Ultimate photography guide to sharpness/focus perfection! English subs!

Ultimate photography guide to sharpness/focus perfection! English subs!


Welcome and great that you’re watching a brand new vlog by KLÆS Today, we will discuss focus I will give you 20 tips for getting maximum focus in your photography. Tip1: Make sure you take pictures with a shutter time at least as fast as the size of your lens. So, when you’re taking pictures with a 200 millimeter lens, make sure your shutter time is at least 1/200th of a second, and ideally even faster. Tip 2: Make sure your subject stands still. If your model moves while you take pictures, this can also cause motion blur. When taking pictures, get your model to adopt a pose and stand still briefly, before moving on to the next pose. Tip 3: Make sure that you don’t move yourself while taking pictures. Train yourself to take pictures with your elbows pressed firmly against your body. In that way, you can use yourself as a tripod. Tip 4: When taking pictures, make sure you use minimum effort to operate the shutter button. Only apply force with the tip of your finger. I see a lot of photographers leaning forward a bit. This also causes motion blur and we don’t want that! Tip 5: Be sure to take pictures with fstrobes. Flashlight freeze movement. Do make sure you don’t catch any ambient light, for movement can occur in ambient light. Tip 6! When taking pictures using long shutter times, you should use a tripod. Invest in a good quality tripod such as Manfrotto or Gitzo. It will set you back a few hundred euros, but you won’t regret it. Tip 7: Use image stabilisation. With image stabilisation you can take pictures with a handheld camera. Tip 8: Turn of your image stabilisation when your camera is placed on a tripod. When your camera is standing still, your image stabilisation itself can cause motion blur. And we don’t want that! If you’ve never had this problem, you’re probably already using really fast shutter times or flashlight. Tip 9! Use your camera’s middle focus point. The middle focus point is sharper. You have to select a focus point for your camera, for else it will always focus a bit differently from what you want. The middle focus point is always closer when repositioning your image and so you only have to make minimal movements Tip 10: Make sure your camera is set to blocking your focus. You can do this in your camera menu. With Canon, this the setting One Shot. Tip 11: Turn on your camera’s focus beep. That way, you will hear whether your camera has found the right focus. Tip 12! Make sure your lens is calibrated to the body you are taking pictures with. . It may the case that your focus point is just behind or in front of your camera’s autofocus. This is known as front or back focus. You can have this checked in a photo camera shop. I do it myself. use a helpful tool for this called SpyderLensCall. I will tell you more about this in another vlog. Tip 13: Clean your lenses and sensor. A dirty lens will result in a softer focus and we don’t want that! Tip 14: Make sure you know what your camera’s sweet spot is. Offcourse you want your images to be at their maximum amount of sharpness. To accomplish this, the sharpness of your photo’s need to be higher then the resolution of your camera. This image is a perfect example of my sharpness being limited by the resolution. (you can see the pixels, while the lens is still sharp) The sweet spot is an F value at which your image has maximum focus. This is never your maximum aperture, but always lies a few F stops above that. So, my favorite lens is the 70-200mm 2.8. The sweet spot of this lens lies around F5.6/f8 a few stops above the maximum aperture. Tip 16! Do not focus your landscapes on infinity, so not on the horizon, but on a third from where your landscape begins, so a third from yourself. Don’t focus on the sweet spot either, but use a slightly higher F value for landscapes. That way, you can be sure everything will have maximum focus. Tip 17!! Invest in a good lens. The quality of your lens determines the overall focus of your picture and a mediocre lens will also result in a mediocre focus. In general, prime lenses are sharper, so buy a good prime lens A prime lens also has a larger aperture, so the sweet spot will be a bit lower as well. That is another advantage. Tip 18: Make sure you have punch in your light. Use light sources with lots of punch such as silver reflectors or beauty dishes. You want to get some contrast in your model’s skin. And with more punch in your light, your pictures will look sharper as well. Tip 19: Sharpen your pictures beforehand, using Lightroom or Camera Raw, but also afterwards using Photoshop. Raw files are not automatically sharpened and normally look fuzzy. That’s why you should sharpen every picture, for if it’s not sharpened, it won’t be sharp enough! Tip 20: Practice as much as possible. Practice focussing using only your index finger, with small movements. Keep your elbows pressed tightly against your body. And find out what the sweet spot of your lens is. The best way to do this is to place your camera on a tripod. Select the widest aperture possible for your lens and go back in small steps. Look at the pictures on your computer and find the sweet spot of your lens. So, the sweet spot is the picture that has optimal focus. These were my twenty tips. I hope you found them useful. Did you like this vlog or found it interesting? Then don’t forget to click on the blue thumbs up. Best of luck taking sharp pictures! Cameraman (CM): No! Klaas-Jelmer (KJ): Not OK? Allright, once more. KJ: Welcome…welcome… CM: We’ve got the first 5 seconds. KJ: Welcome…welcome and great that you’re watching a brand new vlog by KLÆS.

Photographer Barry Mackenzie Bio | PRO EDU Instructor

Photographer Barry Mackenzie Bio | PRO EDU Instructor


(slow music) – My mom was an amateur
photographer when I was a kid, and I remember just taking
her Minolta back in the day, and I was always just
sort of fascinated looking through the lens. I was super into skateboarding
and snowboarding, and I was able to talk my parents into starting a family-run business while I was in high school. So we opened a skateboard
and snowboard shop, and I managed it. From there, I got a job at
a window and door factory. I got better and better,
and I moved all the way up to where I was building
these custom entrance ways that were 50, 60 grand. (light music) During that time, my wife got pregnant, and I decided that I didn’t
want to be a lifer in a factory, and I spent about a year just kind of
doing some soul searching. The only thing I could picture
myself doing forever is taking photos. I just wanted to have
a camera in my hands. That sort of sparked
in my mind an interest that maybe this is something
I could do as a career. (light music) I started shooting abandoned
buildings in my spare time, these old, decaying churches and schools. That’s actually how I got my start. Say, you know, if I’m pretty good at
shooting these ugly buildings, I can probably shoot
something beautiful, as well. (light music) I announced I was going into business, and the only way to really
develop a style and to get better at this stuff is to try and
try and try and fail and try. I would see a really amazing kitchen, and I would make the set of photos I needed to
deliver the next day, and then I would ask for an extra hour, and I would try to light it differently or try to compose it a
little bit differently. Start shooting the stuff now
that you want to be shooting in a year or two from now. (light music) When I was actually just getting
started in this business, I used to go to the bookstore, and I would grab four or
five shelter magazines. I would look at these photos, and I would always wonder
what makes them different. I would try to reverse
engineer how they were lit, and that’s how I started
to develop my style, (light music) a style where it’s wide enough, and it’s showing an accurate
representation of the home, but it’s got more of a design type feel. Part of that came from just
studying these photographs. ♪ Let’s go ♪ One photographer, his
name is Brandon Barre. He’s based out of Toronto. His work, it really spoke to me, and as luck would have it, I
was shooting a home in Toronto. He happened to be shooting
the home next door, and I was able to meet him, and I reached out to him the next day. He replied and said, you know what, Barry. I had a look at your website. Awesome work. I really like your style. The big confidence boost for me was seeing that he’s doing the exact
same thing I’m doing. (light music) Deep down, I really like to help people. There’s been people that
have helped me along the way, and I think it’s really important. If you see that someone’s willing and able and if you can help them, I mean, it’s for the
greater good of everybody. I love doing online consulting. I love running workshops. I love the opportunity that I’ve been given to do this tutorial just so that I can help people get better. I really, truly, I love it. (light music)

