How To Spot A Fake Picture | How To Find The Original Source Of Any Image

How To Spot A Fake Picture | How To Find The Original Source Of Any Image


How To Spot A Fake Picture / How To Find The Original Source Of Any Image The quickest way to find the original source is by right-clicking on your image and selecting “Copy image URL.” Go to Google Images (images.google.com). Paste the image URL. Click the camera icon. Paste the URL again. Click “Search for image.” This shows all the places the image has been linked. You can now find the original image and at the bottom it shows “Visually similar images.” You can apply this for any image you find
online. You can now spot fake images. That’s how to find the original source of any image! Thanks for watching. If this helped you please give it a LIKE, or let me know by commenting below, and don’t forget to SUBSCRIBE for more how-to instructional videos!

Making Rolling Stone Magazine Wall Art!


Hey guys, as you can see behind me, I’ve got
this beautiful wall of Rolling Stone magazine covers. This is actually an art project that’s been
about a year and a half, two years in the making. I got an idea from a friend who had wallpapered
his entire apartment in Rolling Stone wallpaper. The night that I saw it, I went home and bought
a box of a bunch of Rolling Stones. I’ve had this box sitting in my apartments
and moving with me for years now. When my friend Vindhya came up and visited
me, I decided to just make it a fun art project for the day. She’s super artsy, and so I wanted to leverage
that and just make something that was really interesting to put on my wall besides all
the comforters and random other stuff I have up on my walls that were being used for acoustic
treatment. Up on this wall I have musical artists specifically. Big-name hip-hop artists like Tupac, and Eminem,
Dr. Dre, and people who have been influential to me, along with a bunch of other random
artists. I know Deadmau5 is on there, Bob Dylan’s on
there, Kurt Cobain is on there. All these random people that I’ve really enjoyed
listening to and just have influenced me and my musical style. So I took a lot of footage while we were setting
this thing up and I just cut together a bunch of the footage with a new track that I’ve
been working on and so I hope you guys enjoy it. Run it. Man I need better style. What, what’s wrong with the pajama pants though? Alright guys, well, I hope you enjoyed that. If you did, leave a like, leave a comment
below about what you thought about it, subscribe for more videos with similar content, more
of my music in the future. I’m trying to release more consistently because,
you know, it’s the new year, gotta try to stick to those resolutions. I’ll see you guys in the next video.

