Easy Mini Abstract Art Inspiration PLUS A Color Challenge

Easy Mini Abstract Art Inspiration PLUS A Color Challenge


how have you been getting on with your
mini abstracts I have some more inspiration and a mini abstract
challenge for you today that I hope is gonna motivate your art for this week so
I introduces exercise in my art video last week and it’s actually one that I
talk about and give step by steps for in my get creating book and I’ve already
shared a little on why I like doing these types of exercises and why I think
they’re really useful and can really help in your art so if you missed that
video I will put a link below in the description for it as well as a link to
all the products that I’m using today now this week I thought I would share
the process of another mini abstract but let’s take this one up a little bit and
let’s go for challenge something that I hope will inspire you to do a mini
abstract – so are you up for it do you want a mini abstract challenge now the
challenge I’m gonna base it around colors so if you’re needing a bit of
color inspiration then this is a really handy trick and something you can use to
inspire your work or just get you started so the particular palette that
we’re going to use I want you to either pick a hot color palette or a cold color
palette and then pick a contrasting color from the other color family so if
you picked a hot color palette then you’re gonna pick a cold color to
contrast it and vice versa so get yourself started basically pick a couple
of colors before you get going that are either from the hot or the cold color
family so I’ve gone with cold for mine and my main color is going to be blue
then pick yourself a single color that you’re going to use sparingly but this
time pick it from the opposite temperature color family so for my piece
I’ve got my cold blues and then I’m gonna contrast it with a yellow which is
more of a hotter color now this particular exercise there’s another
version of this that you could also try out as well so here’s some more
inspiration to help you with your color combining and your mini abstracts as
well how about just for a complementary color colors that
sit opposite to each other on the color wheel so for instance my blue the
complementary color to blue is orange so instead of using the yellow as my
contrasting color for my blues I could have used orange today so that’s another
way of looking at this color combining that I hope you’ll have fun with it you
could probably do all of them and just do an abstract with all of them and see
which ones you like best now the other colors that you can use in
this are neutrals like blacks whites and grays so even though I’ve just picked
blue as my main color they are actually two very different blues so they work
quite nicely as contrasts in their own little color bubble and you can watch to
see how I work my main cold colors together and then how I add in my warm
color contrast in this mini abstract there’s just so many ways that you could
do this so don’t feel restricted and just go for it
I remember you don’t have to do the same with me you don’t have to use the same
colors you don’t have to use the same marks this mini abstract exercise is all
about discovering your own mark making your own light your own dislikes your
own color palettes so pick things that you really want to use today and you
really want to just experiment with now when I’m doing these mini abstracts I
really try hard to stay in a moment and to work more on impulse than planning
you can do this you can easily plan these if you want that’s entirely up to
you if you prefer to do that then go ahead and plan them but for me these
mini abstracts are much more about listening to what my gut is telling me
to do and you know where it wants to go next so it’s very reactive and I’m not
really sure where the abstract will go but it is so many that it doesn’t really
take that long before it feels finished to me and I enjoy the so minimalist feel
of these pieces but you know again you don’t have to stick with that yourself
even though we’re working on a very small piece of paper
you could just cover the whole thing and do whatever you liked with it you could
spend a long time on it you could spend a short amount of time on it whatever it
feels right for you now for my piece dad there’s something about the rhythm in it
that I really really like and there’s both a symmetry and an asymmetric
symmetry in this piece today and down to the sort of just the the different
elements that I’ve used the different ways I’ve added in some mark making and
then in the whole piece as well you can see some of the symmetry some of the
asymmetric symmetry that’s going on there and I think I really like that
about this piece but you’ll see that more when we get to the end and as this
piece grew my ideas about it grew too and I changed up layers as I went along
so this is part of what I was talking about being more reactive to it for
example I extended the dark blue area after adding the splatter texture so I
had already put down the dots I put down some dark blue I added the splatter and
then I was right I think actually I needed to make the darker blue a bigger
part of the dot pattern and I wasn’t worried about changing up the shapes of
those dots it was just another way that the details in this piece that have
reacted and changed and as I went along I also quite like the way that the brush
line tails off or kind of feathers on the bottom right-hand side and how that
adds another contrast to the kind of lines and the block colors that are here
in this piece and just as with last week’s piece I’m using a creep paint in
three different ways so I’ve got neat paint from – I’ve got watered down paint
but then I’ve also got the acrylic ink in my paint pens and adding more pattern
detour the neutral colour is a really great way to add texture and interest
but without having to introduce another active color because we picked our
colors at the beginning and we went with a very particular
a pallet so the white and black you know is a no-pressure way of adding more
details without having to worry about putting in a different color and just
shifting the way this color combination works and what I haven’t mentioned is
that one of my blue colors is actually an iridescent so there’s another texture
layer so we’re going on here and that adds to the peace as well so actually
doesn’t take that much to add a lot of texture and interest to many abstracts
I’ve only used a very small amount of product but there’s quite a lot to look
at so I have a real play with your shapes your brushes what kind of brush
marks you can get try feathering some of your layers try adding them as blocks
try adding the paint thickly or thinly that’s gonna change the look as well and
if you can add a lot of interest with just a few colors less than a handful of
colors and just some a few small marks imagine what you’re gonna do with a
larger color palette and on a larger surface so have lots of fun playing with
this one have loads of fun picking out your color palettes I would love to see
it also you know do share with me on Instagram I would be happy to come over
and have a look so don’t forget to play with the color challenge today and I
look forward to seeing your hot color palettes with cold contrasts or your
cold color palette with hot contrasts and if you’re looking for some more
video inspiration for other mixed media art then watch these videos next and
I’ll see you there

