, and I’ll see, I’ll take a little bit more burnt Sienna on top of here. Just sort of blend all this, and again, you just, as long as you’re drying in-between you can get some really, really interesting effects. But, you have to dry in between. For instance, suppose you wanted a little area that was darker in here for some reason, that there’s going to, contrast a plant or something in a background where you need it a little bit darker, you could add a little more brown to an area you see that you can add just a little bit more brown. But if you wanted to lighten that up, just add another light color and at some point though you have to dry it again. So this is how, what you do. You just keep layering the colors and layering them on there and then you get this beautiful, beautiful background that really doesn’t take much to do and I can just kind of show it to you like this, and back it up a little bit. Whoops wrong way! Alright, let me back it up, and just kind of lighten up the camera here. You can see what I’ve got. Okay, this is not backing up well. Okay so, alright, so if I thought that I needed more dark, I might just come in here at this [unintelligible] and maybe darken the corners a little bit. Just come back in here and go over it and really, this is what we’re talking about doing. The brush is now flat and I’m going to darken up some of these corners and let some of this stay light. You see what we’re doing? Maybe with this corner a little darker, a little bit of dark here on the, flat of it, but all these other colors are sort of melting through here. They’re peeking through. And that’s what I’m talking about and maybe I want a little bit, Oh, I like this let’s put a little bit light right here. You can kind of look at your picture and say what, what would, what would be very helpful in my painting? Where do I need some light and where do I need some dark? And then also if you’re painting something on top of this, if you need to repair the edges, you know, for instance if you painted something you didn’t like, you can go back and add these colors again. Like right in here. What if I had something real light right in there? Barely touch it, and then what if it came up in here like this. It takes, you know this isn’t fast it takes a little bit of something, but this is not fast but it can get really pretty if you just take your time with this. All right, so that is the that’s the one I want to show you for just say, using burnt umber and you can see how we’ve got this sort of very nice dark background. That would be good for maybe a portrait, may be good for, maybe you want to use fewer colors, but I like to use a lot of colors. Alright, now here’s my burnt Sienna and I’m going to do the same thing. Now this, I didn’t start off with the dark color this time. I started off with this sort of light reddish color So now I’m going to come into some dark brown, and I’m just going to put, this is burnt umber, and I’m just going to go over this with some dark brown, and this is what happens, this is what happens when you start off with the lighter color. Which you could do, you could paint the whole thing red for instance. I mean, this is pretty subtle with the with the burnt sienna kind of a reddish brown, but, I mean, you can see here what we’re doing with the with the, with the, just putting burnt umber over this. Really not getting too clever about it, for a number, like that. Here we go See? Now, but some of this red showing through, do you see that? This isn’t just a plain background anymore because some of the reds showing through. So then what if we took some burnt sienna and some burnt umber and mixed them together and then added another color in here? Now this is our second layer. So now it’s going to start covering up on all the little see-through things at the canvas, and it depends on what kind of, whether you want a real dark background, what you want! I could take some dioxazine purple and some burnt sienna and get something really dark going up here in the corners if I wanted. Just as they wanted that and maybe some some cad red medium what if I want to lighten it up? Here’s some cad red medium! Now watch here. This is all still wet, I haven’t tried anything, now look what happens. Just like this. Now I’m adding some cad red medium, and I’ve got it on the flat of my brush. Let’s just say I want it right in here and the brush is now going flat not on the edge. Kind of going back and forth in here, got a different brushstroke going. Now I’ve got some sort of very interesting background without having to, have done much. Maybe over here a little bit, put some of that red, like that. Now. Alright, let’s do a little bit of orange so if I take cad red medium and, [collects thoughts] cad red medium and cad yellow make a little oranger color. Now what if I want to lighten this up in here? Look at that, see? Now if you have, if you kind of think about a still-life mostly you’re not going to see a lot of this. You know, you make a background like this, and then you can always adjust it to depending, if it’s a portrait or still life! But what you’ve got is something, that’s paintable as opposed to just, you know, plain old piece of pictures. You know, just painted one color. So let me just take off the tape here so you can kind of see what I’m talking about. So those are two different backgrounds that are possible and again, I’m going to show you this picture: where we could see, how I might have done this and have Van Gogh did it! Van Gogh had a best, it’s kind of a copy of his background and, and how all these colors were added to this. Starting with a very dark base. In this case, I started with burnt umber and in this case I started with the burnt sienna then I put the dark over it, then I started adding lights And I, you noticed that I didn’t even dry that much in this. Alright, so that’s our tip for the day I hope this is going to be helpful when you’re, when you’re painting. Let me just move all this out of the way so you can see what we’ve got and there you go how to make backgrounds in different colors. Look for more tips check out my other lessons, I have over 125 lessons recorded on ginger cook live. So get a subscription to that if you want to look at, get more art lessons that I’m always adding new things up to our YouTube channel. So feel free to subscribe to my channel and if you like this let me know if you thought this was fun, let me know. Thanks very much! This is Ginger Cook and [collects thoughts] I appreciate you joining me!

