CAMERA BASICS – Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO

CAMERA BASICS – Aperture, Shutter Speed, and ISO


what’s going on guys today I want to
give you a quick overview on aperture shutter speed and ISO you aperture shutter and ISO these are the
big three when it comes to photography and they can be a little bit tricky to
understand it first so hopefully I can help you understand the relationship
which will make things a lot simpler for you Daniel Peter over at photo blog
Hamburg put together this cheat sheet on the big three and it’ll hopefully give
you a visual as I discussed today so let’s break this down we’re gonna go
through each one by one and we’re gonna go over the two main functions of each
now each of the three controls exposure but on top of that each of the three
also has an artistic control so let’s start with aperture aperture is the
measure of how open or closed the iris of your lenses and it’s measured in the
term called f-stop the larger your f-stop number the more closed down your
irises which means it lets in less light and thus the exposures darker this
smaller your f-stop number the larger the opening of your iris meaning it’s
letting in more light meaning you have a brighter exposure now there is an
artistic use of aperture as well and that’s depth of field when you have a
low f-stop number meaning you’re letting in a lot of light in your exposures
brighter you’re gonna have a shallower depth of field this is how you’re gonna
have nice cinematic look in your photos and in your videos when you have a
higher aperture or f-stop number you’re gonna have a much larger depth of field
this is great when you’re shooting some sort of landscape or environment where
you want everything in focus second we’ve got shutter now the shutter is the
measure of how long the shutter of your camera is open and thus allowing light
to hit your camera sensor so when we’ve got a fast shutter one over two
thousandth of a second for example it means that you’re gonna be letting in
less light you’re only letting in light for one mm of a second which means it’s
gonna be a darker exposure than a longer shutter speed because you’re only
letting in that brief amount of light if we have a longer exposure say 15 seconds
that means your shutters open for 15 whole seconds and letting in light for
that amount of time which means it’s gonna be
a much brighter exposure now that’s the exposure level of shutter but what’s the
artistic use well the artistic use is motion blur when you have a very fast
shutter you’re essentially freezing time you could be taking an action photo or
some sort of sport photo with a high shutter and it’s freezing that action
you won’t see any blur it’s as though everything is just stopping however if
you have a long exposure you’re gonna start to have blur in your shots because
the shutter is open wide and every motion that’s happening for the entirety
of that shutter being open is getting captured by the sensor with long shutter
speeds this is how you’re gonna get those night trail or sorry the light
trail photographs or you’re gonna get photos of the stars it’s when you’re
doing these very long exposures that you can do these sort of tricks but for
these you want to make sure that your cameras on a tripod because any motion
in the camera is gonna be picked up by the sensor and finally we have ISO ISO
measures the sensitivity or the post image grain in your sensor so what this
means when you have a high ISO it means that your camera sensor is more
sensitive to light so it’s gonna be a brighter exposure however it’s also more
sensitive to grain so your image actually breaks down a little and gets
somewhat grainy and noisy whereas if you have a low ISO somewhere around 100
you’re gonna have a lot less sensitivity which means that your exposure is darker
but your image is a lot crisper and less grainy this is something to think about
when you’re in dark place and you’ve already adjusted your shutter and
aperture and you need to play with your ISO if you push the limits too high then
you’re gonna run into some grain issues when you’re looking back at your footage
or your photos based on the artistic look that you’re going for it you can
combine any of these three when you want to get your exposure to the right level
and you want to adjust your depth of field your motion blur and make sure
that your camera sensitivities at the proper levels these are the three that
you need to use and you can sort of get a sense of how their relationship works
we’ll get into a more detailed description of how each of these work in
future videos but for now I hope you have a better understanding of the big
three and how they relate thanks for checking it out guys go ahead and like
and subscribe and we’ll check you back in the next one you

My “ULTIMATE” CANON EF Full Frame Lens Kit

My “ULTIMATE” CANON EF Full Frame Lens Kit


Jared Polin: Right before we jump into this
video, if you haven’t signed up for the froknowsphoto email list, just look for this orange box
over on the website. Put your name, e-mail address in it, hit send
it and I will send you a free guide to capturing motion in low light situations. Jared Polin, froknowsphoto.com and if I shot
Canon, this would be my ultimate full frame lens kit. I want to preface that I’m missing just
a couple of lenses and I’ll talk about those closer to the end. But let’s start down at this side and work
our way all the way down. Here we have a 50 mm 1.2 that’s going to
come handy in low light situations, as well as when you are shooting portraits, it’s
going to be super tack sharp and moving up, you also have the 85 1.2, I would love to
have those lenses in my bag. I do not have a 24 1.4 or the 35 1.4, those
would make it into my ultimate Canon full frame lens kit if I had them, but I don’t. Now, again these are not mine. I do not own these because I do not shoot
the Canon cameras all the time. Then we move up to the 8-15 fisheye. I think that belongs in your bag even though
I’m not a big fan of fisheye, especially circular fisheye at 8 mm, but I think this
is a super tack sharp and a super colorful lens when you shoot it out at 15 mm, it looks
really nice. Even though it’s an f/4, I think it’s
worthy of being in your ultimate lens kit as well. Moving down the list, we have a 24-105 version
1. Now that they have come out with the version
2, I would probably add that here. Let me tell you why that makes it into the
kit. If you are a run and gun video shooter, this
lens is going to be a great one to have. You’ve got the 24 mm. You’ve got the 105 and you have the IS for
the stability that is a great lens. Now, we are moving closer to the Hebrew Trinity
on the Canon side. We have the 24-72.8 version 2, which is an
absolute tremendous in a suite lens. I love this bad boy and for those of you who
want to shoot macro, this is a 100 mm macro 2.8. That is awesome to have in your bag as well. Then we have the 11-24 f/4. It’s a $3000 piece of glass. But if you are putting together a Hebrew Trinity
on the Canon side, this must be there. Some of you may say why isn’t the 16-35
there? Honestly, because I think the 11-24 is better. I would go from the 11-24 to the 24-70 and
the 16-35 isn’t really needed and if you have a 5D Mark IV, you have to remember that
that video in 4K has that 1.74 time crop factor, so you are going to need a much wider lens
if you own that bad boy to shoot wider video. And rounding up the Hebrew Trinity for the
Canon, we have the 70-200 2.8 version 2. That lens sharp as can be I think it’s sharper
than the Nikon version. I absolutely love this. And what other lenses would be in my ultimate
Canon full frame lens kit, we would have something like a 200 f/2, maybe a 200 to 400 or 400
2.8, a 500, I don’t need the 500 f/4, we’ll go with the 600 f/4 and definitely not an
800 5.6, because that would be more expensive than almost all of these lenses combined. But this is really what would consist of my
ultimate Canon full frame lens kit. I want to know what would consist in your
ultimate Canon lens kit. Leave some comments down below. Don’t forget to subscribe here on YouTube. Give it a thumbs-up if you like Canon glass. And if you don’t like Canon glass, just
hit the thumbs-up for me. That’s all I have to say. The thumbs-up absolutely helps. And if you want to check out my ultimate Nikon
lens kit, go ahead click up on the screen right now. It’s going to take you over to that video. So, you can see the lenses that I think would
be great on the Nikon side. So, that is it guys. That’s where I’ll leave it Jared Polin,
froknowsphoto.com. See you.

