CES 2020: Nikon D780 | Crutchfield

CES 2020: Nikon D780 | Crutchfield


Hey this is JR here at the Nikon booth
at CES 2020 in Las Vegas, holding in my hand the brand-new Nikon D780. They
just announced this here at CES this week, and we already are taking
pre-orders for it at Crutchfield so you might want to check it out. Here’s what’s
exciting about it. It’s got a twenty four point five megapixel backside
illuminated full-frame sensor. Gorgeous images on this. There’s a 51-point autofocus system that you can use in the viewfinder, and when you’re going
in live mode or movie mode, you can take advantage of the 273-point
hybrid focus, zooming out, zooming in. And shutter speed, let’s talk about that real
quick. All the way down to as quick as one eight thousandth of a second, or as
long as nine hundred seconds, up to about fifteen minutes for a super long
exposure shot, nighttime, stars, whatever it is you want to shoot that way, The D750
it replaces only went to one four thousandth of a second and only as long
as about thirty seconds, so big improvements here in the shutter speed.
The full-frame sensor images look fantastic. This is the new Nikon D780,
announced here at CES. Check it out at Crutchfield. If you have any questions on
cameras in general, please give us a call, chat with us online, send us an email, we
have advisors who have got experience with cameras ready to help you get the
right camera for you.

Nikon COOLPIX S630 12 Megapixel Digital Camera

Nikon COOLPIX S630 12 Megapixel Digital Camera


Right now you are
looking at the new Nikon. This is the Coolpix S630. Now, this is the top of the line
digital camera in the new S series, and it has so many features.
Starting off with a 12 Megapixel camera. You have a 7x optical zoom,
with a NIKKOR glass lens, so you can shoot with
a wide angle at 37mm, or also a 260 super telephoto lens
as well. You have the EXPEED processor,
which is their new processor. So you’re going to get super
and incredible quality images. You’re going to get a faster response,
and really natural looking pictures. You have four-way vibration reduction
image stabilization, I know it sounds like a long phrase,
but we’re going to break that down for you when we take a closer look at the camera. You also have a 2.7 inch
high resolution LCD screen. You have scene auto selector. You have sports continuous mode,
that’s a new mode on this camera, face detection,
up to 12 faces. You have red-eye fix
already built into the camera. Smile mode.
You also have this new thing called blink proof mode,
which we’ll show you later, you have D-lighting, which is going
to improve the brightness in dark images. 44 MB of internal memory,
but also you have SD and SDHC capabilities, so you can have all the
pictures you need. 18 scene modes,
including panorama mode, you also got movie mode on here,
and that’s at resolution 640 X 480, or if you want a smaller movie
you also have 320 X 240. And, last but definitely not least,
you have a rechargeable battery, so don’t have to worry about
getting those AAs in here. Okay, so let’s take a closer look
around the camera. Again, you have your
NIKKOR glass lens, you have a 7x optical zoom,
which we’re going to show you now, put this power back on,
we were in standby mode, okay, so we’re going
to go tight, it’s a nice looking zoom. Really really great
if your shooting objects far away. Okay, so you have your power
on and off button right here. Again your wide and your tight
for your zoom up here. Turn it around, you have a
nice little spot, right here, it’s a groove for your thumb,
so you can really hold this camera, get a firm grip on it easily.
You have a play back button. Your mode selection button.
Now you have your selector wheel right here. It actually spins.
And you have a dedicated flash button here. Or, dedicated timer,
here’s your flash, and down below is your macro mode.
You also have your trash/delete button, and your menu button.
Turning over to the side, right here, open you up,
and hidden in this port can you see it?
There we go. There is your USB port
to plug into your PC. And, underneath you’ll see
you have your tri-pod holder, right here, and open this slot up
for your rechargeable battery, and this is where your
SD or SDHC card goes. Okay? So there you have it.
So there’s your little tour. Now, I’m sure your wondering,
how do I get to all these features? Show me around the camera. And that is exactly what
I’m going to do right now. Okay, so I’m going to turn it over
so you can see what’s going on. And, we’ll go and I’ll show you
all the different shooting modes, and you can get to your shooting modes
by clicking this green button right here. So you have auto mode.
So auto mode the camera is going to do a lot of the work for you.
You don’t have to worry about setting, you know, different exposures,
or anything like that. So if you use your wheel
you can go down. Now this is scene auto selector. Okay?
Scene auto selector, right here, with the heart above it,
and the camera is going to change the settings automatically
according to the scene. Now, you can also set the scene yourself.
You have 18 different scene modes; portrait, landscape,
