Capturing Movement With Continuous Shooting | I AM Different Tips ‘n Tricks

Capturing Movement With Continuous Shooting | I AM Different Tips ‘n Tricks


[Continuous shooting.] Hi, I’m Thomas from Nikon School. We’re here
on the set of the Blossom project and I will give you
some tips about photography. In order to capture
the moment you really want, especially when you take
some pictures of movement, the burst mode will help you to break down the movement
with many images. Especially if you have a moment
that will never happen again. You can use this burst mode
and secure your images. So about the D7200,
what makes it stand out is that there is a special burst mode
at 7 frames per second which is made by the crop mode. And then you’ll have
even more images to bring back
the right moment in your images. [Discover other inspiring ideas!
Explore more.]

Understanding texture for beginner photographers – How to photograph texture.

Understanding texture for beginner photographers – How to photograph texture.


Texture is about how things feel. With photography
we’re quite often focusing on how things look. Focusing on how something feels can give you
some stunning results, let’s go take a look. When we use texture in our photography we’re
trying to tell the story of how something feels. We’re here at this local port and there’s
tonnes of old buildings, and things like this ship, that have a lot of texture. There’s a couple of different textures even
just here. The bricks are different to the wood, which is different to the metal. They
each have their own specific texture. So we know this ship is old and we’re telling
a story with our photograph. When the light hits the ship on a steep angle we get all
the little shadows on the surface which really brings out the texture and it tells a story
about the boat and how old it is, and it’s quite weathered, so we’re learning all those
things by just looking at the texture. When the light’s soft, like it is now that
the sun’s gone down, there’s not as many shadows. This means that you can’t see the texture
of objects as clearly. So soft light is not really the best light for photographing texture.
You need sort of, really hard light to create shadow. In the afternoon light, the water down here
has gone, sort of, oily and smooth, the texture has really changed with the different light. A really fun activity that you can do to get
used to photographing texture is to go to one location and look for all the different
textures you can find in that location. We’d love for you to come and join us on Instagram,
that’s where our community is sharing their photos and they’ll be sharing their texture
photos this week. And you can subscribe to receive more of these videos every week.