The Russian October Revolution 1917 I THE GREAT WAR Week 172

The Russian October Revolution 1917 I THE GREAT WAR Week 172


Each episode of this show begins with a hook;
something that hasn’t happened so far in the war, but not today. This week’s episode begins with a hook that
has happened before, in fact, it happened only eight months ago – revolution in Russia. I’m Indy Neidell; welcome to the Great War. Last week, the Central Powers breakthrough
on the Italian front – the Battle of Caporetto – continued, with the Italians retreating
all week and the Germans and Austrians taking prisoners in the hundreds of thousands. ANZAC mounted infantry performed brilliantly
as the Ottomans were defeated at Beersheba, the Canadians advanced slightly at Passchendaele,
taking heavy casualties; the British government announced its support for a National Home
for Jews in Palestine, and there was ominous unrest in Petrograd. And as this week unfolded, that unrest grew
and exploded. On the 3rd, German and Russian soldiers fraternize
on northern front. On the 5th, Prime Minister and Minister of
War Alexander Kerensky ordered troops outside the city that he believed were loyal to him
to enter the city to quell revolutionary activity, but on the 6th they declined to do so. That evening, the Bolsheviks occupied the
railway stations, the bridges over the Neva River, the state bank, and the telephone exchange. On the 7th, more than 18,000 Bolsheviks surrounded
the Provisional Government Ministers who had holed up in the Winter Palace, and who were
defended by fewer than 1,000 people. More than 13,000 sailors from Kronstadt had
arrived in the city, dedicated to revolution. That evening the cruiser Aurora, anchored
in the Neva, announced that it would fire on the Winter Palace and fired blank charges
to show it was serious. By 0100, the Bolsheviks had overrun the palace
and scattered the defenders. On the 8th, Lenin proclaimed a new government
– the Council of People’s Commissars. Lenin was elected the Chairman of the Council,
and was now nominally ruler of the capital city. Leon Trotsky became Commissar for Foreign
Affairs. This was the October Revolution – we’re
still in October by the Russian calendar then in use. The first government decree that day was the
decree of peace, which Lenin read out in the evening to an ecstatic crowd. On the 9th, Trotsky asked his ministry to
translate it into foreign languages for immediate distribution abroad, but 100 officials loyal
to either the Tsar or the Provisional Government, walked out. On the 10th, 4 million copies will be sent
to the front, calling for an end to the fighting. One thing here, this new “government”
did not have support of the moderate Socialist Revolutionaries nor the Mensheviks in the
Petrograd Soviet, and it had not been ratified by any Constituent Assembly. Until that could happen, it would be run by
a series of ad hoc committees with no political legitimacy. As the week ended, it was still great turmoil
in Petrograd and Moscow, since nobody had any idea how this was going to play out. There were a couple of things, though, that
were playing out this week in Italy – Caporetto and Cadorna. Italian army Chief of Staff Luigi Cadorna
had played very little part in the battle. He hadn’t actually thought there would even
be one once the snow had arrived in the Julian Alps at the beginning of October so he’d
taken a two-week vacation to Torino. Even when he returned he still didn’t listen
to the rumors about an impending offensive, and that offensive had turned into a rout. And the fighting was still going on. On the 5th, the Germans crossed the Tagliamento
and the Italians were again on the retreat. On the 8th, the Germans were pushing the Italians
toward the Piave River and that day outflanked 17,000 Italians, who surrendered. The same day, Austrian troops coming down
from the Dolomites and Julian Alps occupied Vittorio Veneto, just 55km from Venice. In ten days, the Italian retreat from Caporetto
had been 100km, but at the end of the week, the Italians were established behind the Piave. King Vittorio Emanuele, who was technically
in charge of the army called a meeting of the leaders of the Western Allies for November
5th at Rapallo to try to deal with Italy’s precarious situation. Cadorna didn’t bother attending, and sent
General Carlo Porro instead. At the conference, Porro claimed the Germans
had attacked with 35 divisions, not the seven they actually had attacked with. The Italians asked French and British Prime
Ministers Paul Painlevé and David Lloyd George for 15 British and French divisions to be
sent at once. The British sent in 5 artillery and infantry
divisions and the French 6 (Caporetto). The King was now furious with Cadorna and
called for another meeting the 8th. In English he told those assembled that the
responsibility for the Caporetto disaster lay with the Italian generals, and he called
for the resignation of Cadorna and Luigi Capello. Now Cadorna grew furious and blamed everyone
but himself. He refused to resign. The king fired him. The general consensus was that the Duke of