fireworks, cuisine, and you can see them all as
we scroll through right now. And, if you get to this shape right here,
this is the panorama assist, if you want a 360 view, what it
does is takes a bunch of different shots, and it pastes them together so
you have this full, you know, landscape view of wherever you are. It’s definitely a panorama.
You know. Remember we had to make panoramas
in middle school? I remember that.
Umm, okay, so you have voice recording
righ there. So, let’s say you take a shot
and there’s a special memory you want to remember with that shot,
you can just enlist your voice recording. Okay, so we’ll go back up.
Scrolling down, you can choose between smile mode,
right here, I’m sure you’ve seen smile mode before. Basically what you do is you
hold the camera out, and I’m going to show you right now,
I’m going to select it, you hold the camera out in front of you and it automatically detects when
you’re smiling and it takes the picture. Okay, we have to zoom out first.
There we go. Alright, can you see?
Okay? Alright it’s going to take two. Okay, now, you’re probably wondering
why it took two. Because when you’re in smile mode
you automatically have this new feature called blink proof built in.
So the camera is going to take two pictures and it’s going to save the best one,
where your eyes aren’t closed. It’s blink proof.
It’s a cool feature. Okay, so let’s get out of here.
If you zoom back in, there you go, you hit your mode selection button again,
and we’re in smile mode, but if we want to get out of smile mode
we can be in sport continuous mode. And what this mode does is it
shoots 11 frames per second, and it’s for fast action.
Alright? So if you are at a sporting event,
and you don’t want to miss the shot definitely, you know,
use sport continuous mode and you wont have a problem. Again, high ISO.
You have ISO capabilities on this thing up to 6400.
That’s the highest I’ve seen in a point and shoot camera. It’s essential
if you’re shooting in low light. And it will really really come in handy. Okay, so let’s get out of here. Okay, now we’re going to scroll down to
movie mode. Now you have two options here, you can set your
resolution to 640 X 480 or if you want a smaller movie you’ve got
that 320 X 240 option as well, for uploading to Facebook
or YouTube. And, of you go into your menu,
like so, you’ll see you have
even more options. And, again you’ll see this
electronic VR, which stands for
vibration reduction. Now, let me just take a second
and tell you what vibration reduction is. because this camera comes with
four-way vibration reduction. First of all, it’s going to
compensate for shaky hands by moving the image sensor.
Okay. So you don’t have to worry about that. Second of all, you have
high ISO capabilities, that’s the 6400, okay, that’s also going to help
prevent blurry images. You also have this thing called
best shot selector, what best shot selector does is it
takes, automatically, it takes 10 shots in a row, and it will save
the sharpest image. Okay. So you have those three things.
And last but not least, you have motion detection. What motion detection does is it’s
going to adjust your shutter speed according to the moving
object in the frame. So, those four things make up your four-way vibration reduction
image stabilization. Alright, it’s really, bottom line,
it’s going to help you get crystal clear shots. Okay, so, moving on,
now that you now what VR stands for, we’re going to get out
of movie mode, by clicking menu,
and we’re going to go into play back mode. So when you’re in playback mode
you can scroll through your images, there’s one I took earlier,
another one I took earlier, and if you hit menu,
you have a couple different options, quick retouch,
if you go into quick retouch it will show you, you know,
what you can do in a matter of one click. The camera automatically detects
what needs to be improved with the photo and it does it itself. Alright, so we’re going to go back, D-lighting, okay,
we told you about this earlier. Let’s go back.
D-lighting, now, what D-lighting does is it’s going to
improve the brightness in dark images. You can also print your images,
you can create a slide-show. You can rotate your image,
you can resize your image. Again, you can set a voice memo,
voice recording, copy your image,
and you’re back up to the top. Now, like I said,
this is a top of the line camera. It’s part of the new S series
that Nikon came out with. And, it’s really got incredible
features on here. You’re not going to take
a bad picture with this camera. It’s a great Nikon,
and you have that NIKKOR lens. And, the lens is very important
to get incredible quality, crystal clear images. And that’s exactly
what you’re going to get with this camera. Okay, so that’s all we have
right now. This is the Nikon Coolpix.
This is the S630. Hope you enjoy it,
and we’ll see you next time. For more information on the
Nikon Coolpix S630 digital camera, just visit any of these major retailers
and type in, N13-4504
into the search box. For Computer TV,
I’m Sam. (C) 2008 SYX Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Channel: TigerDirectBlog