Reacting to Popular Photography Myths

Reacting to Popular Photography Myths


Hey guys. Jr Franisco here welcome to my
channel. There are a lot of opinions or beliefs that we hear around the
photography industry. Some are good. Some are bad. Some are funny. Some are annoying.
And there are some that just doesn’t make sense. So today, I want to go through
some of the popular photography beliefs or myths and give you guys my take on
some of these topics. One of the most popular and probably the one that makes
me shake my head the most, is the belief that buying an expensive camera would
equal to great photos. There are a lot of people out there that think that
photographers have good photos because they have expensive cameras. No. No. No.
Michael Jordan is not good in basketball because of his Air Jordans Tiger Woods
is not Tiger Woods because he has expensive golf clubs. They are good at
what they do because they put a lot of time and effort to really improve their
skills. Good photographers are the same way. To be good at taking photos, it takes
more than just buying the most expensive camera. It would take a photographer a
lot of practice and hard work. What an expensive camera could provide a
photographer, is the flexibility to make their job easier. So if you’re a new
photographer and you think you can shortcut your way by buying an expensive
camera, then you’re doing it wrong my friend. Another popular opinion out
there is that a lot of people think that photography is so easy because all we do
is press a button. What a lot of people don’t realize that there are a lot more
things that goes on way before we press the shutter. We got to think about
exposure, lighting, composition, and so on. Things that would require a photographer a
lot of knowledge and skills to get the photo right. I’ve done a lot of hard jobs
in the past, and I would have to say even though photography is really fun, it’s
one of the hardest. From planning the shoot, looking for location,
waking up early, being on your feet from 8 to 13 hours a day, a photographer’s job
requires more than just pressing the button. Another popular photography belief out
there is that you should never shoot against the sun or any light. If you guys
would take a look at my work, you guys would notice that my favorite photos to
take her the ones that are backlit or taken against the sun. So if you’re new
to photography don’t be afraid to shoot against the light. Play around with it
and trust me you’ll get amazing photos. The next one is the belief that pro
photographers should only shoot in manual mode and manual focus.
I agree that to be a good photographer that you should learn how to use your
camera manually. Because this could really help you improve your skills in
craft. But I think only shooting in manual mode, could also hurt your growth as
a photographer. Especially if you’re not open on using other modes and settings. Sometimes a location requires a
photographer to quickly adjust to different lighting situations. So knowing
how to shoot properly an automatic settings, such as aperture priority or
shorter priority, would really come in handy. So you got to learn how to use
them accordingly. The last thing that I’m going to talk about today is the belief
that post-processing or editing your photos is cheating. A lot of people argue
that to be a good photographer, you should get it right on camera. But there
are also very good photographers that likes to bring us to a different world through
their post-processing. And this is why I’m right on the middle when it comes to
this topic. I can see the argument from both sides. But for me personally, I don’t
think editing cheating. For me, I like to keep my work right in the middle. I
like to do my composition, exposure, and lighting on point right away. So I make
sure I get this right in camera. Then I will do a little retouching and tone work
on post to get my image looking at its best. Editing my photos is something I
enjoy doing as well. So I don’t see this coming away from my workload anytime
soon. So for me I think it’s important to have the right balance of both. You don’t
want to overdo your editing work and at the same time you don’t want to keep relying
on post-processing to save you every time you took a bad photo. I know there
are a lot more out there that we can talk about. So let’s continue with the
discussion of the comment section, hit like, click subscribe. And see you guys in
the next video.

Shutter Priority (TV mode)

Shutter Priority (TV mode)