Aosta, who was still undefeated, should replace Cadorna, but the king didn’t want to appoint
a cousin, so he appointed General Armando Diaz as new Chief of Staff. Diaz was a lot different from Cadorna. He was from the south – from Naples – and
was of Spanish descent. He had originally been an artillery officer,
though he’d spent the bulk of two decades in Rome as a staff officer. As a younger man, he had seen action in Libya,
where he’d been wounded and decorated, and in the World War he’d risen quickly through
the ranks, commanding infantry regiments on the Carso. He became a Corps commander in April this
year and his Corps was the only one to gain ground in the 10th and 11th battles of the
Isonzo River. Unlike Cadorna, Diaz cared deeply for the
welfare of his men and was concerned with keeping casualties as low as possible. His jobs now were to rebuild the Italian army
and hold the Piave line. Also at the conference, the Allies decided
on the creation of a Supreme Allied War Council for the western front. This was to be a body charged with constantly
surveying the field of operations as a whole, and from the information gathered, coordinating
the plans of the different general staffs. There was a breakthrough on another front
that also continued this week – the Palestine Front. Following the capture of Beersheba, Gaza now
fell after a massive bombardment from ten British and French naval vessels off the coast. A German sub managed to sink two of them. A combined infantry and mounted assault then
hit the city, and in minutes overwhelmed the defenses that Kress von Kressenstein had spent
the year building. This whole campaign featured more and more
cavalry and mounted infantry charges, used for their shock value, then culminating in
hand to hand combat. On the 8th, for example, the Warwickshire
and Worcestershire Yeomanry charged Turkish positions at Huj that were supported by machine
guns and artillery. “A whole heap of men and horses went down
20 or 30 yards from the muzzles of the guns. The squadron broke into a few scattered horsemen
at the guns and then seemed to melt away completely… I had the impression I was the only man alive. I was amazed to discover we were the victors.” – Lieutenant Wilfred Mercer. They then turned the captured machine guns
on the fleeing enemy. Any way you slice it, cavalry overrunning
machine guns is a serious achievement, but cavalry’s main advantage was that it could
provoke total panic on breaking through. However, in spite of British General Edmund
Allenby’s success, the Ottomans repeatedly escaped encirclement and withdrew to fight
again. And the Canadians were fighting again as well,
on the Western Front at Passchendaele. The assault November 6th was, in fact, to
be an all-Canadian one. In all the other sectors only artillery would
engage. Two Canadian Divisions attacked at 0600 – General
Arthur Currie was going for speed and surprise, and after just two minutes of shelling, the
creeping barrage began. The infantry had already crawled into no-mans
land in the dark and thus avoided the German artillery that now fell on their trenches. By 0745, two battalions of the 1st Division
were already 1km from their assault trenches. The 2nd division had taken Passchendaele itself
by 0740, “a pile of bricks with the ruin of a church, a mass of slaughtered masonry
and nothing else left on this shell-swept height.” The men could see in the distance across the
far end of the remains of the village, a land of tall trees and green fields, with undamaged
houses and unmarked fields, an incredible contrast to the battlefield. Canadian troops drove the Germans off enough
of Passchendaele Ridge for British Army Commander Sir Douglas Haig to claim victory. The price of this little victory was almost
exactly what Currie had predicted a couple weeks ago for it – 16,000 men. And the week ends, with a new Italian Commander
trying to stem the tide, British success in Palestine, Canadian success at a heavy cost
at Passchendaele, a Supreme war Council formed, oh! And Austrian General Svetozar Borojevic von
Bojna is promoted to Field Marshal. And there was another revolution in Russia. But you know what? This Bolshevik coup, for that’s what it
is at the moment, was not the heroic rise of the workers you find in Russian histories,
it was “…the exhausted capitulation of Kerensky’s moribund and virtually defenseless
government.” Seriously. The under-1,000-people I mentioned that were
guarding his government at the winter palace? It was made up of teenaged cadets, a bicycle
squad, two companies of Cossacks, and 135 wom n from a Women’s Death battalion who
expected to fight Germans at the front and had no desire to defend Kerensky’s government. That was it. Against tens of thousands of Bolshevik Red
Guards and revolutionary sailors. At least, though, there wasn’t a great deal
of blood. For now. If you want to learn more about Russia before
the revolution, you can click right here to watch our special episode about that. Our Patreon supporter of the week is Ninip
Lazar – thank you for your ongoing support on Patreon which makes this show what it is
today. Don’t forget to subscribe, see you next
time.