Your problem: You can’t open your camera raw files. Here’s how.

Your problem: You can’t open your camera raw files. Here’s how.


[Music] Hi there it’s Marlene from ImageMaven.com and in this week’s video blog post I’m going to talk about what happens if
you shoot RAW files and they won’t open. This happens when you have a new camera,
or a fairly new camera, and you have slightly older (not even that old)
software. So I’m going to show you what to do when your RAW files don’t open.
This can happen whether you’re using Photoshop Adobe Camera Raw, whether
you’re using Lightroom, Photoshop Elements, Aperture, iPhoto, anything that
you use to open RAW files. You have to keep your raw software up to date. The
reason is is that camera manufacturers haven’t come up with a standard raw file
format. Well actually they have, but very few camera manufacturers are using
it. It’s called the DNG file format, which stands for digital negative. Pentax uses
this file format so their files will open up in any software even older
versions. But Canon and Nikon and Panasonic and all the other popular
brands, often you’ll get a disparity. You have a new camera and older software. And
I’m going to show you steps you can take so that you will be able to open your
RAW files even if you have slightly older raw software. It is recommended
though that you keep your software up to date and that you don’t use a software
that’s too too old. One of the reasons is there’s so many great new features and
newer versions of software and you’re going to want to take advantage of them.
Alright let’s have a look at the software. So this is what Photoshop
Elements looks like when you have no files open. And to see if you can
actually open your RAW files, just go under File, Open, and navigate to a folder
that has RAW files in it. And you can see that in this case it lets me open this
file. However I’m going to navigate to a folder that doesn’t have files that will
open. I have a new Panasonic camera and you can see that the JPEGs open no problem.
But if I look at the other files RW2, those are raw files, my Panasonic RAW
files. They’re grayed out. So I know that I need to upgrade my Adobe Camera Raw
plug-in for Photoshop Elements 9, which I have here. And I know that my plug-in is
not up-to-date for this software. So I’m going to show you how to do that now. So
how do you know if what version of Adobe Camera Raw you’re using? All you do is go
under the Photoshop Elements tab and go About plug-in. Go down to Camera Raw. Click
on it. And it will tell you what version that you’re using in the Camera Raw
plug-in. So in my case it’s 6.1.0.250. I know
from just checking the Adobe website that the latest plug-in version is
actually 6.3, so now I know why my files won’t open. I’ll have to
update to version 6.3 first. If you’re using a Mac, and you have Adobe
products installed you can just go up to the top right corner of your top menu
bar, and you see this A symbol and in my case it has the number 4 here. If I
click on that, it’s actually going to open the updater, the Adobe updater. So
now the Adobe updater has popped up. And, I can see that I have lots of software
to update so all I do is I hit “update” and all of my camera RAW plugins will be
updated. I have a Photoshop version. I have an Element’s version. I have Bridge
here that needs updating. And Adobe Photoshop CS5. So I’m just going to
update all those, and I’ll come back to you when that’s done. When you’re all
done your updates it should look like this. Now let’s see if we can open up
those RAW files. So now let’s try to open that raw file again that wouldn’t open
before. So go under File, Open, go to our folder where those test images are, and
now you can see that the RW2 file isn’t grayed out anymore. So we can click on it
hit Open. There we go, there it’s open, and it’s showing us the Adobe Camera Raw
window. We’re off to the races. And just one more thing I have a page on
my website with information on all the links and where to look and how to find
the latest version of the Adobe Camera Raw software. So have a look in the video
description below. Click on those links it will take you to my website, and there
you can get further detailed information as well as a step by step instruction
guide on how to actually open your files. Leave me a comment. Subscribe to my You
Tube channel. And see you soon. [Music]