DIY Backdrop – My Experience Painting a ‘Canvas’ backdrop Part 2

DIY Backdrop – My Experience Painting a ‘Canvas’ backdrop Part 2


hello that so this is day two of the
actual paint now the goal is either one to finish the base layer which is
actually pretty good and second of all do actually the actual texture
and an important note that I forgot to mention also that process requires me to
start adding more different colors because if I you just layers and layers
layers of gray and won’t show so I’m gonna add a bit of white just to make it
a bit brush it’s a two term real word and from there you second layer was applied it looks kind
of okay a bit wobbly on this because I don’t think I did a mistake of not
feeling let’s say creating a big batch for the entire surface which was my
biggest mistake sorry the paint is not consistent everywhere but I’m gonna let
it dry and see the result worst case we can add and the extra one or two layers
just to make things even also from my readings on the subject so what we’re
gonna do next is I’m gonna add a bit of black paint on top of the gray and the
white so that gives it a bit of more depth and more colors more colors or
different neutrals in the colors cuz you know black isn’t a color white is not a
color it’s just a luminosity issue so I’m gonna probably add a layer of black
I’m gonna let this one dry I forgot my ventilator so it sucks so big tip if you
have redoing this get a ventilator to accelerate the process since my time to
spend on this is really short so that’s it no time with this time I’m gonna show
you the results in a few minutes as you can see here the surface is a bit uneven
so I’m looks at it looks pretty solid right some patches start to appear I
hopefully decided I started first electric transition to be something more
to this stay tuned at worst like I said we can add another 1/2 quart of layer of
paint just to make it even but it for now it was okay
and so here the results of the second layer which is actually the most crucial
one and that I messed up so lesson learned I didn’t add enough water into
the canvas so that’s what happens waiting is we’re trying to test there’s
no there’s no consequences except a bit of money loss so okay so here are the
results so that’s it for that so I think
tomorrow we’re gonna do is I’m gonna apply another layer probably a darker
one just to like even and out and hopefully those patches will disappear I
don’t think so so the solution would be to add another layer if that doesn’t
work then we’ll add another primer coat and then start fresh again there’s no
reason why to throw this canvas away because it is there and that that cloth
so we’ll use them as much as we can and that’s it always like the board we will
adapt anyways I’m hot I’m sweaty it’s time to go home
in our washer so day three of this little disaster right now are about to
maybe put a light correction layer so I’m gonna see it looks actually pretty
decent but looks spotty a bit so we’re gonna put a small fix so this is my
solution so we’re gonna do it one layer of paint we’re going to do a big batch
of things but using this as a squirting thing I just start recently on the
Franklin Franklin backdrop Mr Graham would really great Instagram they’re
also really great backdrop so I’m gonna be inspired by him to get this done so I
use this as a means to disperse the water on top of the thing and then brush
it off very softly either with a brush or a broom or wherever I can find it
right now so I’ll mix a big batch of paint and water and then spray it on and
see the results in three two so it’s a failure
so my first attempt was a complete and utter failure which I expected but so
basically I think my second layer was way way way too color and also I’m
thinking right now that the best approach when you start is to apply just
a white label but like a white coat so basically a white primer and then add
some dirty color to it so let’s say you wanna have a very light neutral gray
then do a light priming coat and then you add your colors afterwards nothing
is the best apportion out because right now it looks a mess there’s patches
everywhere and my my thing is not consistent enough to be called a canvas
so we’re gonna re prime it and start over here my biggest suggestion if you
guys wanna try this out is to avoid and do the consequences because right now
you’re gonna be wasting a lot of paint I just trying to get it correct so using a
let’s say a four by six instead of a complete twelve by fourteen which was a
terrible mistake but so using a smoky a smaller canvas in order to start
practicing and do some tests and then seeing how yields up based on the
techniques know whatever you learned but this has been a great lesson learned
and again it’s how much money lost I mean the actual backdrop itself cost me
fifty six dollars the can of paint was thirty nine dollars if not the
accessories already had it so knowledge to matter I know it’s just a matter of
really I’m starting over again and then practicing to get it right so that’s
what’s gonna do so second quarter primer coming up right
now is drawing as you can maybe see in the background you can’t and that’s it
so see you in a few minutes so as you can see so this one substrate in this one about
texture to what side to do is because I’m so kind of massive this process
where I descended we’re going we’re going to test this one in a light gray
and in this window dark so this one I’m letting it dry and then
fuck up as much as possible or as many mistakes possible and then move it right
now and I can’t really believe I’m okay so it as here and everyone this one has been
days be a slow disaster I mean perfectly so and also update on
the dirty work I’ve dick on a dirty water it works kind
of well but not enough so my thinking is this should be applied whenever it’s
completely dry and it’s gonna give it like a slight texture but not that much
not much of a difference and if we want to be settling this way we don’t want to
be too dramatic and that’s it so let me just made a big pot I just made a big
pot of this mixture and then I’m spraying it with a bottle of water that
has a small hole in it just really simple you just take your bottle of
water and then you drill the hole using a hammer an adapter
what’s up guys so the change of plan actually is going
pretty well so I reprimed the actual canvas again making it really really
flat so I thought I can actually we start working the actual coats of
texture by doing that I use my dirty water that maybe four so about three
parts of water and one part of about three parts of water in one part of
paint and I start applying it very slowly there look deliberately with a
paintbrush so I’m using my little bottle that I showed you before plus a brush
and I’m just going I’m applying some water and I’m just washing on it and I’m
just like really painting you know as I seen in the Franklin Franklin backdrop