The Battle of Jutland – Royal Navy vs. German Imperial Navy I THE GREAT WAR Week 97

The Battle of Jutland – Royal Navy vs. German Imperial Navy I THE GREAT WAR Week 97


Since the beginning of the war, the two most
powerful navies in the world had failed to decisively engage, the British navy instead
blockading the Germans to deprive them of supplies, the Germans harassing international
shipping with U-boats, but that changes this week when mighty ships clash. 100 years ago
this week was the Battle of Jutland. I’m Indy Neidell; welcome to the Great War. Last week at Verdun the French tried and failed
to retake Fort Douaumont, even though they had managed to achieve air superiority there
and the Austro-Hungarian Imperial Army continued its advance in Italy in the Trentino Offensive. I’ll look there first today, as that offensive
continued this week. Now, within two weeks of the initial attack
Italian Army Chief of Staff Luigi Cadorna had managed to get a new army of 180,000 men
to the Trentino and the Italian Fifth Army would guard the valley mouths, hopefully to
prevent the Austrians from spilling out onto the plains of Veneto, but this week the Austrians
took Arsiero, just a few kilometers from the plains. Asiago soon fell as well, and Cadorna
exploded heads in the government by saying that if enemy pressure continued, he would
order a full-scale retreat almost to Venice. 30,000 Italian prisoners had been taken so
far. The week also saw some action on the Western
Front. The endless meat grinder at Verdun was still
in full force, but further north at Ypres, the Battle of Mont Sorrel- in older sources
sometimes even called the Third Battle of Ypres- began on June 2nd and saw two German
attacks that penetrated the British lines 700m on a 3km front. The road to Ypres was
now open and undefended. The real news this week, though, was at sea. Both the British and German fleets were by
this time becoming more aggressive. Commander of the British Fleet Sir John Jellicoe wanted
to trap the German High Seas Fleet and his opposite number Reinhard Scheer was trying
to force a mistake. Scheer sent his fleet into the Skagerrak to attack any British light
forces and shipping there, but the 16 German battleships and 6 pre-dreadnoughts, 5 battlecruisers,
11 light cruisers, and 63 destroyers also wanted to come into contact with the British
Grand Fleet, hoping to break it, and the naval blockade of Germany. However, aided by the intelligence operatives
of Room 40 who decoded German wireless signals, Jellicoe was forewarned and sent out his fleet,
but the British were, in fact, heading into a trap. There was nearly a score of U-boats
waiting for them. But Scheer would be disappointed since the ocean is big and the Grand Fleet,
28 British battleships, 9 battle cruisers, 34 light and armored cruisers, and 78 destroyers,
passed them unobserved. The Battle of Jutland would bring four leading
admirals’ skills into play – Scheer and Franz Hipper for the Germans, Jellicoe and
Sir David Beatty for the British. The enemies made contact when both sides went to check
out a merchant ship that happened to be sailing right between the fleets. Firing between cruisers
kicked off at 14:28 May 31st, 1916, and the Battle of Jutland had begun. Hipper and his battle cruisers headed south,
trying to draw Beatty in to Scheer’s main fleet, still unseen. Beatty followed, aboard
his flagship, the Lion. Fire opened between them at 15:48. The Lion was hit and burst
into flames, and would’ve sunk if the magazine hadn’t flooded and put out the fire. The
British Indefatigable was hit by two 11-inch shells from the German Von der Tann that blew
up the whole ship and killed all except two of the ship’s 1,019 sailors. Then the Queen
Mary was hit and blew to pieces. 1,266 men were killed. Beatty seemed unmoved, and here’s
the reaction of his flag captain, Alfred Chatfeld (Hart), “I was standing beside Sir David Beatty
and we both turned around in time to see the unpleasant spectacle. The thought of my friends
in her flashed through my mind; I thought also how lucky we had evidently been in the
Lion. Beatty turned to me and said, “there seems to be something wrong with our bloody
ships today! A remark that needed neither comment nor answer. There WAS something wrong!” What was wrong was that the British battlecruiser
armor was not thick enough to handle the German shells, and once a shell had penetrated the
hull, inadequate anti-flash precautions meant that a flash could rip straight down to the
magazine, with terrifying results. No ship on earth could survive explosions like that. Soon Hipper had led Beatty almost into Scheer’s
fleet, but Beatty’s 2nd light Cruiser squadron was scouting ahead and spotted the long line
of German battleships. Beatty actually reacted like lightning, reversing course immediately
and heading back toward the Grand Fleet, and Scheer didn’t realize that every minute
he headed north brought him closer to Jellicoe and his massed ships. Beatty, however, sent Jellicoe no useful reports