Basics of Photography – MASTER the Exposure Triangle

Basics of Photography – MASTER the Exposure Triangle


It’s a beautiful day in the city, so we’re having a little photowalk today! Manual exposure. I know it sounds scary, but believe me, it absolutely isn’t. It is a bit like playing chess, but you only have three chess pieces to worry about. We’re talking about aperture, shutter speed and ISO. These three make up the exposure triangle and that’s it! That’s all there’s to it! All of the photos you’ve ever seen started with the right combination of these three settings. “Right” as in right for the situation, since correct exposure is completely subjective, which is reason number one why you should go manual in the first place: The camera has no idea what you want to show. In Auto Mode, it exposes in a way that the picture will have an averaged out balance of dark and bright parts, to keep it simple. But that’s rarely what you want as you know from your many involuntary silhouette shots. So, what are these three settings? First of all, all of these three change the exposure. This means that when you’re in manual mode, whenever you change one of these settings, your photo gets darker or brighter. But they also all have a different side effect. The aperture, or f-stop, tells us how much light the lens lets in. A ring of blades inside the lens forms a hole that we change the size of by changing the aperture. The bigger this hole, the more light it lets in. The side effect of the aperture is that it also changes the depth of field, meaning that more or fever parts of the picture will be sharp. When you focus on something while your camera is set to a wide aperture, meaning the aperture number is very small, you get very shallow depth of field, so that everything in front or behind the subject will be blurry. By the way, these blurry parts are what photographers call bokeh which, depending on the lens, creamy and smooth or jittery and nervous. The more you close down your aperture, meaning you use a higher number f-stop, more of the picture will be in focus. Simultaneously the picture gets darker, so that you would need to compensate for that with one of the other two settings. Some lenses have very wide apertures, that’s what we call “fast” lenses. Next up is shutter speed. The shutter is a curtain in the back of the camera, directly in front of the sensor that captures the images. During exposure, this curtain opens up and closes again, so that light hits the sensor for a certain amount of time. That’s what we call the shutter speed. The longer you shine light on the sensor, the brighter the image becomes. The side effect in this case is that the longer you expose, the higher the probability that you moving the camera or moving objects in the composition will render the photo blurry. This can be something that you would like to use creatively too, if you want to show a certain action for example. But sometimes, you want to freeze the moment as they say, like when you’re shooting sports for example. To do that, you need a faster, meaning a shorter shutter speed. This will make the picture darker again, so that you would need to compensate for that with a bigger aperture or a higher ISO. Which leads us to the third setting: ISO is the sensitivity of the sensor itself. A higher ISO number designates a higher sensitivity, meaning it reacts faster to light, making the image brighter. The lower the number, the darker the photo. The side effect of this is that with increased sensitivity, image quality goes down. By reacting to less light, the sensor also reacts to stuff it shouldn’t, which results in the photos being what we call “noisy”. So, the higher the ISO number, the noisier the photos will become. More professional cameras usually perform better with high ISOs than entry level gear. What you need to remember here is that you should keep it as low as possible, but as high as needed. We usually only use higher ISO when it gets too dark, so that we can’t go any further with the other two settings. That’s it, that’s all you need to remember. Set your camera to manual and change only one setting at a time, see what it does. Get a feeling for how it behaves. If your pictures get blurry, your shutter speed is probably to long, open up your aperture if you can or compensate with higher ISO if needed. Want more shallow depth of field, open up your aperture completely and adjust your shutter speed and ISO accordingly. We’ll talk about that in another video, but if you’re shooting things that aren’t moving, think about getting a tripod, so you can expose with the lowest ISO number and only adjust the other two to your subject. If you think this all went to fast, let me know in the comments and I’ll post more in depth videos for the three parameters individually. I’ve included a link to a short recap of all of this on my website, down in the description. Also, there’s way more of this in my book “The Basics of Creative Photography”, if you’re interested in learning the fundamentals of taking great pictures and want all of the information you need in one place. If you liked this video, and would like to learn more about the basics of photography, please subscribe! See you in the next one! Bye!

How to Edit In a Light & Airy Style in Lightroom | Facebook Live Replay July 23, 2019

How to Edit In a Light & Airy Style in Lightroom | Facebook Live Replay July 23, 2019