Art Sherpa Buying Guide and Art studio Supply List

Art Sherpa Buying Guide and Art studio Supply List


[opening music] Hi! I’m Cinnamon Cooney. I am your Art Sherpa, and I am really excited to be sharing this with you today. This is about how to set up a studio as a beginner. I get asked a lot what my recommendations are for what brushes to I need to buy? What paint do I need to buy? What do I need to have in my studio? Now, when I started on YouTube, I did actually make one of these videos, but having been here for a little bit, I’ve come to understand from answering your questions and constantly being in a conversation with you that you might need some more information on things. And honestly, we’ve expanded the project set in the conversation from the beginning. So I am really happy to be doing this update. I think it’s gonna help you out a lot. In the description below, if you click the little “more” button, there’ll be some links. There’s a link to The Art Sherpa dot com, where this is all gonna be written out so that you can have it, and print it out, and look at it, and have it anytime you wanna see it. I’m also probably gonna stick it on blogger and I’m gonna throw it up on Facebook. Cause I want to make sure you guys have the information you need and that art store experience, instead of being frustrating and overwhelming, is a lot of fun. It’s like Woohooo! I’m going to the art store and I’m gonna get a big ol’ haul! That’s what I really want for you, and I want you guys to have an easy time and I want you guys to be relaxed and mellow about your art experience, even though right now I’m not that mellow. It’s kind of strange but, ba da be da. Kinda owly mood. Alright. The number one question that you guys have been asking me is, what is my basic palette? And this is an interesting kind of question for an artist because I have a base palette that’s a limited palette, that I use here on YouTube, and I did this so that you guys could save some money. So that I wasn’t constantly painting with crazy paints. I kind of try to go to the same colors again and again for projects, and on occasion add a new color for fun and interest. So my base palette is this. If you come to the table you’re gonna see this here. Alright, so I’m gonna push these forward a little bit. My basic palette is Titanium White. Mars Black. Dioxazine Purple. Quinacridone Magenta. Burnt Sienna. That is not in it. Phthalo Blue. Cadmium Yellow Hue. Cadmium Red Hue. Yellow Oxide. So that’s what I really started out with when I was on YouTube. But there was a couple things that came up with that base palette, I would like to talk to you about real quick, which is these which is these two fabulous, delicious, yummy, wonderful Cadmium colors. Now listen. The reason I recommend hue for people, a lot of times, is that real cadmium pigment is super expensive. Kind of only necessary if you’re a professional. There is a difference between hue and true cadmium pigment that’s why we all paint with it. But also there’s controversy. That’s right. There’s so much controversy around these two pigments. In fact, when I’m taking a break from politics, I just get into the cadmium controversy to just kind of keep myself up on that energy. So, these are hue. Hue is perfectly safe. Hue doesn’t have any cadmium in it, and if I was painting with kids or I had any kind of a metal allergy, I’d be kind of inclined to use hue. But honestly, you should always be checking your paints and materials to make sure what the safety guidelines are. Because just cause it’s acrylic painting and it says non-toxic on the bottle, doesn’t mean you can drink or eat any of it. I really say this all the time on my show. Don’t eat paint. Now, real cadmium pigment, though, dun-dun-dun. Look. This has been studied a lot. And the paint companies have looked into this. There was a European study done about this. In fact I’ve included a link to a really important article about this. Awesome. You know what else? There is… Where did it go? I don’t know where- Oh! Pyrrole Red. Now, this is actually comparable to pure cadmium pigment to the eye. It is also comparable to cadmium pigment to the pocket book. So you know, I’m gonna say for just the purposes of being a student, you know, stick with hue. Enjoy that. If you find yourself a professional artist, and you really know what you’re talking about you’re gonna know that cadmium has already been really investigated and short of guzzling it down, and we’re back to don’t eat paint. You’re all good. Alright. Base palette, controversy, addressed it. Those are the colors. The list is down there. Other things I like to have in my studio is palete paper. You guys are always asking me, what are you painting on? I paint on this kind of wax paper called palette paper. This is not the ony solution in the universe. Not at all. There’s lot of solutions. There’s plates. There’s kind of glass palettes. I just really like this one. I like the Gray Matters because it shows up better on camera. And I also like the Strathmore. It’s a really good palette paper. So. That’s what I’m painting on. That’s what I’m painting with. Guess what else I have. I have an expanded color palette. That’s my complex palette, and those are a whole bunch of other colors. I’m gonna pull them over here. I’ve got Ultramarine Blue. I’m got Burnt Umber. I’ve got Phthalo Green. I’ve got Quinacridone Red. I’ve got the Aqua, or Southern Ocean Blue. The Prussian (blue). The Hooker’s Green, no they’re not kidding. The Naphthol Crimson. The Australian Sienna. The Cad Yellow Light. The Cad Red Light. Zinc White. Or Mixing White. Those are just my toys. You don’t have to have to have all those paints to enjoy your art experience. I’m just telling you what I have going on because you ask. But you know what? The truth is, this is your art journey. This is your studio. You don’t have to paint with any of these brands. And you don’t have to have all these colors. All of the projects have a materials list and most of the creators out there that do lessons or have workshops or teach things, they have one of those. And, you know, it’s all good. It’s all viable. There is not one way to do a painting. There is an infinite number of ways of doing paintings, which I like a lot. I like that it doesn’t have a simple, whatever answer. I think it’s important to be able to wash your brushes. There’s been a lot of discussion about this lately. In my previous video I talked about you could just use Dawn soap. And that’s true for synthetic fibers. I don’t really recommend that for a four hundred dollar Kolinsky sable brush. But for, you know, synthetic brushes, Dawn is great, but I really like “The Master’s Brush Cleaner.” And then I really have fallen in love with “Jack’s Linseed Soap.” There are about fifty other brush cleaners on the planet. I’m just telling you the two that I enjoy. I also always keep in my studio ninety-one percent rubbing alcohol. Now, seventy-one also works, but this sucker takes dried paint out of stuff. If you have a stick, that you’ve just left your brush, and it’s just a stick now, this will recover it. It’s really incredible. Got a video in the i-Card, all about it. Painter’s tape. This is not what’s at Home Depot. It’s an artist’s tape. It’s by Scotch 3M. You know, I get this for an inexpensive amount of money where I’m at, but it’s cost to cost. Just some sort of tape that really helps you make a straight line. I talk a lot about having chalk. Or watercolor pencils. But what I’m really talking about is, you need a way to make marks on a canvas, that doesn’t bleed into your paint. That’s all it is. I got these Artist Loft really inexpensively. I got this chalk from my kids. Mm-hmm. Took it right away from them. Ok. Canvases. I have these packs of canvases. And let’s be honest. Some of the canvases have some crazy coatings on them lately that can resist paint. I’ve gotten some really good reports from you guys. There’s some people who just lightly rinse them off and allow them to dry and that seems to be fixing the coating um, applying a coat of gesso seems to be fixing the coating. I like to use like a flow agent and then just brush it on and that fixes the coating. But you’re looking for a pre-stretched canvas. These are all kind of stapled on the back, and I get them in economy. You can paint on canvas paper. Yes, you can. You could paint on Bristol paper. There’s a lot of stuff that you can paint on. This is just what I’m painting on. You might paint on masonite board, and that is completely ok. Brushes. You guys ask me a lot about brushes. Where to get ’em. What to get ’em. And everybody’s out of Goldilocks. Alright. I did not know I was gonna be starting such a rigmarole when I discovered, and this is her, the original Goldilocks. Which is a number ten bright by Simply Simmons, extra firm filament. Isn’t she cool? Isn’t she fun? So, here’s the deal. Brushes are an interesting thing, in the life of everybody. Right. Brushes are really fun. But, when I started out, I was like, Hey, just get an economy pack of brushes. If you check the i-Card, if you watch the video, I’m like, Economy pack of brushes. The issue with off brand economy paints, or off brand economy brushes, there really isn’t an oversight for any of these companies and so some of them will make a good brush, but some of them will make a brush where all the bristles will fall out. And I don’t feel like it’s very economical to go buy a cheap brush if all the bristles fall out. I think what’s great is to know what you’re looking for in a brush, and it doesn’t really matter where you buy it as long as you know what you’re looking for. So when I got Goldilocks, she was pretty fantastic. She was three dollars, which, I guess, what she costs most places, and that’s not her official name from the company. By the way. That’s been messing with everybody and I’m really sorry for that. In fact, uh, if you go to The Brush Guys dot com, they actually added the word “Goldilocks” to the listing cause nobody, everyone kept calling them up. I didn’t know them at the time. Going, “I need the Goldilocks brush!” And they were like “I don’t- I don’t know what that brush is.” So, this is her. Number ten. Simply Simmons. Extra firm filament. You know what was messing with you guys, though? I’ll tell you. So, at Michael’s they don’t have this one. They have these two. This is not that brush. This is a fabulous, nice multi-media brush. And this is a great natural bristle for oil. Not the same brush. See how this is the dark filament? And this is white? And this is kind of a sable brown? These are both great brushes but they are not this brush. I like this brush. I like this brush because the filaments are very firm. Too firm for makeup. Again, if you did the Big Art Quest and you watched the brush one, I’ll talk about that. Now this is actually their long handle. When I say in videos that I don’t like long handle, I’m talking