Feather Camera Crane Spotlight – Lite Pro Gear

Feather Camera Crane Spotlight – Lite Pro Gear


My name is Canyon Florey. I’m the designer of the Feather Camera Crane: a portable, lightweight
adventure jib created for easy use in remote places. What separates the Feather Camera Crane from the rest? It is designed to perform in
the dynamic elements that you will encounter when working in the world’s extremes. That
means setting up and flying it on top of snowy mountains, narrow spires, or on the side of
the trail. Another unique attribute of the Feather Camera Crane is its lightweight design. Made
from carbon fiber, the crane breaks down to 28 inches, and weighs only 3.8 pounds. With a 10
foot boom, it has various configuration options for DSLRs and other larger video cameras.
No other jib will give you as much production value in wild and remote places. It was designed to stow in two sections
because we found that having multiple packing options can be very valuable when all of your
gear is going on your back. The boom sleeve was engineered to fit inside your tripod case,
or next to the tripod on your backpack. The rock bag, which is made from the same materials
as your backpack, is small and compact and can be stored in many different ways. This
is the boom protective sleeve, which is made from 5 mm stretch neoprene and has a balanced
carrying strap. Our design philosophy here at Lite Pro Gear centers around innovation. Rethinking new
and creative ways to improved upon current components and materials is what we do best.
You’ll find that these flip locks are much easier and faster to use then rotating locks,
especially when operating in snowy or icy conditions. The tower and other components are anodized
aluminum which is weather and scratch resistant. The mounting screw is secured in a track and
is compatible with either a 1/4″ 20 or 3/8″ screw Another innovative design feature is centers around the rock bag. It doubles as both a hardware bag when transporting your crane, and as the
counterweight bag. Instead of lugging weights around, fill the bag with rocks, water bottles,
snow or sand until the system is balanced. You can also slide standard weight plates
onto the jib handle. You’ll find that the camera is self-leveling as it goes up and
down. You can make adjustments to the front head for versatile camera mounting and visibility
of the LCD screen. We also offer an extension plate for larger cameras. Looking to add cool
additional movements to your shot? Try tilting your fluid head while panning the crane to
take your creativity to the next level. Are you heading to Mt. Everest, Peru, or the Amazon? Or just need a versatile boom
to shoot multiple angles for an event, the Feather Camera Crane has proven itself as
the first choice for working professionals world wide. No other jib weighs so little,
is built as tough, and packs so small. Swooping cinematic landscape shots, revealing opening
shots, push and pull movements, and even short slider moves can all be achieved, and bring
some rad elements to your project. Visit Lite Pro Gear.com for more information and learn
how the Feather Camera Crane can help you create better images.

BUILDING MY FIRST CAMERA TRAP | Camera trap photography – part 2 (With English subtitles)

BUILDING MY FIRST CAMERA TRAP | Camera trap photography – part 2 (With English subtitles)


At the end of the last year it happened when I started with my camera trap photography. It began when Kätu and I found a badger’s den. That’s when I set up my trail camera. Despite the winter Estonia didn’t had almost no snow, that’s why the badgers where surprisingly active. In addition to badger my trail camera captured lynx, raccoon dog and a red fox. The reason why I setup the trail camera was because I wanted to get to no better animals’ activity, therefore I could eventually start building the camera trap and set it up in the future. Hey, today I’m starting with the second part of the camera trap vlog. The reason why I devided this vlog in separaate parts was because I saw that the whole process is quite time-consuming, therefore I’d like to give you already some sort of story while I’m still cathering the last pieces of the whole outcome. The purpose of this second part is to build the camera trap. Most of the things I’m needing to build the camera trap is already arrived.This is the thing I wanted to share with you. Let’s start from the beginning. Here are two flashes. I’m going to build this camera trap with 2 flashes. Here are 2 specific flashes – Nikon SB-28. Which are actually old film camera flashes. The reason why I needed these specific flashes was that these are really good for camera trapping. One of the reason is that these are with a very fast wake-up time. When these are in sleep mode, they are able to flash already at the first photo. A lot of regular flashes are not capable to wake up so quickly. Usually the first photo is a black photo and not before the second photo it won’t flash. In camera trap photography it is super important that the flash would wake up already on the first photo. In addition the flash capacitor doesn’t discharge the charge that often, which means it stays charged for a longer time and it charges less often. Which means the battery life is better. As I said, these are film camera flashes and no store is selling these. One I bought from Japan, through Ebay. And the second one I found in Estonia, someone still had this flash. So much about the flashes. Today I also received another package. As I mentioned, these are Nikon flashes, but I’m going to use Canon’s 60d camera so, Nikon and Canon are not capable to work together, therefore I needed a transmitter and receiver which is custom built. Camtraption is the company who is selling those custom built widgets. As I said, costom built so they would work with Nikon flashes and Canon body. Here I have one 1 transmitter and 2 receivers. The third good new was, that when I was today at the post office I found out that I have a third package waiting for me. Here are those sensors, which I’m going to use to built my DIY motion sensor. Why I’m so surprised is because I knew that these will be delivered not before the end of February. I have no idea why these arrived month before they were actually supposed to arrive. This is a super news, because now we are able to start building the whole thing! So much about the packages that arrived. Now I’m going to Overall, which is the main reseller of Canon products. There is one friend of mine, whose name is Martin. He is a technician there and I asked, if he could help me with building the sensor. Because I’m not competent enough to build a sensor by myself. He has also pointed out some other topics regarding the whole camera trap process. I think that involving him to the project will only be beneficial and will result in the final product. See you in a bit, when I’m already in Overall. We are here in the