– Hey everybody, it’s me
Kirk Mastin at Mastin Labs, and we’ve got a very special
episode for you today. We are gonna be walking through how to get a perfect light
and airy look for your photo. So this is the look that everybody wants, and it can be frustrating if you don’t quite exactly
know what’s going on that’s making it so you’re
not getting that look. So the way I have things
structured for today is that I’m gonna be
using community images submitted by our amazing
Mastin Labs community, and I’m gonna go through images that just hit everything out of the park with you know, being shot exactly the right way to prepare you
for a light and airy look, and then I’m gonna show you some images where there’s a few
elements that are missing that will make it impossible
to get a light and airy look and then at the end, I’m
gonna show you a few images that are almost all the way there that could be improved just a little bit. So again, these are all community images, and I’m really grateful for
our huge Facebook community at Mastin labs, and thank you for sending
in so many good things. All right, let’s get started. So the light and airy look. What is the light and airy look? So some people think of
it as like the definition of fine art photography although fine art photography
covers a lot of things, but in general the light and airy look is very light, pastel look, very light tones, it’s there a light, I mean light and airy says it all, that’s the look that light and airy is, that’s what people want, and I’ve been shooting for 20 years. I did wedding photography
for most of that time. I shot a lot of film, I
still shoot mostly film, and the light and airy look
was something I went to a lot. There are dark and moody photographers, and you know who you are, and that’s a really great look too. It’s just a different
mood for your photos. But today, we’re gonna be
focusing on light and airy only. And for all of the images, I’m gonna be editing with
the Fuji original pack. So this is the second pack
that Mastin Labs ever created and it’s been updated a few times. As I learn more, I make
it better and better, but this is the pack, and it comes from the film
that defines light and airy. So this is where the
light and airy movement and everything started, right here. And I’m gonna walk you through
it from beginning to end. So are you ready? Yes, all right, let’s get started. So I made this light and airy checklist. And, let’s see, who shot this? This is Mikaela Hewins shot
this picture on the right, so thank you for sending it in, but I’ve edited this already
with Fuji-400H from Mastin Labs and I’ve boiled down the
conditions you need to have in order to make a foundation
for a light and airy photo. So here’s the checklist if you want to get a light and airy photo. The lighting needs to be
either backlit or open shade. So backlit means that the light source, the main light source like the sun, is behind the subject somewhere. Open shade means that the light isn’t really coming
from any one direction, it’s just very like diffuse and evenly lighting your subject, so it’s all very, very even. The second part that makes
a photo feel light and airy or the way that we expect a photo to feel light and airy is the location that you’re shooting in. You’re not gonna get a light and airy look shooting outside of a mall. You’re not gonna get a light and airy look shooting inside of a cafeteria or in a busy office
building or in the street, I mean you could get
in the street, I guess, if you had everything just right, but for the most part, you need a location that’s very simple, not cluttered, that is either white, mostly
white, or very neutral meaning like no big, strong colors, no big billboards with big
words or anything on them or some kind of vegetation, so like a forest, maybe an open field, just a setting that is
I guess sophisticated and simple and light. So the setting itself has to be light. The third thing is the wardrobe. So if your subject is wearing
like a really busy shirt like stripes or like huge contrasts between different parts of their clothing or any kind of graphics, that kind of automatically
kills your photo from being truly like a fine
art light and airy photo. So wardrobe is super important. And then the last thing
that’s really important which trips a lot of people up is that we associate a light and airy look with a very shallow depth of field. So when you have a shallow depth of field, meaning your lens is, the
aperture is all the way open or nearly all the way open, you have a lot of fall off from your subject being sharp
to the background being blurry and we associate this
subconsciously, for some reason, with film and in particular
a light and airy look. So if you’re shooting your your lens at, you know, f/4 or 5.6 or f/8, you will not be able to get this part of the light and airy look. You need to be shooting it
at like f/1.2, 1.6, f/2, I shot a lot at like f/2.2, that would be the maximum depth of field that I have for my lens. Anything above that, and you start to kind
of lose that film look. And part of that lens thing too is it’s in general, a lot
of light and airy photos are shot with a normal lens meaning like a 50 millimeter
lens to a telephoto lens. So anything, any lens length that’s longer than 50, like saying 85, that’s a
very classic portrait lens or 135, you get that
really nice separation from sharp to blurry in the background, and also the compression, so the lens compression meaning
that things aren’t distorted when you have those elements
you’ve set the stage for a photo, right out of the gate, that’s gonna look light and
airy without any preset. So you’ve noticed that I have
not talked about two things. I’ve not talked about
how you expose the image, so I haven’t said anything about like underexpose or overexpose. That will not make your
image light and airy. In fact, I recommend just
shooting normal exposure, and the second thing that I have not talked about are presets. You should be able to get,
and this is just sacrilege, you should be able to get
a light and airy edit, a perfect light and airy edit
without any presets at all. If your photo cannot look light
and airy without any preset, it is just was not shot
correctly to get that look. That being said, Mastin Labs
will give you a true film look on top of that nice edit, and
that’s what we’re here for. We’re not a magic bullet that will transform any
photo into any photo. No, there’s no good preset
in the world that can do that that’s worth your time or money. But if you get the image right as a skilled photographer, and you remember this checklist, you’re setting yourself up for success and you will get a light and airy image. So I’m gonna go through
a bunch of images now and go to the checklist and show you where things
hit and where they miss and diagnose things and then I’ll also do a bunch of edits with community images. So if that sounds good, let’s get started. Okay so this first image, it’s an open shade and
it’s slightly backlit. So if you look behind the couple, the light is probably
coming through diffused like overhead clouds but it’s not harsh like
straight down on top of them, it’s coming from a little
bit off to the side. So you don’t have like
any kind of harsh light. They’re wearing, or they’re in a very neutral location. If you look at the location they’re in, it’s not busy, there’s
no busyness in the photo, it’s very neutral, like
the colors behind them, you know, these are very neutral colors like gray, green, tan,
white, very important. Their wardrobe is very neutral. I mean she is wearing a very
bright kind of pink dress, but it all works, there’s
nothing garish about this, and all the colors really flow together. This is like a fine art
photography color palette in a photo. You’ve got like peach,
sage green, light yellow, her dress is a little bit, you know, the most different
thing in the photo, but everything works. And the lens is, this
is an 85 millimeter lens shot at 1.6 so aperture is 1.6 so it’s very shallow depth of field. So this hits everything on the checklist. All right, here’s another photo. This is by Daniel Usenko. I picked this photo because it’s not shot in front of a forest or anything, this is just in a city, but it works. This is shot in France, maybe
’cause it’s France it works? I know, France is so
light and airy in itself. But they are in open shade,
so the lighting is open shade, the location is very neutral, there’s nothing in this location, there’s no big red
blotches or colorful things or like a taxi passing
behind them or anything, it’s all very neutral, their
wardrobe is very neutral, she’s wearing kind of a
champagne-colored dress, he’s wearing like a gray-brown suit, and the lens used was a 58
millimeter lens shot at 1.4. Now if this image were shot
at f/8, it would be too busy, and would really lose that effect, but as you can see, it’s a very nice, perfect
example of a light and airy look. Okay, so here is another photo, this is by yes, Valerio Costilla. I love all of Valerio’s
work, it’s really nice, so thank you for sending this in. I picked this image
because it’s shot inside. This is not even outside, this is inside with I’m
assuming window light, but it’s nice, clean window light. This isn’t backlit or open shade, but it still works because
it’s fairly evenly lit, there’s detail throughout the whole thing, and what makes this work despite the lighting not being softer is that it has essentially
a white background, she’s wearing neutral colors, and it’s shot completely wide open, an 85 millimeter lens at 1.6, so this image has all the ingredients of a light and airy photo. Now if she was against like
some dark red bricks inside with like a yellow dress on, and like a shelf behind her
with some pictures on it, it would not feel light and airy anymore because it no longer
satisfies this checklist. And then here’s a photo of
mine from a long time ago. So this is in front of vegetation, but you can see that
they’re backlit from behind, and they’re in open shade, so it’s kind of the one-two combo like you know, this is the