Levitation Photography Tutorial: How to Hover with Multiple Exposures

Levitation Photography Tutorial: How to Hover with Multiple Exposures


Hi, I’m Chelsea. And for our book, Stunning Digital Photography we’re going over levitation photography.
Now there are two ways to take a levitation photograph: the first way you just set a high
shutter speed and have your subject jump and it creates the illusion that
their floating. The method were going to be using is that I’ll be propping myself up with these
books here, taking two pictures and then blending the two exposures
together in post to make it look like I’m floating. The
only hardware you really need is a camera and a tripod, but because
this is a self portrait for us we’re also using a remote shutter release
and a few other pieces of equipment I’ll get into later. The first thing you’ll want to do before you take your shot is make your story. So I had envisioned a couple sitting
together and reading by fire so I got these prop books and I got
Tony, my prop husband and found a nice nook of
the house that would look good on camera. So we set up our camera and a tripod and kind of played around with the crop
and the angle to make sure that we have our fireplace in the shot and the lamp and the chair, everything we
thought would be attractive. One interesting thing that we did was I
really wanted it to look warm I wanted it to look like the fire was
glowing and we were nestled up and comfortable in our home. so we got another light on a tripod,
another flash, put an orange gel over and put it
behind our fireplace which actually goes completely through to the
other side and had it flash through at us so that we had nice
warm lighting like the fire was glowing. To trigger the flash that we set up
behind the fireplace, we used a PocketWizard. We also used the flash on
top of our camera to kinda bounce the light off of the wall and
fill the room with light from the other directions so that the lighting wasn’t too
hard. Next, we set our camera timer to an 8
second delay and just kind of posed for a while. Once you get the pictures that you like,
move out of your frame, take a picture of your background and
then it’s time to bring your photos into post processing. Now that you finished taking your
pictures, load them onto your computer and use your editing software of choice to
start merging your photos. It doesn’t matter which editing
programming you use, I’m going to use Photoshop, but as long as they can blend two pictures, you’ll be all set. I’ve loaded my pictures into Lightroom,
so I’m going to click the levitation photo of my choice and then I’m going to choose a
background picture to blend it with. Using Ctrl click I selected both pictures at once. Once
you have your photo selected right click, then choose Edit In, then go to open as layers in Photoshop. Now that
you have both of your pictures imported into your editing program put your levitation photo on top. So you can see, the background is on the bottom. Select both
of your pictures go to Edit, and auto align your layers to make sure
that they match up. Using the Auto projection option works
just fine. Next select your top layer, your levitation
photo, and create a mask. Click on your mask, select your paintbrush tool and make sure that you’re painting in black, and you can start to erase the books out of
your picture. I like to make sure that my paint
brushe is soft and that my opacity is fairly low I have
it at 48 right now. So let me zoom in here, I’ll make my brush a little bit bigger, and you can
start blending away whatever it is you’re levitating on. So one problem we ran into when we
started editing the pictures is that I noticed that the background picture had cooler lighting than the picture with me levitating and I think
it’s because one of the flashes was bouncing off me and making a warmer
light. So what I did was I selected my
background photo and in the adjustment layers I put a photo filter on with the color orange and warmed up the background a little bit
until the color matched the foreground better. That’s pretty good. And since you’re opacity’s low, you can just
kind of blend the pictures together so that the color differences isn’t so obvious. Once
you have your color adjusted, you can continue taking those books out out. Another problem that I
ran into is that my skirt was falling behind the books at one
point so I can’t just use the layer mask and paint out the books. So what I did was I selected a section of my skirt,
making sure that I had the hemline in there, and create a new layer to paste
the piece of clothing into. Now that you have part of the skirt pasted in, you can move it. Go to Edit, Free Transform and line it up with the rest of the hem. Now that you have the skirt in there, it’s really rough,
you can use an eraser and I will just blend it in. This is kind of a
rough example so I’m gonna do a little bit more tweaking and play around with this to get it just
right and then I’ll cut to the finished product. Next I’m going to reimport it into
Lightroom by saving my photo and finish up the rest of my editing there. Now than I am in Lightroom I’ll click on
Develop to finish editing and crop it down a little
bit. Next I’m going to soften my photo up to
give it a warmer, cozier feeling. By just roducing my clarity just a little tiny bit. I usually like to
just play with my adjustments a little bit to get the get a nice feel going in the picture. So it’s
all just a matter taste. And there you have it! There is our
finished levitation photo. There are a few other pictures that I
played around with it as well If you’d like to see more videos from us,
click subscribe above and if you’d like to learn more about
photography, buy our book, Stunning Digital Photography. You can get it on
Amazon, you can get it for iBooks. All the links will
be down below and don’t forget to LIKE us too. Thank you.