like this long. Not everybody’s got a short handle. I’m gonna have to start over again. If that’s causing anybody any grief, I’m really sorry. This is what they’re calling their long handle. This is a number ten. I just like her because she’s functional and she’s inexpensive. However, she’s not the only brush that does this exact job. This is a Richeson 7530. Number ten bright. Just as good. Right. I just found this. Number ten The Silver Grand Prix. I really actually like this brush quite a lot. I’m really excited about this. And it has a copper ferrule. Which, I think, is super cool. Also is fantastic. And what these three brushes have in common and how I pick, like- I think I didn’t grab my bright again. I’m so silly. Here she is. What I really really like in a bright, what I want in a bright, is these filaments will be short. So when I’m in an art store and I think I’ve got a good flick. In other words, too firm for makeup, but won’t take paint off my car, then I line them up and I actually look to see who has the very shortest filaments. Guess what. This one wins. And then I look to see if they’ve done a real sharp edge on it. That’s what you’re looking for. It doesn’t matter where you find that brush, you’re just gonna want to make sure those filaments don’t come out of it. Right. And you’re gonna want to make sure that they’re short. See, this is what’s called a flat. Look how much longer that is. See the difference between the bright and the flat? We talk about that in the brush quest. Well, that is not gonna be as firm for pushing paint- I love doing this on my face- as these are. So that’s what’s happening there. And I really hope that clears it up. But listen, I’m here. I’m here for questions. I’m here. Now, I have the list of brushes that I think you should start out with. I think everybody needs a number ten bright. Just not because that’s actually true, but that’s my feeling. [chuckles] And that’s my best recommendation to you based on my experience. That’s how I formulate these ideas, is I look back and I go, what would really really help people? What’s really effective? What wouldn’t mess them up? And then I say to myself my number ten bright is my go to brush and so then I recommend that to you. And then I’m like, you need a number six. And you need a number four. This is like a number eight right here. But here’s a number two. I have pulled out, where I put them, I don’t kn- Oh! I put them places. Alright. So here’s like a number four bright. Right. And that’s what a number eight looks- See you need a number four, and you need a number six, and ideally it would be great if you add in an eight and a two to that. Is that in the list? Yes, it is. Well, actually, here’s the list. Then I feel like you need some of these filberts, which were in the list. Right. And a filbert, we’ve learned, through the internet, means cat’s tongue. So basically I’m licking a cat’s tongue on my face. You don’t want to do this with everything because sometimes brushes are made of goat and squirrel. Um. Horrible moment in my life about that recently. But these are just made out of synthetic fibers and they wash easily. We talk a lot about cloud brushes, and you need one. Hard to find a good cloud brush. Hard to find one. Here’s my thoughts on cloud brushes, but I think everyone should have one. This is my favorite cloud brush. I don’t even know what the brand is anymore but I can find it whenever I’m out. The- It’s very thick and stiff and the bristles are shorter. Everyone wants to make thses have really long bristles, but you want shorter for this kind of stiff thing. But the other great cloud brush. This actually came from a sip and paint. Right. Because whenever their brushes get real bad they get rid of them, but this angle, man, that is the idea cloud. And, if you can’t find any of that, this is a deerfoot stippler. See him? Deerfoot stippler. That’s the whole mystery there. A lot of them are soft, cause they’re for watercolor, so you gotta feel them. You need them to be like a thistle. That’s all I’m saying. That’s all I’m saying. Wide brush. Yes! You can use one for painting the house. Yes. Yeah. They have them for paint, and they’re cut for that, and they’re manufactured for it and that’s fantastic, and that’s what I have here. I’m gonna actually do a live on Facebook where I’ll go and show you buying at Home Depot, cause that’s fine. If you want to do happy little trees, you need a fan brush. In acrylic painting, needs to be a stiff filament on this. This is the issue with almost all fan brushes. Is they’re not firm enough. Are you getting kind of a trend? Because I’m painting in heavy bodied paints. I’m not painting in soft bodied paints. When people paint with soft bodied paints, guess what they like. The like the softer filaments. But we’re not. We’re painting with heavy bodied paints, so we like the firmer filaments. So you need the detail rounds, and I have that listed as a six, a four, and a two. Right. But also I keep talking about the micro mini’s. This is what I’m talking about. They’re miniature brushes. You can find them in the miniature painting section. You’re just talking about teeny tiny, teeny tiny little brush. What are those for? That’s for branches. When you’re like, “I can’t paint branches!” That’s about having a fluid paint. This is in the recommended list. Fluid soft body paints. Branches!!! Solved. All those branch problems, right here. Totally solved. Gesso. Cause stuff happens, and then you don’t like it. And then you want to paint over it. Or the coating sucks. Gesso. Gotta have it. Yes, you have to varnish. Spray varnish. Have to do it outside. I’m allergic to this stuff. My husband has to use it because I can’t do the propellants in it. This is my point about art supplies. Why we don’t need to be hysterical about what’s in our art supplies. Read everything. Always read the safety on every single art supply. Right? This is not edible stuff. This is not food coloring. So, it may be non-toxic. It may not have the OC’s, but it might have stuff going on with it. The paint manufacturer’s really like you. They want you to keep painting. They’re gonna wrote a whole bunch of information on the bottle. Always read everything. I don’t know your allergies. I don’t know what you’ve got going on at home. So if you read what’s on the bottles, or on the website, then you know. And there’s always, always, and I’m even here to help with that. There’s always an exchange. If you’re like, “Man, I’m allergic to this thing,” I might know a product. Some artist in the aisle next to you might know a product. We’re a helpful community. That is just how we are. We like to help each other out. So, I like to have that there. Glazing liquid. And I have retarders. So, this is my favorite of the glazings. I like this one because it slows down the drying time. However, that’s relevant to me cause I’m in the studio and it’s really really hot and it dries out my paint real fast. You might want a glazing liquid that dries fast. That would be the Liquitex glazing, but this one dries slower and does glazes. And then this is a retarder. So when they say the words open or retarder, and I think it’s a good thing to have in your studio, this is what they’re talking about. I can’t- Oh, hairdryer! Doesn’t have to be a good one. I got one of those. And easels. This is an easel by a company called Jack Richeson. This is a Best Easel. This is a Best Easel. This is the European. I have it in the description. I have it in this list. I’m not trying to hide it from you. But here’s the thing on easels. There’s a lot of brands. I’ve just always painted on this. This is like seriously, from the time I was in the crib, I been wanting one of these easels. My mom has just always had them in the house. Do you have traditions like this in your family? I do, definitely. This table easel I have here. This is my favorite style of table easel. I love this, cause it goes like this, and it sits very nicely on the table, and it holds a lot of different size canvases, and it’s so stable. But here’s what you need out of an easel. Needs to be stable. Shake ’em. Go to the art store and shake ’em. Mine’s like a rock. I love my easel. I’ve had a bunch from this company, other companies, I just know this company. I am not sponsored at all. This is just what’s happening in my studio, and this is just my way of saying, hey, this is what I’m experiencing. I want you to experience a good time and hopefully together and in an ongoing conversation that we’re having you can have a great time stocking up your studio. I have the list set up in the order that you might want to add to it because, look. At the end of the day this is just art, and people do great art with a number two pencil, and lined paper. You’ve gotta do what is best for you and you’ve got to- My general recommendation is this. Get the best materials that your budget allows for. And buy from a company that cares that you did. You know, and those are generally companies that have websites. Have social media. Have more information about their products. You know I- If you’re in Australia, you know, the two brands I know from Australia are Mont Marte and Matisse. Right. But you want somebody who has laid their boots on the ground that wants your business that cares. So if you get a tube of paint your tube of paint should never be clumpy. If you get a tube of paint that isn’t right you want them to care about that experience. You want to have somebody to write to say hey, this is what happened to me. If you have a question about a product, you want that. If a company isn’t willing to provide that to you I don’t really think they should get your business. That’s my opinion. Right. So, that’s what I recommend to people. That’s what I do in my own life. If a company is willing to take care of me then that makes me feel really good about buying from them. So it’s not that you have to have my brand of paint. You don’t. I just, I like these. These make me happy. This is a personal choice. And I don’t mind telling you want my personal choice is, but your personal choice is valid too, and I support that. And I hope this is a good, updated, um… materials list video for you to help you, you know, set up your studio, and I hope that blog, The Art Sherpa dot com helps out. Check the i-Card for the quest cause we go deep. You think this was deep? We actually go deeper. We go on for a really long time talking about all this stuff. But this is the most updated stuff, and you know what? I’ll probably be making another one of these. Later! Because, when it needs to change, it needs to change. I hope you guys are great. I hope you feel validated and loved in your lives. And I want to see you at the easel really really soon. [Come join us live. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday at eleven a.m. central] [Or enjoy one of the hundreds of paintings available on replay anytime.]