light I was always looking for when I was shooting outside for a wedding like in the forest. I’d always try to get opposite the light so that I could shoot back at my subjects with the light behind them, and then I knew that in post or on film, I could get all the detail
back and overexpose it, and get that light and airy look. But this is backlit with open shade, the location is vegetation, and it’s fairly neutral
except for these flowers, but I want the flowers to stand out. Their wardrobe is fairly neutral,
it’s all blues and white, and it shot pretty much wide open, so this is shot with a 50 millimeter lens, that was my favorite lens
throughout my whole career, and was shot at 2.2 and that
was kind of my go-to aperture because it gave me a
little bit of wiggle room if I didn’t get my focus completely right, but it was also wide open enough that I could get that
really nice separation between my subject and the background. So there you go, there’s my photo. All right, so here are a few photos sent in by the community, and I’m gonna do an edit, and show you how they cannot, even though they’re nice photos, they cannot get to a light and airy look for different reasons. So this is shot, this is a Nikon file, so
I’m gonna go to Nikon, where is it? Here it is. 400H, I applied it, I’m gonna do cloudy for the white, ugh, yeah cloudy for the white balance, I’m gonna take away a little
bit of the magenta cast here by sliding the green or the
tint slider towards green, and I’m gonna increase
exposure and do All Soft. Okay, and I’m gonna crop
it a little bit differently so that you can see it, or actually, I’m gonna
go to to a full screen. Okay, so this is as close as I can get to a light and airy, a light and airy edit for this image, but it doesn’t look like this. Now there are few reasons why this image, I mean it’s a really nice
image, it’s really great edit, I would be happy to send
my client this image, but it’s not quite the light
and airy look that people want, and let’s go to the
checklist to find out why. First of all, the lighting. This is lit from the side, so you can see the side light coming in, on the left side of the
woman here and the baby, and then it gets much darker
on his face on this side. So already we’ve got side light. It’s not super harsh, but
it’s enough to kind of start taking away the softness
of the whole image. I would say the biggest
issue with this image is the location and the wardrobe. So the location is very, very busy. You can see there’s these guardrails, there are marks on the street,
there are these leaves, and then if you look at their wardrobe, she’s got polka dots, he’s got green, you know, I would actually
say it’s mostly her dress, these polka dots and this
blue kind of throw me off. And then, I don’t know, like, in general, like light and airy photos, people really like to stylize them with like, I don’t know,
flowy dresses and linen and peach colors and things like that. So their wardrobe isn’t cohesive in a light and airy fine art style, even though it’s a wonderful family photo. And then if you look at the
lens, it’s a 50 millimeter lens, but it was shot at 4.5,
so the aperture is 4.5. One thing that could, two things that would improve this image to make it more light and airy would be to find a part of the road that doesn’t have these marks on it, and then to shoot more wide open, so shoot it at like f/2.2 and then to wait for a time of day when the light isn’t coming from the side, but it’s still a really nice photo. So this photo is from Siarhei Sarachuk, and it’s a really cool action shot, but I picked this image because this is a kind of image
I would see in the community where people are frustrated
they’re not getting, again, like this look or this look or this look, and they assume that it’s possible to get that look for any photo,
and this is a great photo, but they try to edit it
and it’s just not possible. And I’ll show you why. And this is unedited, I’ll
do my best to edit it. So here’s Fuji-eutral,
I’ll do full screen. Okay, so here’s Fuji-eutral, I gonna increase the exposure. I’m gonna use All Soft to kind
of balance out that contrast and, oh man, I’m gonna do cloudy white balance and that’s
about as close as I can get, and it’s not quite satisfying, it doesn’t feel like a
light and airy image. And the reason for this is that, first of all, the
lighting is very harsh. We’re in a split lighting
condition where we’ve got like I would say near sunset light coming in straight from the left, really harsh compared to the shadows on the right side of the image. So that immediately takes
away any possibility of this image being light and airy. The location is super, super busy. There’s a lot of lines coming through it. The wardrobe is not
neutral, peach or white, it’s very bold and vibrant, and the way that it’s shot, it’s shot with a wide-angle lens at f/4. So basically, it’s a great photo, and I don’t want this person
take it the wrong way, but it doesn’t pass any
part of the checklist to be a light and airy photo. It just will not work. What’s interesting is that
if you let go of the idea of this being a light and airy photo, what it really is is a
vibrant, fun, active photo, and I would use, and personally, I would do
something like Ektar on it, and just lean in to the
fact that it’s contrasty and that it’s shot towards
the end of the day. So with Ektar, you get
that beautiful sunlight, you’re actually embracing and playing with the
contrast in the image, and you can see her expression and their movement even better. So like this image was never meant to be light and airy ever. In fact, it works really well as like a colorful,
vibrant, summertime image. So I just applied Ektar, I would maybe increase exposure tiny bit, and then call it a day. And in this last photo, this
last photo is beautiful. Abul Shah sent it in, and when I saw it my
immediate reaction was man, this is gonna make a really
nice light and airy image, and then I started editing it. So this is a Nikon file,
let’s do 400H again. So I applied 400H, going to increase the exposure. I think it needs to be maybe
a little bit more magenta. Yeah, like there, and I’ll
try to do all All Soft, I’m gonna do my best to
make this light and airy. So there’s All Soft, and
increase the exposure again. Now this image is very close to being
a light and airy image but it’s not, it is what it is. It’s a beautiful image, but
it’s not really that fine art really light feeling. And that’s mostly because of the, not even the aperture it was shot at, but just the busyness of the frame and that there’s no separation between her and her background. So this is mostly open
shade, she’s in the doorway, so it passes that, the location
is vegetation, that’s fine. The wardrobe is not exactly neutral, if she was in like a peach or white or champagne-colored dress, then it would drift more
towards the light and airy look that people expect. And here’s the crazy little technicality. So on the lens part, it’s a
50 millimeter lens shot at 1.8 so it shot like all the way open, and yet, it doesn’t work on the lens part because she’s in the same plane of focus as the vegetation around her. So if you moved her way out in front, it would blur out that, you know, it would blur out
the vegetation around her a little bit and separator her. Even if you found a doorway
that was a little bit wider so she wasn’t touching the
vegetation, that might help, but the fact that so much
is in focus in that plane, kind of negates the fact
that it was shot at 1.8. You can shoot this at the f/8, and it will look identical
to this, or f/11. So in those cases, it doesn’t work, but it’s still a beautiful photo. Okay, I’ve got two questions. – [Man] The first one
is from Raymond Limbers who asks when is the best
time to do a backlit image? – Okay, so Raymond is
asking when is the best time to do back with image? So I think the best time
to do a backlit image is, when, I would say anytime
that the sun is low enough that it’s at least, in general, 45 degrees behind your subject. So any higher in the sky than 45 degrees, then you get a really hot sky, like a completely blown out sky, and the lighting starts
to get kind of hazy and harsh on the subject. – [Man] And Ginger Briller asks how do you shoot a family of four at f/2.2 and have everybody in focus? – Okay, so ginger asks how
would you shoot a family of four at a wide-open aperture like 2.2 and keep everyone in focus? Great question. Let me see, I don’t have
an example in this group, but what I would do is I would
shoot with a longer lens. So if you shoot with a 50
millimeter lens at 2.2, you create a certain amount of separation between your subject and the background. Another way to get that separation
is to use a longer lens. So when you’re shooting at say 135, if you had a lens that was
you know, 135 millimeters, you could shoot it at like
f/4 and get everybody in focus as long as they’re in
the same plane of focus and still have a very blurry background, and that’s what I would do. One little trick that I
learned when I was shooting a lot of families and things like that is that I made sure to get everybody as lined up on the plane
of focus as I could before I started. So I’m gonna turn my hand this way, so imagine you’re looking
straight down on people. If this is a person and this is a person and I’m standing up here, this person’s gonna be in focus and this person is gonna be out of focus. If you can move them into
the same plane of focus, you could shoot at f/2 and
everyone would be in focus. If you’re careful enough about
getting everybody aligned on that plane of focus. If you have a very large group of people and there are people standing
in front and some in back, say like rows of people,
like a giant family, then my suggestion is to
get a longer lens like an 85 and shoot at a higher
aperture like f/4 or 5.6 and then you’re getting everybody in focus from front to back but everything before the group of people and everything after the group
of people are gonna be blurry and that’s what people
associate with fine art. I hope the helps. All right, one more question. – [Man] Kyana asks what