about Scheer’s whereabouts, and soon Jellicoe’s starboard column was upon the Germans. The
1st Cruiser Squadron under Rear Admiral Sir Robert Arbuthnot aboard the Defence came under
heavy fire and in a few seconds, the Defence was sent to the bottom of the sea. Soon though,
Jellicoe’s battlecruisers were showering shells upon Hipper’s, and because of the
light and the mist, the Germans couldn’t see them to fire back, but just for a few
moments the mist cleared, and the Germans rained fire on the Invincible. The British
naval maxim that “speed would be our armor” was put to the test and found wanting when
the Invincible exploded at 18:34, only six men survived out of 1,032. But Jellicoe’s dreadnought battleships were
now in a long line blasting the exposed vanguard of the Germans fleet, causing serious damage.
Scheer ordered a turn movement to starboard that the Germans had practiced, where the
rear ship turns first and the successive ships up the line follow suit, and the Germans soon
disappeared from sight. Jellicoe did not follow. He changed course and put himself between
the German fleet and its base at Wilhelmshaven, and when Scheer turned his ships again, they
were again headed directly for the British, and they came under heavy fire. He turned
his battleships away and ordered his battlecruisers to cover the retreat. They took terrible damage;
the kind no British battlecruiser could’ve withstood, but the Germans had better armor
and were better subdivided below into watertight compartments. The Germans got away, but the
Grand Fleet was still between the High Seas Fleet and its port, and when darkness fell,
the question was, could Scheer evade the British by night and return home? Since several of his battlecruisers were near
to sinking, Scheer took the shortest route, via Horns reef, but Jellicoe didn’t know
this and based on his last reports received he thought the Northern Friesian coast route
was the likely German one so Jellicoe headed there, with his destroyer flotillas following
five miles behind to cover the Horns reef channel. So Jellicoe’s destroyers crashed
into the German Fleet, but the British, unlike the Germans, did not have properly shuttered
searchlights, no star shells, and pretty much no nighttime identification signals, so they
were really wary of firing on the black shapes heading toward them in the darkness in case
they were their own ships. Oh, and nobody told Jellicoe, with his mighty dreadnoughts
five miles ahead, what was happening. The British did manage to destroy the pre-dreadnought
Pommern, killing her crew of 844, but the High Seas Fleet swept past the British in
the night. The battered and bruised German battlecruisers,
some even incapable of attack, limped through the British columns, and were sighted several
times, but none of dreadnoughts opened fire on the incredulous Germans. The Grand Fleet
sailed on, preparing for a new battle at dawn that would not happen. Scheer reached Wilhelmshaven
in the early afternoon. The Germans lost one battlecruiser, one pre-dreadnought,
four light cruisers, and five destroyers, the British lost more, three battle cruisers,
three armored cruisers, and eight destroyers. 2,551 German lives were lost, against 6,094
British, and the Kaiser commented that “The spell of Trafalgar is broken”, but here’s
the thing: the German fleet did not again seek out battle with the British fleet and
Scheer wrote to the Kaiser about the battle that real victory could only be achieved by
sending U-boats to sink British merchant ships. So the status quo would continue, which for
Germany actually meant a strategic defeat. And we come to the end of another week, the
Austrians on the move in Italy, the Germans blowing holes in the lines at Ypres, and a
gigantic naval battle in the North Sea. And that battle was a real blow for British
prestige. I’m going to end today with an observation about the press and propaganda
during the war, which we’ve talked about before, but you can really see it in action
this week, as the British Admiralty released one communiqué about the battle, and then
another with a different spin, thanks to Winston Churchill, which painted things a bit rosier.
The upshot of this was scenes like Vera Brittain, in her London hospital, saying (Gilbert p.252),
“Were we celebrating a glorious naval victory or lamenting an ignominious defeat? We hardly
knew: each fresh edition of the newspapers obscured rather than illuminated this really
quite important distinction.” By this point, though, nobody really knew what was going
on anymore. If you’d like to learn a bit more about
wartime propaganda, click here for our special episode about it. Our Patreon supporter of
the week is Todd Zaragoza. If you want to see this show get better and better, please
consider supporting us on Patreon. And if you want to read a fantastic book about the
world war one at sea, go to our Amazon shop and check out Castles of Steel. Don’t forget
to subscribe! See you next time.