the video on Instagram so it’s really pretty well textures building slowly so
it’s good I’ll give us a bit more controlled I guess that if you’re more
experienced with that process it gets easier with time so you can actually add
more paint and control over it but I think if there’s a nice balance between
building texture very slowly like that it actually works well and you can
control how however it goes and afterwards we’re probably gonna distress
it with a piece of rock I know these I’m not sure this moon rocks something
that you can actually use so I can see dirty get a bit or maybe distress it a
bit so that’s the fine so I’ll show you the coat of paint that I’m in right now
so right now this one has the primer whiskey’s reprime plus it has two coats
of slight texture I think I’m gonna go for about maybe five or six I can knock
these up every hour or so or the drying right now it is late and I’m do it so
I’ll show you the actual layer that I built and then we’ll get out here and
then we’ll see you in day four which is probably gonna be Monday or Tuesday not
too sure it doesn’t matter for you guys because you’re watching a video so as you can see that’s a bit different
than your previous footage there is now more picture slightly more again you
always go through the minimum possible because these things are stupid easy to
over textual eyes and as you can see this part is drawn and this part is
slits right so it’s coming along very nicely the
white paint here to the goal is to build it up very slowly
so maybe we’ll do a more aggressive with more paint but from my experience and
big apology for the sniffles the paint is actually making me like leak it’s
unbelievable so I look like a cocaine addict which are not I think so so sorry
for that me sniffing all over the video what’s up guys so this is day four I’ve
actually laying coats of dirty water on top of my canvas so I learned two major
things that I think if you want to do it you feel also maybe including do you
thing so I made some dirty water as I told you before see previous clip and
it’s working pretty well but I noticed that if you don’t actually put enough of
it like I mean if you put that dirty water on top of the canvas it won’t be
wet enough and it won’t absorb and it won’t give that texture so whenever you
make it through your water like making is thin as possible not too much and
just make sure you soak the hell out of your canvas that’s the number one thing
it can give you and second is I my test is actually doing pretty well so I
didn’t reprime the dirty one that I showed you before because I was just too
lazy and I didn’t feel like spending more paint so I did a darker layer and
it’s actually going pretty well let me show you so surely have the fans on just doing
your thing and it’s doing super well so I’m gonna apply more coats I think I
have about to be left right now at 3 or 9 and I think I can do like one every 45
minutes to an hour so I’m gonna do three more and then see the results in a few
seconds so yeah pretty interesting again number one tip is make your daily water
as light as possible and whatever you apply it like soak the hell out of your
canvas and brush it off so I’ll show you the technique how I get it done
basically I’m gonna be using protection of the campus because into our campus
first thing we do is leave the water I think that putting a lot of it just to
make sure it’s wet and then we brush it again the goal is to fill at least
resistance as possible so whenever I feel like my brushes feels dry whenever
I’m applying the coats I really add some more water and the goal is to make it
shiny as hell compared to this if we do that often
enough then you will win the game of painting yo canvas hey guys this is it
from here the finals or the final photo that I made for this session so I want
to do a sophomore sugar was easy afterwards that someone else to come in
just to do a little test I kind of like the results the black one came out
really great the what change between the black one
and the grey one they decided to do is small wet blind so basically did I mix
my light grey one with my darker one and created interesting depth some of those
wrinkles on my backdrop which I don’t know how it happened I think it wasn’t
tight enough where there was maybe too much liquid not too certain this is what
we have it has to be fixed in the future so the grey one was a bit flat it looks
like a pretty much neutral gray background
that’s just walled up anyway I didn’t do any photos with this one I’ll have to
test it again but again it was interesting to look at I think I’ll be
doing it in the future because I actually like the experiment I like the
process I like the build and a lot of us just
slow process it’s really interesting also next time I
think I’ll do it instead of doing it on four days for two or three hours I’ll
take a full day from 8 a.m. to like 5 to 6 p.m. just do a coat of prime and then
build up my colors very slowly and using fans also to accelerate the process so
if I have any suggestions to do again just make sure that you understand the
after the primer I understand the wet blend
I think this is a crucial part to build texture the dirty water seemed to have
worked a bit but I wish it would have had more impact on it so if I were you
do the dirty water thing just make sure it’s slightly colored differently and
also what I also noticed a nice my friends the other green is that it’s
easier to build from dark to light then go from light to dark for some reasons
it’s just so so so damn easy to mess it up
if ever you’re not building for solving anyway so these are my lessons my too
long didn’t read if you want to make it really short and that’s pretty much it
so I hope you appreciate this video again I really enjoy doing this and I
highly recommend doing it if you don’t have the patience to actually get it
back up done then I highly suggest the Franklin they look really great if you
have the budget the elephant and no savage also is in the business of doing
piece and one guy that I know Ethan alex is also in the business of
doing backdrops I hope this video was also useful to you through powder are
you planning to do it and if you have to do it please do it it’s a lot of fun so
thank you guys for watching I hope you enjoyed this video if you did enjoy the
video please give it a like and if you like the content that I’m putting out
please make sure to subscribe to stay tuned I will post now two videos a month
so we can all be joyful and they were all on YouTube that’s it folks I hope
you’re having a fantastic day hope you enjoyed this video and now if ever you
are on Facebook on social media and you did your own and because of this video
please tag me I want to know and if you have any tips to share with the
community just picture a comment below what you found that was useful to
understand what doing your back job thanks again for watching
Cheers and good luck