is your recommendation for shooting in harsh light? – What is my, so Kyana asks– – [Man] What is your recommendation for shooting in harsh light? – Kyana asks what is my recommendation for shooting in harsh light. Don’t. Don’t, I mean you can’t make
harsh light into soft light. My recommendation is if
you have harsh light, move your subject into a doorway or under some kind of open shade facing, facing towards the light. So what does that mean? It means like an awning or roof or foliage that doesn’t let dappled light through, put your subject under that so that it diffuses the light
and it’s even on your subject and then have them face
out towards the light not like back towards the house
or the tree trunk, but out. And then if you stand in front of them, you’re gonna be shooting
them under diffused light and that’ll soften it and
give you that light you want. All right, so I hope
that helps set the stage for the ingredients for
a light and airy photo. And let’s move on now to the edit. Now that you have, now that you’ve followed
the rules or the checklist, and you’ve got this photo
that can be light and airy without any preset at all, how do you make a perfect with presets? All right. So this photo is by Howard Treeby, and I’ve condensed the tips
for a light and airy edit down to six things, a
few of them are optional. And this is the best workflow. Again, I want you to remember
that the starting exposure that you’re working at,
doesn’t even factor into this. Get that out of your head
that it even matters, it doesn’t matter. I mean it matters if you’re trying to capture a super wide range of contrast, then yes, if you have a
Nikon D810 or something, yeah sure, shoot it like way underexposed so you save the sky, but it is not the magic bullet. So don’t worry about that part. And I’m gonna show you images that are like way underexposed, and overexposed, and perfectly exposed, and they’re all gonna get there just fine. So Howard sent this in, and the workflow that I recommend is that you apply the preset first, so we’re gonna do Fuji-400H Neutral, and then we’re going to
apply lens correction. If you are shooting your images according to the first
checklist aka wide open, you’re gonna need to almost
always apply lens correction because when you shoot a lens wide open, you get vignetting and
distortion around the corners, and that can really
throw off your exposure later when you edit, so you don’t want to do that at the end you want to do it up front. So I applied the preset, I’m
gonna do lens correction on, and you can see the image
changed a little bit. I’ll go back and forth to show you. So this is before, and this is after. Now we’ve got the preset
applied, lens correction, and then you need to adjust exposure, and for most people,
especially in this day and age when everyone is super
underexposing for who knows why, it’s just kind of a trend these days, you’re gonna have to
increase the exposure. So in general, most of the time you’re gonna have to
increase the exposure. So I’m gonna increase it. And you can see that this
image that you started with that seemed really dark
and like, you know, it didn’t look like a
light and airy image, it has all the ingredients already and I’ve barely done anything. So I’ve increased the exposure, now I’m gonna adjust the
white balance and tint. So let’s see here. I think daylight looks really good, and then we can select a
tone profile if we want. A tone profile is a special tool that we’ve added to
all of our preset packs which lets you get more detail
out of highlights or shadows or increase the contrast
in highlights and shadows for different effects. So originally, it came
from our film scanner, the Fuji Frontier, and
it was a way to solve for blown-out skies, you
could bring that detail back without affecting everything else. But you can use it in different photos to slightly adjust them without
changing them completely. So in this case I would use Highlight Soft which is gonna bring back
a little bit of detail in their dress and in the sky. So there’s Highlight Soft. I’ll show you before and after. So this is before, and that’s after. And with it applied, I
can even go up in exposure just a little bit more because
it’s retained all that detail just like film would. So there’s an example of
an edit for this photo. Here is another photo that we received, actually yeah, from Siarhei Sarachuk. I actually put this in the
impossible to edit category when I first saw it, and
then later I played with it, and found that even
though it doesn’t satisfy hardly any of the requirements
for a light and airy photo, it still can get there. I’m actually quite amazed. So, let me straighten it real quick. Now I’m gonna apply Fuji-400H and I’m gonna do Fuji-400H
for every photo just, for every photo in this edit
just to keep it consistent. So there’s 400H, I’m gonna apply lens correction on, going to adjust the exposure up, and then I’m gonna adjust
the temperature and tint till everything looks as
good as I can make it. So they’re a little bit magenta,
I’m gonna go towards green, and a little bit warmer. And now looking at it, I’m gonna increase
exposure a little bit again to about here. Now this is just totally shocking to me that this photo can get to a
somewhat light and airy look considering that it was shot
indoors, in mixed lighting. I think the reason that it can get there is because it satisfies two
things out of this list. The location is like totally neutral. Everything is either white or
champagne-colored or green. And then their wardrobe
is completely neutral. She’s wearing a champagne-colored dress, he’s wearing kind of brownish yellow vest and he’s bald like me, so there’s no hair to kind of
make things more complicated and all things considered, yeah, it’s a wide-angle
lens but it’s shot at f/2, so there’s a little bit of separation between them and the background, and even though it doesn’t satisfy that much of the checklist, it’s not that bad for being shot indoors and getting to a light and airy look. Okay, actually, I’ll
show you before and after ’cause it’s really wild. Here’s some before and after this photo, so thank you for sending it in. All right, so back to a photo that’s a little more
traditionally light and airy. So this is by Amber Renea Dalholt, and this is a Canon file, so here is Fuji-400H, lens correction on, increasing exposure. I’m going to adjust the, the temperature looks about right to me, I’m gonna just adjust tint towards green, just a tiny bit, why? Because I see a little bit
of magenta in her face. I’m also looking at her shirt and a little bit of this tree trunk, and there’s a little bit
of a global magenta to it, so I’m going to go towards
green, just a tiny bit, and then I’m gonna do All Soft. All Soft brings back
detail in the highlights, and brings out of the
shadows just a little bit, and that is like just the
simple light and airy look. It satisfies all the requirements, it’s shot with a 50
millimeter lens at 1.8. Really nice background blur, she’s wearing very neutral colors, and the background is very
neutral and beautiful, so that’s an easy light and airy edit. This photo was also by Amber,
this was in my category of this is gonna be really hard to edit, and it surprisingly wasn’t. So I’m gonna do Fuji-400H Neutral, apply the lens correction
although it doesn’t really need it ’cause it was shot at f/5, but I’m gonna increase the exposure, and then do white balance
a little bit warmer, and a little bit towards magenta. Why magenta? ‘Cause if I look at this guy’s butt, it looks a little bit green to me. And that is a nice light and airy look. It could be better if it was shot a little bit later in the day where we don’t have such a bright sky, and if it was shot a
little shallower aperture, so like it at f/2.2, it would be more of a
light and airy photo, but it’s really not bad
considering you started with this. Super underexposed. So that’s really cool and
my tips for making it better would be later in the day
and a shallower aperture. All right, so this is,
yes we have a question. – [Man] Just, it lines
up, Claudia wants to know, she says how to I know the
limit of increasing exposure? – Oh, that’s a good question– – [Man] With that photo
that you were just using, how do you know how far you go? – Okay, with the photo I just did? So Claudia asks how far
can you increase exposure or what’s the limit? So let’s focus on that for a second. There’s a few ways you
can figure this out, two ways in particular, and it depends on what you want. Now if you’re a purist who can’t stand the thought of there being anything pure white in your
photo, then you should, I don’t know, the light and airy look might not even be for you in particular, it might not be something you like. If you’re okay with the sky
being just totally white which I am, and if you look
at a lot of fashion magazines, it happens all the time and it
doesn’t make it a bad photo. You don’t have to have detail
all the way through the photo. But if you can accept those
things, here is what I look for. I look for the bulk, I look for the bulk of the
image like the midtones to be exposed correctly. So I’m looking at his back
and her back and her back and when those look correct to me, if my subjects look correct, that’s perfect, that’s
where I want it to be. I don’t really care if there’s sky detail nor do a lot of fine art
photographers, they do not care. Now, if you get really hung up on that, and everything has to have detail in it, you could add like a sky
overlay or something like that or you could try to do some
really fancy lighting setup with a soft box and try to balance it out, but in general, I just let the
sky go where it needs to go and to me, that is the perfect exposure. The second choice you have
is you can get the J key, and you can actually see where things are becoming pure white, and you can adjust to that. So if you don’t want anything
to be absolutely pure white, then that’s where your limit is. So in this photo, I’ve
already applied All Soft which maximizes the highlight
retention in the photo. If that’s still not enough, then I would just bump the exposure down to where we’re just