She Builds Tiny Worlds — BiDiPi #51

She Builds Tiny Worlds — BiDiPi #51


Build It. Draw It. Play It. Vsauce! Kevin here with some of the coolest
creations from extraordinary people. This is BiDiPi. Build It. Choe U-Ram builds kinetic insect lamps. The
shiny biomorphic insects flutter and glow using motors and LEDs. And he considers his
moving sculptures to be living things – in which every piece has its place and after
it eventually breaks down – the pieces can be dismantled and reused as a type of rebirth.  Lori Nix makes post-apocalyptic dioramas.
She meticulously builds landscapes and architectural interiors and then photographs them without
any digital manipulation. And she mixes a wide variety of materials like foam board,
clay, paper, acrylic paint, plaster, wood, tiny figurines and organic materials like
real leaves punched through leaf-shaped holes. And she creates them in her small apartment
in New York City. Kendra Haste creates huge animals out of galvanized
wire. She goes on wild expeditions like tracking tigers in India or following wildebeest migrations
in Tanzania and then makes the sculptures based on individual animals she encounters.
The unique portraits are drawn on paper and then matched with wire and brought into the
third dimension.  Draw It Josiah Brooks makes animations, tutorials,
and speed paintings on his YouTube channel Draw With Jazza. The Australian will teach
you everything from painting in Photoshop to different animating techniques like how
to animate a transformation. He even has a series of videos just about the creative process
to provide advice and motivation for budding artists. Judith Braun creates wall murals by fingerpainting
with charcoal dust. She explores symmetrical designs as well as textured landscapes. Though
Braun typically painstakingly plans her pieces in advance she was recently diagnosed with
breast cancer which has influenced her to take a more improvisational approach to her
work. And she abides by three rules – Symmetry, Abstraction and Carbon medium. And now for the hyper-collage architecture
of Jim Kazanjian. made from up to fifty composited images. Mike Kravanis is a bento box fanatic and focuses
his food creations mostly on Disney-inspired food characters. His Instagram account OMGiri
showcases dozens of colored-rice creations ranging from Tigger and Professor Ratigan
to a few non-Disney creations like Princess Bubblegum and PuppyCat. Play It. Polynoid director Jan Bitzer used a setup
of laser and mirrors to animate Islands of Glass by Barcelona musician Rob Clouth. SamuraiGuitarist makes inventive guitar-based
videos. Here’s his version of Kentucky Jelly by Brad Paisley using a banjo, telecaster,
acoustic guitar, washboard and spoons, mandolin and acoustic bass.  Finally, the video for Raiders by French band
Soundcrawler draws from Star Wars, Dune and Mad Max.  Inspiration also comes from you. Vsauce Creative
Fan Showcase. First up is Eddef with Early Winter Morning. Let’s go! Jordan Clayton is a Canadian visual artist
that specializes in paintings that focus on the science and understanding of phenomena.
His most recent work explores fungal and bacterial growth. David Lechner creates wooden sculptures using
driftwood pulled out of a local river in Austria. The 17-year-old began a carpentry apprenticeship
and has since been using his newfound skills to create sculptures. Here’s the digital photography of Shaheer
Akbar. Naisu performs three original songs behind
the San Diego Convention Center. Wes was paralyzed from the neck down during
a motocross accident and uses a Headmouse Extreme to create designs for his clothing
brand 4ONE7.  Emiel Sleegers is a 3D environment artist
from the Netherlands – he hopes to get a full-time job in the gaming industry and recently recreated
part of the University environment from The Last Of Us. While over in Australia, Daniel Rutherford
designs and models mecha, weapons, characters and other sci-fi stuff with 3ds max.  Leo Freidrich has a series of daily improv
piano videos – here’s his take on M83, Rihanna and Imagine Dragons. Stefan Perse is an architect from Romania
who bends copper wire into different creations and he just recently completed this set of
copper insects.  And Bonny John drew a pokemon a day – often
using completely different styles – and you can find the complete set on his website. Submit your BiDiPis to [email protected] or
share them with everyone over on Twitter with hashtag #BiDiPi. And as always – thanks for
watching!