Overall. In the background you can see Martin is already doing some stuff. At the moment we are going to experiment with different things and hopefully we will start building the sensor. Basically, you have to… if we are looking exactly at the diagram. One will be connected with the red one, and the other one with the white one. It will start melting in a seconds. Let’s put quite a lot of tin. Hold the red cord against it. You can also blow some air, then it dries faster. – It seems like sort of a type of art, who’s able to tin more beautifully. We have spent some time building the sensor. Now it is the moment of truth. Did we do everything correctly or the sensor is not working. – It should be taking photos by now. – Seems like we failed our first try, there seems to be some sort of a problem. It isn’t working as it is supposed to. We spent 2 days building it but with no luck, the sensor didn’t start working. Seems to be another problem. Now it is getting signal constantly. A little update. We have done everything like it is on the paper, but somehow it isn’t working. We have run out of ideas. At the same weekend I headed again to Luhamaa, therefore I took the sensor with me and gave it to my another friend Ats, who kindly suggested that he can also try to fix the problem. Unfortunately he wasn’t also able to find the solution during the weekend. Despite the problem with the sensor I was dealing with some other topics regarding the camera trap. I spent multiple days looking for specific food containers which would fit the flashes. Also I found a perfect case for my camera. Also the finally product that was missing from the whole arrived with the post. I received another package. Now I can say that I have everything I need to build the camera trap. Let’s open it. Let’s have a look what’s inside here. Here is one Magic Arm from Manfrotto. Here are two Super Clamps. And here are two flash sockets. This is the setup I’m using to secure the flashes. I’m needing 2 pair of these, because I have 2 flashes. This is how the setup looks like. Yes, it is possible to do with the easier solution. But I decided that if I’m doing the project then I’m going to do it properly. I didn’t want to start using the Macgyver tape to attach the flashes to the trees. I wanted to use the solution that is able to hold the flashes in position for multiple months. Today is the third time here at Overall. Before we start building everything, I wanted to tell you some good news. Martin told me today that he was finally able to make the sensor work. I’m going to test it in a second. But before I wanted to show you 2 things. when I started with this project I really didn’t had anything, I had to get all the stuff. A new camera, new flashes etc. As funny as it seems, the small things are the ones that have made me the most excited. First thing is a normal food container. I’m going to put the flash inside here. The reason why I’m so happy about the find is because I spent quite a lot of time looking for this specific container, from different stores. I wasn’t able to find this kind of large container with the locking system There were a lot of these kind of food boxes, but they were too small for the flashes to fit inside. Also they were on a sale, so I got these 2 with only 7€. The second thing that makes me really happy is this toolbox. A lot of camera trap photographers are usin similiar box for camera, it is called pelican case, but this costs around 150€. I found this with only 18€. Another magnificent find. If you open it, then you find a foam hidden inside the box. Let’s have a look at this sensor now, because I understood that it is working perfectly. The sensor is really working! If I’m passing the sensor, then the camera is triggered. I’ll turn on the flashes too, then you’ll see how it is really supposed to work. As you can see, it already took a photo. Super awesome! It is working perfectly. Right now we are going to imitate the situation. – Very cool! Maybe you could take on step behind. As you can see, it took the photo immediately. Maybe you could sneak closed like some sort of an animal. As you can see, it still took the photos. So cool! Very cool! Let’s say that our test runs have been successful. It is so cool to see, how all this project is slowly coming together. Now we are going to set this setup in a cold room to test how well are the batteries functioning in the cold. This way we can estimate how long the batteries would last in the field. Therefore we can evaluate if we need some additional power supply or not. Flash boxes are pretty much ready. There isn’t much to do to bee honest. Just made a hole in the cover. I’ll show you the other flash, it is already in the box. That’s how the flashes will be. They are easily accessible this way. The only thing we have to do with flash boxes is to paint these, with a camouflage paint. One week has passed. We are again here in Overall. And now we are going to build the boxes, cut the holes that are necessary and paint everything over. We also made a more interesting light setup today. In order to make a Daniel Schiffer-like b-roll. But let’s get started! This is definitely not the best news. I was able to cut myself pretty bad. This specific knife is very sharp. Martin took over. My school woodwork teacher Kaupo loan it to me and he also mentioned thet be extra careful with it, because it is extremely sharp. And I at least tried to be very careful. It cut quite deep. So I was lucky I didn’t hurt myself to bad. We just cut a hole for the lens. And now we will start setting the rivets. We are going to attach the stainless steel
with rivets underneath the box. This should make the box a little more sturdy. This is the rivet gun. We have trilled all the holes and attached rivets. The outcome looks very dope. And we also cut the proper shape for the lens hood. This is the outcome of the rivets. This is how the lens hood looks like. With a correct shape. No we are going to spray these boxes with the camouflage spray. It is finally March. This is our last time together here, because we’ve finished with most of the stuff. Right now Martin is fixing the issue with the transmitter. It doesn’t really fit into the box. And we are going to build the sensor into this little box. I spent more than an hour cutting the whole into it. It took me quite some time. But now it is perfect. As you can see, behind me is fully finished camera trap. First time I met with Martin and told my crazy idea, it was 8th of January. Today is 6th of March. Which means that the whole building process took us exactly 2 months. We met 7-8 times, I haven’t really counted. I didn’t film every time I came here. It doesn’t even matter to be honest. The most important is that the camera trap is ready Let’s have a look what it looks like! In the next episode I’m going to talk about the value of the camera trap. And I will describe a few mistakes that we made.