avoiding that red stuff, and that would be my new
exposure right there. I personally don’t care if
the sky goes completely white. I’d rather have my subject look like that if I’m going for a light and airy look. So I hope that helps. All right, I’ve got just
a few more images to edit, and then we’ll wrap it up. If you have any more
questions, please ask them. I’ll take two more
questions before we end. Okay, this is by Niki Crews. Let’s see how this one goes, so, Fuji-400H, lens correction on, it was shot of that 1.8 with an 85, so I recommend lens correction. We’re gonna increase the exposure, and now I’m gonna do, I don’t
know, cloudy white balance or maybe open shade. Open shade’s perfect, okay. These white balance settings on the side, they’re just a shortcut, sometimes you have to
just adjust it manually, which is totally fine too. So I’m gonna actually gonna go a little bit warmer than open shade, it’s right about there. This photo is interesting
because it’s not your traditional light and airy photo, it’s
not like a flowy dress in Tuscany in Italy, it’s just
like a girl at a skate park with a jean jacket, but
it’s still kind of works because it’s really out of focus, or the separation of the subject from the background is perfect, it’s fairly neutral, the background. It’s a little bit busy, I
would’ve tried to have moved away from these banners or whatever they are in the background, but she’s wearing very
simple outfit, so it works. And that’s not bad, so thanks
for sending it in, Niki. This is by Christopher Thomas. I’m going to apply, let’s
see, this is a Fuji file. So I’m gonna do Fuji-400H, lens correction on, exposure up, this needs to be warmer, and maybe a little bit more magenta. This is a tough image,
because I can actually see her skin that well through the
veil, but it still works. And then I’m gonna do,
no, All Soft is too much. I’m gonna just do Highlight Soft. Yeah, Highlight Soft brings
back the detail in her veil. So here’s the before
and after of this photo. This is a photo where you would see it, and my bias in my mind would be of course this is a light and airy photo, it’s a woman with a veil over face in front of a green forest. It’s a beautiful photo and it would be, I don’t know, more light and airy if she was separated
from the background more. So if she took just, I don’t
know, four or five steps to her left away from those bushes, those bushes would be out of focus, and more focus will be on her, and it would feel more light and airy. I would also try to
avoid having these things in the top of the frame
that are super in focus ’cause they’re kind of competing with her, but it’s still a great photo. Here is another photo,
this is by Abul Shah. I like this one because we get, you know, a really nice
wide range of skin tones. This is something people
are always interested in, so I added this one in here. If I do my edit, I’ll show you how close I can get to a light and airy look. So this is a Nikon file. Where are you Nikon? Right here, okay Fuji-400H, lens correction on. Hmm, didn’t need it, strange. This might be a third-party lens that doesn’t have a correction on it yet. Let me see here. Okay, there is no profile for this lens so that means we need to
fix the vignetting by hand which is kind of annoying, but whatever. Okay, so I took a little
of the vignetting away, and I’m going to increase the exposure. Now looking at them, I think
that this would benefit from being a little bit more green, and the reason I say
that is I look at his face, and he’s got a little redness
in the shadows of his face. Just a small thing, but it
needs to be little more green, there we go, and a little
warmer, just a tiny bit. Fuji is a cool look so it
shouldn’t go super warm. That looks about perfect. And I think I overdid it on
the vignetting correction, let me pull that back. There we go, all right perfect. So, this almost nails
everything perfectly. What I would do to get a little bit better light and airy look would be moving them a little bit closer to the camera and away from the background so you can blur that out
just a little bit more, and the wardrobe is great,
the background is great. If the sun was behind the couple, like see where the tip of
this castle is or whatever, if the sun was like right up here, kind of going through the
trees, and backlighting them, then it would be just like a knockout perfect light and airy photo. Those are my little quibbles with it, but it fits most of the checklist. Awesome photo. We got two more and then
I’ll take two questions, and then we’re done. This is by Kristen Hansen. I picked this one because
it’s in the desert, we don’t have any desert photos yet. This is a Nikon file, so we’ll
do, oh it’s like, all right. Let’s do Nikon 400H, lens correction on. This image is really super cool so I think we’re gonna go with open shade. Ah, perfect. And this is kind of crazy
but I’m gonna do All Hard. I think it needs a little more punch So All Hard, and then I
increase the exposure a bit. And it needs just a little bit of magenta. All right, there we go. I’m gonna do one more thing, I’m gonna crop it in a little
bit, it’s just so much sky, I want you to be able to see the couple. Let me get rid of that
little column, there we go. Ah. All right. All right, so let’s break
this photo down real quick. It has a really nice
separation from the background, so it got that right, the background is like a nice
neutral color, it’s not busy ’cause it’s blurry and it looks
like a watercolor painting. Their wardrobe, so the
ways this could be better is their wardrobe could be more, I don’t know, classic. Like it’s a very contemporary
wardrobe right now. He’s wearing jeans and like hiking boots. If he was in like a white suit or like a light gray suit
or something like that or maybe a white shirt and like chinos, or something like that, it would make it feel more of that sophisticated light
and airy fine art look. However, I think these
clients look amazing and this photo looks great, I
would love to give it to them. That’s just my little quibble, and the other thing is that
it’s shot at a time of the day where there’s no detail at all in the sky, and if you would just
wait until like blue hour which is right around sunset or it’s the hour after sunset, you would probably get some
nice sky detail in there, and still get that light and airy look, but it’s a great photo. And then here is our last photo. Let me bring up our
checklist one more time. I’m gonna do both checklists. So, just to kind of wrap things up. The foundation is perfect for this photo. It’s backlit a little bit, you can see on edge of her hair, and it’s an open shade. Her location is vegetation and neutral, there’s no like big red
blotches or anything or signs or anything. Her wardrobe is neutral, it’s literally white and peach, perfect. And it’s shot wide open with
a 135 millimeter lens at 1.8. Everything is here. This is your classic fine art photo that you’re trying to get to. I’m gonna edit it with
no preset real quick to show you that it’s just ready to rock, like there we go, simple edit, two clicks, it’s a super nice photo. So keep that in mind
while you’re shooting, the ingredients have to be right. Now let’s do the light
and airy edit checklist. Oh, this is by Siarhei Sarachuk again, thank you for sending it in. You are a busy bee, you
send us a lot of stuff. So let’s do Fuji-400H. Let’s see, we’ll do cloudy for the white balance, oh, I forgot to do lens
correction, lens correction on, I’m going to increase the exposure and then do All Soft. Boom, and a little bit of
magenta, just a tiny bit. Look at that. That is awesome, perfect. It passed all of my checklist. This is how you get to
a light and airy photo with no struggle. So I hope that this has been
really, really helpful for you. I’m excited to kind of break things down into very specific topics and this is something
that comes up all the time so I hope this is helpful. If you have any questions, please leave them in the comments here, and we will be broadcasting this. I’ll take two more questions
and then we’ll wrap it up. Do we have any more questions? – [Man] Jozuel, I’m
trying to say his name, asks if you use sharpening
and noise reduction. – So Jozuel asks if I use
sharpening or noise reduction when getting photos like this. So noise reduction, no. I don’t hardly ever use it anymore. That was like way back in the
day, I’ll use noise reduction. My favorite solution to noise is just try not to
shoot at super high ISO, and not really works with
a light and airy look. You shouldn’t be shooting
a super high ISO anyway. So you’ll never have to worry about that. And then as far as sharpening goes, everyone’s got their recipe, I don’t touch sharpening in Lightroom. I think if you over sharpen a photo, it looks super digital so I just leave it. When I do go to export, I
export for screen at low. No, I do screen, the medium setting, and then print, the low setting. That’s what I do so your mileage may vary. But anyway, okay, well
thank you for joining us. I hope that helps you in
your light and airy pursuits. If you’re new to Mastin Labs,
join our Facebook group. Just go to Facebook and type
in Mastin Labs Community. We’d love to have you even if
you don’t own anything yet, and you can go there, and just put in a link
to a Dropbox raw file, like put it in Dropbox,
a raw file of yours that you want to see
edited with Mastin Labs, and you’ll have like 25
people edit it for you so you can see. We love answering questions, there’s a lot of good info in there on all kinds of photography topics, and we’re a very friendly community. So it’s the least you can do
for yourself is join the group and see if we can’t convince you to become a full tribe
member of Mastin Labs. But for those of you who are familiar with me and Mastin Labs, please keep sending any more photos. We’re gonna be doing a
live edit every two weeks on different subjects. Just stay tuned in the group, when you see the link go up, put your photo in with your
name and the preset you want and you might be in the next live edit. So thank you very much and
can’t wait to see you next time.