【10 Digital Art Tips】 For Beginners

【10 Digital Art Tips】 For Beginners


Hello and welcome to my first digital tutorial
on this channel. I’ve uploaded some digital speedpaints before,
and even though they are a bit older at this point, I still recommend checking them out
afterwards. But a tutorial on digital art? I’ve never done that because I don’t really
feel that consistent with the way I work digitally. I mean, there are probably a dozen ways to
draw a simple circle so you can imagine the many ways to do digital art in general. Personally I tend to shift my way of working
with almost every picture. But there are basic tools and methods that
have been consistent for me and I want to share those with you. I will mostly use Photoshop and a bit of Clip
Studio Paint, because these are the ones I have the most experience with. But a lot of these of these tips will be transferable
to other software and often the way you do things are very similar. 1. Work with Shortcuts
Before starting a digital artwork it is helpful to know about the keyboard shortcuts that
are available. These will save you an immense amount of time,
especially if your tablet has express keys to assign them to. There are lots of different preferences and
you might not even know some of these exist. So let me give you a few recommendations that
I use:. Ctrl+Z for undoing things is the most common
and should definitely always be on your mind or assigned to one of your expresskeys Holding R allows you to rotate your canvas
freely and therefore is also a nice shortcut you might want to keep for an expresskey. Then we have Ctrl+T which is for the transform
tool and helpful if you started to big or too small. Scale, rotate or distort things with this. Ctrl- and Ctrl+ is for zooming and especially
timesaving so I have them on express keys as well. Of course this becomes obsolete if your touch
enabled tablet allows you to pinch to zoom with your fingers. The Alt key, while in brush mode, activates
the color picker as long as you hold it. I use it so frequently that I have it assigned
to a button on my stylus. This is incredibly helpful with painting,
but more on that later. For the other button on the stylus I usually
use the Right-Click, which in Photoshop lets you browse through your brush set and adjust
the size of the brush. 2. Pick your Brushes
Early on when I started digital art I really got caught up with brushes, playing around
and even creating some of my own from photos with really low resolution. I thought that other digital artists were
only so good because they had that one specific brush that I would never get my hands on. There are some brushes that are perfect for
a highly specific thing like certain textures, clouds or chains. But for most of your drawing and painting
process, a simple round brush is often enough. You can change the pen pressure, the hardness
and opacity and I learned that this already gives you a lot of options in your hand. But it can also be a lot of fun to try out
different brushes, so I will link a few awesome brush sets in the description of this video. And while you’re there, click the Like button
😉 3. Sketching
For sketching I typically use a simple round brush with slightly reduced opacity. Why a lower opacity? When you’re drawing many lines over or along
each other, the areas they have in common will come out stronger. This acts as a great guide for when you work
on your lineart later. You can of course experiment with different
brushes if you want your sketch to have a certain aesthetic. Make sure to put the sketch on its own layer. That way you can color it if needed. Try not to lose yourself in details too much
and rather focus on the overall composition and proportions. When working digitally you can easily mirror
the image, which can quickly expose errors that you might overlook because you get so
used to your drawing in its regular orientation. 4. Use the Liquify and transformation tool
When you spot mistakes after drawing for a bit, there are great tools you can use to
avoid having to draw everything from scratch again. Two of these are the liquify and transform
tools. As I mentioned, you can mirror the sketch
to see any oddities that have gone unnoticed and then use the liquify tool to push and
warp everything to its correct place. I love this tool because you can just play
around with it, because sometimes you are not really sure what exactly is wrong with
your drawing until you see it corrected. A tool like Liquify can also be found in Krita
and Gimp. But another helpful tool that is also included
in Clip Studio Paint is the transform tool. There is a bit of a difference between those
programs but the application is pretty similar and great to use on details. Use a lasso and circle the area you want to
change, the eyes for example. Then use transform to create a grid to warp
the subject to your liking. It’s especially helpful when you want to match
objects to a certain perspective, like for example add posters to a wall. An important note though: The liquify or the
transformation tool is best used while you are still in the sketching process because
they lower the quality of the areas you work on. Lines for example often become noticeably
blurry afterwards. With the sketch it usually is no big deal,
since it will most likely disappear later in the process anyway. But if you warp your lineart heavily you might
notice it. 5. Lineart vs. Painting
Something that you should be aware of once you are satisfied with your sketch is that
you can go in basically two different directions from there. You can continue and start working on a lineart
which is often the case with manga or cartoon drawings that have significant lineart. Or you can work in a more painterly manner
for a rendered look. In that case you want to work with areas and
only use the sketch as your guide. If you choose the lineart route you would
first create a new layer on top of your sketch. To set the lineart apart from the sketch in
the process, you can either lower the opacity of the underlying sketch layer or you can
color it. Either way, doing this will help you distinguish
the lineart from the sketch while keeping both visible. Doing the lineart can often be quite exhausting
in my experience. A lot of time is wasted on undoing brush strokes
which you’re trying to match to the underlying sketch. Unfortunately there is no real shortcut around
this, other than for example copying or mirroring single elements to re-use them wherever possible. For drawing Linearts I recommend using Clip
Studio Paint or Paint Tool SAI rather than Photoshop. Clip Studio Paint creates very crisp and sharp,
thin lines that look a lot cleaner compared to the ones you can do in Photoshop for example. After years of using both I always end up
feeling that lineart done in Photoshop comes out more rough, sketchy and shaky. But of course you can use whatever you like
most. When it comes to architecture or other objects
with lots of even, straight lines I can recommend Photoshop. Turn off the pen pressure and hold shift to
connect points with a line easily. If you want to go more into realistic rendering,
just skip the lineart and move on to the next step which is … 6. Creating a base
First we want to create a basic layer that helps us stay inside the lines when we color. One way to do it is using the lasso tool to
trace the outer line of your drawing. This way you make a selection of the inside
that you can then fill on a seperate layer. With a tidy and clean lineart that doesn’t
have any gaps, the magic wand can save you some time. Select the space outside of our drawing and
then invert the selection. This effectively selects the inside of your
lineart. Fill it and you have a solid base layer. Once we have that, we want to make sure we
only paint on the base and not outside of it. For that, you can lock the layer. Now, you can only paint on the parts of that
layer that already have color in them. 7- Clipping layers
If you are scared of making mistakes – like me – and also want to quickly adjust and
change things, make sure to try using clipping layers. For that you need to right click on your layer
and select “Create clipping mask”. Here you can see me being able to paint everywhere. But as soon as I create a clipping mask, everything
outside the area that we defined with our base layer disappears. Only the areas that overlap with the base
layer can now be seen. The rest gets clipped. This is super helpful, because now we only
have to focus on the area inside the line art. Using this technique you can create layers
for the single purposes like hair, skin, eyes, clothes. Basically as many as you like. Just keep in mind that you will quickly increase
the number of layers and navigating hundreds of them can become quite confusing. Anyway, now that we have our base done, we
can start shading. 8. How to use the Color Picker
The color picker is one of the essential tools for digital painting. As I said previously, I recommend assigning
it to a button on your stylus, or at least somewhere easily reachable. The color picker – asits name implies – picks
up the visible color so you can use that as follows. Chose the layer you want to paint on and start
with a shadow tone for example. Now you can hold the key for the Color Picker,
pick up a transition tone, let go of the key and you can immediately keep painting with
your brush. Of course this also works with highlights
or just to keep a consistent color scheme, because you only use colors that are already
present in your painting. 9. Smudging tool is not as bad as it seems
For a long time I despised the smudging tool because it has such a characteristic look
when you try to implement it in your work. But that was because I didn’t know how to
use it properly. The smudge tool actually is pretty versatile. You can use different brushes with it, creating
different effects. You can use it for textures and interesting
transitions. What I love to use it for is to soften edges. For example, I start cel-shading a piece and
then just go over the hard edges to soften them to my liking. The brush isn’t standard with photoshop
as far as I know, but you can easily build such a brush for the smudge tool yourself. Pick the smudge tool and open a regular round
soft brush. Then open the brush settings and set the spacing
to 25% , scatter to 29%, countjitter to 46%, activate transfer and you are done. 10. Layer Blending Styles
Last but not least let’s take a quick look at some of the blending styles for layers
that are worth checking out. Multiply is great when you scanned your traditional
lineart and want to start coloring. Just put your line art on top and set it on
multiply to make the white paper transparent Screen is very helpful to create light effects. For example I took this photo of a sparkler
and set the layer to screen which makes all the black tones transparent. It’s like the negative version of multiply Overlay is best for textures. If you want to give your art a watercolor
look you can use textures and overlay them to add them to your painting Color is useful to change colors on individual
areas and play around with color schemes. Would the ring look better in silver? Create a layer set to “color” and draw
on the area with a grey tone to try it. Last but not least, here is some general advice
on your tools. A bonus tip if you will:
For digital art there are loads of options regarding both software and hardware. From normal drawing tablets to screen tablets,
to tablet computers there is a variety of brands, qualities and prices you can choose
from. I have noticed that a lot of beginning artists
imagine that you can only create good art with a screen tablet but that’s a misconception. Back in 2005 I used a Graphire 4 and Photoshop
Elements that came with it. At that point I only occasionally did digital
art and I wasn’t sure whether I would be doing it much in the future. Not because it was so weird to not look at
the surface you are physically drawing on but simply because learning the program was
actually a lot harder. After using the screenless tablets for about
10 years I eventually figured that I wanted to upgrade to a Cintiq. My advice would be to let the tools grow with
you. Start with a tablet appropriate to your needs
and budget. You don’t want to spend a fortune on a tablet
when you do not see see yourself working with it for a long time. For beginners, I highly recommend starting
with a classic drawing tablet without a screen on it because they are far more affordable
and you won’t hate yourself too much if it starts gathering dust. With practice you will get used to looking
at your computer monitor. After all, you can always see where the cursor
is on screen. Some people actually use games like OSU to
practice their accuracy if they’re not drawing or painting something anyway. For digital art, I think understanding of
the software is often times more crucial for your workflow than whether your drawing tablet
has a screen built in or not. But what do you think. Do you have any experiences with drawing digitally
that you want to share? What was your favourite tip? Let me know in the comments 🙂 By the way, it’s not too late to act on
your New Year’s resolution! If you want to learn a new skill, try out
a new hobby or get deeper knowledge of something you already do then have a look at Skillshare. It’s an online learning community with thousands
of classes on drawing, painting, design and more. A few years ago I wanted to learn bookbinding
and using Skillshare I made one or actually several books by following some of
their classes. My editor Matt is also learning Illustrator
right now by following a class on Skillshare. How is that going for you? Well I’m not good at the whole art thing
but know I understand the software at least 😀 With a Premium Membership you will gain unlimited
access to high-quality classes made by experts in their fields and at $10 a month for an
annual subscription it is also more affordable than most learning platforms out there. But I’ve also got a special offer for you:
By following the link in the video description you can get two months for free. This offer is only available for the first
500 people who sign up using that link so be quick. Alright, if you found these tips helpful please
give this video a like and subscribe for more. Thank you very much for watching and I see
you next time.