Nikon D5600 “User Guide”: How To Setup Your New DSLR

Nikon D5600 “User Guide”: How To Setup Your New DSLR


Right before you jump into this video, if
you want to get my free 11 days to better photography mini video course, head on over
to froknowsphoto.com/11 days to get started right now. Jared Polin, froknowsphoto.com
and this is your user’s guide for the Nikon D5600. Now, I hope that you use this instead
of reading the manual, but I do suggest that you do read the manual because there are some
good nuggets of information in there. Now speaking of nuggets, some of this stuff
may seem super simple to you, but as we progress it may get a little more advanced, but it’s
going to help you set up the camera and use it, so you can start getting great pictures
and video of whatever it is you want to shoot. So, the first thing I want to show you how
to do is put the lens on. Now, to start I’m going to take the lens off,
because it’s off when you get it. You see this white dot right there. You line that
white dot up with this white dot right here. Go ahead and do this. Boom! It goes in. Turn
it towards you. If you’re holding it like me, you’ll hear a click and you’re all set.
How do you take it off? You’ve got this release button right here. You press it. You turn
the lens the other way and you take it off. Now, be careful when you take the lens off
you don’t ever want to touch anything inside this camera, you don’t want to touch the mirror
or the sensor underneath, so just know to get the lens back on, line it up, turn it
towards you, and it locks right in. So, before we turn it on, I want to show you where the
battery goes. Right here on the bottom there’s a little door. The battery pops out just like
this. There’s only one way that it can go in. Move
this yellow tab out of the way. Press it in. Boom! Close it recommendation. Try to have
two batteries always fully charged, especially if you go away, if one goes bad or you run
out of power you don’t want to not be able to shoot. Now, when you turn the camera to
the side, you have one SD card slot. Right here we have a Lexar 128GB SD card. You can
go ahead. You pop it in here. It goes in one way. Press it. Shut the door. Close it. You’re
ready to go. Now, to turn the camera on and off, move the
switch right there. It goes on. Turn it off. It goes that way also. So, how do you take
a picture in focus? Well, you have a shutter button right here. You can go ahead and press
that all the way down to take a picture or hold it halfway down to get your focus for
whatever you’re trying to focus on. Now, moving around these buttons you have
a plus, minus, for exposure compensation, but also for changing your aperture. I will
show you that when we turn the camera on. This red one is for shooting video, to get
into the live view mode to shoot either photos or video you would pull back on this spring
loaded button right here. You’ve got this dial right here, which helps you change your
shutter speed. Now this is your mode dial. Now you’re going
to notice something a little different than some other cameras you may have seen in the
past, because you have your auto right here. Then you have the no flash one, which means
if you don’t want the flash popping up in any situation you’re in, go ahead and do that,
it will be completely in auto still, but the flash won’t pop up. You’ve got your effects
mode. You have manual, aperture priority, shutter priority, program mode, and now you
have a scene mode. Now if you’ve seen other cameras mode dials,
you’ll see a running man person on there. You’ll see a portrait. You’ll see a kid. You’ll
see a landscape. They’ve got rid of that on the wheel. So, how do you access it? Well,
I am going to turn the camera on. I’m going to show you real quick because it’s in the
scene mode and I go ahead and I look at the back of the camera on the screen, you see
this lady with a hat on. I go ahead and hit that in the top left and I can either use
this dial to move through or I could touch the one I want or use the touch screen to
go ahead and change it. So, I’ll show you more of that as we get into
the camera, but I just wanted to show you how you get your scene modes. Now, moving
to the top of the camera, you’ve got your left microphone, your right microphone, as
well as your hot shoe. This is where you would put a flash or an external microphone if you
were going to connect the microphone right to here. This is your flash. Now, when you press this and it’s too dark
to take a picture, you press the button halfway down and it’s supposed to pop up. I just realized
why it’s not popping up, but let me show you that right now. If you have the 18-55 kit
lens, it has a lock on it with this button right here for when you put it back into your
bag. To unlock it, press the button. Turn the lens that way. You hear a click. It’s
now unlocked, so that when I go ahead and press the button, the flash is popping up
just like that. Now, I want to show you how it won’t pop up
if I put it into the ‘don’t flash pop up’ part. Boom! Not popping up anymore. All right.
I am going to turn the camera off for the time being and let me show you the side of
the camera right here. Right here we’ve got another manual way for you to pop up the flash.
We have a function button, which you can set yourself. We have the release button like
I showed you how to take the lens on and off. We also have another dedicated button. This
means how many frames a second you can shoot. It will allow you to make that change in the
menu system by pressing that, as well as accessing the timer function if you want to do timed
photos, say, two seconds or five seconds, it can do that. Right here you’ve got your
name plate to let everybody know that it’s the D5600. Right here on the side you can
see if you move this piece of rubber, open up the door, you have a remote slot, you have
a microphone slot and you have a USB plug that you can plug in right here. Moving around to the top right here, this
is where you can put your strap that comes in the box. This right here is a speaker to
play back the audio for when you’ve recorded audio and you want to hear it. It’s not the
greatest thing in the world because look how small it is. Now let me show you what you
look through in order to take the picture. This is your view finder right here. Right next to the viewfinder, you will find
a diopter. If you wear glasses or you don’t want to wear glasses and dial that in, you
can go ahead and use the diopter to do that. You’ve got the info button right here, as
well as another button that helps you to do focusing or auto exposure lock. You’ve got
your play button for playing back your images. You have another info button, but this one
is I. It does something different. I’ll show you that later as well. You’re up, up, down, down, left right, left
right, B A B A button right here for anybody who knows what that is. Leave a comment down
below. But that’s how you go ahead and move around the menu system with an OK button.
You’ve got your zoom buttons. That shows you exactly what that is and then you have a trash
can. Now this is your screen right here, your LCD
screen, because you have a Nikon D5600 it will come to you closed. Boom! You can close
it when you put it in your bag, so it protects the screen in case anything bumps into it.
You have a protector built in by this. Now, to open it you just pull it out. You can rotate
it back like this and then, boom, close it and it can be exposed right here and this
is the LCD screen that you would use. Now also people always ask, well, how – what
if I don’t want the LCD screen on when I’m shooting pictures using the viewfinder? Simple.
We have a proximity sensor built into this camera and when I say ‘we’ I mean Nikon,
not actually me, because I didn’t build it, but you’ve got the proximity sensor there,
so that if your eye comes up to this, it will turn off the screen so that it makes it easier
to shoot. Now moving to the bottom of the camera, we
have right here is your tripod socket. If you want to go ahead and put it on a tripod
that’s where you would do it. Or if you want to put it onto a monopod, you would put it
there as well. So, that’s pretty much everything on the outside of the camera. I’m going to
take a quick second to go ahead and get ready to show you how the menu system works. Before we jump into the next section, I have
a question for you. How do you organize and protect your camera gear? Well, if you don’t
have an answer for that, I have an answer for you. It’s called mygearvault. It is the
best way to input, organize, and protect your camera gear. It’s a free app that you can
check out right now at mygearvault.com. Download it in the Apple App Store and it’s coming
soon for Android. So, go ahead and check that out. Now let’s get back to the user guide. So now I want to show you how to set up your
camera by using the menu system. I’m going to walk you through step by step and show
you how I personally would set it up myself. But before I do that, I want to let you know
we’re using what’s called an Atomos to record the back of the camera, so that you can see
all of the menu systems as if you were going through the camera with me right now. So, the first thing that I want to do is remind
you that if you’re in the auto mode, you may not have access to all of the menu systems
to make a change. Let me show you what I mean by that right now. I’m in auto mode. Do you
see these grayed out areas on the back of the camera? Those are functions that you cannot
control because you’re in auto mode. So, if I go ahead and get out of there and
I move from Scene Mode back into say Program Mode, it’s no longer in Auto Mode, but I want
to let you in on a little secret that Program Mode is basically full auto. It’s just going
to give you full control of your camera. So, now I’m going to hit the menu button again.
It’s going to take us into the menu settings and the first thing we see here is playback