Nikon Z50 Hands-On And Opinion (guest staring the Canon EOS M5)

Nikon Z50 Hands-On And Opinion (guest staring the Canon EOS M5)


Hey, this is Scott of Photography Banzai. Today we’re taking
a look at the Nikon Z50. Thanks to Camera Craft in Rockford Illinois for
letting me try this out at their shop. I’ll be comparing this to the Canon EOS M5. It
has a few similar features mostly physically like the flip down screen. But
we’re gonna look at those two cameras together in this video. This is the first
aps-c mirrorless camera in the Z mount. That means it has a smaller sensor
than the full frame is Z6 and Z7. I’m not gonna go into specs too much. You can
look those up easily, but basically has around 21 megapixels.
There is no in-body stabilization in the Z50. With the M5 that I have here as
comparison it also does not have in body image stabilization. Definitely has a
solid feeling body. Nice materials, the grip is substantial. I think this is the
best grip that have used for an aps-c mirrorless camera so far. I’m liking how
the controls are laid out. You have the two dials for adjusting settings of
whatever mode you’re in. So if you’re in manual mode you’ll use the front dial
and the top dial to adjust two different settings, and then there’s an ISO button
to adjust ISO itself. With Nikon, you hold that button down and then use one
of the dials to adjust ISO. The main mode dial on the Z50 does not have any type
of lock to it. On the M5 it actually does have a lock, which is convenient in some
situations. But it is also harder to change. One of the nicest physical
features of the Nikon cameras with the Z6, Z7, and this is Z50 is that the
viewfinder comes out quite a bit from the back of the camera. So that gives you
a nice eye relief. It works well with photography up to your face with the
viewfinder. The viewfinder itself is around 2.3 million pixels, which is
actually very similar to the M5. But I think the view in the Z50 is larger.
Seems a little bit better in my opinion for the viewfinder. On the bottom of
the camera you have the tripod socket. It’s in a nice position. Also, the battery door
is far to the side so that you shouldn’t have any issues with quick
release plates. The battery door itself doesn’t have any type of spring to it. So
it does flop around if you open it up. I don’t see any type of weather seal
around that battery door. There is a new battery for this camera. it’s the EN-EL25 battery. Has around 1100 milliamp hours. That’s on the pretty average side
how much battery power it has. Actually the the M5 is very similar in that case.
Considering these aren’t my cameras that I try out, I have no way of testing the
battery capacity on my own. So it is rated around 300 photos per charge and
around 75 minutes of video per charge. Next to the battery there’s the SD card
slot. It’s a little challenging to get to the card itself, but I think it’s
better than A6100 that I had used previously. On the M5 it is also near the
battery. But it’s slightly easier to access. The one negative of the M5 is the
battery door is so long that if you want to use quick release plates with tripods
that doesn’t work too well on the M5. But with the Z50 definitely a nice setup
there. You have a lot of standard ports on the camera. HDMI, USB.. you can charge
through the USB, which is very nice. Also you have a mic port. That’s very good for
any type of video stuff you want to do. With the M5 it also has a mic port. One
difference with ports on the M5 and Z50 is that the M5 has a dedicated port for
a cable release. Now, with the Z50 you can get an accessory to do wireless
bluetooth connectivity with the shutter and all that. So there is at least an
option. The Z50 has a touchscreen. It flips down 180 degrees to face the lens.
The M5 is exactly the same in that case. Now, there are some challenges to this
design. Vlogging works nicely if you’re doing it handheld. But any type of
situation where you want to film yourself and put it on a tripod you’ll
need some type of bracket system. It is a very unusual design, but sometimes it
does work out decently well. The touch implementation on both cameras is very
nice. The Z50, you’ve got full touch with the interface. With touch to focus. You can go
through your photos and zoom in zoom out on them. Adjust settings. It has a very nice
touch interface to the Z50. Same thing with the M5. On the Z50 you can switch
between photo and video with a top switch next to the mode dial. The Z50 has a
built-in flash. That’s nice to have if you are into that. Of course the M5 also has a
built-in flash. Let’s take a quick look at the size difference between the Z
mount and the EF-M mount. You can see it! it’s definitely a much larger diameter
for the Z mount. So there are some benefits and negatives. If you want a
very compact camera, that is a challenge for the Z mount. However, you can see that the Z50 is definitely very small for what it is compared to
the M5. As I mentioned before, there is a front dial and a top dial to adjust
settings as you like. So if you’re in aperture priority, use
one of those dials. If you’re in manual, you can use one for aperture, one for
shutter speed, and then you’ve got your ISO with a button. Of course, one of
the nicest features of a camera of this level are the custom modes. In the Nikon
it’s U1 and U2. Basically, you can push whatever settings you want into those
and you’ll be able to get back to those settings instantly. I really like that
feature. With the Nikon you have an ‘i’ button. That allows you to access some
features faster than you would if you were going through the menu itself.
You’re definitely going to be using that ‘i’ button a lot with this camera. On the
Z50 touch screen you actually have three dedicated buttons that are part of
the screen itself. Zoom in, zoom out, and display. I think that’s a great setup and
it’s very logical from a control standpoint an interface standpoint to
have those three buttons associated with the screen itself. So it does use the
actual touch screen technology to make those buttons work. I think it’s a really
interesting setup and I like how they design that. The Z50 has a dedicated
button that allows you to switch between the viewfinder and the back screen. There
is, of course, the standard sensor on there that you can do it automatically.
But it is nice to have a button as well. The Z50 has a button that allows you to
adjust exposure compensation. You can hold that button down and use one of the
dials to adjust it. With the M5 it has a dedicated dial for exposure compensation,
but I think in some situations the Nikon setup is better. There’s an Fn1 and Fn2 button near the mount on the Z50. It’s nice to have. You can adjust those
how you would like. In my limited testing so far the Z50’s autofocus feels very
quick. I didn’t notice any issues with it. Now, when we get to tracking it works
like their older DSLRs in liveview still. Use the OK button to lock on and
lock off of targets. So you can select something on the screen or use the OK
button to give you a selectable box to move around the screen. You pick an
object on the screen, lock on and then the camera will follow that. When I was
testing the tracking it did lock on nicely. It kept on the
subject for the most part. I would even move it off-screen and they move it back
on the screen and they would track that object still some of the time. So I do
think tracking will be pretty decent on the Z50. There are various autofocus modes
on the camera. I didn’t try them all out, but I did use the pin point autofocus
most of the time. Gives a very small point of focus, which is nice. I like that fine
grain autofocus control. Worked just fine. No issues with that pinpoint autofocus.
One of the nice features that really helps out aperture priority and similar
setups is having a minimum shutter speed. So in the Z50 that feature is in there.
When you set auto ISO you can set a minimum shutter speed. Very nice feature to
have. The M5 actually does not have that and it’s pretty frustrating. If your
subjects are moving pretty quick you can dial that in as you would like. But still