DIY Backdrop – My Experience Painting a ‘Canvas’ backdrop Part 1

DIY Backdrop – My Experience Painting a ‘Canvas’ backdrop Part 1


what’s up guys YvensB here today I’m
taking you behind the scenes I’m doing it for a special project for me to paint
canvases over actually backdrops what are our canvases or backdrops I don’t
know how you call them it’s called backdrops really it’s something that a
lot of high-end photographers use in their portraiture so you have the Annie
Leibovitz the Mark Seliger and a whole bunch of like really high in
photographers that use backdrops as a way to create texture so I was
interested in seeing how I could get it done because there’s a lot of DIY
methods out there and today I’m showing you my spin on it so I’m gonna do two
backdrops well one today I’m gonna do a neutral
gray with a bit of white texture as a as depth-wise abstractions so hopefully I
really hope it goes well because I’m 100% not sure what I’m doing but a lot
of my friends are giving me tips about how to get it done so I’ll be taking you
behind the scenes and showing the steps that I did to get it done this is my
first time doing it so I might be doing completely wrong but hopefully it’ll
work so here’s this piece I’m working with any Selena and so I can have the
backdrop completely laid out so time lapse in three two one step one is actually done we’re just
getting a place as I seen in time-lapse then so I went to Home Depot or any
hardware store that you have and got two things I got one a painter’s plastic
tarp so I can protect my studio so I don’t clean dirty the floors and – we
got a painter’s cloth what it is is big tablecloth or painters cloth basically
that’s gonna be the actual canvas so the plastic is to protect our floors and the
cloth is just to be the canvas and that canvas it’s not that expensive it’s like
$56 in Canada for a piece of that I guess in the state that’s about 45 to 40
dollars I would think so and because Kenya Canada everything is just more
more expensive and yeah great country but coastal living right now we’re gonna
lay the plastic tarps so we can protect their floor and second we’re gonna blend
the actual painters cloth and then I’m gonna see I’m thinking of cutting it
into because it’s quite large the one I got because I want to make two of them
so I’m gonna start with the first a gray one just to be and get some experience
and then I’m gonna move on to another one so stay tuned time lapse coming in so the first bit is done which laid out
the actual plastic wrap so what we’re gonna do afterwards we’re going to
simply have to measure the actual canvas of the backdrop so I make sure it’s in
the right size so if I check quickly right now we got a 14 by 12 Bennett no
clue the brand we’re gonna cut it in the size that is actually convenient want to
transport and also to to to actually be convenient for opposing so I’m thinking
of keeping the 12 feet alive and busy cutting into so have a 7 by 12 which
gives roughly a pretty large canvas for someone regular size if you look at a
universal or a savage backdrop which is pretty popular one they’re typically
like nine feet I think like these things so we’ll see what heals afterwards but
again another time-lapse coming really really soon I’ll be cutting the canvas
in okay so that thing is actually humongous
so what we’re gonna do is we’re gonna cut it in two I’m a bit surprised of the
size so because of its size I think I’m gonna
do is gonna cut it in two so I can get more canvas out of it and also gonna be
my first run so before committing fully to like a mistake let’s let get a lesson
the lesson learned first and then we’re gonna like the improvement technique so
I’m going to cut it into two pieces right now I think it’s 14 by 18 like as
I showed before so when I cut it in two and then see what is steaming the actual cloth so it
doesn’t wrinkle because from what I heard
if ever there are wrinkles in the actual cloth it may cause actually Rico’s long
term any actual any actual cloth backdrop so something we try to avoid so
I spent the last like 15 minutes doing this so now I’m gonna lay on the floor
and find a way to staple it on the ground because I forgot my stapler and
it’s a mess so I’m probably gonna use some thumbtacks and try to stretch it to
the ground like that the actual backdrop stays in place one and two we can also
keep that thing stretch and make sure the paint actually keeps it in old
together so that’s it for now so next step which is step number and I
forgot here’s the next step next time so not
everything is packed and ready to get going to start painting so I’m gonna
change and I’m gonna change and get going so changing so we changed outfit
of the day hashtag OTD looking real fashion here so I’m gonna get cracking
start painting start mixing the paint and apply actually the first coat which
is the most exciting part so biro right all right so paint is now in a tub Oh
whatever you may call it so next step is to start painting so ten
laps in three hello there so this is day two of the
actual painting so the goal is either one to finish the base layer which was
actually pretty good and second of all do actually the actual circuit texture
because I bought an acrylic plus primer paint I think I’m gonna have to dilute
the paint to like maybe like one quarter to three parts ratio of paint and water
so that’s gonna be our challenge today mmm that’s an important note that I
forgot to mention also that process requires me to start adding more
different colors because if I you just layers and layers layers of gray and
won’t show so I’m gonna add a bit of white just to make it a bit brush if
that’s a term for a word and go from there so I’m gonna add a very little
from the start and the start you see how it looks and then gonna be Linux so
again I’m just taking the really long rods and a long sea froth instead of the
short quick one because again it’s my first time so we don’t want to f*ck it
up we’re gonna do it properly and and I kinda like the results the black
one came out really great