Photography In Extreme Cold

Photography In Extreme Cold


Good day. Welcome to the Great White North – it’s great it’s white its north. It’s also known as Canada. A nation of just over nine million square kilometres and forty percent of its land mass is considered Arctic. The coldest temperature ever documented in our refrigerated nation, was minus 63 degrees celsius or for our southern neighbors that’s minus 81 degrees Fahrenheit. That was back in February of 1947 in snag Yukon. Today it’s a bit warmer, still very cold though. Now it takes a lot of dedication to press a cold-conducting hunk of metal against your face for such long periods in this cold weather – and even if you’re willing to endure a frostbitten finger or two to capture a few photos – your camera may not be as willing. What follows are a few tips and tricks that I’ve picked up over the years that will help you capture photos in extreme cold. Anyone who has spent significant time outdoors in the cold, knows your body needs more energy in order to stay warm. In fact you need to consume roughly 4,500 calories to endure a day at -30°C and your camera also has increased energy demands in the cold. Or rather, your camera battery won’t be retaining its full charge. A lithium-ion camera battery at room temperature of 27°C holds 100% of its charge but at -18°C it only retains 50% of its charge and the colder it gets the less charge your camera batteries will be holding. There are two simple means of combating to reduced power delivery of those batteries and they’re both very easy to practice. The first is the most obvious – simply bring more batteries. In fact bring twice as many as you typically would bring. And if you know you’re going somewhere cold like the Arctic, the Antarctic or Saskatchewan, it’s worth investing in more batteries. In fact buy more batteries than you think are necessary, because they will save your butt. Now the second solution requires a bit of role play. You’re going to take on a Wolf of Wall Street persona, treating your batteries like stacks at Borden’s or Benjamins and you’re smuggling them through airport security by strapping them to your body. Okay, you don’t actually have to duct-tape your camera batteries to your body, but the closer you can keep those batteries to your body heat, the warmer they will stay and the more charge they will retain. So if you’re working outside for an extended period – keep your batteries in the inner pocket of your jacket so they stay warm. and if you’re spending the night outside in a tent – you’re going to be sharing your sleeping bag with some rather awkward and painful companions. Picking at your camera and pressing it against your face at 30 below, is going to require some forethought. Most photographers are familiar with the annoying nose smudge. Created by looking through the viewfinder and your nose inevitably is pressed against that rear LCD screen leaving behind a gross oily smudge. Now, at 30 below when you’ve got that ever-present pesky drip at the end of your nose. The nose smudge is replaced by a nose-sized patch of ice. It obscures the LCD screen and if it’s a touchscreen it’s pretty much useless. Now, the only real way of avoiding this, is making a concerted effort not to let your nose touch the LCD screen of the camera. The camera as well as your nose will thank you. After spending a day outside shooting in the cold, you need to prepare your camera gear for the upcoming change in temperature. So, before you rush inside to the warmth of your igloo: take the flashcard and battery out of your camera – take the camera, put it inside a ziplock or any other type of airtight bag. If you didn’t bring one, your camera bag will do. Once all your gear is inside a bag take it all indoors with you and leave it there undisturbed for the next few hours. This allows the air temperature inside the bag to slowly acclimatize matching the air temperature outside. You may see conversation form on the outside of the bag, but don’t worry – be reassured there’s nothing forming inside. Your camera is dry. This is a process not worth rushing. If you bring your camera directly indoors from the cold without any preventive measures, compensation may form inside your camera and that can do some damage. Now, if you know your quickly transitioning from a cold dry environment to a warm humid environment it’s worth being proactive in the battle against condensation. If you’re budget minded photographer like myself, start collecting the desiccant packs you find in shoe boxes and other random new products. put those desiccants inside that airtight plastic bag. Alternatively, these lens and body caps from BRNO are also great preventive measure. If you’re planning on capturing time-lapse imagery in the depths of winter – you need to prepare your camera for the prolonged cold. Paying specific attention to the lens. If left unattended for long durations the front element is very susceptible to condensation and frost accumulation. Now the solution does seem a bit primitive, but it really does work. To start, you need some tape. You need a couple of those chemical reaction pocket warmers. and – a sock. Preferably one of your Grandpa’s old knee high socks. Compose your frame as desired and use a bit of the tape the lock off both zoom and the focus ring of the lens. Activate the pocket warmers and stick them inside the sock. Wrap the sock around the lens and again use more tape to secure it all in place. Double-check you haven’t accidentally bumped the camera and altered your composition. When you’re happy with it begin your intervalometer. Now, the success of this technique does vary depending on how cold it is, how humid the environment is and how long your camera will be spending outdoors. Generally speaking your actual camera is going to be one of the very last things to