DOOM on a Digital Camera from 1998!

DOOM on a Digital Camera from 1998!


[shotgun blasts]
[zombies groaning] – Now that’s what I call
a point and shoot camera. [piano playing, PC bootup sounds] Greetings and welcome to
an LGR thing involving Doom running on devices that
are unusual [laughs]. This is the Kodak Digital
Science DC260 ZOOM Camera released around June of 1998
for an asking price of $999 or around $1577 adjusted for inflation. And on the surface this
was a pretty typical late ’90s camera for consumer market. Kind of a mid, upper mid range, not the best but certainly not cheap. You get a 1.6 megapixel sensor, an auto focusing 3x optical zoom lens and all a bunch of other cool stuff. You know, compact flash,
memory card storage to store your flash pics
and jpeg format photos. And connections all over the place, serial and infrared but also USB. In fact this was one of
the first digital cameras on the consumer space to actually use USB that I can find anyway. But that’s just all camera
stuff we’re not really gonna be looking at that
at least in this video, I might cover it again in
the future just a look at it in terms of how it
performs as a retro camera. But it’s all the stuff
inside and in particular the Digita OS, it’s kind of
this Digital Science thing. But yeah Digita OS is what
it runs and that is something released by FlashPoint Technology in 1997. And this was an initiative
to have the power of a desktop computer without all
the desktop computer stuff. You know just stick
all these image editing and manipulation things
in the camera itself. So end users could do
things like review, edit, and share photos directly
from your camera. But developers could also
develop third party apps that could be installed
to the camera itself. Which is really forward
thinking stuff for the ’90s. I mean good grief downloading
apps to augment your camera, I mean that took years for that kind of thing to be common place. And the reason that is possible is because inside of this thing is actually running a 66
MHz PowerPC NPC 823 CPU, eight megabytes of RAM, and
11 kHz sound input and output. This is kinda like having
an older Macintosh computer, like a Power PC in a digital camera. It’s pretty nuts, like
I have the Macintosh The Power Mac 60100 and it’s
got really similar specs, 66 MHz Power PC CPU and it’s got more RAM ’cause I’ve upgraded it. But I mean yeah it’s capable
of running Power PC stuff under this Digita OS. You combine that with that
sound and the little D-pad here, and the two inch TFT LCD
with 288 x 216 resolution and you’ve got yourself an
interesting little machine here. So of course we gonna install
some software on here, in particular Doom but
also some other things. We’re gonna start with
Doom though because I mean that’s the title of the video so. yeah really all you need
is this camera itself and the normal stuff
that goes a long with it like a compact flash
card and a card reader. These will work with other
DC200 series cameras, not the DC220 really it
doesn’t have enough memory but the others one’s as
well as some other cameras from Minolta, HP, and Pentax, but yeah we’re just gonna
look at this one right here. Really the first thing to
do is just take your CF card plug that into the reader
and then get that going in whatever your computer
system is that has a capability of reading these cards. And then you’ll need some
ZIP files from the developers of this source port of
Doom, or DOOMD as it’s known put together by Jim
Serene and Scott Angel. They also did some other things like MAME and MESS ports to this camera, so I’ll have to try those out later. But yeah we’re just gonna
go with Doom for now. And it’s extremely simple
you just extract the CAM application file into the
system folder on the compact flash card and then you copy
the Doom WAD into the base directly of the card itself and that’s it, the camera will take
care of everything else. So yeah we’ll be trying some
other things in addition to Doom but for now let’s
just get this thing plugged into the wall and powered on. So while this does support
four AA batteries for getting power normally it’s not really optimized for doing so with the LCD turned on, like it’ll last a while if
you’re just using the viewfinder, normal camera stuff but we’re
gonna be playing Doom on here so I’m gonna be plugging in the AC adapter that it came with and
just sort of forgetting the whole battery situation. And that’s pretty much that, we’ll just put it into review mode here, power it on and yeah this’ll be the thing where you normally go into
messing around with your images and whatnot just sort of looking at what’s on the camera of course. Checking out the memory
card and options and things. And yeah this is pretty
much the Digita OS, and it’s all the stuff that you normally do on a digital camera. Including camera to camera