shutter priority or time value as it’s also known is a semi-automatic mode on your
camera which allows you to choose a shutter speed and the camera will go away and find an
aperture to work with it therefore the camera is automatically
controlling the exposure whilst you control the shutter, you’re saying the shutter is the most important thing in the whole wide world and that’s what i want to use. now shutters predominately an exposure
control the longer the shelter is open for more
light comes in, the less time the shutter is open less light comes in but you can also use
them creatively but it’s all about motion a slow shutter
speed will blur motion and get a real dynamic feel of moving in it and a fast shutter speed will freeze it,
hold it solid that’s why I’m walking round and round in circles. Now to demonstrate how the camera can freeze motion by using shutter priority what i’m gonna do is do a shot of my old skater mate Lawrence, coming past this grafitti behind me, but first we gotta set up the camera. so we’re in shutter priority mode
already, in want a fast shutter speed to freeze Lawrence and the background as he comes past it. So i’m gonna use a five hundreth of a second, that is a pretty fast shutetr speed which will be plenty to freeze something like a skateboarder. So i set the five hundred just look through the viewfinder of where you’re gonna be shooting to make sure the exposures okay, and straight away I can see it says low in the aperture side of you know the display. The reason for this is that a 500th of a second in rather dull light like this the camera can’t find a big enough aperture to make that shutter speed work. now when you’re in shutter priority mode
you also have control of your white balance and your Iso, now nothing on a camera works in isolation, if you tweak one thing you usually got to tweak something
else. I’m gonna tweak the Iso, because if I make the sensor more sensitive it will scoop up more light and it will allow the camera to find an aperture to work with if you’re not sure
about Iso’s then you need to watch the Iso film. So press the Iso button, let’s rack that up, i’m gonna go to 1000 Iso, so it’s a much more sensitive sensor. If I point it at the wall over there yeah, i’m getting between f7 and f8 now the camera now has
the ability to choose an aperture to work with the shutter speed up chosen. let’s see if
we can get a shot Lawrence coming down the path now. Lawrence go for it. Yeah that’s reall cool. All you have to do is put your focusing gun site on Lawrence in continuous mode and hold it there as he comes past, I’m panning the camera so everythings on the move but as you can see the shot of lawrence is beautifully frozen against the background. With this shot what I wanna do is to get Lawrence fairly sharp against
the background as he skateboards through but i want the background to blur to do
that I’m gonna set a slower shutter speed or slow-ish and I’m gonna move the camera with
Lawrence’s as he comes through. now if you try this technique yourself
and get it wrong don’t lose heart it really is quite tricky have to do it
many many times to get it right outside of film land we actaully did this about twenty times before i actually got the right shot and because i’ve already done it i know which shutter speed i need, I find that at a 50th of a second with lawrence going through I get the result i want. So set up the camera, shutter priority I’m gonna set a 50th of a
second onto the camera now the camera is straight away setting the aperture for me again look where the shots gonna be it’s over there now i’m getting a high reading, this time. so I’m gonna lower my Iso okay, because the Iso is now at 1000 from the last shot it’s really really
sensitive it’s not letting the camera find a small enough aperture for me to use for ther slow shutter speed. The shutters open for a long time and lot’s of light comes in. So, change the Iso let’s take that all the way back down i’m gonan go to round about 200, 250 maybe let’s have a look, er 250th of a second, sorry Iso 250 it gives me f16 aperture, the camera can find and aperture. Just kind of like go and watch the aperture films, and the Iso films if you haven’t quite got your head around that bit. We’re now set up, I know what’s going on. Lawrence go for it. I’m gonna pan with Lawrence as he comes through the shot, Now start shooting as he goes through, there we go. Yeah, bingo, look. We’ve got a nice blurred background and Lawrence is pretty sharp I’d gone
with Lawrence, my movements is with Lawrence but the blurred background is going on. Suppose
you wanna shoot the classic waterfall shot it’s the same thing it’s only instead moving the camera you
look good on the tripod you could you shutter priority to set a
slow shutter speed now the waterfall shot generally speaking needs about a half a second exposure, that’s a very long exposure and you may need to start adding neutral density filters, i’m not talking about that in this one. hopefully that has explained shutter priority to you, where you can use it and how to set it.

Street Photography Part 1c

Street Photography Part 1c


I’ve got the wide angle lens on this body as i’m walking down the street. because i’m far more likely to see
something interesting and be able to grab it with the wide lens, than to faff around and zoom in with a a long lens. but here’s something which is usually
pretty interesting isn’t it we all kind of go for shots of colorful fruit and veg and stuff on the market. i quite like this stuff, i just need to ask the man if it’s okay. hi mate, do you mind if i take a few shots of your fruits and veg, is that alright? yeah. who’s the boss? are you the boss? yes, hello my dear, do you mind if we take a few shots of your fruits and veg and stuff, what is that for then? we run, and shoot little films teaching people to use there cameras and that sort of thing. everybody want’s to take nice pictures down the market. okay, well as long as when i get a few customers, don’t block them out, nah, nah i won’t get in your way of customers at all. that’s very kind of you. she’s a nice lady. well the first thing i like is, well isn’t it weird the first thing about market shops fruit and veg traders all have signs like that, i don’t know why, it doesn’t matter who you are or in which country anywhere in the world in any city or any town they always look like that, i don’t know why. i don’t know, it must be some kind of deep psychological thing. Look at that. we have the pink grapefruit cut in half. now i expect when it was first cut i half it looked lovely, i expect it was all, bright and vibrant and gorgeous, it’s not quite so good now but none the less i still think there’s a shot to be had here, with the grapefruit sign above it. wide lens again, i’m going for the, wide lens, i don’t know why, i don’t know i just am. because i wan’t to try and get close to the grapefruit, yeah that’s going to work i want to get very close to the fruit, i want the feeling that you’re almost in the box with the fruit. i like this halved grapefruit, because it i dunno kind of breaks up the grapefruit. i like the market trader sign. and i like the building in the background, and of the canopy, because this bit of canopy really really says market. also right now, we’ve got clouds in the sky if the sun was out and it was a bright sky, that would just burn into white, but at the moment i think they’ll be some detail in the sky too. so bright sunshine isn’t always the best let’s just get in close here, ow there’s even a strip of street light going on over there. so let’s get in close, and focus on the cut fruit, here we go. adjust and just squeeze that. i want to get a different angle on it. i’m going to zoom my lens only a bit. it’s not working, that’s better. so i’m focusing on the cut fruit. I’ve zoomed it in only very slightly, from ten to about thirteen millimeters. focus on the cut fruit, and and i’m tilting the camera slightly, and I’ve got the pink grapefruit three for one pound going on in the background. i quite like that. i think that’s okay, that’s cool. now then sorry i’m very tempted to say melons, aha can’t help myself i’m such a kid. but let’s have a look at your melons dear. now then. what does this look like at the moment I’ve got, ordinary people in my shot, have a look. there’s janey with the camera, now let’s see, janey can you go that way a bit. i’m going to have a look along the stall. That’s quite cool, melons one pound. people walking up the street. here we go, there’s a little bit of street photography going on. now look at that, now as i took that last shot, and i had to do it very quickly i focused on the melons I’ve just got a bit of the sign there, but not as much as i wanted the reason i did it quickly was i liked the two guys walking up the street. i wanted to put them i the opposite corner of the picture to the fruit. this is were you’ve gotta kind of have eyes everywhere, and you’ve gotta move quickly. this is why aperture priority semi-auto mode works so so well and you don’t want to have to be thinking about is my shutter speed going to be fast enough so use a faster ISO in the first place. so kind of worked. i really really like these kind of clementine oranges. and we’ve got a guy being served, that’s really cool. so i’m talking quietly because i don’t want the to over hear me. uh… look at that, look at that. large clementines. cool. really really nice isn’t it aw nice. ca i take a picture of your carrots my dear? you may take a picture of the carrots. thank you right, i like that, i do like that. sorry i’m going to use the wide angled lens. look at that. i love that. oh look. how much more market-y could this get? than that. i’m going to have another go, ow i knocked her stall there. look at that, let’s get real close. i want them i’m gonna get real close to
the carrots. ah, if i can just focus. it’s difficult to focus there we go we’ve got a focus. choice carrots. look at that. how market-y is that for a still life? it’s cool isn’t it? and it’s so easy, and how nice people are. it’s not like these are people who have met me loads of times. but if you come back each week to the market and talk to the traders, and get people used to seeing you, their going to be really really cool about letting you take some pictures. do you mind if i just go round the other side? no that’s fine you’re very kind, thank you. the labels will be the wrong way. but i’m being sneaky actually because i just like looking across them from this angle like that. because it’s a real market-y sort of a shot i like the colours too. let’s just tilt this that way, look at that. they’re nice. yeah, i quite like that you see, that’s quite a nice wide angle very much on the market shot. the preserves a really really strong in
the foreground leading it up to the guy in the corner. So let’s just analysis this composition, because i need to make sure i tell you things not just let you watch me do things. I set the shot up ten mill lens, very very wide i’m still working at, no i’m not i’m working at a four point five, i must have knocked it by accident, i was hoping i’d get a great depth of field. but with that lens it shouldn’t be an issue. very in close so the so that the left hand corner of the picture has got jams and preserves very very strong but i compose it by moving the camera very slowly so that the guy who runs the stall is in the right hand corner. so we’ve got a bit of a dynamic going on these jams and preserves going to the man in the corner. there’s quite a diagonal dynamic going on there. i’m still shooting aperture priority i’m letting the camera deal with the
exposure i’m keeping my iso high. Then hopefully, seeing what’s been going on here is giving you an insight into how easy it can be to do a bit of street photography. the big thing is you have to own, there’s a kind of thing in your head it’s a mental space you have to be happy to just talk to people, ask them things be up front be straight about it, if you start being sneaky and kind of going, like that and think oh my god there watching, then they’re going to think what’s that bloke up to. so there we go, we’re gonna come back again and we’re going to look at photographing with the traders rather more than photographing their products. Get out there with your camera, have a play with this, go and take some still life’s on some markets and post them to our Facebook page, we’d love to see them.