encounter problems because of the cold – and it’s not likely ever to stop working completely. What you may encounter is the LCD screens becoming a little sluggish. The liquid crystals inside those screens won’t freeze completely, but they do slowed down significantly – making them very awkward to work with. Change a dial to adjust shutter speed or aperture and be prepared to wait for those changes to be reflected in the screen. Even more frustrating is the latency experience with capturing video. Movement within your frame has a blurred and ghosting appearance making panning and focusing very challenging. Looking past mother nature’s beautiful white gown. Winter offers some of the best shooting conditions imaginable. The cold air is cleaner, it holds less moisture and that creates sharper images – especially longer focal lengths. As an added bonus the winter Sun never strays too far from the horizon, which creates more dramatic shadows throughout the entire day and better light angles. And the days are shorter, which means you have to wake up at a ridiculous hour to catch sunrise and sunset is long before dinner time. Both tripods taste the same – however one offers the same mid-winter experience as licking the schoolyard flagpole. Ow. Hold on. Double-double to the rescue. Aluminum tripods are easily one of the most dreaded aspects of cold weather photography. Handling one without gloves or mittens, is this surefire means of experiencing frostbite – and even with a great pair of mitts – it’s really painful to hold. Carbon-fiber doesn’t conduct cold well and it’s much more comfortable to use in the cold. However, if you’ve ever read the tiny owners manual that comes with your carbon fiber tripod. There’s a warning about extreme temperatures. In the cold, carbon fiber is susceptible to cracking or shattering. Now, you can get leg warmers to help mitigate the risk of that happening and hopefully that helps. Or, you could buy a wooden tripod. Beyond the technical logistics of capturing photos into cold – there are a few things to consider prior to pressing the shutter button. Mainly how to photograph snow. Snow may be white, but you should never use it to set your white balance. For that you need a proper white card. If you’re in a pinch and you don’t have a white card – set your camera’s white balance to the cloudy preset – and that should do the trick. Relying on your camera’s automatic white balance – results in bluer are cooler color temperatures. Which can be beneficial if you’re trying to convey a cold feeling. Additionally a composition comprised primarily of snow such, as this one – Is going to fool your camera’s meter into under exposing. If you’re shooting in aperture or shutter priority – adjust your exposure compensation accordingly. Now, it is a fine line between overexposing and under exposing snow – so, it is best that you get it right in the camera and not rely on RAW adjustments in post processing. At really, really cold temperatures – let’s say anything below 40 degrees Celsius . Your gear becomes rather fragile. This is something i experienced firsthand working in Gjoa Haven, at temperatures below 50 degrees Celsius. Microphone shock mounts shattered, metal zipper tabs broke as if they were made of plastic, XLR cables snapped in half. The only way to prevent pieces of your gear breaking in the cold Is by using extra care. If something becomes stuck, a mount, a zipper, Don’t use extra force. That goes through your eyelids as well. Before wrapping up i’m going to quickly rattle off a handful of easy do’s and don’ts. Although, I suppose most of them don’ts. Don’t change memory cards over deep snow. If you drop it it’s gone for good. Do it over your camera bag, If you drop it there, it’s in your bag. Snow on your lens? Don’t blow on it. You’re warm human breath will coat the front element in frost – Use a rocket blower instead. Don’t carry your camera under your jacket. The slightest perspiration creates a sauna. Carry it in your bag – that’s what you brought it for. Don’t bring your camera indoors with snow on in. Make a concerted effort to clean your camera of any snow, frost or moisture. Don’t allow any snow to find its way inside your camera bag. Moisture here can condense on your gear once in a warmer environment. Finally the single most important part of capturing photos in the extreme cold has nothing to do with your camera at all. It’s all about taking care of yourself. Dressing appropriately so you see nice and toasty the entire time you’re outdoors. If you get cold – you’re not going to enjoy what you’re doing. You’re not going to want to take photos – believe me! So, that means wearing many layers. More. More Keep going. Good enough. Don’t even bother wearing cotton. If it gets wet or damp, you’re going to freeze. Wool is going to be your best friend. It may not be clothing, but as I mentioned off the top – you need to consume a crazy amount of calories just to stay warm in the cold. So, make sure you’re packing plenty of snacks wherever you’re going. And a cold dry environment is going to suck the moisture from your skin – and that can lead to dehydration. So, make sure you’re drinking ample water throughout the day. Oh – and here in the great white north this is a toque, you should wear one. As a photographer I cannot imagine hibernating through the cold and not heading outdoors to capture photos of winters beauty – and hopefully through this video I’ve showed you that with the right preparation it – is possible. So, the next time you think of visiting the Arctic the Antarctic or the Great White North try and remember what I showed you throughout this video. If you liked this video – click like. If you think I’ve missed something – you’ve got your own suggestion for cold weather photography – put it in the comments below and thanks for watching.