infrared transfers, oh. But anyway this is really what we want, we have the applications
section which is normally unpopulated with anything
but of course we’ve installed Doom so we’re gonna start Doom. And so yeah you just sort of start it up, click the power button really quick and it’ll boot into this application. And it takes a second to load here but you know it’s a digital
camera we can forgive it. And there we go, we’ve got
doom running on a Kodak digital camera from
1998 [laughs joyfully]. Oh yeah I’ll zoom in here a little bit, so the demo is playing
in the background there. I’ve got sound, [gunshots] [demonic groaning] got the volume wheel right there and these buttons are your
enter and escape keys. I believe that’s enter yeah, menu is escape. Bring up the main menu here and yeah I mean you can see it is
just straight up Doom. It’s just a port of Doom, there is no music [groans]
I assume that Kodak didn’t exactly [laughs] worry about like a general MIDI implementation when they designed this thing so that’s fine. Let’s go into new game and
we’re gonna start a game here, knee deep in the dead episode one, ah we’ll do hurt me plenty why not. And well here’s something
that’s kind of weird, I don’t know if you can here this [electronic buzzing] Yeah there’s like a
squeaking sound coming out of the speaker when
nothing else is going on or really just about all the time. I don’t know if that’s like
the capacitors being weird or who knows what, anyway
it’s there can’t really get rid of it I’ve tried. Ah but yeah I mean you
know, here we go we got Doom and we’ve got the little D-pad down here that is perfectly functional, Er [laughs] it’s not great but it works I mean what are you gonna do it’s a digital camera playing Doom. We have got this zoom wheel up here so that does shooting and then
telephoto goes to open things. So we’ll go to the door
here and open this up. Yeah! [gunshots] [groaning] [laughing happily] And you know it actually
runs pretty decently, it’s about on par with
what my Macintosh 60100 is and that makes total sense. I believe this is a map yeah, that opens this, this enables the run mode which is a little too much. We have this here for
switching between weapons. I don’t really have anything
but fists and pistols right now and anyway, yeah. [gunshots] I kind of wish that the shutter button [laughs] was shoot but it’s not, instead you have this over here. I mean it’s fine, it works. [gunshots] Oh, I do wish the D-pad
were a little more purposely directional if that makes sense. It’s kind of vague you’re
just sort of rocking a long this weird center axis. It kind of reminds me of like a Gravis GamePad honestly that’s not a great D-pad either. [laughing] So it’s not a positive reminder, but it is a reminder none the less. [laughing] Mmm I don’t know why this
is so enjoyable to me, man playing Doom on absolutely anything that it doesn’t make sense, makes all the sense in
the world in my opinion. If it plays Doom I want to do it. [relaxing music] All right, yeah let’s
just get out of here. [lever clunking] Yeah, oh yeah photo finish right there. Next level, we’re gonna play through the whole game in this vi– No I’m not [laughs]
just a couple of levels, just to show you what’s up. [gunshots] [death cries] Now that’s what I call a point
and shoot camera [laughs]. I mean it’s a totally
playable version of the game, like it’s way more so than I anticipated when I first learned about
this however many years ago. [laughing] it’s just fun. Here’s where I wanted to go, all right. [gunshots] [demonic moaning] Yeah. Nope, not gonna mess with you sir. And we’re outta here. Nice [laughs]. And there we go that is
Doom on the Kodak DC260 and actually I wanna show a
couple of those other things that it can run like
MAME and MESS but also I am going to stop ruining
my posture and my eyesight and use an AV cable that it comes with, because this allows you to
have composite video output. So, in fact we’ll use this
as little handheld console. A mini MAC kind of
situation, this is [laughs] just so cool, ah yeah let’s hook it up to a TV. Okay I got the camera plugged into the TV [TV powers on, Doom sounds playing] [chuckles] and there you go. [Doom continues doomily] So yeah this should be
a little easier to play since I can just hold the camera down here off screen like a controller. Let’s do, oh yeah that’s
just the shareware WAD, I guess we’ll play knee
deep in the dead again on ultra violence ’cause why not. Squeaky, squeaky. Yeah you can still hear some of that squeaking coming through. [gunshots] [groaning] [screaming] [laughing] Well you know, ‘ultra violence.’ Yeah the controls are still awful but that’s how it is this tiny
little D-pad with like a complete lack of dead zone. It just sort of rocks
around this center mass. If it weren’t for the