menu. Delete, that’s one way you could delete the pictures, but I’m not a fan of deleting
any pictures on the camera. Playback folder, play all is perfectly fine.
Playback display options, let’s see what that is. Oh, do you guys see the question mark
in the bottom of the screen? Well, you also have a question mark on the back of your camera.
If you see the question mark on the bottom of the screen and you hit the question mark
on the back of the camera, it goes ahead and brings up the actual user’s guide inside of
the camera, so you can read what it means. No image, none, highlight, RGB histogram,
it explains everything for you. So, what do I turn on? I go ahead and I use the arrow
to hit right to turn on none. Let’s turn on highlights. Highlights are the blinky things
that you’ll see in the back. Just play around with this one. Shooting data and overview
is what I like to do. Also you go ahead and hit the OK button right here and that goes
ahead and it should have saved everything. Let’s go back and it did. So, I hit the OK
button again. Image review, I like to turn image review
off. Personally that means when you take a picture, the picture doesn’t pop up on the
back of the screen, I recommend doing this because you don’t want to get in the habit
of taking a picture, looking at the screen, taking a picture, looking at the screen, because
you end up missing the pictures that you should have been shooting because you’re looking
at the screen. So, don’t do that. Keep on moving. Auto-rotate image, what does
this say right here? Record camera orientation when taking photographs. Images taken when
off is selected will not be rotated for display during playback. Now, this is something that
I personally leave off, because I want to be able to turn the camera myself like this
to see the full image covering the entire screen, but vertically if I shoot vertical
images, now when we move rotate tall, let’s see what this says. If on is selected, images taken with on selected
for auto image rotation in the PLAYBACK MENU will be rotated for display during playback.
Images are not rotated for display in the monitor immediately after shooting. So, I’m
going to leave this on. Moving through slide show, I don’t even touch rating. I don’t touch
and select to send to smart devices, I don’t touch that either. Moving on to the SHOOTING MENU, you could
reset everything. You could change storage folder. This is stuff that I’d leave basically
with whatever the camera had set. File naming DSC is a file naming structure that the camera
has it set to. You could change it to your initials. It could be J something 2. It could
be J22, whatever you want it to be, you can change those three digits right there. Image quality, this is important. So, on image
quality it comes to you set in Jpeg normal. I’m a big fan of shooting RAW as my shirts
say I shoot RAW by the way if you want to get I shoot RAW shirt, go to store.froknowsphoto.com.
You can pick one up right now. My recommendation is if you are just starting out, I would shoot
RAW plus Jpeg, fine. Now, it’s going to use more space on your
memory cards because you’re shooting a RAW file and a full res JPEG, but you will thank
me in the future when you understand the importance of shooting RAW. What I want to quickly say
is that the RAW file gives you all of the data, all of the RAW data that the camera
captured. A JPEG goes ahead and throws away a lot of
that data that you don’t need that it thinks you don’t need, but maybe in the future you
do, but a word of warning is that RAW files are larger. They take up more space and you’ll
have to tweak and edit each and every one of them, but you may not be ready for that
now, but you want to have that. You want to take those photos, so that when you are ready
to go ahead and edit them in the future, you still have them. So, I put it on RAW plus
JPEG, fine. Image size, I put that on large. There’s no
reason to shoot medium or small. I don’t care about shooting small. I don’t care how much
space it takes up. The reason I say this is you can always go down in quality, you can
never go back up if you don’t have it, so I leave that on large for your JPEG. NEF RAW recording, I put that on 14-bit instead
of 12. Again, the best quality is what I want. I don’t want a dumbed down file. Moving through,
ISO sensitivity settings. We can show you this on the back of the camera. There’s a
Info button that allows you to make changes there. It’s much easier. We’ll show you
that later. White Balance, I personally leave on auto. Set your picture controls. You can
see the different ones from standard to neutral to vivid to monochrome to portrait to landscape
to flat. I generally leave it on standard. Now keep
in mind that your RAW files will not retain the picture style controls, but your JPEGs
will. Also if you’re shooting video and, say, you shoot it in monochrome, yep, your video
is going to have no color. It’s going to be monochrome only. So when you’re shooting video,
make sure you set your picture style before you do that. So, moving back through the menu here, Manage
Picture Control style, save and load, that means you could save them for later to come
back to color space sRGB. Activity D-Lighting, I personally turn this off. I don’t want that.
Let’s see. High dynamic range is currently off for whatever reason. Release mode, what
does that mean? Let’s go inside and see. Ah, that’s what it means. Do you want to shoot one frame every time
you press the button or do you want to shoot continuous frames and continuous low, meaning
when you hold your finger down on the shutter button, it’s going to shoot photos in rapid
succession or in continuous high? Now, I like to shoot in continuous high especially if
I’m shooting action, I want to get as many frames a second as possible for that short
burst that I’m going to shoot. You’ve got quiet shutter release mode. If
I had to guess, it’s probably not that much quieter than regular mode. And then you have
self-timer mode, which you could set as well. I’m going to show you another button that
you could do that with. Actually I’ll show you right now. I go ahead and hit this button
and it brings up the back of the camera. Now you’d be able to touch the back of the
camera to make these changes because I’m plugged into this Atomos right here. I can’t touch
it, so I’ll just use the arrows. You see if you hit this button, you can get a quick menu
to single frame to continuous low, continuous high, to quiet mode, as well as the – what
do they call this? They call this the self-timer. So getting back into the menu section, let’s
get back into the menu section right here. You’ve got long exposure noise reduction.
I personally leave it off. High ISO noise reduction, I also turn that off. For those
of you who shoot JPEGs, if you shoot at higher ISOs and you leave that on, you would see
more of a mushy muddled image. If you leave it off, you may see a little
more grain, but it’s at least going to be a sharper image, so that’s my recommendation
for you right there. Vignette control, I leave it exactly where it’s at. Auto distortion
control off. Optical VR, so being that this lens right here does not have a button anymore
for turning on VR and turning it off, if you want to turn it off, you have to come into
the camera and go ahead and hit off. You might as well just leave it on. Now if
you’re on a tripod that’s where you would want to turn it off. For the other times,
just go ahead and leave it on. Internal timer shooting, wow, this camera has that. That’s
a pretty good thing. You could play around with this for time lapse, for setting the
camera to take pictures every second, every 10 minutes, every 20 minutes. Play around with that. That’s a fun little
setting in there. And then your movie settings, you’ve got your frame size rate. Let’s go
in there, 1920/1080, which is full HD at 60 frames a second. Now remember if you shoot
at 60 frames a second, you’re chewing up more data as opposed to if you shot at, say, 24
frames a second. Now 24 frames a second is more cinematic what you’re used to seeing
when you are watching movies and 60 frames a second is more what you would see with video
games. It’s kind of awkward when you’re shooting
your video, so I recommend doing 24 frames a second if you’re going to go ahead and do
that. You’ve got these other lower end ones. I really wouldn’t go less than 1080. I wouldn’t
get into 720 at this point and so those are the options that you have. I’m going to go
ahead and set it to 24 frames a second right there. Movie quality, I don’t want it on normal.
I want it on high. Remember what I said, you can always go down
in quality, you can’t get higher in quality once you’re lower. Microphone, you could leave
that on auto for the most part except if you’re plugging in an external microphone, I recommend
that you study up on how to set your audio levels for that. I leave wind noise reduction
off and manual movie settings, I’m actually going to put that on. Let’s read what that
says. Manual movie settings: Choosing ‘On’ allows
the shutter speed and ISO sensitivity for movies to be selected manually. Yep, this
means if you’re shooting manual video, you can change your shutter speed when you’re
recording that’s something I recommend you do, so let’s get out of there. I go ahead
and turn that off. So, moving back over to here, we are now into your CUSTOM SETTING
MENU. I know this takes a little bit of time, but
watch this video once and also refer back to it if you ever need to find a section where
you want to know what something means. You always have me to come back to at froknowsphoto,
so go ahead, hit the Subscribe button while you’re at it. Let’s get into auto focus. Auto focus, so you’ve got AF-C priority selection.
What does this mean? It means if you’re not in focus, it won’t take a picture. You could