Parkour Fotografie – 5 einfache Tipps

Parkour Fotografie – 5 einfache Tipps


welcome to a new video something special today the weather is beautiful again it is slowly spring That’s why I’m outside to shoot some parkourpictures today and I show you today my five basic rules to get the good pictures if you want to take parkour photos you should make your first thoughts about the location important is that we have a clear structure in your photo and a free space where you can make your move of course the spot were you want to jump should be good for your parkour moves but for pictures the background is even more important for example it always looks good if your jumping pose is in a blue sky or a clean wall like this over here if I perform my jump in front of the wall you can see the moment very clear if you have a mixed up backgound like a tree it can be hard to see your jump clearly if you have found a cool location my second important point is that you choose the right trick it is important that you can perform the trick a lot of times so you should be very safe with it often you need a while to get the right angle and timing with the photographer so better choose an easy trick that you can perform safe and nice than a hard one if you make simpler tricks you can also perform better at your expression and the clean execution for good pictures that is more important than a high difficulty of the move Let us now come to the third important point that is the right perspective depending on the perspective your move looks pretty different if I for example shoot a wall flip from behind, you can not see very much of the movement so it is better to shoot it from the side also if you shoot a jump from wall to wall it is often good to shoot it from underneath and from the side if you use a wide angle lens it also looks higher and more impressive I will now do a simple jump here but you will see that it will look good from that position Tipp number 4 is the light good light is very important for pictures of fast sport movements yo need a short exposure time to get a clear picture and for that you need good light you should als do not shoot against the sun you can see a big difference when the sun lightens up the motive wehn you shoot with the sun you will have more contrast and a nicer picture fifth and final point for today Often one does not know exactly how the move looks in the air before a shooting so often it makes sense to use the slow-motion video tool of your camera to film your move in slomotion before you start taking pictures and watch it frame for frame to analyze the movement than you can concentrate on the part of the move you want to have for your picture if it is a fast move you can also use the burst mode of your camera especially if u try to do something new that helps a lot to get the right part of your movement so you can shoot first and decide later wich part of it you like the most if you are alone on the road you can also use the burst mode to shoot yourself with a remote shutter like this you just have to push the butte when you start your jump and the camera will do pictures of your whole jump and than you can take the picture out of the move you wanted to shoot my shooting today was a lot of fun and we got some cool shots you can find the edited pictures on my instagram channel thanks to Nikon for the sponsoring I hope you enjoyed the video if you have questions please write them down to the comments have fun with your training and foto shootings see you next time