absolutely terrible ergonomics of holding this camera I would completely forget this is a camera. I mean this could be like an early 32-bit console or something. Okay well that’s, that [laughs]. It’s no surprise, so we
will quit out of here. And you get some craziness
right here whenever the camera’s power cycling. But yeah we’ll get back to the menu. So I wasn’t able to get MESS working, but I was able to get
MAME or MAMED working, so we’ll do that. MAMED! So this is an absolutely
awesome source port, MAME 0.37 beta six. So I’m gonna switch some of these options to make sure that it’s not
rotating around on you. Because yeah I mean it’s
easy enough to [laughs] rotate the camera in your hands to get the proper vertical kinda gameplay but yeah we’re playing on a
TV we don’t want that. Well let’s try Frogger. Typical MAME start up there, but as you can see it’s a little slow. [electronic tone] [faster electronic tones] [rapid electronic tones] [laughing] I mean it works. Oof. Get about a half second lag everything is just
running abysmally slowly. But that is, that’s what you get man. I mean this is about how MAME would run on that MAC 60100 I have anyway. So, you know. [sad Frogger death] Let’s get out of there. And it’s the same with all of these in terms of everything running slow. So we’ll get Pac-Man going here. You can already tell
it’s a little bit slow [cheeky electronic music] [laughing] So this is the special fart
noise edition of Pac-Man. [electronic beeps] [groans] That’s enough of that. As you can see there
the screen was cut off on the top and bottom as well, and that has to do with
the aspect ratio thing that I was messing around with, the rotation and all that. You can apply some stretching, or resolution scaling and whatnot, but it really doesn’t like doing that. And then some games like Galaga here, they just don’t run at all. In fact it freezes the whole camera every time I try to run it. Now that may just be an emulator issue. It’s tricky to get this thing configured when all you’re looking
at is what’s on here. And all of the things that
you’d wanna switch around with command lines and all
that, ah you can’t really. Unless you do it before you put everything on the memory card, so. But here’s another one that’s on here that I was able to get working. This is called Multi Pac, it really is just Pac-Man using the same ROMs that MAME would but it’s supposedly
optimized for this camera. And well it does kind of, well no I think it runs about the same. And there’s no sound but… So anyway I don’t know why I showed this. Unfortunately all the other
things that I wanted to try like there’s a version of
Boulder Dash and Minesweeper and several other things. They all seem to be
made for like the DC290 and I guess they just don’t work on here. I mean I haven’t been able
to get them working at all. So this is the other thing that I’ve really gotten working is PLAYMP3. Now this is a very simple MP3 player, it doesn’t even have any visuals really. But it does in fact play
MP3 files that you put on the root directory of
the compact flash card. [energetic rock music] [laughing] So I’ve got the, that’s the Andrew Hulshult
LGR theme song remix. So yeah this is just an
absolutely fascinating thing. Like the fact that it
works as well as it does and allows you to run
Doom dang it [laughs]. It’s just way to enjoyable to me. Well I guess that I’ll probably
cover this camera again in some way in the future, just to do more of like a
traditional LGR retrospective. And maybe I can get some of the other cameras in the range to
sort of compare it to, or maybe one of the other
Digita OS compatible cameras. I don’t know, if there’s
anything that you’d like to see let me know and if you enjoyed
this let me know that to. Or if you had any experience messing around with this thing yourself. I don’t know man leave comments. Either way I hope that you
enjoyed this video in general, and as always new one’s
coming out every week here on LGR so stay tuned if you like. And as always thank you
very much for watching LGR.

BETWEEN US | Ep. 3 – Afternoon Delight (a short film series)

BETWEEN US | Ep. 3 – Afternoon Delight (a short film series)


(acoustic guitar plays) Shhhh…. (girl giggles) (door slams into wall) Jeez… (laughter) He’s gonna hear us. Who cares? You sure you want to do this? Mmmm… Yes! Ow! (laughing) What… is this? You broke it! Bad girl. Shut up. Lips… Now… What about a tickle? No. No! No! (playfully) Stop! Shhh! Stop! Shhh! Are you sure you want to do this? What are you laughing at? Huh? It’s been too long. (exhales) Baby screams! Your turn. Bullshit. Bullshit! (baby cries) You’re closer… Look who it is? Hi bud… Hi! Did you have a good nap? (baby giggles) That’s what you get boy! That’s what you get! (baby screams joyfully) (dad screams wildly) We made you. What? You have to do what we– (baby screams) Ow! (baby giggles)