Light Painting Photography

Light Painting Photography


Hey, what’s up! It’s Chris from Brooker
Films and in today’s video I’m talking all about light writing. So, let’s get into
it! Light writing is a fun, creative and
fairly straightforward photography technique that utilizes long exposure
photography to capture custom-made light streaks with in your photo. When done
correctly, you can write messages, draw emojis or create custom-made patterns
and textures within your photo. But, how do you do this? And what do you need?
First up, you need a digital SLR camera that is capable of shooting long
exposure photos, you need a tripod and you also need a flashlight or a
smartphone. So, mount your camera to your tripod, set your shutter speed to 30
seconds and adjust your camera interval mode to 2 seconds. Doing this will ensure
that your photo doesn’t get any motion blur caused from the action of pressing
down on the shutter button. Now, once you’ve pressed down on your shutter
button, you want to run into frame, grab your flashlight and start drawing out as
many patterns as you physically can If you want to have spaces in between
the different shapes in your photo, try turning off your light, move into a new
position and carry on the drawing with the light turned back on.
So, once you’ve taken your photos, you’re going to want to back these up onto the
computer and import these into Adobe Lightroom Okay, so once they have been imported,
we just want to go and develop these now So, we’re just going to select… let’s select
the smiley face and we’re just going to press “develop”. Now, I’m just going to go through
and I’m just going to very quickly colour grade this image to make it look as good as
possible. So, I’m just going to pull the highlights down a little bit, push the
shadows a bit, pull the exposure up a fraction. I’m going to increase the
vibrance just to pop those colours out Pop the clarity a little bit and then
I’m just going to pull the temperature down a little bit just to make this
cooler If you enjoyed watching this video then
please do let me know in the comment section below and don’t forget to
subscribe if you would like to see more videos like this one in the future. Thank
you ever so much for watching, I really do truly appreciate it. I hope you’re
having the most amazing day today I will see you soon.
Thanks for watching!

Jerusalem Fine Art Prints Artists Books

Jerusalem Fine Art Prints Artists Books



slammin hot like the water from your day the Lochte room shall advance that the vow Shelly Potter and in Lowell saloon sheriff that woman and if of my gosh Kalama hotel a specimen don't a davao domination is a an a new pet name occult or by agencia Clairvaux da hammoudi me share dynamic event a Hotel Kiev Adagio thermo Cavett Mishima Stephanie can clear the collaborative Hall of Fame Shelley de chelly a racial yollop tech note bellum autumn autumn of Coachella wanna cover two big Italian what – tractor killing the rocky yourself short Amitabha Amitabha social manga words mu epsilon0 mystical allow in Alma Lazio valerian is me what I love about the studio is first of all the incredible technical abilities this is a place where there's never no there's maybe the answer not yet but there's always this constant pushing the limits of the technology and the papers to find a way to do something being here from the very beginning of the chiclet technology one might say that it has advanced in the last ten years incredibly the quality of the work is really unlimited well underneath Mahadeva technical Foose memorizer they yell it signify technical amaze and we had the Annie need Hampton my short break is over we are three cars Allah it's your Artemis the overheated Marcia was here a maximum stair hollowfication yeah Zelo he not an Aloha surface area Macomb co-organizer bell rings hello throw over gamma face it at the Warka door the machinist beholding let's hear that the virtual blossom Valley Aslan would call a Colima hot zone vltava result you

Can I Draw REALISM with only 12 Colored Pencils?

Can I Draw REALISM with only 12 Colored Pencils?