ANSWERING QUESTIONS ABOUT MULTIMEDIA ARTS (TIPS AND ADVICES, ENG SUB) | Geraldine Gallardo

ANSWERING QUESTIONS ABOUT MULTIMEDIA ARTS (TIPS AND ADVICES, ENG SUB) | Geraldine Gallardo


It’s not just Photography, Videography, Traditional Arts, for Web, Animation Hey, guys! Good morning! It’s Geraldine and welcome back to my YouTube Channel! Today, it’s not that a lot of people requests But a lot of people are asking and are curious on what are we going to talk about for today and this is about Multimedia Arts so i was shocked because I made a vlog about what we do in Multimedia Arts which is it’s not that accurate on what’s shown on the vlog because it’s just one day in a whole week and a whole term/semester so a lot of people are asking for tips and questions about Multimedia Arts and about Multimedia Arts in Benilde and let’s get started! So guys, in this video, i’m making this because there are people who are asking like i will place the screenshots here because maybe you are also curious and have the same question as theirs there she said “What year are you in?” like that “Any thoughts being a Multimedia Arts student because i am enrolled as an MMA student freshmen college student hehe” there hold on i realized that before we answer the question i’ll explain what Multimedia arts is on why i became a Multimedia Artist okay, we’ll have a story time first it’s just short Why did i took up Multimedia Arts? because if you’ve watched my past videos in the “Facts about me” video i said that i liked Photoshop like that since grade school and until high school so when i was in high school, i thought that because this is what i want to do this is where i am happy every time that i will study Math, History even if i really want those subjects in high school when i study, i get stressed at some point then when i edit, it’s where i destress that’s what i feel when i was in high school so, my sister she’s studying in Benilde that time now, she graduated she had classmates who took up Multimedia Arts so, i searched about Multimedia Arts and i didn’t had any idea what i know is that they use Photoshop and they edit that time there’s no vlogs about MMA that’s why, you know, i had no one to ask to on what Multimedia Arts is and what they do what i did was i enrolled MMA because i’m happy with editing i’m happy with editing videos even if my skills were basic and guys here’s the catch, i was not informed that there is traditional arts in MMA so guys if you’re going to take up MMA, there’s traditional arts and if you know how to do traditional arts like drawing, painting sculpting, it’s good for you because you have advantage i’m not saying that people who don’t know traditional arts, cannot take up MMA what i’m saying is you have advantage but if you don’t know traditional arts, it’s also good because you will learn a lot about traditional arts when you enroll in MMA because MMA is not just digital it’s also about traditional and combining different kinds of media, that’s why it’s called Multimedia arts and that’s it and i learned a lot being a student of Multimedia Arts because now i am almost graduating and doing my thesis i just realized that in everything that i learned everything is combined in our thesis and i enjoyed in MMA even if in what i do, i make the stress as a good thing like in a positive thing it’s not when i get stressed i say “I give up” guys that’s my tip #1 Don’t give up because when you are a Multimedia Arts student you will do a lot of stuff, in different kinds it’s not just photography, videography traditional arts, for web, animation it’s combined, guys because when you take up Multimedia Arts it’s “MULTI” that’s why it’s “MULTI” right? so that’s my tip #1 “Don’t give up” so that’s my answer to the first question who DMed me on my Instagram that’s my thoughts being a Multimedia Arts student and my advice for a freshmen student of Multimedia Arts in any school and this one, somebody asked me on my Facebook Page this was also my problem because mostly who will enter now right now “now right now” mostly who will enter college are K to 12 students i was part of the old curriculum so i have no idea about K to 12 like the strands STEM and stuff so here’s what he said there i’ll give you a shoutout Ren Gabriel Lucas Buluran Hi he said that “I watched you on Youtube” WOW there are people who watches my vlogs “I was looking for an MMA student of CSB so that i can ask regarding MMA because i am a graduating student of Senior High School this year and i will take up MMA in Benilde.” there when we talked he said that his case is complicated because his strand in senior high is Home Economics then he wants to take up MMA but he already has a background, in his junior high school days but what i know is the strands in senior high about Arts and Design, only a few schools offer this i talked to a friend, a churchmate, she told me that her strand in senior high is the same as what she’s taking up in college it’s related but what she already studied in senior high, was not credited on college so there’s not much difference my advice for you is you go in Benilde and ask them if the subjects on your senior high will be credited and also you can ask your guidance office on your high school here is Zachary Valerio she said “Hi currently watching your vlog about MMA,” wow thank you so much for watching “Can i ask you for some questions?” in this one, her question is a bit long but her point is she was asking for tips on being an MMA student so it’s just the same as what i have said a while ago you will learn a lot in college because even me, i had no idea about animation and in traditional media i had little knowledge about web and super i was amazed because i learned all of it and i am happy in what i do when you are happy in what you do, it follows everything that you do you are happy, it’s like you are not studying like my tips are first, don’t give up and don’t think that MMA is all about photography and videography because no, that’s very wrong it’s MULTImedia arts, MULTImedia so there’s drawing, painting, sculpting you will use almost all of the Adobe softwares Multimedia Arts is a SUPER COMBO it’s like it’s not just about arts it also has business we have marketing, branding and advertising you will learn a lot in MMA because it’s like the WHOLE PACKAGE guys, i don’t know what i will post first this MMA vlog or the haul that i shot a while ago if you guys want to know the details about of what i’m wearing right now this shirt and the earrings watch out for the haul video because i have a lot of vlogs i have a lot of vlogs to upload so watch out for it thank you so much for watching this vlog guys thank you, thank you so much i really don’t expect that there are people who are watching my videos please, thank you so much, really, thank you so much subscribe to my channel if you guys want to see more of my videos, more of me, more of my experiences, my travels, my hauls and all of that facebook page, instagram, and twitter OH! I decided on what to call all of you you’re #Dindirindins i feel like it’s the right name for you thank you, thank you so much for watching guys, don’t forget to be a blessing to other people God bless everyone! Bye!

Jack Whitten: An Artist’s Life | Art21 “Extended Play”

Jack Whitten: An Artist’s Life | Art21 “Extended Play”


[sound of tools being sharpened] [“Jack Whitten: An Artist’s Life”] Now I find myself doing a type of painting
where my hand doesn’t touch it. This is an adaptation of the artist’s palette. Okay. About ready to go. Each one of these carries information– it’s compressed into each one– because it relates so much to
what’s happening with modern technology. You know, bytes of information.
Bits. That kind of a thing. I can build anything I want to build. I’m not a narrative painter. I don’t do the idea, or the painting
being the illustration of an idea, I don’t do that. It’s all about the materiality of the paint. I grew up in Bessemer, Alabama. Everything was segregated–
transportation, the buses. What I call American apartheid. I always did art.
I always did painting since I was a kid. But it was not encouraged, the theory being that it’s good for a hobby,
but you couldn’t make a living out of it. Lucky for me, I graduated with good grades. I went to Tuskegee. The idea was for me to be a doctor
in the U.S. Air Force and a pilot. It was always in the back of my mind
that I was an artist. That’s what I wanted to do,
I wanted to do artwork. Tuskegee did not have an art program, so I left Tuskegee to study art at Southern
University. And that went well, for a while, but I got involved politically with the demonstrations. We organized a big civil rights march
that went from downtown Baton Rouge to the state office building. It was that march, what I experienced,
is what drove me out of the South. After that march,
which turned vicious and violent, that politically changed me forever. The fall of 1960,
I took a Greyhound bus from New Orleans to take the test at Cooper Union. And I was accepted. I studied art–painting. It was a good thing
and it was tuition-free. When I came to New York,
some of the first people I met was Romare Bearden, Norman Lewis, and Jacob Lawrence. And in 1960 in New York City,
the scene was open. Bill de Kooning would talk to you! I had a dialogue,
what I call, on both sides of the divide. I don’t make a distinction between
there being Black, White, and whatever. I really don’t. If they’ve got information
and my instincts tell me, “Boy, you got to meet that person”– “You got to find out what they’re doing,”
“you have to understand this stuff”– I’d reach out. The young artist has to
have something to react to. My first influence was Arshile Gorky. Nobody springs forth from the head of Zeus! That was my first influence. Early surrealism. Figurative expressionism. It wasn’t until the end of the ’60s, though,
that I made a drastic change toward more conceptual ideas
that dealt with the materiality of paint. I removed all the spectrum color. Made a big move to acrylic. Restructured the studio. Restructured my thinking about painting. I built a tool. I called it “the developer.” With that tool, I could move large bodies of acrylic paint
across the surface of the canvas. I call them “slab” paintings.
S-L-A-B. It became a slab. I wanted a painting to exist as a single line– one gesture, three seconds. That’s why I built that big tool. I spent ten years working on that drawing
board. Ten years bent over, stooped down. I can’t do that no more. There comes a time when the body
will not accept that type of abuse– and it was abuse. The slab is what led me into the tesserae. It’s a chunk of acrylic that has been cut
from a large slab of acrylic. My interest, of course, is always about
how I can use it to direct the light. So with these surfaces,
depending on how I place them, I can direct the light. You see how it changes? That painting came out of a lot of pain. I started that painting
and then I developed a serious illness. I spent a month in the hospital. So that knocked me on my ass. And that painting was a way of hitting back. [LAUGHS] I’m not going to let this shit defeat me,
you know? It’s one of the “Black Monoliths.” It’s called,
“Six Kinky Strings: For Chuck Berry.” And that title comes from the fact that, anybody who knows about the personality
of Chuck Berry, he did some weird shit. The “Black Monolith” is a series of paintings that
I’ve been doing for a number of years, though. It started back in the early ’80s. It’s a Black person who has
contributed a lot to society. So I make it my business
to memorialize those people. And I find that each one,
I have to locate the essence of that person. That person becomes a symbol and I build that into the paint. I want to be remembered
as a very average guy who pretty much stays to himself. [LAUGHS] Dedicated worker.
But on top of that… The question was asked to Count Basie once, he says, “I just want to go down as
one of the boys.” There was a kind of a modesty in that
that I’ve always admired. Nothing big,
just one of the boys. I like that. [“Quantum Wall, VIII (For Arshile Gorky, My
First Love In Painting)”] [Jack Whitten (1939–2018), In Memoriam]