Medium Format Digital vs. 35mm DSLR Cameras – Which is better?

Medium Format Digital vs. 35mm DSLR Cameras – Which is better?


Hello guys Josh Geiger here. Product
photographer from Atlanta and instructor at photigy.com. Today we’re going to talk
about two types of cameras, 35 millimeter DSLR and medium format DSLR I like most
of you started out on a 35-millimeter system and its really all we’ll ever
need for the majority of our work but sometimes we find ourselves in a
situation where we need to upgrade or we’re looking to upgrade down the road
and when you start talking about systems like this you’re looking at big money
and it’s a good idea to have a little bit more information before diving
straight in when I was looking around online for more information about medium
format systems I found the basic information kind of hard to find if you
root around deep enough you can find you know a whole bunch of technical
information but I was really just want to start at the beginning the basics and
that’s kind of what we’re going to do today we’re going to break down each
camera system to their main parts talk a little bit about them and then we’re
going to dive a little bit deeper and do a pros and cons comparison we’re going
to look at some of the benefits of each system some of the negatives of each
system obviously it cost comparison maybe a little bit of photo comparisons
and you might be surprised at what you don’t get for fifteen to thirty thousand
dollars let’s check these out first we’re going to start with the 35
millimeter system that we’re all pretty familiar with but for those of you who
don’t know everything about these and we’re not going to go over everything we
are going to dive a little bit deeper and break this down so let’s go ahead
and do that alright so here we have a nikon d700 this belongs to a buddy of
mine i’m currently using my d800 making this video so it still gets plenty of
use this is a 12.1 megapixel camera it shoots like five to eight frames per
second and it’s a full-frame camera meaning that it’s chip is the same size
as a full piece of 35 millimeter film but that’s not all there is to this
camera so let’s take a deeper look inside okay
so looking at the 35 millimeter DSLR it’s pretty simple we have two main
parts here the body and the lens I’ll remove this lens cap real quick and a
lens hood and we see our front element our rear element and inside of this lens
we have aperture blades that open and close to varying amounts allowing more
or less light in which is actually referred to as your f-stop obviously the
more that is closed down the less light will come in the more open it is more
light will obviously come in looking at the body you can see inside here there’s
a mirror that mirror actually reflects the image up into the viewfinder behind
that mirror is the shutter curtain and the sensor when you press the shutter
button the mirror flips up the curtain does its thing in the sensors exposed
looking at the back we have our LCD screen which on the majority of new
DSLRs is really great our regular controls for the different functions
which will of course vary depending on the body that you have whether it’s
Nikon or Canon or any other brand that’s pretty simple LCD on the top for just
viewing more information and that’s the basics this camera actually happens to
have a pop-up flash most do and of course slots for memory cards and here
our battery slot very simple hasn’t changed much in a pretty long time with
the exception of maybe you know software options
and that’s it moving on from this we’re going to take a look at the medium
format system okay so now that we’ve seen the 35 millimeter system we’re
going to do the same thing to this here we have a medium format DSLR the body is
a mamiya 645 DF they also make a DF + and you’ll notice too that you see
cameras that look just like this thats a phase one on them phase one I believe
purchased mamaya leaf and so they produce the same bodies with you know
the different name on them I think now they might actually all be phase one but
it’s the same camera here we have the digital bag this is a leaf aptus to 10
it’s 56 megapixels and the chip in this is a little bit wider format then is
typically found in other medium format digital bags also you’ll notice that the
battery on this is external on newer backs a lot of the batteries are
internal which is kind of nice and it also helps with some weather proofing
I’m not sure I think they have some weather proofing digital bags not
positive anyway that said let’s take a deeper look inside this what I’m going
to do first is just go ahead and break these pieces down and then we’ll talk
about them individually so getting started I have here a really right stuff
L bracket on here so I’ll remove that and then I’ll remove the battery so we
can just set this down flat make it easier to deal with if I can manage to
get this piece on here oh that would help wouldn’t it okay so first let’s
take off the lens it’s a little bit different than we’re used to on the 35
millimeter systems normally you’d have a button on either side of the lens that
you would press and rotate the lens off here the button is actually over here
which is actually kind of dangerous because I’m always afraid I’m going to
hit that which is partially do I keep that L bracket on here it kind
of blocks that but anyway moving on let’s take that off for a second and put
the cap on and then our body we will remove our digital back and I’m just
going to put the cap on that real quick while we talk about some other stuff I’m
just a little protective of that to keep the chip clean so looking at this body
obviously it’s bigger than the 35 millimeter body but the first thing we
notice is we can see straight through it it does still have a mirror in here and
actually a focusing screen but when you take off the back it automatically flips
up it really works just like a regular 35 millimeter DSLR the only real
difference is the chip comes off the back there is a shutter in here it just
so happens that this lens is a mamaya sec or d schneider leaf shutter lens and
what that means is is unlike the 35 millimeter lens this not only has
aperture blades it also has its own built-in shutter which has its own
blades they call Leafs and the benefit to this really is just that you get very
high sync speeds on this it actually sinks up to 116 hundredth of a second
which can be quite handy in a myriad of situations but setting that aside again
with the rest of this body we have our LCD screen our control knob
your regular array of scroll wheels and doodads for changing your different
options and then actually i’ll move this over here here we have our digital bag
this is pretty cool because it’s basically a little computer what we have
here is our normal LCD screen on the back which as I said we’ll talk more
about in the pros and cons it is a touchscreen LCD this particular back is
a firewire tethered support back some of them will do USB 3 even some of the
newer ones you’ll get Wi-Fi support for tethering which is really nice but we’re
moving that if we put the battery back on you can see we have an external
battery some of the new digital backs have the bit battery um built in which
is kind of nice it just reduces a little bit of the bulkiness and then let’s just
take a look at this chip for a second look at the size of that bad boy typically a full frame medium format
chip is going to be twice the size of a 35-millimeter chip and without getting
too specific into technicalities here basically what that means is larger
depth of field more sharpness and all-around image goodness but breaking
them down they’re really pretty similar to the 35 millimeter systems biggest