set it to release, which would mean. Let’s see what it means. Let’s go ahead and hit
the button. Release means the shutter can be released even when the camera is not in
focus, say, sometimes the camera is wrong and you’re actually in focus, but it doesn’t
think you are, look, this is a crapshoot. You pick whichever one you want. For now we’ll
put it on focus. Number of focus points you have to choose
between 39 and 11. I leave it on 39, because I like to select a bunch of different ones
of those. We’ve got the built in AF-assist illuminator thingymabobber. This lights up
when you press the shutter button halfway down to help light up your subject. It’s actually
kind of annoying. I don’t recommend doing it because then people know you’re taking
their picture, especially if you’re trying to get candid moments, it can become annoying. So I personally turn this one off. Rangefinder
off. Manual focus ring in AF mode on. Let’s see EV steps one-third, I like third stops.
ISO display, what is this talking about? On and off. Let’s read about it right here. Choose
whether ISO sensitivity is shown in the viewfinder frame-count display. That’s up to you. Not
a big deal. I leave that off. Shutter release button, yep, skip past that. Auto off timers,
you can go ahead. I have it set, so it doesn’t go off, but you can set it to short, normal,
long, I have it custom right now, but you go ahead and set that up for yourself. Self-timers, you can say self-timer delay
10 seconds. You could also do 2 seconds, 5 seconds, 10 seconds, 20 seconds, it’s going
to beep and when it gets to the end, it’s going to go beep, beep, beep, click and take
the picture. Number of shots, now this is pretty cool. This means in self-timer if you
go ahead and say set it to 10 seconds and hit this over here and you could set between
one and nine frames. So, when you go ahead and hit self-timer and
you set this eight to nine or let’s say eight because that’s what I just hit it, it would
take eight pictures in a row and I don’t know if it’s going to take it every 10 seconds
or if it just takes eight after every set, I don’t know I have to try that out. You guys
test it out, but just know that this functions there and it’s pretty cool to have. Let’s see exposure delay mode, I don’t even
know what the heck that is. It’s funny. I don’t know what all the stuff means either,
because most of the time you don’t need it. Delay shutter release until about one second
after the mirror is raised. Exposure delay mode that’s interesting. That’s for if you’re
shooting super slow shutter speeds. They don’t have this. It’s funny. They don’t have a lot
of this in Pro cameras, but they have it down here. So, what this means is it would delay the
picture being taken. So, if you don’t want any shaking, because you’re shooting at a
super slow shutter speed, you would hit it, it would wait and then it would shoot the
picture. File number sequence, turn this on. You don’t want this off. You want this on,
so that when you take a picture and you take another picture and then you turn the camera
off and you turn it back on, it doesn’t give it the same file name. It will go to 1999
before it resets to zero. Viewfinder grid display, I leave that off.
Date time stamp that is absolutely off. Remember in the ‘80’s when you would go to the
One Hour Photo Mark and you get your pictures back with that burnt in thing in the bottom
right-hand corner with the date and time and when you would enlarge it, you would enlarge
the date and time, yeah, don’t put that on in your photos. Nobody likes that.
Unless you’re one of those people who likes that, then turn it on. More power to you.
Reverse, nope, don’t do that. Flash control, TTL is fine. Auto bracketing set, I leave
that. Assign function budget right now is set to ISO. So the function button, which
is right here on the side that means it’s set to ISO. So if I hit that, it would then
go into ISO. Assign AE lock, leave that. Assign touch function,
I leave it where it’s at. Reverse dials, I don’t do that either. So, that’s your CUSTOM
SETTING MENU. Moving down we’ve got your SET UP MENU. Man, there’s a lot of menus in here
when you’re out of auto. Format, this is what you do every time you put a new card into
the camera. You format it so that the card and the camera are talking the same language,
so that you have less issues when you’re shooting photos. Now, remember before you reformat a card,
make sure you’ve offloaded the data that’s on it because once you reformat it, it’s much
harder to get it back and recover it. I’m not going to reformat it right now because
I have some images on the card. Image comment, you would set this to leave. Remember how
I said you don’t want to put that time stamp in the bottom corner. Well, with image comment, you can digitally
put it into your, what’s called, metadata. It’s going to store it inside the file, so
you can put an image comment and copyright information. This is where you would set the
time. I would take the time to do image comment and copyright information. You guys should
do that, turn that on. Language, you can change it to a bunch of
different languages. In this case, English, because that’s all I can read. Beep options,
on, I like having my beep options on. This means when you’re in single focus mode, it
will beep when you’re in focus. So here you’ve got your choice between high. That sounds
like that. And low, low, high, low, high, low, high, whatever you want to pick, pick
it. So, for now I’ll leave it on high pitch. Let’s
keep on moving. Touch controls, what are touch controls? That just means I should be able
to just touch the screen? Yes. I’m leaving that on. I want that enabled. Monitor brightness,
I generally leave it on zero, because we were filming it earlier. It’s still set to minus
three, so I like to leave it set to zero. Let’s see. Info display format, yes, you could
change this. I like the more traditional style, which is this more so than the nontraditional. Let’s take a look. That’s the nontraditional.
I don’t like the way that looks. That’s awfully confusing to me. So when I go in here and
I go to info display for P/S/A/M, I’m going to go to this one with the old [Indiscernible]
[00:24:14] go a look. Let me show, yes, that’s much better. Oh, and you see everything blinking
right now. The reason it’s blinking even though I have a lens attached to it, remember I said
that if it’s locked, you can’t shoot pictures. Well, it’s locked. So, let’s unlock it right
now to show you. Yep, see that. All those numbers start to show up. So let’s get back
into the menu system once again. Info display, I leave that on. Info display auto off on
as well. Clean image sensor that’s where the camera would clean the image sensor. It doesn’t
hurt to do that every once in a while. It’s going to clean the dust off. And I will remind you that if you see what
looks like a black spot on your images that may be because you have dust on your sensor.
Don’t go in there and try to clean the sensor yourself. Use this clean image sensor mode
in the camera first and then if you notice that you’re looking through the viewfinder
and it looks like you have specs in your images, those won’t turn out in your photos because
the mirror is what’s dirty. I wouldn’t even worry about cleaning that either because you
don’t want to mess anything up. You can lock the mirror up if you want to
go ahead and clean something. Image dust off, I’ve never even touched that. Flicker reduction
is on auto. That’s cool for if you’re shooting inside a gym. It may know and it won’t shoot
while the lights are flickering. Slot empty release lock, I highly recommend that you
leave this on lock. If it’s on unlock and you start taking pictures
without a memory card and then you go, well, why didn’t I get any pictures? But you don’t
have a memory card. I made that mistake back when I was shooting film. I was at the school
event and I took like 30 pictures and I looked at my camera and realized that I didn’t have
any film in it, so you don’t want to have that issue right here. Moving on HDMI, yep, location data, remote
control, if you connect it, airplane mode in case you’re on an airplane, you want to
turn off the Wi-Fi. You could do that, but nobody is going to turn it off on an airplane.
Connect to smart devices. This is where you would go ahead and connect to snap bridge.
I’m not going to show you how to do that now. You can – that’s really easy to go ahead
and do. It can walk you through that by itself. Wi-Fi, all right, so that’s all of that. Conformity
marketing, what is conformity? I don’t even know what the heck that means. Oh, it’s an
FCC thing. That’s on the bottom of the camera and, yeah, I don’t even know what the heck
that means. And then firmware, this tells you what firmware you are currently on. And
if there’s ever a firmware update, you can update it and I’ll make a video to show you
how to do that. Then you’ve got your RETOUCH MENU. If you
want to edit your RAW files or any files inside the camera, you could do that. I don’t do
anything inside the camera. I save that for later and then you’ve got your recent settings.
Any of the settings that you recently went through and changed you would see them right
here in the recent setting menu, so that is running you through how to set up the menu
system. I know it’s a little long, but this should
help you out right out of the gate and remember just because I said it one way, it doesn’t
mean that you should set it the exact same way. This is just a guide. Try it for yourself.
See what works for you and then leave a comment down below with what settings you use that
I don’t personally use and we’ll be right back with another section. So, now I want to walk you through everything
you will see on your touch screen on the back of the camera. Now you can make a lot of changes
from this touchscreen where back in the day everything had to be done in the menu system,