5 BEGINNER PHOTOGRAPHY MISTAKES + How to avoid them

5 BEGINNER PHOTOGRAPHY MISTAKES + How to avoid them


Hey and welcome in this video. In today episode I’ll talk about five common
mistakes that photography beginners do and how to avoid them. My name is Benjamin Jaworskyj, adventure photographer
from Berlin Germany and I was a beginner as well. As you are now and I want you to avoid the
mistakes I did a few of them you will see in this video I did as well, not all of them
and I saw a lot of people visiting my workshops doing these mistakes so you can avoid them
in the future if you listen closely to the following tips. There is nothing about it to having great
gear and being a bit of a techie but in the beginning, too much gear will confuse you
and with that every lens and every peace of new equipment the things get more complicated. You should focus on the essentials like aperture,
ISO and shutter in manual mode. That’s enough to get confused by as a beginner. Understand natural light. Try to find things you are interested in photographing
and take photos, photos, photos. Practice, practice, practice. The less gear you have the more you think
about photography. All you need in the beginning is any camera,
one lens, a battery, card and maybe a tripod. Autofocus is a great thing but your camera
never knows what exactly is going on in your crazy brain. Do you want to focus in the front or in the
back? The camera does not know that you love the
bokeh and that you want to take photos of your hand in macro mode. It may think, wouh that is a nice background
or away with that ugly hand. So what you should do, is set you focus points
manually to the part of the image you want to focus. Help the camera and work together as a team. No more confusion and sharper images. You got your first camera and the first thing
you do is, you go in the menu and take a look around. Wow all those new words and all those nice
buttons let’s press them and turn them but never ever read the manual. Okay that’s fine if you have some experiences
but as a beginner, just don’t. I have seen a lot of people coming to my workshops
in the last years who asked me. Ben why are my pictures so blurry, why is
everything black and white, why does it only shoot JPG and the pictures are super small. Only change the settings if you know what
they mean. Reset your camera if you have done anything
bad. Usually the standard settings are working
pretty fine and if you want to do something with a new camera adjust the little wheel
on the viewfinder next to your eye. If the auto focus says it’s sharp but you
see blurry it may be that little nasty wheel next to the viewfinder. Most people shoot from the head perspective. They walk around take photos and there is
nothing bad to that, but if you want to be creative and get perspectives that look more
interesting go away from what everyone does. Lay on the ground in the dirt take things
in the foreground climb on trees do your thing and be creative. Do what you need to get the picture and don’t
be afraid of the dirt, don’t be afraid of your wife who shouts at you when come home
all dirty and wet and oh okay maybe better be afraid but do everything for a photo. The flash is a great invention and you can
do awesome stuff with the flash but in 99% of your photography life your internal camera
flash should stay inside. Do you know tourists who come to a landscape
spot in the middle of the day and flash edit or they are in a zoo flashing through the
glass or stand on a concert 200 meters away from the stage and flash at the artist. It makes no sense it is just annoying. In most of the situations the internal harsh
flash destroys the mood of a picture. Better keep the ISO up or use a tripod or
take an external flash. The internal flash of the camera only use
when I have no other choice or just want a quick snapshot of me and Leonardo DiCaprio
hanging out for my Instagram. Those where five common mistakes that photography
beginners do and how to avoid them. Now I’m interested in which mistakes you did
as well. Maybe some of the video you recognized yourself. Post them in the comments below maybe you
have other mistakes that you recognized on your self to help other people. Post them in the comments section as well
and if you want to see more videos, disciple the channel. Every Friday there is a new video about photography
coming out. So see you next time. Hit the thumbs up button share the video with
somebody you think about it might help them and never forget. Sag mal Einstellung Digga und haut rein!