using easier simpler mode so you can focus on composition and other aspects of
photography. There are a bunch of creative filters on the Z50. I really
didn’t try them up too much but just know that they’re in there. If you’re into
that sort of thing… The Z50 does not have any in-body
stabilization in the camera. But it does have an electronic stabilizer for video.
Also, the optical VR when the lens has it’s has a few settings as well.
One nice quality of life feature with photography that I noticed in the Z50
is that you can adjust it to where… When you take a photo it’ll normally just
show you the photo itself in a review mode and you press the shutter button or
something you know go back to the live view. So you can actually adjust this to
not have that happen in the viewfinder but still have it happen in the back
screen. The camera has auto exposure bracketing for five photos maximum plus
or minus three stops. Has a multiple exposure overlay feature with various
types of overlays. Haven’t tried it out, but it’s in there if you’re interested. Also
has an interval timer. Time-lapse movie mode and silent photography. I did do some
sample videos for the Z50, let’s check those out… The Z50 is very featured with video. You
have 4k 30.. 24.. and all that. You can do slow motion with 120 frames a second, or
have the camera itself slow down the footage. I did do a test with the slow
motion video. I used the option where the camera makes that slow motion clip. You
can see how much time goes between pressing the spray bottle and the liquid
coming out of there. Really interesting to see slow motion like that where it
comes right from the camera. That’s a super convenient way to make those clips. The main reason we’re looking at the Z50
and M5 together is that flip-down screen. I wanted to do a vlogging test with those
two just to see how they turned out together. I had all of the stabilization
settings on both cameras. So electronic VR. Did a vlogging test. The first vlogging
test full manual settings nothing that the camera could change. And for the second test I did auto ISO.
But besides that all the settings were manual and the same. Of course, I used
the standard kit lenses on both cameras. Of course, I did take simple photos with
the Z50. Let’s check those out. We’re gonna look at a full view of each photo
and then 100% crop of somewhere in the photo… I also took a few sample photos of the
M5 and Z50 together. Let’s check those out… One important aspect of a camera
are lenses. So with the Z50 there aren’t a ton of native lens options. Especially
with aps-c. You’ve got the two different kit lenses. The 16 to 50 3.5-5.6 VR.
And also the 50 to 250 at 4.5-6.3 VR. I had both the lenses. I really didn’t try the
telephoto out too much. Now here’s a little quick comparison with the M5 kit
lens and the Z50 kit lens. You can see that diameter again. The lens.. how big
of a difference it is. These aps-c Z mount lenses have a lock setup to them so they
do compact. You can rotate the lens a little bit, unlocks and they’ll be ready
to use. With the Z50 of course you can adapt f-mount lenses. That’s all of the
film era, DSLR era. So the G type lenses I really like the F/1.8 primes for F
mount. But you’ll need the adapter of course. With the f-mount adapter you can
adjust the aperture, which is good. But you can’t use lenses in autofocus that
don’t have a motor inside. Actually had one of those older film era lenses.
Tried out with the Z50. It worked just fine with aperture. I was able to adjust
it through the camera. Of course I was doing manual focus with that lens. But
there is peaking inside the Z50 so you will definitely have some benefits with
manual lenses on that camera. If you don’t know what peaking is, it’s basically a feature
to help you focus. So you can use the full frame Z mount lenses on the camera of
course. There are some options. You’ve got the 50 1.8. There is a 35 millimeter
f/1.8. That’s getting up there in price. But it is an option. It’ll give you
that 50 millimeter equivalent look to the photos. Looking at the road-map…
There’s going to be a 28 and a 40 millimeter that are not ‘S’, so I
can expect those to be a decent option for the Z50. Now we’re going to talk a
little bit more about my personal opinion with the Z50. Basically, some of
the positives and negatives. First off we’re going to go with the negatives.
There is no wired cable release. I think this camera is very good for
photographers. So it’s too bad that they didn’t put that physical port in the
camera. The autofocus tracking on the camera is a
little fumbly. You have to use the okay button. Works nicely from my experience
so far, but just consider that if you’re doing a lot of action sports tracking
with the camera. The flip down 180 degree screen is an awkward design. I have it on
the M5 and it has definitely some negatives to it. Especially when you’re
trying to mount it on something and have the screen face forward. There is no
in-camera shake reduction. I think that was a big missed feature for the Z50. I
really do think it would have given the Z50 a leg up. They could use full-frame
lenses with it and have a really amazing stabilizing system. I think in the future
we’ll probably see that, but who knows… It really doesn’t make sense to me than Nikon was trying to compete on size with the Z50. You have a really large mount. I
think they could have done some things to improve the camera and sacrifice a
little bit of the size. In a relation to that, the battery is a big sticking point
for me personally. I think they really should have tried to go with the battery
they use in the Z6 and Z7 and some of their DSLRs. Would have been better for
anyone that was already in the system. for the Z mount. Whatever size sacrifice
they would have had to make, I really do think it would have been worth it. The Z
mount as a system is really just starting out. So with native dedicated
lenses in aps-c you’ve only got those two kit lenses. And the full-frame lenses
are not super cheap. Now, they’re definitely cheaper than some of the
other options in other mounts. You just have to consider that if you want to go
full native. Now let’s go over the things I really do like about the camera.
Compared to something like Z6 this uses SD cards. Super convenient format. You can
find SD cards anywhere any store. I do think the camera is a joy to use from a
photographer’s standpoint. It’s got a good layout. Nice ergonomics. Nice large
grip to it. So using the camera as a photography camera I really did enjoy
that. You’ve got some of the features like the U1 U2. You have a minimum shutter
speed feature. Definitely has a lot to it with the interface, the design, how it
works. That using as a photo camera I think it’s one of the best out there for
aps-c mirrorless right now. While the viewfinder is the same megapixels as the
M5, I think the viewfinder in the Z6 is better in every way.
It feels larger. Comes out from the camera more, so it’s more convenient to
use. I really do like the viewfinder on the Z50. Video output on the Z50 seems very
nice. You have a lot of options with it. The 4k stuff, that nice high frames per
second. The autofocus felt quick, felt prompt. Had no issues there. They did put
a nice amount of customization and even features like autofocus adjust. Which I
assume is related to their f-mount lenses. Definitely a good amount of
customization. Good amount of features in the camera. The z mount itself feels like
the most future-proof of all the mounts out there, if you are interested in that.
A nice large diameter with the short registration distance means you can
adapt pretty much anything to the Z mount. It will be interesting to see how
the Z mount itself develops. Especially now that the Z50 is there with the aps-c.
That was a look at the Z50. Hope you enjoyed the video. Again thanks to Camera
Craft in Rockford Illinois for letting me try this camera out at their shop. Scott from photography Banzai. If you did enjoy the video please consider subscribing that
helps me out a lot likes in shares helped out a lot as well. Thanks again!