Pixel Painting: Dollightful 2018 Banner Art SO MANY CHARACTERS

Pixel Painting: Dollightful 2018 Banner Art SO MANY CHARACTERS


Annyeong! Welcome to Dollightful. It’s been a while since I made a digital illustration, and it’s also been a while since I created my first channel artwork. I still like that painting but I feel I can do better now. So it’s time for something new! I start off with a very rough sketch just placing the characters around generally where I want them. On a new layer above the rough draft I fine-tune the line work for more clarity and definition. I don’t bother making the line work perfect because I’ll paint over most of it anyway. I treat digital painting a lot like regular painting which is why I tend to use very few layers.. I would definitely have arranged things differently if it was a normal drawing but the banner rules make it kind of tricky. Because it’s going to be a banner and appear in different aspect ratios on different devices, the most important stuff has to be in the center. So just like last time it’s got this kind of weird composition. With the lines all in place I zoom out to the full picture and rough in the colors on a layer underneath my lines. Hopefully it’s obvious, but I’m going for a super colorful almost rainbow spectrum color palette. It’s a big, complicated, loud composition and I want the colors to accentuate that, might as well roll with it, right? With the colors in place, it’s time to start painting on top or rendering each character one by one. I started with my own face or I guess more accurately Mini Katherine’s face. The lines looked cute, but as I painted on top the expression became kind of crazy-looking? I’ve said it before in other videos, but it seems there’s a fine line between cutely wide-eyed and excited and just plain crazy eyes. I’ll revisit Yandere Katherine again down the line, don’t worry Next up is Eevee! It was hard choosing who to put in the front, but I thought Eevee is a good representation for the entire Eeveelution line of dolls I made. Plus she makes a nice darker colored contrast against Mini Katherine. I also chose to include Nova in the front lineup despite my many troubles with making that doll. I almost decided against even posting her video. She quickly became a fan favorite against all odds. So I guess she deserves more credit than I give her. I feel bad for ragging on her so much in the video now. Maybe it’s because everyone can relate to messing up and getting frustrated with their artwork. I don’t know. Next is little Sherbet Blossom, my first Unicorno custom from my first ever video on the channel. She was in my first channel artwork, too. Macaroon had to be in front too because she’s one of my favorites. And yes, people told me that I meant Macaron in her video. I researched it a little bit and turns out both macaroons and macarons, share a common ancestor if you will, which is why the names are so similar and confusion persists to this day. Pretty interesting actually. So yes, I was thinking of the macaron when I made the doll, but I think it’s too late. Her name is Macaroon. So I’m just perpetuating the confusion in time. Oops And yes, I put a shape over Mini Katherine’s face because I didn’t want her staring at me. We’ll just keep it on for a while longer. Next is Charlotte Copperchain, which was the doll I made for Anastasia Custom for a swap event. I didn’t think about it during the sketch phase, but the pink on pink colors with Macaroon’s hair looks pretty bad. They want to mold into a single pink blob shape, so I have to separate them somehow. Ayako had to be prominently displayed too of course. Sometimes I get asked what my favorite doll is among the customs I’ve made and that’s a hard question because it changes a lot. I think right now as I record this my faves are Ayako and Macaroon. Although I’m really fond of my Mermaid Cora as well. Hopefully, it comes across with the characters I created but I love making dolls in a variety of styles. I try to have a large scope with my artwork because I’ve never been the type to limit myself to one thing. Variety is the spice of life, as they say. Of course there are artists who do the opposite. I know many talented artists who study and perfect one type of face to the point where it’s the most beautiful thing in existence. I could never do that. I think I’m way too experimental and I always want to look at something new. I’m interested to hear how you guys approach your artwork. Are you an all over the place jack-of-all-trades type of artist or perfectionist of a specific niche? Or something else. I really would like to know. That’s what makes artistic expressions so incredible, because it’s as varied as there are types of people in the world. Sorry, may have gone off on amusing there. That’s why I write scripts for my videos. I had to pose Ty in a way that shows off his mechanical arm. I tried to use rougher brushes and more texture on his character to make him appear rugged and masculine. Although he’s still surrounded by poofy pink dolls, so what can you do? Peeking out from Ty’s mohawk we have my tiny Christmas angel doll accompanied by the mini Unicornos which were both sweets themed. I was just bragging about how I love variety, but I do admit I come back to sweets as a topic fairly often, don’t I? I thought it’d be funny to have Xerneas in the back, clearly way too big to fit in the photo with everybody else. Maybe not even sure what’s going on. Vaporeon and Jolteon made it in and Flareon does too although I add her at the end. That way Eevee and the original three Eeveelutions were all together which felt right. He’s probably keeping an eye on me, or wondering like him and Ty are the only dudes in the photo. Cupcake is another fave of mine and of course she’s sweets theme. I thought her character would be the type to really ham it up and pose all cutesy-like with the heart arms. Kind of like me in real life. Cora is jumping up in the background here presumably out of water, but who really knows? If it looks good in the composition, it doesn’t have to make complete sense, right? Because she has brightly colored three toned hair, it gets a little confusing with the fins because they are also the same color. I pull out the fin’s edges later on but decided to leave the hair as sort of abstract blocks of color. She’s in the background anyway, I didn’t think it had to be really clear. I really wanted Khairin in this photo because this doll reminds me of my mom, so she’s cheering me on back there. Once again, we have a similar color issue like with the pink, so I’ll have to separate these shapes somehow. I did some environment/background artwork for a game called Skyhook a couple years ago and it called for a lot of ice and crystalline structures. I drew so many crystals that I got pretty good at it. So it’s basically all thanks to that job I can whip up sparkly gems fairly easily now. Just goes to show drilling something you’re weak at helps you improve. Because there weren’t enough characters, I popped my most recent stock box series doll way up at the top. A couple more characters even made it in at the last minute after her, but I wasn’t recording because I swear I was almost done. You guys know that feeling you’re like, “Okay, it’s done now,” and then 10 to 20 more things come to your attention. Then you’re like, “Okay, seriously, it’s done.” The last thing I want to show you before we call it finished is a nice trick with the layer blending modes. I often struggle with color and tend to make each separate object its own separate color, which isn’t great for painting. I want more gradients of colors within the clothing, skin tones, hair, etcetera. So I paint all sorts of blue and purple shadow colors onto a separate layer and then set it to color. See how much more wholesome and interconnected the painting looks with that? Ideally I could think to paint it this way the first time, but it’s a handy tool to have. I also painted on highlighting in certain places which I felt could use more separation, like the similarly colored characters and also to make the gems appear more glowy glowy. Because you can never have too much sparkle. I considered foreground sprinkles or maybe flowers but nah. It’s already a complicated image it didn’t need it. And with that this massive illustration is done. Obviously it’s sped up but if we total the original footage’s time it took me about 14 hours. That’s double my usual for a digital painting, wow. There were so many characters. This digital painting will be available for purchase on my Society 6 store if you’d like to own it in any way shape and form. Or if you just like to use the digital file for personal use like desktop wallpaper. I’ve included a link to that below in the description box as well. I wanted this drawing to be packed full of characters that represent Dollightful of course. But I also hope it makes you feel happy and welcomed, and that you’re going to have lots of fun here together with everybody. That is what I tried to depict in this painting, and that’s also how I hope you feel when you watch a Dollightful video. So, thank you so much for watching and stay artsy! Annyeong!