difference being this little computer pops off the back and is incredibly
expensive so I guess now we’ll get into the meat of this situation which would
be the pros and cons where’s one beat the other and let’s do that now okay so
now that we’ve broken down both of these systems and taking a look at their main
parts we’re going to do a little pros and cons comparison let’s start with the
35 millimeter system first it’s got an accurate auto focus it’s fast it’s
accurate there are tons of auto focus points on the majority of these DSLRs
and having the ability to fly around the viewfinder with your selection wheel and
just pick a specific thing that you want to focus on is a real big help
especially if you’re looking through the viewfinder it’s sometimes hard to see
and check focus visually so the electronic focus check is pretty much
imperative if you’re not tethered to something with live view also is OS in
these cameras because of the chip they use the iso range is incredible most of
them come around standard or native a hundred ISO and go upwards of you know
6400 and then ridiculous numbers above that high one high 2 & 2 just crazy
numbers I normally wouldn’t go above 1600 iso I just happen to like it’s
clean of images as possible I know some people like noise especially in black
and white photography but needless to say the ISO ranges in here
are great and you can get some really clean photos with iso s in the four six
eight hundred range and that’s real beneficial in low-light conditions also
the capture rate another benefit to the chips and knees is that they can capture
images faster like I said this camera i think will do five frames or so some of
the higher-end cameras will go upwards of 10 or 11 frames a second which is
just so fast rear displays on these cameras talking about our LCD they’re
great they’re bright they produce color nicely which leads us into the other
thing is that a lot of these you can do video and having a nice screen that’s
got a high resolution is good to have when you’re doing video work easy access
to controls there’s tons of buttons on these cameras everything’s pretty much
right at your fingertips that’s really nice not having to dive down into menus
and select around and find what you’re looking for and make your adjustment it
just speeds up the workflow quite a bit weatherproofing most DSLRs are going to
have some degree of weather proofing I wouldn’t soak them in a tub or anything
like that but I’ve seen plenty of instances where in a light drizzle or
something you don’t really have to worry about it I’ve seen other instances where
somebody left their camera outside in a storm and it was just soaking wet and it
survived I wouldn’t suggest that but I’ve seen it done and they’re not too
expensive for what you get you know you can get upwards of probably seven or
eight thousand dollars on a high-end DSLR body and 35 millimeter format but
really for somewhere between you know one and three thousand dollars you can
get a really nice camera it’ll do pretty much anything you needed
to do and there’s tons of lenses available form a lot of manufacturers a
lot of specialty lenses macro lenses tilt-shift lens is really that kind of
boils down to the markets just so much larger you know when there’s a lot of
people out there with these cameras that’s a lot more customers out there
for companies to create products for I guess that kind of brings us to the
negatives the downsides I don’t really consider it a downside but when you’re
comparing it to a medium format system you could say image quality nowadays the
images you get out of these 35 millimeter systems are incredible but
you do get a little bit more out of a medium format camera they’re difficult
to clean as we saw earlier when you break one of these down and you look
inside you know if you want to clean the sensor you got to lock the mirror up and
then get a light so you can see what you’re doing down there and you know
special tools and there’s oil in there for the mirror to flip up and stuff and
you don’t want to touch anything and smear oil inside and it’s just really
kind of a hassle to get in there and most people actually suggest you just
have them done professionally I’d call that a downside and I guess probably
least of the worries is if you’re dealing with high-end clients or
something like that they’re just not that impressive you know a camera’s a
camera is a camera but if you’re dealing with a client it’s used to walking in
and seeing somebody using you know either large-format cameras or medium
format DSLRs and they come in and they see a 35-millimeter DSLR it doesn’t mean
you can’t do the job right or produce images they want necessarily but it
might make them feel not as comfortable as they were when they originally hired
you for the job but I wouldn’t let that hold you back that’s not reason enough
to upgrade to a medium format system that said I think that’s probably all
the cons that I could come up with on these things they’re just great little
cameras wonderful and I guess we’ll move on to
breaking down the medium format let’s go okay so now we’re going to do the same
thing with the medium format DSLR first the pros I would think that the first
pro that I have with this is if you’re going to work a system like this you
have to have a digital back and by having the digital back you have more
versatility because one thing that we know is you can take the digital back
off and put it on a technical camera that just opens up you know the
possibilities of what you can actually do with the equipment and that’s just
amazing of course the image quality you’re dealing with a sensor that’s
twice a size as a 35-millimeter sensor and that’s going to produce shallower
depth of field it’s going to capture more light it’s going to be sharper and
of course that’s all the stuff we’re going for but what it also does is
provides more color information more accurate color representation larger
dynamic ranges you know from the blacks to the whites you know you’re looking at
12 14 stops of dynamic range and easy to clean you know when you take that back
off that chip sitting right there you just get your swab wipe it clean it up
brand new of course you know it’s impressive that’s just kind of a little
ego driven thing there I guess and you have great lenses available on these
things now you don’t have the range of lenses like you do in here which will go
in the con list but the lenses you do have available for these are superb
they’re sharp they’re crisp you have the leaf shutter options in some of the
lenses they’re just magnificent and of course another thing that’s not
necessarily a benefit of the camera itself but when you get into a system
like this is the customer service you get from the company that you purchase
from I don’t know about all of the you know different companies and plans
available and stuff like that but I know that if something goes wrong with this
camera I can have it taken to the shop I’ll get something to use in exchange
for it it’ll be taken care of in no time and ship back to me I’ve heard some
horror stories of course on both sides and you can’t win them all all the time
but I have heard a lot of bad things about new models and cameras that come
out in the 35 millimeter world my d800 when it first came out had some issues
and luckily I ended up with a model that came out after those issues were taken
care of but I haven’t heard of that many issues out of medium format systems I
would think that’s mostly because when you have a customer forking out that
kind of money the last thing you want is for them to be angry with you because
you didn’t give them a functioning product that said I’m only saying that
because I personally haven’t heard of any of those issues and then I guess