Music Festival Tips What Gear to Pack: Out of the Darkroom with Ruth Medjber

Music Festival Tips What Gear to Pack: Out of the Darkroom with Ruth Medjber


Welcome to Out of the Darkroom on AdoramaTV. This is the first part of a very special series of episodes where I’m going to share some trade secrets with you, all about how to shoot music festivals; what to bring, who to shoot and where to share the photos. So for those of you who don’t know me, my name is Ruth Medjbur and I’m a professional music photographer. All the tips that I’m about to share with you come from my own personal experience. However, it’s important to note that there’s no steadfast rules in this business. I’m just sharing what works for me. For the last 15 years I’ve been shooting music festivals. I shoot about 10 to 15 per year, mostly in Ireland where I’m based, but sometimes across Europe too. I’ve shot for magazines, newspapers, commercial clients and for the festivals themselves. In this episode I will talk you through a full list of the essentials, every lens to cover every stage indoors and outdoors. As well as a run-through of the extra bits I’ve learned to pack over the years. All the points I’m going to mention here can only really apply once you’ve secured your press accreditation in advance with the festival organizers. If you turn up at the gate with all of this stuff packed in your bag and no pass you’ll be turned away. So have your email confirmation printed out, or on your phone so that you can show the gate staff that you’re legitimately picking up a pass and are allowed to have your gear on site. First things first, obviously you need your camera but don’t get hung up about the overall speck of your body. If you’ve been booked to shoot a music festival just go with what you have. It’s a good idea to bring a second body if you have one, but you should definitely have spare batteries for your body. You’ll be out shooting for hours each day and coming across power supplies can be tricky. So invest in a good spare battery. When I’m buying spares I always go for the genuine model instead of the third-party brand as I’ve had a bit of bad experience with them running low really quickly. Do your own research and read reviews before you buy. Memory cards are also something you need spares of. I end up shooting about 90 to 120 gigs a day on the D4S. I split that over various cards so that I can leave one importing in the media tent and then I can go out and shoot more shots. It’s also a good idea to have cards with a fast write speed. If something incredible is happening in front of you, like the lead singer has stage dived into the crowd and you need to be shooting furiously, the last thing you want to do is suffer a writing lag on your cards. One of the reasons I chose the D4S is for the FPS rate, the frames per second. I tend to find this pretty crucial when shooting live music so that I can get the burst of shots needed to capture live action shots. Lenses, really you should be bringing your entire arsenal of lenses with you. Shooting a music festival these days means shooting everything. Doing crowd portraits, shooting the food, the merchandise stands. You’ll want to get super wide to get the entire crowd in some of the shots. Then you’ll also need to be on a Telephoto. When your main stage is over 10 feet tall and you need that extra reach. What I bring is the following; a super-wide Sigma a Nikon 24-70mm which are mainly used when wandering around the festival grounds looking for good atmosphere shots. I can also use it on some of the medium or smaller stages. I’ll switch it up to a 70-200mm, when I want to get either some candid crowd shots from afar like in spy mode, or I’ve hit one of the big stages. I’ll use the nifty 50mm as well when we’re shooting tiny stages with no lights, or I want to do some f/1.4 work with some of the products, food or the merchandise Now flash. So you all know that you’re not allowed to use it in the pit but at night-time when you’re wandering around the arena or the campsite some off camera flash makes for some pretty interesting light, so pack it anyway, and have your triggers with you and maybe also one of your friends can hold it, or just pack a light stand. Business cards; This might seem a bit nuts in a gear list but you’ll be surprised at the amount of people that you meet down there. Some of them might just be music fans looking for copies of their photos but there’s still another Instagram follower so share those cards. A rain jacket for your camera. I know most pro bodies are weather sealed but they’re not waterproof. There is a difference. If you’re in a wet and windy part of the world, like I am sometimes, that rain can come down in buckets and come at you from all angles. The band might be due on stage at nine o’clock you’re in place in the rain from ten to nine. If they don’t walk on until 9:30pm, that’s 40 minutes of getting soaked. It’s best not to have your camera exposed to all of this. Invest in a rain jacket, you can pick up cheap baggies if you don’t shoot a lot, or you can get a reusable one if you’re a seasoned pro. Here’s the other thing, you’ll be at this music festival for three, maybe four days you need to look after yourself too. So get waterproof boots, jackets, hats, it doesn’t matter how stupid you look. When it’s lashing rain or freezing cold you’ll be glad of it. If you do get soaked keep some silicon gel packs in your lens cases and at the end of your bag as they’ll absorb the moisture and save from potentially cloudy or moldy lenses. It’s also a good idea to have dry cloths up your sleeve, so you can quickly wipe the raindrops from your lens when you’re shooting in the rain. I’ve seen photographers being turned away from the pit as they were wearing open-toe sandals. This is a working pit with lots od gear flying around. Have some sense, wear work boots or you’ll lose your toe. Don’t forget the laptop if you need to be filing images throughout the weekend make sure you have something to do it on. I’ve seen newbie photographers rock up to the media tent expecting there to be a row of free computers to use. Bring everything you need to be self-sustaining; chargers, hard drive, spare transfer cables and mark your name on everything. Believe me you won’t be the only Canon charger plugged into the socket panel. There might be a hundred photographers in and out of there all weekend. Sometimes you’re lucky enough that they have lockers to rent, so you can dump your gear between drop-offs, otherwise you might be running back and forth to your car. You can check this in advance with your media contact. If you’re vertically challenged like me, you just can’t cope with the weight of all of this gear, then invest in some new methods of carrying your gear. Last year I shifted the weight from my shoulders to my waist. I put my lenses, flash, other bits like my phone and my wallets in this and I’m good to just run around the festival for errors. If you’re shooting on two bodies instead of one, to save time changing lenses in the pit then grab a double strap. Personally, I only work on one body at a time as I’m consciously trying to slow down my shooting style. So a comfy strap works just as well for me. Earplugs; Do you know how loud main stages get? Imagine standing there for hours a day. Best thing I ever bought was a pair of molded earplugs. They can be a little bit pricey but they are worth every penny. They’ll also help you get some much-needed shut-eye in your tent at night. Speaking of tents, don’t be silly and buy one that costs 10 quid. You don’t want your gear, your clothes and you to wake up drenched every morning. Get a decent pop-up tent. Sometimes you could be doing these festivals completely on your own. So make sure you can put it up and take it down all by yourself. Another thing I’m going to recommend that your bring is a tripod. Now, don’t attempt to put this up in the pit! If looks could kill then each other photographer will have you dead in a second. I’m recommending bringing it for the nighttime ambient shots, when you want to do something quirky like long exposures of the carousel. You can keep it in the car until you actually need it but just make sure it’s lightweight. That’s all from me for this episode. Join me again next time where I’m going to talk you through exactly what to shoot while you’re at the music festival. Subscribe to AdoramaTV for more videos and don’t forget to check out the Adorama Learning Center for more great tips and tricks. Thanks and I’ll see you again soon.