let's keep your expectations realistic for this video doing the realism challenge with 12 colored pencils is not going to be easy do keep in mind that when people do the realism challenge they use everything at their disposal a Crilley is the master of the realism challenge people use gouache for shadows and they use hundreds of different colored pencils just using 12 color pencils is going to be very difficult to pull it off but that's what this video is going to attempt and it may not be perfect as a result especially because I am not good at realism every time I attempt it goes horribly horribly wrong also learnt a bit from the last and first and only other time I did the realism challenge I picked something too small I picked something grayscale think it would be easier but the problem it was reflective so that the highlights were brighter than the white paper I was working on it just wasn't good so this time having learned from those mistakes I'm gonna go a little larger a little more colorful these art materials the sketchbook that I'll be using today and these twelve beautiful polychromos color pencils they're 20 times as fast as you can't polychromos color pencil polychrome it's polycomb it's competent that's really hard to do these are two of the incredible art supply line up in the Jazz's jazzy album the sale of this box will never happen again and sails in on the 31st of July so if you want the Jazz's jazzy art box you need to go check it out if you want to know what's in the box I'll link in the card in the description to the video where I'll share everything that's in the box and why I picked it for the box it goes into great detail you can check it out there if you want to know what people think of the box I'll link to the video where react to people's reactions to the box and it has a whole bunch of videos where people unbox it and share their so and if you want to know the people who make the box with me and know how its put together and where it comes from I'll link to the video where I go visit the people who made it over at smart but I really want to take time today to have a bit of fun with the sketchbook in the pencils these are some of the heroes of jazz's jazzy art box these are top notch I love this so much I know for a fact these are fantastic I literally so much about this sketchbook recent one of my new favorite kind of sketchbook this is a very nice sketchbook so there you go you don't have to take my word for it people love these things I love these things that's why they're in the box and if you want to get them as well as all the other amazing goodies you can go check out jazz this Jesse art box for a very very limited time now that sales are going to end let's get to the realism challenge so how this is gonna work is I'm gonna open this up and I'm gonna have two sides of the page and the challenge involves setting down a 3d object on one side over here on the left and then replicating that on the right in order to get the best things to try and replicate I of course raided my children's baby toy box I wanted a variety of colors that's got like a lot of complex shadow work so don't do something like that watch the spider I thought if I did that well that could look really cool yeah there's what's this this is a like a teething toy see how I touch it and like things move quite drastically like if the highlights change oh I can't let it move in fact I should pin like the book down with blue tack that feels pretty solid I think that's going anywhere what are our other options we've got some play-doh cutting tools this is like the the baby version of a mobile phone that's pretty cool I mean that's got a real mix of primary colors it's a clean simple shape clean simple shadows but a lot of gradients and a lot of different blends and transitions oh my god my heart is actually start to race this is this is gonna be really difficult oh boy alright let's do it this is the one I'm gonna do the bright stars baby phone toy I'm gonna rotate this because I don't want to draw the complexity of the elephant or the cat some of that alright so I'm set up and my hope is by the end of the following time-lapse I will have here what you see here I don't think it'll be perfect but I'm gonna take my time and do the best I can I am scared because every other time I've done this I've failed miserably wish me luck I have to say this challenge was really really hard and most intimidating at the beginning I tried to use the pencil and roughly sort of measure sections but it's not entirely accurate I just had to do my best on top of that you don't even draw from the perspective of what you're seeing you're actually drawing from what you see on the camera display I mean think about what you're looking at that's the perspective of the camera and I'm copying that therefore I'm not actually watching the paper as I draw I'm looking at the screen so all of you measuring and proportions isn't based on the object itself it's based on the lens of camera and how it shows in the video so it's quite an awkward drawing process but I just took my time chucked on an audio book and tried to enjoy it and say get in but was also as picky as I could possibly be moving on to the coloring was a relief after all that meticulous sketching as I slowly built up the colors careful to leave the highlight areas clean and wide I realized very quickly was going to take a lot of saturated color to look solid but the thing with colored pencils is there's only so much it'll erase so when you put it down really heavily there's no way you can fully erase it to the point that it's gone so then it became a matter of really slowly building up the drawing and constantly watching the object I was trying to replicate to make sure I didn't take any of the coloring too far now you might think that there really wasn't any color blending needed even though I'm only using twelve colors the toy I'm replicating is so primary colored and simple that surely those twelve colors cover it all yeah for the blue that's mostly true and some of the orange but overall there was a lot of blending to try and get the exact hues over see for example the green wasn't just green that was a hint of yellow in the lighter areas there was a touch of blue and the