we’ll get to the cons the bad sides and you might be surprised at some of these
a they’re super expensive no kidding no surprise the lenses super expensive
maybe a little bit of a surprise but um I guess it should have been expected
right working with these you have a single focal point unlike these where
you look through the viewfinder and you have a ton of little boxes and a ray to
choose from and you can flick it around in there and get whatever you need in
here you have one circle in the middle of the frame that’s your focusing point
you do have the ability to kind of decide where it’s going to weigh you
know where it’s focusing so I’m like the edges of the focusing circle or the
center of the focusing circle but you can’t move it around the frame and when
you’re shooting something like this with a shallower depth of field that becomes
even more difficult because if you have to say focus and recompose
you got to be really careful doing that because the slight change in your
recomposition can completely blow your focus so it’s not the easiest thing in
the world to deal with of course again if you’re shooting tethered and you have
a live view saying capture one or some other similar program and becomes less
of an issue I so capabilities basically I wouldn’t use this camera on anything
over its native iso 100 if I have to I might put it on 200 but like I said I
like clean images but these things produce a lot of noise I think it might
go up to 800 iso and that’s just completely unusable so you’re not going
to be using these for sporting events low-light situations you know and some
soccer in a field at night of your family you’re definitely not going to be
getting photos with this guy you’re going to want to take something like
this with the long wide aperture lens and just have a blast and capture rate
you know on these we were talking about five frames a second upwards of 10 or 11
frames a second something like this you’re looking at one frame a second
maybe one point zero five frames per second something like that but uh
they’re slow and I think a lot of that has to do is just how long it takes to
process such a large image image file it’s it’s not really that big of a deal
for the kind of work I do if your still life photographer or something like that
but you know if you’re shooting say hi fashion or something and you’ve got a
model that’s there’s just a whole bunch of energy and she’s going through these
tons of poses and you want to be able to capture as much of that as possible this
you’re not really going to be able to do that with you know it’s going to be
click click click and that’s about as fast as it’s going to get the LCD screen
on the back of these cameras I’m not going to say this about the new ones
because some of the newer ones the Krytos and the IQ to
forties or two 80s or 2 60’s or whatever they are probably have really nice
screens on them I haven’t had my hands on one yet but I do know that the older
digital backs or even some of the newer versions of older models like the Aptus
series from leaf the screens just aren’t very good you get a lot of banding and
gradients and stuff like that for color representation and it’s just kind of
difficult to deal with the touchscreen is nice but you end up with fingerprints
all over the screen and I find myself having to wipe it constantly and no
built-in live view some of the newer ones do like I said the sum of the
Krytos and the IQ series from phase have live view built in and I can tell you
that would definitely be at the top of the pro list if I had one of those but
as of right now it’s got to sit on my con list because it’s in the majority of
the older more affordable digital backs that you find the lower quality screens
and accessing some of the controls you know if you take a look at this you
don’t have all the buttons that you had on this I mean it’s just buttons
everywhere on this thing here you’ve got a knob you know your dial of three or
four buttons here and a button here you know what I mean the rest of it is in
your digital back so if you want to change your white balance or your ISO or
any of that kind of stuff you have to go in here route into your menu or whatever
it is go to wherever it is and you can set up a favorites folder that has your
most accessed options and that’s pretty convenient but still it’s not really as
easy as just pressing the button scroll to where it is and you’re good to go I
find with this I don’t have to really look at what I’m doing when I’m making
changes with this I do and complicated custom settings you know over here it’s
pretty easy to set up custom menus and settings but over here when you get into
the customizations nothing’s really named
intuitively it’s like c1 c2 c3 and then there’s all these just different
categories that don’t have even abbreviations that make sense so you
kind of to keep a little cheat sheet with you or something that tells you
what they all mean if you play with that kind of stuff a lot I find myself not
doing that I tend to just keep it in manual hundred iso and then I’m just
messing with you know shutter speed and aperture and even shutter speed not that
often because I’m using you know strobes and I typically keep it a it max ink so
that would be that talking about the lenses again you know I said that with
medium format the lenses that are available are incredible but where you
have a problem is there aren’t that many available at least not in comparison to
35 millimeter there are a couple tilt shift lens available a couple of macro
lenses available but really the choices are fairly limited good news is the
choices that are there are superb they’re also incredibly expensive I
think I say like a 85 millimeter tilt shift lens from Schneider or well let’s
go with Nikon which is pretty much just as good it’s 90 millimeters from
schneider i believe the 85 millimeter tilt shift lens from nikon is going to
run you a couple thousand dollars and that’s expensive but it’s a great lens
and it will do what you needed to do however on medium format the 90
millimeter Schneider tilt shift I’m sorry 120 millimeter Schneider tilt
shift lens is depending on where you get it going to run you somewhere between
five thousand and six and a half thousand dollars that’s pretty expensive
likewise just regular you know leaf shutter macro lenses 120 millimeter from
the same company you’re looking at four grand ish four or five thousand dollars
so it’s very expensive but you do get the quality out of that and that pretty
much wraps up for this pros and cons when I only
had my d800 system when I was dreaming about having a medium format system I
kind of expected that if i was going to fork out that kind of money everything
would just be better that this all the options that you had in this would
transfer to this and it would just do the job better maybe even provide me
some new trickier options that weren’t previously available in this kind of
system that turned out not to be the case actually a lot of the things that
are available here are not available here and when they are available here in
a handful of instances they actually don’t perform as well as they do in the
35 millimeter system so as I said at the beginning of this you might be really
surprised at what fifteen to thirty thousand dollars won’t buy you in a
future part of this series we are going to compare a medium format DSLR system
with this digital back on a cambo Ultima monorail camera and we’re just going to
compare the pros and cons of using both of those systems obviously using the
large format system is going to slow things down a bit but it might get us
some really nice results that we don’t expect to we’ll see I’ve been Josh
Geiger with photo gcom and we’ll talk to you later