Sony RX100 VI review: overpriced?

Sony RX100 VI review: overpriced?


– I was going to shoot
this RX100 Mark VI review in downtown Brooklyn and it
was going to be beautiful a work of art, a masterpiece but mother nature had a
little bit of a different plan so it looks like it’s time for plan B. (jazzy music)
♪ You Suck ♪ – How’s that? So this is the Sony RX100 Mark VI When I’m shooting stills
I’m almost exclusively shooting on a 35 millimeter film camera but when I’m not I’m actually using one of these they’re super portable,
they’re really light lighter than DSLR and
most certainly lighter than my 35 millimeter
and the transfer speeds are incredible, I can
quickly put it on my phone and then up to Instagram and its video capabilities
are also amazing which obviously I can’t
do with my 35 millimeter. Now, Sony comes out
with a new one of these just about every year,
which is why we’re already at the mark VI when the
mark I came out in 2012. Now that’s great because
we’ve come a long way but it also means that now that we’re at the later generations,
how much is changing. So let’s figure out why
you probably won’t pay 1200 dollars for the mark VI. So just like its predecessor, the mark VI has a 20.1
megapixel one inch CMOS sensor with 4K video at 24 30 p and at the lower 1080 p resolution you have that HFR mode,
or high frame rate mode, that is capable of 960 frames per second. The ISO spans from 125 to 12800 so I find that it performs
better in the lower ISO range that’s like a 125 to 800 once you get to 1600
and especially at 3200 you’re going to see a
lot of noise and grain you just have to keep in mind that this is a point and
shoot camera after all and with that comes a small flash and small batteries that
can’t really handle hot days or long recording times. Be prepared to own a few batteries especially if you’re recording video. And also like last years model there’s the pop up OLED EVF. God bless the pop up EVF I love it so much, yes, yes! It’s one of the main
reasons I bought this camera and it’s so crisp and so clean there’s something really intimate about being able to look
through a view finder and take a photo. I mean no one else is behind you looking at what you’re getting, it’s just you and your camera and it makes you feel really professional. Now the big difference this year though, is that it’s a single action EVF. So it pops up and instead
of having to pull it out like you did on previous generations it just does that automatically then when you want to close it it’s one single push down. The photo burst modes and auto focus also got a refresh on this model the auto focus is fast and I mean really fast and its facial recognition is on point too even when the face is
super far in the frame or you’re really wide. Burst mode can also now capture 230 shots at 24 frames per second, which is almost a 100 shots more than the RX100 mark V 150 shots for making gifs or
capturing the perfect moment this is really great. For the vertically challenged among us and the foodies, you’re
really going to love the extended range on this screen in previous models you
had that 180 degree screen which it still does, this
is great for vlogging this is great for taking selfies but new this year, is
the 90 degrees tilt down. It typically only when to 45 but now you have that full 90 I really didn’t think this
was going to be super useful but when taking shots of food or at concerts, it actually came in handy. So you pair that with the
touch screen capabilities that are also new this year it’s kind of banging. You can finally touch the screen to focus and to take shots but I can’t navigate the menu or hit okay so in a world where touch
screens are so intuitive they’re on everything we use we didn’t we go one step further and make it completely usable via touch, we’re so close but speaking of close, hello’s eye is 24 to 200 millimeter lens. For tourists or festival
goers or bird watchers or a parent in a high school event this is really a great feature and it’s clean, it’s crisp and it actually flattens out the image and gives you depth of field much like the Canon 7200 millimeter would it made me feel like a great photographer even when I was just on the fly doing something really quick the problem is, we gave
up F 1.8 aperture lens and those built in NDs, which I use all the time I loved being able to get down to 1.8 especially at night and the ND was so easy
and quick to slap on it was much easier than
adjusting the shutter and when doing video the ND is like absolutely valuable so this might be the difference
between buying this model and a previous cheaper model that ND and F1.8 is a little bit more valuable to me. Overall the RX100 continues
to be a great camera with better video options and way more models than Canon’s G7 or Lumix LX line and with all these models have
come incredible improvements I mean this is a super
powerful point and shoot, it has great HDR features and with added S-Log 3 support, this model can even step
up as a V cam on shoots with an A7S, very comfortable. The real problem though is the total and complete lack of a mic input and the price. I mean for 1200 dollars there really should be a mic input especially for how many
vloggers use this camera. Just put it in! So if you had the money, go for it you’ll absolutely not be
disappointed by this camera, but if you’re looking
for bang for your buck you might want to look
at the RX100 Mark IV or V I had the IV and I bought
it on craigslist last year and it stills works really well and with that extra money, you could buy an external audio recorder. So thanks for watching if you like this video and you like watching
my hair slowly deflate be sure you like and subscribe also shout out to this camera that is currently doused in water, alright we’ll see you next time.