Having faith in the composition | A landscape photography vlog

Having faith in the composition | A landscape photography vlog


I have to confess that I have no idea how the sky is going to look this sunset. During the whole afternoon there’s been small puffs of clouds drifting by and there’s been lots of them. But now it seems to have cleared up a little bit but there’s still this soft cloudy haze, laying a thin layer over the sky which could let up pretty nice during and after the sunset so I have kind of high hopes on this and it’s going to be interesting I think I’ve found a really awesome foreground here. Well, it’s basically a leading line straight into where the Sun is going to set so that’s going to be absolutely awesome. What I’m going to have to try to do here is just to frame it in the best way. First, way that I framed it which is just having it stick out in the middle of the image. Probably isn’t the best one I’m going to try to make it a little bit more dynamic try to get it to come from one of the sides and well incorporate the surroundings perhaps a little bit more so we’re going to see how I’m gonna be able to get get it into the way that really want it I’m not too sure about how it looks at the horizon there are some clouds lingering there and they look like they could be a little bit thicker so perhaps it won’t be that good sunset but as I said in the beginning it was a complete gamble this and well I’ve no idea if it’s gonna pay off or not just yet but before this composition is going to be any good the Sun really needs to go below the treeline else is just gonna create too much of a highlight in the water so I’m gonna keep working on the composition here and get it ready for the sunset I think I’ve found the best possible use of this foreground meaning the best composition here at least in my opinion what I did was moved the camera a little bit to the left just so that I could get the rock formation and leading line just in a little bit more of an angle really and that’s created well quite a lot more interest in in the whole image I think the only thing that the Sun is actually moving a bit further away than this foreground would have liked I’m actually quite uncertain about the sunset itself right now because it really seems to be quite a thick cloud coverage at the horizon from what I can see behind me nothing is really kicking anywhere it’s a little bit of colors out towards the left it’s the southeast something like that and well my only hope really now is that some colors is gonna to come when the sun goes low enough so that it gets under that cloud and hopefully can shine up something in these lighter clouds that above me now waiting game ok so the sun is setting properly now and it’s looking a little bit better than my worst fears but it could’ve looked better as well so it’s going so so at the moment we’re now having the absolute last light of the Sun Ray some nice purple in the clouds but it is really super visible and its really really small portion of the sky lighting up I’m thinking that perhaps I should actually wait a bit longer and see if something of the blue hour could perhaps add something more to this image because the sun’s it wasn’t really that good and perhaps some other type of light could create more interest in the image than what I’m currently having you can see behind me here it’s actually really beautiful but I’m set on the composition that I already have and I don’t want to change it to well somewhere over here even though it’s almost like an infinity see if over here you can see it’s almost like an infinity gradient there it is really really beautiful but as I said I’m set on the composition here I’m not going to change that because if i start to fool around with changing composition now it’s just I’m just going to ruin the one that I have and then it’s probably going to be something nice coming over here and then I won’t be able to get it there because I well lost the composition so I’m gonna stick with it that’s usually the best way to do these kinds of things in my opinion and hopefully it’s going to work out I guess my patients kind of got rewarded right now because the last really the last light is shining now I guess and would get I got some nice pink color even coming up above on these small clouds and that’s really a lot better than I actually hoped for for her because well it wasn’t looking like it was supposed to get well it didn’t look like I was going to get that kind of color but receiving it like this is just really nice it’s getting just blue really blue behind me now the last of the color is most certainly going away now and that nice gradation that I had won’t really be following around as a first thought because that can’t gradation I guess only happens when the water goes out all the way to the horizon because when the reflection and will the sky and the reflection of the sky in the water meet in a more natural way over here we have some land on the horizon so it really really destroys that kind of feature it really isn’t present when there’s a land mass at the horizon ok so now the color is gone real and I’m quite satisfied actually I think it turned out well I wont say better than expected I didn’t really have I didn’t really know when I went here or when I start to walk but I would say that it turned out better than I thought from well when I got to the location here so i’m actually quite satisfied with this it’s really calm just I wouldn’t like to say it’s the first real sensation that’s touching on well a summer sensation even though it’s really cold right now it was well extremely nice just being out here and standing by the water listening to the water I’m well there was a lot of seagulls nesting the that’s not really the most or the prettiest thing to listen to but hey it’s part of summer i guess anyway that’s all for me this time thank you all for watching I hope to see you all next week until then goodbye

Off-Camera Flash Tutorial (Wireless Flash/Remote Flash/PocketWizard)

Off-Camera Flash Tutorial (Wireless Flash/Remote Flash/PocketWizard)