Nikon Z50 | Our Thoughts

Nikon Z50 | Our Thoughts


Here it is, the new Nikon Z50! I know what
you’re asking yourself. Does the Z50 live up to the hype? How does it compare to the
Z6 and Z7? Do I use hair gel or hair cream? All that and more, but before we get started, Remember to come visit us here at the Digital Goja
showroom in Miami. And, don’t forget, we publish new content weekly, so subscribe to
our channel and tap the bell icon to get notified about the latest videos. We got our hands on the Nikon Z50 and I’ve
been putting it through its paces. And the Nikon Z50 is the first Z-mount APS-C camera
and in terms of build, the body feels great. It has a full magnesium constructed body and
it feels good. The Z50’s body is actually quite small when compared to something like
the Z6 and Z7, but even with its smaller size it has a fantastic grip. They did a really
great job with its ergonomics. This camera actually weighs less than 1 pound and 4 ounces. It’s
also weather sealed so you can get your shots even if the weather isn’t cooperating, which
is a lot during Miami summers. The touch screen is a big plus. Vloggers and
content creators are going to love how easy it is to navigate through the camera’s menu
using the high resolution 3.2″ rear touch screen which happens to flip down. And it
flips down so an attached microphone or light doesn’t interfere with your view.
Now this is a great feature to have for hand holding and solves for the mic and flash obstruction
issue, but now it could introduce interference when using a selfie stick. What do you think?
Would you prefer the screen to flip up or are you a fan of having a flip down screen?
Let me know in the comments section below. The touch screen is responsive and convenient as you could use it to navigate through the
menus, choose your focus points, pinch to zoom when reviewing photos, and tap to shutter. But one feature I would have like to see is
touch and drag autofocus when using the viewfinder. This is a feature found on some similarly
priced cameras. Getting into the technical specs, the Z50
features a brand new 20.9-megapixel sensor with a new AF phase array. It’s capable
of shooting 11FPS at full resolution with continuous autofocus and auto exposure, and
the autofocus performance is on par with the Z6 and Z7 when shooting both stills and video. The Z50 uses a new battery, the EN-EL25 it
should give you about 300 shots on a fully charged battery. Nikon does include the battery
charger inside the box, but if you forget your charger at home, don’t worry because
you can still charge the battery with the USB cable. Just like the Z6 and Z7, the Z50 records 4K
ultra high definition video up to 30p with a bit rate up to 144 megabits pers second
 using the full width of the sensor and and you can record 1080p up to 120 frames
per second. But since the Z50 has an aps-c sized sensor the 1.5x crop factor still applies
to stills images as it applies to videos. The phase-detect autofocus is like that of the Z6 and Z7, the focus is smooth, precise,
and quick. It’s a significant improvement over the autofocus from Nikon’s DSLR cameras
that were using contrast detect autofocus. Now one thing you’ll notice or not notice is that the camera does lack a headphone jack,
so unfortunately you won’t be able to hear how your audio from your video sounds until
you play the audio back using the camera’s internal speakers or until you play it back
from your computer or mobile device. Unlike the Z6 and Z7, the Z50 does feature a pop-up flash, now this is going to be a
great option if you want to go without an external flash if space is an issue. The Nikon Z50’s menu interface is going
to be very familiar if you’re a Nikon shooter and it’s going to be very similar to that
of the Z6 and Z7. A cool thing that Nikon did when designing
this camera is that even though it’s smaller than their full frame mirrorless cameras,
such as the Z6 and Z7, it still uses the same Z mount. So you’ll be able to use all the
same lenses, just note that the lens equivalency is a bit different. Having the same mount
as their full frame cameras might be a selling point for many because you’ll be able to
upgrade to the Z6 or to the Z7 and not have to worry about buying a new lineup of lenses. Now, Nikon only has two DX Z-mount lenses
available that’s optimized for this APS-C camera, but the camera is fully compatible
with all the FX Z-mount lenses and is also compatible with over 300 plus F-mount lenses
when used with the optional FTZ mount adapter. The 2 DX Z mount lenses are the DX 16-50,
which is a very compact pancake-like zoom lens. And the other lens is the DX 50-250mm
telephoto zoom lens. So even though there are only 2 lenses available, you get a versatile
range covering you from 16mm for those wide-angle shots to 250mm when you want to pull a subject
in thats at a distance. Now the Nikon Z50 does not have in body image
stabilization like with the Z6 and Z7, but the DX lenses do have vibration reduction.
With the DX 16-50 you’re going to get about 4.5 stops of stabilization and with the 50-250mm
you’re getting roughly 5 stops of stabilization. And this functions great when extending both
kits lenses out since they’ll have a maximum aperture of 6.3. Now in terms of build quality, both lenses
are plastic in construction and have a plastic lens mount making them extremely light and
compact, but are extremely sharp as well. All in all, I think enthusiasts will really enjoy this camera and coming in at just under
$1000 for the Z50 and the 16-50mm lens… it’s not too shabby right? So if you liked this video hit the thumbs
up button below, subscribe to our channel and tap the bell icon. And if you’re in
the Miami area, come visit us here in the Digital Goja showroom. Thanks for watching
and we’ll see you in the next video.