but now that you can touch the screen, you pretty much have a dedicated button for everything.
So, you see how it says lens retracted and I can’t make any changes. Again I’m going to unlock this. I hate the
fact that they have this on this lens, but you unlock it and you have to lock it when
you put it away and it won’t let you shoot until you unlock it. So, you see how it says
one to thousandth of a second, yep, that’s exactly how you say it. If you rotate this
back dial right here that’s how you change your shutter speed. Now, how do you change
your aperture? A lot of people ask this question on this
camera because it doesn’t have a dial to make any changes on the front. So, you hit the
plus, minus, right here and you turn that scene dial that you were using for the shutter
and this time it overrides that and it will change your aperture. You can see that it’s
changing right here on the back of your camera. So, on the screen right now, you can see the
meter. That’s where the arrow is all the way to the left because it’s telling you that
it’s under-exposed. That’s what you could line up right in the middle if you go ahead
and line it up properly, which I probably [Indiscernible] [00:28:28] that’s telling
me that’s a proper exposure right there. Also like I said at the beginning of this
video, if you want to become a better photographer in only 11 days go to froknowsphoto.com/11
days. I have a video specifically on how to set up the meter for free right there. So,
what do we do if we want to change the ISO? See this info button on the side. We can go
ahead and hit that right now. This basically is like a dedicated button for everything,
now because I can’t access the touch screen right now, which you can, you can just touch
everything. I’m going to go in here and show you can change
the RAW to whatever you want it to change to. I leave it in RAW + fine as you can see.
It also tells you how many – how much storage it will take. It would take 54 megabytes per
picture that you take, but because I have 128 gigabyte card in there, it would give
me 2300 pictures. So, moving down basically we went into the
menu system. We already showed you that bracketing. I leave that off. Auto white balance, changing
the ISO, you’re going to change the ISO quite often at the back of your camera. So, here
the lower the number – by the way in 11 days I have a video on this as well, but the
lower the number the more light you need, so a bright day you’re going to go ahead and
use that. You could also see that on the back of the
camera it shows you a picture of a situation that you might want to shoot there. Now, if
you’re shooting action sports, maybe start around 400 if you’re outside and then as it
gets darker, you start to use a higher ISO. In this case, this one tops out at 25,600.
So, at those higher ISOs, you may see what’s called noise and grain, so the best way to
have less noise and less grain is to shoot at lower ISOs where possible, but do not be
afraid to shoot at higher ones from time to time. So, moving on back here this you can get your
picture style and this one is how you can set your focusing modes. So, right now it’s
set to AF-A. I do not like auto-servo AF. That means the camera is going to decide should
it do single or continuous, it could get it wrong, so that’s why I’m either in AF-S. What
that means is if you hold the shutter button halfway down, you’ll hear that beep when you’re
in focus that means you can lock your composition and move the camera and the focus will stay
locked. And if you want to refocus, you press the
button again. You use that for subjects that aren’t moving. Now, if the subject is moving
you use AF-C, which is continuous. That’s for your sports or shooting cars or somebody
running or the kids in the backyard. That’s where you would use that and then manual focus
and if you want to go ahead and override everything else and do that yourself. So, most of the time you’re going to be living
in AF-S and AF-C. AF area mode, so let’s go through what those are. You’ve got single
AF. You’ve got 9 point, 21 point, and 39 point, as well as 3D. 3D tracking is really good
if you’re shooting a subject that’s moving superfast like a jet. I’ve shot fighter jets
before and if you want the focus to continually track it 3D wise, this is what you’re going
to use and I don’t use it all the time especially for sports where people running at me because
if somebody kicks a ball, it may focus on their foot or it may focus on the ball when
it should have been focusing on their face. Nine points means you could select nine different
points. This one means you could use the 21 points and this one would use all 39 points
to get the autofocus data. This is for you to choose. Try them out. Most of the time
I’m probably in 9 or 21. Moving on, we’ve got metering mode. I leave this in this one.
This is called matrix metering. This one is called center-weighted. And if you’re ever
shooting a subject at, say, back against a strong back light, you could get into spot
metering, meaning it will only give you the meter reading for what’s inside that spot. So I generally leave it on matrix metering.
Flash, you can’t touch. You can’t touch that. I don’t have those [Indiscernible] [00:32:20]
anymore. But anyway that is the back of the camera right there. So, next let’s go to the
playback menu, so you can see the pictures that you’ve taken. Right here you’ve got that
sideways triangle. I think you should know what a play button is by now, but if you don’t,
this is it. I go ahead and hit play and I can cycle through
the images by hitting left or I could hit right and check this out. If I hit up, it
changes what you see, now because we set that in the playback menu, I can see the settings
that I use the histogram. The histogram is that thing to the right of the screen. As
I keep hitting up, I can see more data. That’s where I would see the image comment and all
of that information if I had that set. So you can see all of that stuff. Don’t forget
cycle through and if I had video in here, which I think I do, I could play that back
as well, but I’m not going to do that right here. So let’s get out of that and hit play
once again. Oh, let me hit play again because I want to show you something. Say I want to
delete this. I could hit the trash can and I could hit the trash can again to delete
it, but my recommendation is don’t ever delete anything inside the camera because you may
delete something that you didn’t want to delete. The cards are cheap. Fill them up. Don’t worry
about deleting stuff on the camera itself. So, now I want to show you how to get into
live view to take photos, as well as shoot video. What you need to do is pull back on
the live view toggle. It flips the mirror up, which then allows you to see everything
on the LCD, the back of the cameras. So, right here you can see everything that I’m seeing. Now this is if you want to take stills, if
you want to take video, you can go ahead and hit the record button right here and I’ll
show you that in just a second. On the bottom of the screen, you can see that my shutter
speed is changing, because we allowed that in the menu system that I could change it
manually. You could also see how many photos are left, the ISO. On the right-hand side,
you can see that I’m in AF-S, which is single focus. So, in this case you can hear the beep. Press
the button, shutter button halfway down, and the green box shows up, because it’s in focus.
Now that means it’s locked in. But what if you want to track a subject for video or for
photos, go ahead and hit this ‘I’ button again. Right now it’s on AF single. Let’s
put it on AF-F, which is full time servo AF and hit the ‘I’ again and watch this. It’s going to focus in on the time and then
I’m going to pull it back like this and watch it’s going to focus in on my hand. Now this
is not the greatest autofocus in the history of autofocus. It’s not like an old camcorder.
Now, it’s good. It’s not the best, but it’s going to do the job if that’s what you want
to do. My recommendation is not to use live view to shoot still images. I’m a big proponent
of holding the camera like this and shooting through the viewfinder just like this. That
is more stable than holding the camera just like this. So, now how do we hit record for video? We
hit this red button and boom. It starts recording. You can see what it’s recording right now.
We can zoom in on the Wheel Of Fro right there, boom. It found the focus in this low light.
Like this you can also see my levels are on auto, how much battery time is there and in
the top left-hand corner you can see that I have 20 minutes of record time. So, you will get 20 minutes in the highest
mode that I was set at right now to record video. To stop it, you go ahead and hit the
record button again and that stops recording your video and that’s what you use live view
for. In order to turn live view off once again you pull back on the LV right here and that
will turn off live view. So, there you have it. That’s your free user’s
guide for this Nikon D5600. I know it’s a long video. I know it’s a lot of information.
But if you get everything set right at the beginning, it’s going to make shooting photos
a heck of a lot easier as you progress with your camera. So, any questions that you have,
you could always leave comments down below and I will do my best to answer them and don’t
forget to subscribe right here on YouTube, so you can be notified when all of my videos
go live. So, that is where I’m going to leave it. Thank
you very much for watching, Jared Poland froknowsphoto.com. See you. Hey, look, it’s my logo on the top
left-hand corner. Go ahead and click on it, so you can subscribe to my YouTube channel
and never miss another video again. Over here on the top right-hand corner, you have the
mygearvault logo. Go ahead and download mygearvault, the best way to input, organize, and protect
your gear and on the bottom right a video.