Hi, I’m Tony Northrup and for chapters 3 and 6 of my book I want to tell you about using a remote flash. By taking your
external flash off camera you can get studio lighting effects on the cheap. So you’ll need a little bit of extra
equipment, the cheapest way to get into it is to use what they call an off-
camera shoe cord. These shoe cords aren’t expensive at all,
but they have a limited reach and if you get a longer cord there’s a good chance
somebody is going to trip over it. For that reason this type of cord is
primarily used by wedding photographers who happen to use a bracket to allow
them to move the flash from horizontal to vertical positions. A better solution
is to get a wireless shutter trigger. These triggers from cowboystudio will
only cost you about thirty dollars. You connect one to the flash and one to your
camera and any time you push the shutter the flash
will fire. These cheap versions are a little bit limited though. First, they’re not completely reliable,
they’ll flake out sometimes and they might even break on you. So they’re not good
for professional use but that might be okay for amateur use. Second, they
don’t communicate all the, what they call the ETTL information, from the flash to
the camera. So your camera might not be able to auto
expose your flash correctly. That means you’ll need to manually adjust the flash
up and down. If you’re comfortable doing that it’s actually a great way to learn
and it’s something I prefer anyway. If you have a little bit more in your
budget you can upgrade to a PocketWizard system. PocketWizard is the system that I use
and the system will cost you about 450 maybe 500 bucks for both the transmitter
and the receiver. However, they’re completely reliable and
they work just great. So, to demonstrate how you can use off camera flash, I’m going to start by
taking a picture of Chelsea there without any flash. Note that i’m using a
remote shutter trigger which allows me to trigger my camera without actually
standing next to it. This will allow me to move around with
the flash. This system only costs about thirty dollars, you can get an off-brand
for that and I’ve had great luck with it. So I’ll fire that first picture. That’s
without any flash at all, not a bad effect. Now we’ll try it with an
on-camera flash. The on-camera flash look isn’t bad but it’s really common and it’s very flat. It adds a catch light to the eyes but it
also hides a lot of the detail in the face and doesn’t bring out, say, the
cheekbones in a portrait. You can make that much better by taking
your flash off camera. The first thing I’ll do is I’ll take a
picture with Chelsea and I’ll hold the flash just a little bit higher than it
would normally be so you can see the difference. I think that’s already a much more
pleasing effect. But as long as you’ve got the flash off camera you can walk
anywhere with it and check out the difference between side lighting, back
lighting, or any other type of lighting that you want. I’ll walk around now and
take a few different pictures so you can see the variety of different effects
that are available. You can see the wide variety of effects just by
moving the light to different places around the model. I want to show you one more trick. We’ll move to a wider angle shot of Chelsea and I’ll show you that you can
remove yourself from the photo. So this allows you to stand closer to the model
making the light brighter and a little bit softer by adding those two layers in
photoshop later we’ll be able to remove you or your light stand from the picture. So, first a shot without me in the picture.
Now I will move into the frame so I can light Chelsea directly with the flash. By using multiple exposures we can add those two pictures as layers into
Photoshop. Then, using the eraser tool I can simply erase myself from the picture. It’s an old photographers trick, it actually happened in the film days using multiple
exposures. This was for chapters three and six in
my book Stunning Digital Photography. If you liked it please click Subscribe
above so you can see new videos that I make and click like down below. Check out my facebook page Tony Northrup Photography and remember when you want to take portraits don’t just take it, make it.

Photography tips | What’s the best kit for wave photography? | I AM DIFFERENT (UK)

Photography tips | What’s the best kit for wave photography? | I AM DIFFERENT (UK)


My name is Clark Little
and I’m a wave photographer. This is my Nikon D4, my go-to camera in
big shorebreak. This is AquaTech housing and it’s got
a two-stage trigger. So the top button
actually focuses and in the bottom
is the trigger. And the reason why I take this
in large shorebreak is it shoots 10 to 11 frames
if is the D4, D4S a second so when
that wave is coming over trying to get
as much frames as I can before I try to sneak out
the back of the wave. I got a 10.5 fisheye lens when there’s
a huge barrel breaking over. I wanna see the lip crashing. I wanna see the sand sucking up
on the left side. I wanna see that backdrop,
the mountains, the coconut trees To get that perfect shot,
fisheye is the best. And that’s pretty much
my go-to lens. There’s no sense I go out there
and I shoot with a 35 or 50mm and only get part of the wave
I want to get the whole tube. This is my D800
with the 10.5 fisheye lens. I like the D800 because
it’s lighter, more compact. I use it to shoot a lot of turtles,
sharks, dolphins. The mega pixels are really high
which means I can go in and I can crop some of
a beautiful sections out and still get
a very high quality image. This is my go-to flash
Nikon SB-910. It gives me the light
when it’s dark. It’s really cool to see the night
shots or early early morning shots. It really lights up
the barrels at night. It’s a little bit spooky,
it kind of shows that fear. I think in the images. So this is Clark Little’s kit. Obviously swim fans
are mandatory. Rash guard,
long sleeve preferable. AquaTech housings. And the best cameras
in the planet Nikon.