Nikon COOLPIX B500 Hands-On and Opinion

Nikon COOLPIX B500 Hands-On and Opinion


Hey, this is Scott of Photography Banzai. In this video
I’m gonna go over this Nikon Coolpix B500. Thanks to Camera Craft in Rockford
Illinois for let me try this out with their shop. The B500 is a prosumer
extreme zoom camera. Has a 16 megapixel, 4:3 ratio sensor inside. It is backlit.
80 to 3200 ISO range. That zoom lens I mentioned goes from 22.5 to 900
millimeter equivalent focal length. So definitely a huge range. Also has a 1
centimeter, 0.39 inch, macro mode. So you can get some close shots as well. Has a
tilting 3-inch screen. It does not fully articulate, but you do get vertical
adjustments to the screen. Which is good, especially in the macro mode. This camera
does not have any type of viewfinder you have to use the back screen to compose
your photographs. One of the interesting features of this cameras is that it uses AA
batteries, 4 to be exact. Definitely many years back AAs
were more of a thing, but if you are interested in having a very common
battery for your camera this is an option. I’m a little surprised the
estimated battery life for the batteries is 600 shots. So not too bad in that case.
This camera does have a built-in flash, but it does not have any type of hotshoe.
So at the very least you do have some type of flash capability with this
camera. Does have Bluetooth connectivity which is pretty standard these days
especially for the prosumer and consumer-level cameras. Video wise, 1080p
30 frames a second. It does have some type of high frames per second mode. 100 and
120 frames per second, but it’s in very low resolutions. Oddly it does have a
little bit of internal storage for pictures around 20 megabytes. Definitely
not very useful, but it is in there if you happen to forget a SD card. SD card
slot itself is near the batteries, which is pretty standard for this type of
camera. So let’s get into some of the negatives of this camera.
It isn’t really pocket-able. The lens has a massive extension when it’s fully
zoomed. And when you try to zoom the lens it’s very lethargic.. extremely slow to
zoom in and out. However there is one feature which we’ll get to it helps you
with a zooming. With a camera like this there’s always
a type of delay that is involved when turning on. Because it adjusts the zoom
lens to a certain focal length from when it’s fully compacted into the camera. So
there is going to always be a bit of delay before you can take a photo. The
camera does have a tripod mount, which is nice. But it’s not in line with the lens.
Which is not especially great for panoramas and situations were it would
be good to be in line with the lens. Ports wise, pretty standard stuff however
it does have a jack for DC power, which is interesting. But you’ll probably need
some type of proprietary connector and power brick if you wanted to do that. So
let’s get to the positives of this camera. It’s a super zoom camera. You have
a huge range of focal lengths. You can use it for almost any situation. It covers
pretty much everything you would want related to focal length. The camera itself does
have a traditional prosumer, almost DSLR, look to it. It’s relatively large, but the
grip is nice in the hand. And I didn’t have any issues accessing any of the
controls, or using the camera from a functional standpoint. So as I mentioned
before with the slow zoom lens. Has a special zoom feature with this button
that looks like a little square with arrows. When you’re zoomed out you can
hold that button down and you get a quick zoom adjustment to a wider focal
length. That way you can compose your framing and get an idea of where you’re
pointing, and then you can zoom back out. This makes the extreme zoom a little
more functional and easier to use. Especially considering the slow zoom
lens. Thanks to David at Camera Craft for pointing that feature out to me.
All that said, this pretty standard prosumer level camera if you are looking
for an extreme zoom. You want a small camera, especially as small as possible
for that level of zoom… This is an option. There are so many out there though. Can
get a used one for significantly cheaper, but you can also find similar models
around with a large focal length range. It is missing a viewfinder. It’s missing
some features you would expect these days like a touchscreen, but does at
least have that tilting screen. Allowing you to compose photos from waist level
or above the head more easily with that tilting screen.
This camera doesn’t do anything especially well, or different than other
cameras similar to it. Does have the AA batteries, which can be nice if
you’re into that very versatile easy to find battery type. It does have that
button to deal with a zoom more easily. So there are a few things in benefit to
this camera, but I don’t see it too much. So if you’re interested definitely try
it out and see if it feels good in the hands for you, but besides that decent
little camera. But there are a lot of options out there similar to it. So that
was Nikon Coolpix B500. Hope you enjoyed this video. Little quick hands-on.
Again, thanks to Camera Craft in Rockford Illinois for letting me try this out
at their shop. Thanks again!