shadows the orange was a mix of orange red and yellow the purple was the trickiest by far as I didn't have a color close to that in my base 12 color so as a mix of AM / blue and a red and I slowly mix them all until I came close enough to the color next them towards the end came the shadow this was quite tricky but also the most satisfying bit because out of everything it was the thing that really made what I was drawing look three-dimensional and also the thing that most clearly showed what I was copying was the object on left as with all of the other colors and values it was a matter of very slowly building it up but I actually did get most of my shadows done with the mechanical pencil gray levers it was much lighter than the black and also smudged nicely to produce a soft transition to the pure white now after that I built up the deeper sections of shadow and ambient occlusion with the black pencil last but not least I used the white gel pen to add that final polish and shine to my painstaking attempt at realism and there it is that is the result of my realism challenge this is a look ok I don't mean to toot my own horn but I am really happy with the way this turned out it's not perfect but it's pretty damn close and I think I think there we go even more realistic if you watch this video and you need to wear glasses in general but you forgot to wear your glasses it's probably looked picture-perfect the whole way through but the funnest part of doing the realism challenge like this is the warp in perspective I'm going to use my phone to cap to the top and then twist its most interesting when you turn angle look at that that's sort of trippy we're going to dimensional and then we're going back to a 3-dimensional replication I'm pretty happy with that before I finish I do want to do one thing that I've never done before so I have never unboxed Jazz's jazzy a box and I want to do that today simply because I've never done it I know it sounds like I will have done it obviously I put the whole box together organized all the suppliers I even displayed them all beautifully when I first released it and promoted to you guys but I'd never received the box and when I went to visit the smiler officers I asked if I could have a box and now that the box is going to finish selling forever and ever really gonna promote it on the channel over again I'm never gonna have another chance to do this so I want to do this with you guys oh this is it my little thank-you cards or anyone guess the box and all of these supplies in the box this is the artwork that comes with the box the signed in print work here we have the fabulous faber castell polychromos pencils one of the true heroes of the box as you can see the colors of these pencils go down so damn well my custom spectrum noir markers huge sat out of course two crafters companion or spectrum are for doing the custom packaging and letting me pick the exact colors I've wanted if the marabou graphics fineliners these are fantastic we have three different font liner sizes and then one brush mount I'm a huge brush pen fan that's why there are three kinds of brush pens in the box so if you like inking or if you want to learn too I have a bit of fun with it there's a lot of fun to be had here I love this thing because it's like it's really sharp and fun you can do a lot of detail but it's technically a bit of a brush pen you can really get a little bit of line weight variation in there but it's almost like a plastic tip so you can really do a lot of work with it really solidly really sharp and fine like look how funny and yeah this is a brush pen and I don't have to worry about you know losing detail but I can also get a lot of that a lot of a variation that's a gorgeous bit really loved if the prismacolor color eyes pencil I'll of this for construction work my favorite mechanical pencil I'm obsessed with mechanical pencils but I'm also really picky so I love this thing we have the Express at blending card again this was extra but this is the same type of card that I use for pretty much all of my feature final illustrations in like character design sessions and stuff we have my pencil case this is the thing I take with me and travel everywhere I have it packed like this it's missing a couple of things I've been using in this video but that's that and then of course we have the Hannah mule sketchbook this is an amazing sketchbook I mean you can see how I use it in this video and if you're interested to see how people use any and all of these our suppliers go check out the hashtag jazzy art box I really love hardcover sketchbooks they just obviously feel like they're gonna last a lot longer and they feel really premium in the hand I am just in love with how all this came together and I'm so grateful for everyone who supported the box partners over at smart art who made this possible and has sent it out to everyone really worked hard to get the best suppliers to work with and send me samples and have a lot of patience with how picky I can be this is a weirdly like a bittersweet moment for me because this is the last video where I'm gonna be shouting it out and thanking you guys for getting it really at the end of the day and after all that it's just one of those amazing things that I'm just so grateful to have been able to do with you guys and for you guys and you know it just like really highlights how special this community isn't and the amount of awesome stuff we get to do together and how fun art and creativity is so this is it Jazz's jazzy art book I thank you so much for watching this video and also for making things like the jazzy art box possible by being such an awesome community and supporting us so much and showing so much love with the hashtag and just with your positivity even people who didn't get the box sharing their creativity or the suggestions or their encouragement it's all just been such an overwhelmingly amazing positive experience so I just wanted to thank you from the bottom of my heart from making this possible I've talked about it a lot I'm finding I'm struggling to stop talking about it because it's the last time I'm talking about it with you guys this has been awesome thank you so much for watching this video and until next time I'll see you later