Nikon COOLPIX P1000 16.7 Digital Camera with 3.2″ LCD, Black


Nikon Coolpix P1000 Review. Even with its impressive focal range of 24mm
to 3,000mm, this camera is a lot for the average photographer to handle. With patience, practice and a very steady
hand, you may be able to capture unique pictures of wildlife — and even the craters on the
moon. The Nikon is a niche camera that will appeal
to wildlife and landscape photographers who want to capture images of distant subjects
and scenes. This wide focal range, the camera covers pretty
much any situation you may encounter — from wide-angle terrestrial landscapes to the craters
of the moon. For macro shots, the lens can focus on objects
as close as 0.4 inches. At the same time, the lens’ focal range brings
a whole set of challenges to shooting, which I discuss later on in this review. Two physical controls activate the zoom: a
lever surrounding the shutter button and a lever on the left side of the camera body. A “snap back” zoom button is positioned adjacent
to the latter control and temporarily displays a wider angle with a framing-assist box so
you can reacquire your subject if you lose sight of it in the viewfinder or on the LCD. Special Bird Watching and Moon functions are
pretty basic, but their frame-assist features, which provide a border within which to frame
the subject, can come in handy when you’re photographing either subject. Others with steadier hands have been able
to shoot the P1000 at longer zoom ranges, but you’ll want a tripod if you’re zooming
at anything greater than that. I’m a huge fan of full-articulated LCDs. Being able to open the LCD to the side and
tilt it up and down makes it easier to shoot at different angles. The monitor can be folded facing the back
of the camera to protect the screen from scratches when you’re carrying it in a bag or backpack. Nikon was one of the first companies to include
interval shooting, which allows you to capture images at specific intervals and create your
own time-lapse shots. If you’d rather not fuss with manually setting
up a time-lapse shoot and then combining the images in a video in post production, the
P1000 has a handful of options you can use to shoot and automatically create a time-lapse
video. A touch screen would be especially useful
with the P1000 at telephoto zoom ranges. Being able to tap the screen to pick a focus
point is more efficient and accurate than manually adjusting a focus point with the
rotary dial on the back of the camera. I really wanted to like the Nikon P1000 more
than I did after shooting with it. While it’s very cool to have a 3,000mm focal
range at your fingertips, working with a lens that long requires a level of practice, patience
and a very steady hand. For me, it took too much work to get good
photos while taking advantage of the lens’ long zoom. If you’re into birding, for example, you are
probably used to the discipline it takes to photograph these beautiful creatures from
afar, and you’ll really appreciate the close-up shots that are possible with the P1000’s lens. Kindly see the description for this Amazon
product link. Thanks for watching this product review video. Kindly like and subscribe our YouTube channel.

Nikon COOLPIX P1000 Digital Camera with Deluxe Accessory Bundle Review

Nikon COOLPIX P1000 Digital Camera with Deluxe Accessory Bundle Review


This Video Review Is Based On :
Price, quality, performance, warranty, brand trust, after sales & service, reusability,
familiarity and easy to operate. If you want to take photos of running wild
animals or flying birds, P1000 with its incredible 125-times zoom allows capturing them with
comfort while remaining at a safe distance. This is definitely the best bridge camera
for wildlife that offers nice stabilization due to the integrated vibration reduction
system. This model provides high-resolution EVF, 4K, and RAW format support. While the
sensor is smaller than in similar models, it still allows the camera to have an incredibly
powerful zoom. Overall, the photos I’ve taken with this megazoom camera are of high
quality. Kindly See the Description for This Product
Link. Thanks for watching
Kindly like and subscribe.

Nikon COOLPIX P7700 Digital Camera

Nikon COOLPIX P7700 Digital Camera


Nikon announces its new flagship COOLPIX camera,
the P7700. The Nikon COOLPIX P7700 is a compact camera
with high performance features to capture stunning photos and full HD video.
“Nikon’s new COOLPIX P7700 pushes the boundaries of traditional point-and-shoot
cameras, offering stunning image quality and fast performance along with the freedom to
customize every shot.” The camera features a 12.2 megapixel Backside
Illuminated CMOS sensor, a 7.1x (28 – 200mm equivalent) f/2 zoom lens, a 3 inch vari-angle
LCD monitor, full manual control along with 19 scene modes, full HD video with microphone
input and an HDMI mini connector. The P7700 will sell for around $500 and will
be available September 2012.

Best Nikon Cameras in 2020 [Top 5 Picks]

Best Nikon Cameras in 2020 [Top 5 Picks]