How to get started with digital art

How to get started with digital art


– I started doing web comics about eight years ago and my style now is
almost unrecognizable from what it used to be. I drew with a ball point pen on paper, scanned it and it looked like this. Then I started drawing digitally and it changed everything. There’s a ton of options out there and with the right tools anyone can learn how to do digital art. So this is my main set up and this is just a standard, entry
level Wacom bamboo tablet that you just plug into a laptop with a USB cable. And I’ve had this for a few years and it has never given
me any issues considering how badly I treat it. Wacom sells a ton of different models ranging in price but the
new 80 dollar Intuos should have more than enough features for anyone just starting out. I recently got a nine
point seven inch Ipad Pro and Apple pencil. Mainly so I can work while I’m traveling but really I just use it to draw in bed. I do wish I went slightly bigger but it’s not a deal breaker. A lot of artists say that 10.5
inch is like the perfect size ’cause it makes all the
toolbars accessible. But I think this works
just fine for me and also the new 329 dollar Ipad
works with the Apple pencil so it makes portable drawing more affordable than ever. If you don’t want to spend 99 dollars on an apple pencil or you’re
older ipad doesn’t support it keep in mind there are other
stylus options out there. You just have to look for
features like pressure sensitivity, palm rejection, tilt support, maybe some short cut buttons. And this will make the move to digital feel a lot more natural. Let’s take a step back and talk
about the basics of drawing. To draw this bubble head of Will our art director, start
with a rough sketch laying out the proportions
with simple shapes. His head is an oval, his body is more or a rectangular oval and his arms and legs
are like thick noodles. Then I’ll go back and
add details like his eyes connecting the ovals
with more precise lines. Now you can start the inking layer. This is basically going over
the rough sketch in a more precise way and you have to be a little bit more careful here as this is the final version of the drawing that you’ll color in. For me the biggest
advantage of digital art is the ability to work in layers. Think of it like drawing on tracing paper. Layer allow you to stack the many parts of your image on different levels to form the whole drawing
which makes editing the final image easier. So once I have the full
outline of what I’m drawing, I just fill in the colors
on another layer underneath and for shading I’ll
add a layer over that. Shading can be daunting but
it’s pretty easy if you think about light in the physical world. First decide where your light source’s coming from and use that as
your guide to determine which parts are the shadows and which parts will be the highlights. So for the shadows I take a black brush which allordo passe to darken one side of the drawing and
highlight the other side in white where the light
is hitting the subject. The end result is this
lovely drawing of Will drawn in four separate layers. If you’re concerned about how drawing on glass might affect you, you can always look into
matte screen protectors that will mimic the feeling
of drawing on paper. I tried one out from a
company called Paper Like and it really helped bring
some resistance to drawing on the ipad. So once you have
all your tools we’re gonna move on to software. On my MacBook I like to use software like Adobe Photoshop but on the ipad I use Clip Studio Paint because
it’s most like a desktop app. There’s all these other drawing apps on the ipad like Procreate or Adobe Draw but these apps kind of
have a learning curve because you have to learn
each app’s gesture controls like double tapping to undo. If you’re not happy with any of these apps there’s
always other options. There’s software like
Astropad or Duet Display that lets you connect your ipad to a computer so you can use it as a second display. And if you’re in the market for a new laptop altogether there’s always two in one devices like
the Microsoft Surface Pro so everything’s on there. You can use the desk
top version of Photoshop and there’s no transferring of files like you would have with an ipad. Since I’m most comfortable
with the Macos interface, using a Wacom tablet
just make sense for me. If you’re in a position
where you’re trying to decide what’s best for you. Think more about the apps you want to use and for what purpose. But ultimately, making art is a personal experience so play around and find
your favorite options. Thanks for watching, this is from my new series work flow and for more tips on how to incorporate tech into your life check out Youtube.com/the verge.

Photoshop Paint Over Photo PART 1 – Anime Background Bus Stop Scene

Photoshop Paint Over Photo PART 1 – Anime Background Bus Stop Scene


Copy and paste photo into a new Photoshop document. CTRL-T to scale the photo to fit into the new document. I am cropping and re-frame the photo slightly as well. Press ENTER to confirm the scale transform. Delete the default Background layer. Choose the hard edge round brush for both brush and eraser mode. I duplicate the photo layer to have a backup in case I make any mistake. Add layer mask for the photo layer Start masking the bus stop using the mask layer. Black colour is transparent, white colour is opaque (not transparent) Hold down SHIFT to draw or erase in straight line. Use polygonal lasso tool to quickly select a large area and mask them. Duplicate a photo layer again, so I can use it to mask the fence. Fill the mask with black colour to hide everything. Lower down opacity of photo layer, so I can use it as a guide for masking the fence. Start painting the mask layer with white colour to reveal the fence. Duplicate another photo layer again. This time I am using it for the tree trunk on the right. I noticed I made a mistake earlier, I am not using black colour but a dark grey for the mask. This result in a semi transparent mask which show the faded background. A quick way to fix it is to adjust the contrast of the mask. I am using Level adjustment (CTRL-L) for this adjustment. Refining the mask for the tree trunk. Delete the mask when everything is done. After the masking task is done. I proceed to apply colour adjustment for th I added a Vibrance adjustment to increase overall vibrance and saturation. Then I addded a Level adjustment to adjust the value and contrast. Lastly, a Curve adjustment is used. Select Blue channel and increase blue in Shadow area. Select Green channel and increase a bit of green in Shadow area. Select Red channel and increase red in Highlight area. These adjustment let us have dark cyan shadow and warm color at bright area. Rearranging the adjustment layers and double checking the colours. Duplicate the adjustment layers. Applying adjustments to all the layers by merging them (CTRL-E) Organizing the layers into folders. Double checking the colours again. Add a new layer for paint over as I don’t want to paint on the photo layer. Painting over the photo. Press ALT while in brush mode to use Eyedropper tool to colour pick. Removing the unwanted stuff on the road by painting over them. Removing this plastic beg by painting over them. Painting a line near the edge using a lighter colour. Erasing part of the painted line with a soft edge brush. Painting a lighter colour line along the edge. Painting a line along the edge. Painting bevel line Painting over the roof tiles. Mainly just adding the bevel line. Press R to rotate canvas. Painting some line on the side path. Using cold colour to paint the shade side of tree trunk. Using warm colour to paint the bright area of tree trunk. Painting grass with custom grass brush. Painting some bigger grass. Adding some varieties to the grass. Painting tree leaves with custom leaves brush. Decided to use another leaves brush. Move the leaves layer behind the tree trunk layer. Paint some light blue colour on the leaves layer behind the tree to brighten them. Use clipping mask to mask the bright colour so it only show on the leaves layer. Painting the sky colour using soft edge round brush (air brush). Painting brighter strand of grass using hard edge round brush.