Adobe Illustrator CC Tutorial - Using Layers

Adobe Illustrator CC Tutorial – Using Layers



hey guys will Patterson here and welcome to a new alliterated CC tutorials and today I'm doing a tutorial but layers because people wanted to know more about layers within Photoshop now this could be a long video and you're probably wondering why but there's so many things within this powerful function called layers that you need to know when doing illustrator a lot of illustrators will say that they don't use layers but if you're a designer and a graphic designer you making logos illustrator is such a powerful tool within layers sorry it's such a powerful tool that you can use to hierarchy base your workflow and to organize where everything goes to make quick and clean edits when changing your images so as you can see here I've got like just post live created from a website a prophesy apparel go check it out if you want and I've got tons and tons of layers but if you don't know where the layers are go to a window and then go down to layers or press f7 just to get it quickly you'll get this little box here and if you having trouble then there shouldn't be anything in there if you've got a new document up what I'm going to do is I'm going to create a new document so you can see there we go just create that then I've got my layers panel here and it should just look like that so it should just say layer one with a black square sorry a white square on it okay so I'm going to show you a few things about layers this could be a long video so prepare yourself okay so the first thing I want to show you is that the background layer has these two icons on it and every layer has his eye icon if you used to Photoshop then you'll know some of the tools within the layers of Illustrator but if you are in Photoshop don't be fooled thinking that it's just the same because it's not it's quite a bit different and it feels different as well it's actually more efficient for illustrator okay so the layers part of illustrator is a lot like Adobe InDesign so we have the visibility toggle with the eye so anything that is not got the eye on it you can't see and what you can do is you can press and drag to see which layers you want to see it or not so I'll just click on everything that same with this one here is basically the toggles lock and you can lock things so you don't edit them so if I was to unlock the background I could press the background and move it however willy nilly but if I was to lock it you can't actually select it so it makes it easier to select things with it in the background so you're not going to mess it all up I could do this the same as the eyes so I can drag all the way down to toggle and toggle everything awesome so what we have in these layers are basically loads of groups so in the first layer of up here which is black lines which is just coincidentally first that is why I'm going for it we can see which layers these are on so on this tight bit there if we wanted to see what was in them and you didn't know and you've got loads and your document just press this little button there and what that does is that selects it within that I'm going to zoom in here press Z and zoomin in within that we should have shapes that you've put into that layer or that are already in that layer and basically within these is we have this sort of magenta square on them but within these we have a red one and then within strengthen something different but within this one we have like a greeny sort of thing in them a greeny border on them what this means is that they're on different layers and the delay is a color coordinated you can edit them so the first thing I want to show you is how to edit your layers so black lines here we I'm going to see which is in there all these are in there because I've just selected them I'm going to double click on the side of that and we can change the name we can change the color and we can even go to the color part here change whatever color we want literally to whatever shade you want if you're on a Mac or whatever we can change it to ever it's a template and you can dim the images that's useful for like if you tracing over things like a piece of artwork with a blob brush tool or you want to dim the image so you can trace it back over it with a pen tool it's useful for that also another way to change the name is just to double click on the layer name not on the side of it sampling the layer options up but on the name you can double click on it and change it ok so the next one is we're going to look into grouping so if in this we have like if we look into this and we just expand that you can see we've got loads of them it's really big we've got loads and loads and layers here in this and these are all paths and these are all actors differently it let me show you so firstly click on this path layer I can just select it like so on the layers panel I would click on this one you can select it but what if I wanted to create a sort of a group and then have other layers within this black lines later what I'll need to do is within this I'm just going to press the meatball function and what it's going to do is going to select each and every single one of these and you can see which are selected with the green sorry the magenta squares on the outside indicate selected out there you go if you just hover over it then I'm going to press command G where's it gone well it's gone to a new layers going to a sub layer called group and you can even edit the name of these as well we have guides which are in layers as well which is crazy and you cannot see you can't as you select them but you can views them view them and stuff like that okay so that's in a group we can just call this black lines one but whatever want to create a new sub group to do is I'm going to go to a new document over here and I'm going to create a background layer so in this first layer which I'm automatically set to I'm going to create just a square around the border and then I'm going to change the color to a nice green and then I don't want any sort of stroke around it or some okay and then what I'm going to do is within this I don't know why it's been a bit strange we've got sort of a path going on there within this we've got this path within the layer I'm going to edit this layer to call it BG then I want to edit the color by double clicking I'm going to edit it to cyan and the problem is that illustrators got a bug at the moment so if I wanted to change this color as well you just have to click and close it and then open it again okay so we've got this path but whatever what it's something else in the background but I don't want to sort of move this but all we have to do is lock it but I don't mean lock the main layer I mean go into the layer and lock the actual green outline so I'm going to call screens square because part of kind of want to make and then we've locked that then what I'm going to do within this layer here I'm going to create another sub layer which is basically a kind of the group I'm going to call these circles and then I'm going to create a circle within that group like so I'm going to change the color to something ridiculous that doesn't look good and then I'm going to simply make it smaller a bit I'm going to edit them like so and then I'm going to move them and then bring them down and then I'm going to copy them all the way down like so and then highlight them all again bring them in now that's great because they're all in this one layer if I went in here you can see each and every circle is on a separate layer so we can call it circle if we wanted to one two but I'm not going to do it actually that's stupid but whatever I wanted to create a group if I could do this automatically that would be so much easier so what I'm going to do is in within this you'll see in a second so we've got loads of layers here board to create something different within the circles I'm going to select all these circles but I have a passion marquee in them or by going to a circles bit here and just pressing on it I'm going to press command G that will create group within this and then in that group you'll see all the circles that's how you create that now I've done the background layers I'm going to come off that but press this little arrow key and press the overall lock so you can't actually go on to it I would create a new layer to have something over the top of it so I'm going to have another square on the top of it like so and then I'm going to change the color to something ridiculous again this is not meant to look good it is just to show you exactly what to do with in Illustrator within this I want to create something in this layer so I'm going to create maybe press M and I'm going to create another square and then change the color again like and then we've got two of these things and these aren't actually in a proper layers I'm going to close square and then change the color of it because you can't really see it very well if I can to gold and then there I want to create I don't know maybe let's create another layer actually as create another layer so I want this circle this square here to be on a different layer so the easiest way to do is not to go to the layers and bring it all the way up all you can do is you could press this square bit here and you'll see that there's a square highlighted on here I'm going to press alt and drag this up to the blue layer what that's done is it's copied it over to the blue layer but what if I wanted to just bring it up swap it I've just swapped it to the blue layer by just dragging it up and then basically that is how I've done it so these are on two separate layers like so we can also make clipping masks on this but this is going to be done on a new video I'm going to go back over here and make sure haven't missed anything out okay so within these layers you'll have loads of groups and stuff especially groups are especially helpful not just for the layer stacking but also so you can just click on them automatically let's try and find the group we're trying to find okay it's from another group okay it's not really a group show find a good group that's not a group either so the bunch of paths I'm not doing any here we go okay so group here okay see all else is very well but within this if I was to click off this if I was to click a group it was a group more together in the selection which is why it's helpful so if you were to be on layers and stuff then I would say the best thing to do is to play around with it yourself there's only so much I can say about it I know this is a strange video and I know a lot of people probably will say I didn't understand a word you were saying there but I hope some of you could understand the sort of basics of what I was doing there but all you need to do is really have a practice with this and then see how you grow within the layers so if you have any questions about this leave a comment underneath and then I'll try and answer them but if you think the questions are to be announced and make sure you check in the description are in another comment because I won't be answering the same question twice because I've done that for the past year and it's been a bit difficult to do so yeah thank you so much for watching the someone just became a patreon to me thank you so much if you want to support what I do and so you can keep getting free content then go check out my patreon page at the end of this video because that's where you can tip me a few dollars or $1.00 per video that I do of a tutorial and then that'll help me keep things absolutely free but don't feel pressured to do it it just really helps me and you'll also get prizes like t-shirts and Skype calls and one-to-one lessons and stuff so make sure that you do that if anyone wants any one-to-one lessons as well by the way email me because I'm going to be going over a few things and one-to-one lessons are going to be done for patreon so if you want to become a patreon you'll get a free 1/2 a lesson if you spend five dollars or more per video so thank you so much everyone and I'll see you in my next video goodbye