Nikon is
one of the best camera manufacturers in the market
today. Nikon D5300 is an amazing camera that provides amazing photos, no matter the place
or the lightning. It has many great and new features that you won’t find in its predecessor
and takes amazing pictures. It lacks an anti-aliasing filter which gives it the edge in terms of
resolution. However, it still doesn’t let you down.
This Nikon camera is the first one to be built using a monocoque construction, which means
that it was made from one single piece of material, and this makes the camera stronger.
It weighs only 1 lb (480 g ), and this makes it easier for you to hold the camera while
taking pictures. It is very well made and feels very solid in your hand. There aren’t
many buttons on this camera, there are just a few buttons and most of the setting adjustments
are made via on-screen controls. This camera has a very clear and bright display.
IT has a feature that is called Active-D Lightning, which can be very effective when you shoot
high-contrast subjects, but it can produce some images with mid-tones that are too bright,
this may happen when you use this feature on Normal or Automatic mode. It has a 23.1
MP DX-format CMOS sensor and has a 5 fps continuous shooting. It has a 1080p60 video recording.
It has a sensitivity range of ISO 100-ISO 12800//25600, which is pretty solid.
It has a 39-point AF system, 9 sensors cross-type, and 39 or 11 AF points can be selected. The
autofocus works just great, however, when you move into lower light conditions, it can
slow things down a little bit and there maybe sometimes a little indecision. On the other
hand, the magnified view has plenty of detail, that is available when you focus manually.
I should also mention that it has 1.04M dot 3.2” vari-angle LCD monitor.
It is powered by a proprietary EN-EL14a Lithium-ion battery, which can take about 800 shots per
charge and that is good enough. In conclusion, this is an amazingly small, light camera that
can take excellent images in any light, also the colors are superb, it focuses very well
and works amazingly in dim lights with its great ISOs. If you have decided to buy a Nikon
camera you should check this one out, it is not very expensive and delivers amazing picture
quality. Moving on, we have another great camera from
Nikon. The COOLPIX B500 is a great camera that is not expensive and provides amazing
picture-taking experiences. It has many great features that will make you take a look at
this excellent camera. It delivers a range of shooting modes, but you cannot control
it manually. Another great feature that this camera has is the SnapBridge technology feature,
which allows you to send images to your smartphone via Bluetooth.
It has a nice and simple design, it is a mid-sized camera that weighs about 1.19 lbs. It is a
comfortable fit in your hands. The handgrip is chunky and feels secure in the hand, it
is also textured only in the handgrip. You can hold and take pictures with only one hand,
but using it with two hands will make the camera more steady and you will feel more
comfortable. IT has a tilting 921k-dot TFT LCD.
It provides great image quality, with a maximum resolution of 4608 x 3456 p. It has a 16.0
1/2.3 BSI-CMOS sensor. And the lens has a 40x zoom range that extends from a super-wide
22.5mm to 900mm at the telephoto end. The images are very detailed, provides nice saturation
and vibrant colors. The flash on the Coolpix B500 has four settings: Fill flash, Auto,
Auto with red-eye reduction, and Slow sync. The sensitivity settings on the Coolpix B500
range from ISO 125 to ISO 6400 at full resolution. The autofocus modes include center, manual
AF selection, face priority, target finding, and subject-tracking AF options. This camera
uses contrast-detect autofocus. And when it comes to the shutter speed the fastest available
shutter speed when using this camera is 1/1500. But you can get 1/14000 if you use the continuous
high-speed shooting mode. It has built-in NFC, WiFi, and Bluetooth Low Energy.
This camera is powered by AA batteries and has an amazing battery life, it also can record
Full HD videos with stereo sound. The Nikon Coolpix B500 is one of the best budget ultra
zoom dirge cameras in the market today. It offers many amazing features and provides
excellent picture quality, makes sure that you check this camera out before you make
your final decision. Moving on we have another great product by
Nikon. The D300. This one is a great camera that offers amazing features along with excellent
picture quality. It is very easy to use and feels very comfortable in hands. I should
also mention that the battery life of the D3500 is just amazing and can take up to 1550
shots. It has many other superb features that you might want to look at.
It is a light, small and capable camera that offers a lot. It has a beautiful design, and
it has a redesigned button layout on the rear that handles well the accidental pressing
buttons you didn’t mean to. The display quality is very good with sharp detail and clear colors,
but the screen is not touched sensitive. IT is very comfortable for a full day shooting.
But it may feel a little bit like a toy and it could get dinged up if you aren’t careful.
This camera has a 24.2 megapixel APS-C CMOS sensor, and an ISO range of 100-25600. IT
can shoot continuously at 5 frames per second and is capable of FULL HD 1080/60 pixel video
shooting. IT has plenty of Picture Control options, there are seven modes: Vivid, Standart,
Monochrome, Neutral, Landscape, Flat and Portrait. The noise performance is very good too on
this one. It has many other great features that you should check out.
It has the same 11-point focus module. It is good enough for an SLR in this price range.
You can power on the camera, and it immediately focuses and takes the picture for 0.5 seconds.
It does a great job when you have a static subject, but with something that is moving
fast, you will need to learn to pre-focus, which will take some time. This camera lacks
WiFi and the Bluetooth is a bit slow, but it still does a great job.
When it comes to battery life, this camera has one of the best battery lives. It can
last you for days if you shoot through the optical viewfinder. In conclusion, i would
like to say that this camera does a great job for beginners and for everyone who likes
DSLR cameras. You should check it out and see if it fits your needs. Another great Nikon camera is the D7500. It
has a great high ISO performance and many amazing features that make this camera so
special. The speed and low light performance are the first rates. It is not very expensive
and provides amazing picture quality. At this price range, you won’t find a better DSLR.
It has a brilliant sensor and an advanced autofocus system. You check out all the amazing
features that the D7500 has to offer. This camera weighs about 1 lb, which is pretty
light and feels very solid in the hand. IT has a nice design and it is weatherproofed,
which will allow you to shoot even when the elements turn against you. The rear display
is very slim and it can be tilted downwards and upwards. It also has a tap-top focus control,
which allows you to tap the are of the screen where you want to focus and it will immediately
focus in that area. This camera has a 20.9 megapixel APS-C CMOS
Sensor, and an 8 fps burst for 100+ JPEGS or 50 Raws. It has a 3.2-inch tilting touchscreen
LCD screen that works pretty well. It also has a 180k- pixel RGB sensor for metering
and subject recognition. The D7500 produces natural-looking, rich colors, even tho Nikon
has opted for a slight drop down to 20.9 MP, the detail remains very crisp and sharp. The
grip of the D7500 is very excellent. It may be a bit deeper than the most camera grips
and has added other things that make it less likely to fall out of your hands.
It has a 51-point Auto Focus system that was in the D7200, and the autofocus works pretty
great even in fast-moving subjects when you use the 3D tracking it does a better job because
it follows the subject through the frame very smoothly. It can record 4K video from 1.5x
crop of the sensor. It has both Wifi and Bluetooth that work pretty fast, so connectivity isn’t
a problem with this one. It has a great battery life even in the coldest
conditions, it can last you for a couple of hours. To sum up I would say that this camera
is an amazing picture taker. It has an excellent image quality,well-designed ergonomics, and
handling, impressive deep buffer, the touchscreen implementation is fast and effective, reliable
autofocus performance, even at 8fps, and many other superb features that complete this camera. Moving on, like our top pick we have chosen
the Nikon D850, it is one of the best Nikon cameras, offers a lot of great features, and
amazing picture quality. It has a great and simple design, an amazing performance, and
it is a bit pricey, but it is worth it because it is one of the best-rounded cameras in the
market today. You should definitely check it out and see what this camera has to offer.
It has a nice design and a great display as well. The optical viewfinder is very large
and bright. It has an amazing magnesium alloy body, and weather seals to protect it from
elements. It also doesn’t have a pop-up flash, and the AF assist light is now gone and replaced
by a small red light that turns on when you are shooting on a timer. It feels a bit shorter
than the other cameras because of the removal of the built-in flash. The LCD screen is now
a tiltable touch-enabled LCD, you can pinch-zoom or swipe through images without a problem.
The 45.7 megapixel BSI CMOS sensor can capture extraordinary fine detail. It has a 7fps burst
shooting and a 51 shot raw file buffer. The 153 point Autofocus system is linked to the
180,000-pixel metering system. It has a resolution of 8256 x 5504 pixels. It also includes in-camera
4K recording at 30fps using the width of the sensor, which makes this camera great for
videographers too. It uses the Multi-Cam 20K autofocus sensor
module. It is very impressive even in very poor lighting conditions. You may experience
a bit of difficulty at tracking moving subjects, but with the time you will get used to is.
It has very responsive touch control, a crystal clear rear display, and an accurate color
rendition. The connection is not an issue with this one. It can connect easily via Bluetooth
or WiFi. The battery life on this one is just amazing.
You can shoot up to 1800 images from a single charge, thanks to its energy-efficient power
circuit and the Expeed 5 image-processing engine. This camera is one of the best DSLRs
ever if you have already decided to buy a Nikon camera, you should check these top 5
picks and see which one suits you best.

Nikon COOLPIX S01 Digital Camera

Nikon COOLPIX S01 Digital Camera


Today Nikon announces the Ultra-Compact Nikon
COOLPIX S01. The S01 packs great image quality into a tiny
3.1 x 2.1 x 0.7 inch package. “The new COOLPIX S01 combines a stylish
design and legendary Nikon image quality into a compact camera body for those users who
love to easily capture stunning images.” The camera features a 10 megapixel CCD sensor,
a 3x zoom (29 – 87mm equivalent), a 2.5 inch touchscreen display, a built in battery and
7.3 gigabytes of internal memory. The Nikon COOLPIX S01 will come in a variety
of colors and will retail for around $180. The camera will be available September 2012.

Nikon COOLPIX S800c Digital Camera

Nikon COOLPIX S800c Digital Camera


Nikon announces their first Wi-Fi enabled
compact digital camera, the Nikon COOLPIX S800c.
With this camera Nikon combines its powerful camera technology with the popular Android
Operating System. ÒNow users can connect easily and instantly
with their social networks through the wireless connection, and take advantage of the vast
possibilities of the Android Operating System. The new S800c is truly the easiest way to
share amazing images on the spot.Ó The camera features a 10x optical zoom, a
16 megapixel Backside Illuminated CMOS Sensor, a 3.5 inch touchscreen OLED display, Built
in GPS and full HD video. The S800c will come in both black and white
with a suggested retail price of around $350. The camera will be available in September
2012.