Digital Camera Menus

Digital Camera Menus


Listen to this, twice bake lavostock pot, buffalo mozerella basil and pine nuts souffle a terin of duck hand ham, hock and rabbit with cranberries, with spiced pear fueling smoke salmon with suede goats cheese ice cream and a seeded tweel sounds pretty interesting doesn’t it but you don’t need it all, and just like a menu in this fantatsic restaurant DSLR camera menu is a very
similar thing you don’t need all of it, infact i urge you to leave most of it well alone but there are one or two things which
can come in very useful let’s take a very quick speedy guided
tour in the playback menu with the little playback sign there’s one or two things
basically it tells you whether you can turn your pictures up the other way in
the camera or not I leave mine left on their side, whetehr you wanna do a slide show, whether you want to show people your pictures for for
longer or less time on the LCD they’re all personal choices. The shooting menu has got one or two quite handy things in it, for example your image quality settings I suggest you use the biggest and best
in the shop now you’ve got Raw, Tiffs, and Jpegs, suppose whatever you’re shooting, shoot the best quality that your camera can do. Jpeg compression, I would do the same thing. Make sure they’re the biggest you could always make an image file a bit smaller and then email it but but if you’ve already got a small one and you want to print it, you’re stuffed. Your white balance control is very handy this is where you set the colour temperature of your camera according to the light around you, some cloudy exctra. you can usually access that from a
button on the top though. Picture control, can be very useful in here you’ve got a whole little nest of different settings, some of which the manufacturers have already made for you, so in standard you got a very flat neutral looking image neutral is very
similar but in my case on this camera it’s a bit less contrasty. Vivid, that’s very vivid. It’s got more contrast and more colour, quite handy on a very dull cloudy day
when you want to brighten things up a bit. there’s also monochrome if you wanna
shoot black-on-white in the camera color spaces there’s an
awful lot of gossip and black art mumbo-jumbo talked about them but
they’re really very simple there are two color spaces Adobe RGB an SRGB some things work in
Adobe some things work in SRGB it’s one of
those things that on its own won’t make any difference to your
photography but if you stack them up altogether with lots of other little tiny details
they will start to give you an edge right now in just going through the menu
I don’t want to discuss them all you need to know is that they’re not gonna make a big difference to you right now. delighting is something I always leave alone because I find that on this camera at least it just kinda
messes things up beyond that in the shooting menu there is really
very little else you need to look at if anything. In the custom settings menu this is where you can change things that
your camera does such as auto white balance bracketing again I would urge you to leave it alone
I never touch these things you don’t need them they will not improve your photography
they offer convenience in how you set up your camera and if you really want to dig into it
take a look at your instruction book and you’ll find out what those things do. in your setup menu there’s just a couple of
things that are handy one being formatting your memory card, it’s
well worth doing this when you’ve been on a shoot and you’ve got a bunch of pictures go home download them into the computer back
them up and then it should have just deleting them off your card going to the menu and format the card it
keeps the card healthy. LCD brightness here you can adjust how
bright or dark your monitor is, in the back of the camera, i would urge you to leave that well and truly alone too, because supposing you brighten it up a
bit and and you forget and then you’re working on a really dull
day the monitor will seem very bright in comparison to your surroundings it could lead you to completely messing
up your exposures and thinking you’ve got it wrong when you haven’t leave your LCD brightness well and truly
alone there a sense a cleaning settings in here and again I just leave on the factory
defaults because they’ll do the job beautifully for you. Auto image rotation is a personal choice, if you wanna turn your picture up the other way in the camera or in the computer as I said I like mine laying on this side so i can see them bigger when i look back instead of having a little up and down strip like that, so despite the fact there’s all sorts of
exciting goodies hiding away in your menus unfortunately they won’t make you a
better photographer the handful of things we’ve spoken about are useful and i’d urge you to have a look at those but beyond that just leave it alone the
things that will impact your photography are understanding depth of field,
lighting shutter speed, apertures. So, i’m gonna put this menu down, and think about my lunch.

Nikon Z6 Mirrorless Digital Camera with Nikon FTZ Mount Adapter Bundle

Nikon Z6 Mirrorless Digital Camera with Nikon FTZ Mount Adapter Bundle


This Video Review Is Based On :
Price, quality, performance, warranty, brand trust, after sales & service, reusability,
familiarity and easy to operate. Part of Nikon’s next step in their imaging
journey, the Z 6 Mirrorless Camera is positioned as the “all-arounder” within the new Z System.
Beginning with the Z Mount itself, a large-diameter design with a short 16mm flange distance allows
Nikon to create compact, yet powerful cameras and develop more advanced optics. The Z 6
is among the first in the series, and features a high-performing FX-format 24.5MP BSI CMOS
sensor and the EXPEED 6 Image Processing Engine delivering outstanding image quality and speed
with a native sensitivity range. On the sensor you will find an advanced phase-detect
autofocus system using 273 points covering 90% of the image area, and the sensor features
5-axis Vibration Reduction technology for stabilized photos and video regardless of
the lens used. This advanced hybrid AF system will also benefit video. The Z 6 features
UHD 4K recording at up to 30p and can use the N-Log gamma profile along with the camera’s
10-bit HDMI output to create cinema-quality video. As with many mirrorless systems, the
Z Series boasts a much more compact form factor than its DSLR counterparts. The Z 6 is no
exception with its slimmed down design and lighter build, though it maintains the weather
sealing and ergonomics for which Nikon is known. The camera features multiple displays
and screens for ease of use, including a 0.80x 3.6m-dot EVF with NIKKOR optics and a Fluorine
coating, ensuring clear viewing. Kindly See the Description for This Product
Link. Thanks for watching
Kindly like and subscribe.

Nikon COOLPIX P6000 Digital Camera

Nikon COOLPIX P6000 Digital Camera


Captions by www.SubPLY.com
. . . . . . . . . . . . . Hey, what’s going on, it’s Bauer. You’re looking at the new Nikon Coolpix P6000! Highly-anticipated little camera, and it’s incredibly powerful- and it’s very cool and it takes amazing pictures and it’s going to give you the ability to do stuff you’ve never been able to do on a digital camera before in all likelihood. It’s got 13.5 megapixels to start off with, so, right out of the gate it’s already got an extraordinarily high resolution on this sensor here- 13.5 megapixels. does 4x digital and 4x optical as well, of course the optical being the more important of the two. It does do GPS geo-tagging, now if you look at the side here you can see if does have a GPS antenna that is built into the camera, so when you’re taking pictures this will actually embed the latitude and the longitude of wherever you take your photographs into the data in the picture. Then when you upload the photos somewhere like flicker or you’re browsing photos in one of your photo-management programs, you’ll be able to browse your pictures by location, or look at exactly where your photos were taken on Flickr on a google map. It’s incredibly powerful and very, very cool. It has the Nikkor glass lens, so you’re going to get really, really sharp, very clear photos with this camera. It’s got a 2.7-inch LCD on the back of it, and a very sharp looking LCD display on this camera. It does have optical stabilization built into it, so it doesn’t use the digital stabilization that you see on a lot of cameras- this actually will use the optical stabilization scheme to make sure your shaky hands don’t ruin your photographs. It does have- you can actually add attachments to this lens, so there are wide-angle and telephoto converters for this camera. You just have to pop this ring off and they are available for you to add to this camera. So you can expand it a little bit, rather than being locked into only the lens setup that you have on the camera right now. It also does really good low-light situations; it gets up to 6400 ISO on this camera. So it performs extraordinarily well when there’s not a whole hell of a lot of light in the room. Let’s go ahead and take a look at how this thing works a little bit- it’s got a lot of buttons, a lot of wheels, a lot going on because it gives you a lot of ability to customize your photos and tweak them manually. Take a look here- this is your wheel, this is where you can get to all of your quick functions… this is also a navigation wheel right here, your manual and telephoto zoom settings are located right here and your shutter is going to be right here. On the side is where the GPS antenna for this camera is located, and that’s going to allow you to do all those GPS, geo-tagging features, on the bottom- now this does take SD cards, so you won’t have to worry about any sort of crazy storage card on this, it does take SD, it also has a rechargeable battery, and comes with that rechargeable battery, it also has something going on here that you maybe don’t see in a whole lot of cameras- that’s an ethernet port in the bottom of this camera. That ethernet port is going to allow you to- as you take your photos, you can assign them, whether they’ll be uploaded to the Nikon-hosted picture service or not, once you plug in an ethernet cable it will automatically sense that it’s on a network and upload all of those pictures to whatever service or actually the Nikon service- all the pictures you’ve selected to be uploaded will be automatically uploaded once you plug that thing in. On the side you’re going to find your DC-in for your charging and your AV-out on the side there, and…that’s pretty much it for a look around it. Let’s go ahead and take a look at the menu system on this thing, because it does have a whole lot going on, actually. If you take a lot at here, this is kinda cool, because it does have two user-programmable scene modes. Now this is nice if you’re in a situation where you’re switching between two different types of scenes, you can program either of those to be any mode that you’d like. If you take a look here, this is the photo upload, the Nikon MyPicturetown. Any images you select to be uploaded in this will actually be uploaded every single time you plug this thing into an ethernet port. This is your GPS signal strength, so you can make sure that you’re actually getting a GPS signal- if it’s important to you to make sure those GPS tags are on there; that is the GPS signal-strength screen right there. Now, these are various scene modes located in this camera- once you put it into the scene mode, you simply hit the menu button and it just comes up with all the various scene modes that are available in this camera- all the basic scene modes that you’re going to find in most digital cameras. But it does have a lot of them so it’s going to make it easy to get those to be really nice shots. It also has a movie mode: 640×480, 30 frames-per-second on that. This is your manual mode right here, that’s going to allow you to manually adjust everything. There’s a little wheel right here that’s going to allow you to manually adjust the speed- right there, it will also allow you to adjust all of the other settings, and it does have a manual focus mode as well. If you push this button it will put you into manual focus mode, and then you can use this wheel here to adjust the focus, and it does give you a nice zoomed in view of the middle of your frame, as you can see, so you can get a nice clean focus on whatever it is you trying to focus in on in the manual mode. It also has aperture-priority mode, shutter-priority mode, so it makes it very easy to take solid pictures, and has a lot of user-programmable functions, like the My Menu. Now this is actually a programmable menu, it will allow you to get to all of your favorite settings very, very quickly on this camera, and it’s just one button away. It also has this function button; now what that function button does is a user-programmable button and you can actually program this button for any sort of settings that you want. Right now it’s set for obviously ISO sensitivity- oh, there we go- but you can actually program that button so that you could reach any of the functions in the camera very quickly and very easily. Now it does allow you to adjust things like exposure, your manual focus, your macro focus setting right here, it does do macro, and it does do auto-focus, and that’s right there, it also does your self-timer and your various flash modes. now the flash is a little hidden, it’s right in here, it will automatically deploy when you turn it on, but the flash actually is concealed in the top of the camera there. So overall this thing is awesome, I mean it takes extraordinarily high-resolution, very, very sharp images, and it’s got features that are just not beatable. You’re just not seeing a lot of cameras these days with GPS, and ethernet, and the ability to customize the camera in the way that this one is going to let you do it. So go have a look at it, i’m impressed so far. It’s a solid, solid digital camera, 13.5 megapixels, with a nice 4x optical zoom and a 4x digital zoom, and of course that GPS geotagging and a nice 2.7 inch LCD screen that you’re going to find on this- the Nikon P600, go check it out. For more information on the Nikon P6000 13.5 megapixel camera with geotagging, go to any of the retailers listed here, or, in any major search engine, type in N13-4410. For computer TV, I’m Bauer. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Captions by www.SubPLY.com