Replace Lightroom AND Edit Faster in Affinity Photo

Replace Lightroom AND Edit Faster in Affinity Photo


Today’s your lucky day! Today’s the day
you can finally cancel your Adobe subscription. With the help of this brand
new course, you’ll be able to say goodbye to Adobe once and for all.
I love Affinity Photo, but it’s missing two critical features for photographers:
it doesn’t let you edit more than one RAW photo at a time, and it doesn’t let
you organize your photos. For that, you need another tool, like Lightroom.
Unfortunately, Adobe only lets you rent Lightroom for $10 a month. That’s why I
use a program called Darktable. Darktable isn’t an Affinity product, but if
your goal is to get away from Adobe, it’s a great app to use. It does everything
that Lightroom can do, and it’s 100% free. With Darktable, you can organize
thousands of photos, and batch edit RAW images, allowing you to edit entire photo
shoots in minutes. It took me a few months to get comfortable using Darktable. If any of you have ever tried to learn how to use Darktable, then you
know the tutorials on YouTube can be… pretty technical. That’s why I’ve made
this course, and broken down the steps that you need to know to use Darktable
so that it’s nice and simple, and so that you can cancel your Adobe subscription
as soon as possible. But wait! There’s more! In this course, I want to show you
more than just how to use Darktable. I want to show you my favorite techniques
for editing faster inside of Affinity Photo. In this course, we’ll go over good
shortcuts to know, my workflow for editing photos, and how to create
professional macros. Macros make editing your photos so simple. With the click of
a button, you can apply beautiful filters and
effects to your photos. In this course, we’ll make macros for whitening teeth,
enhancing eyes, dodging and burning, and tons of other
fun effects. This course will teach you everything you need to create any macro
you can imagine. I’m so excited to share this course with you! Enroll today, and
I’ll see you in the course.

Star Trails Photography (astrophotography) How to take startrail  photos at night

Star Trails Photography (astrophotography) How to take startrail photos at night


today I’m going to go through the
process of photographing and editing star trails star trails are basically
long exposure images which streak the stars across the sky the longer the
exposure the longer the streaks I’m going to be using three different bits
of software Lightroom Photoshop and star tracks if you don’t have the Adobe
Creative Suite but want to give it a go click on the link below this will take
you to a 30-day free trial star tracks is a piece of freeware software so you
can download it and start using it straight away to shoot the photographs
you’ll need a tripod an intervalometer a camera and obviously a clear night when
the moon’s out that’ll bleach out a lot of their stars so if you shoot around
the New Moon that’s the best time to do these types of photographs basically
it’s like any type of long exposure photography you’re gonna leave the
shutter open for extended amounts of time and you’re gonna keep the camera as
still as possible with the intervalometer it’ll mean that you won’t
be pressing the shutter button inducing movement into the camera to get decent
star trails you need your shutter open for at least an hour now if you did this
in one shot the camera would soak up a lot of lights and if there’s any ambient
light about it would just soak up all of that light and probably over expose your
shot there are two better ways to do this and I’m going to show you the
results I got from doing it these two different ways the first set of shots
was of twenty second exposures and I took around about 260 of these my
thinking behind this is I’ve taken the shots within the 500 rule so if this way
works I’ll be able to get videos and photos from exactly the same shots with
these shorter exposures I had 3 second intervals in between each of the shots
the second set of photographs is of 2 minute exposures and I took 48 of these
they had a 5 second gap for the camera to process the images the advantage of
shooting it this way is you have less images and therefore less data however
due to the longer exposures you’re more likely to
get long exposure noise in this instance you have to turn off long exposure noise
reduction this is because when you have this on it processes the image and takes
about the same time as the shot if I was doing a 20 second exposure I’d have to
wait another 20 seconds before being able to take the next shot and this
would ruin the start rails so just remember long exposure noise
reduction off to get the shots basically follow my astrophotography rules that’s
in the video linked in the corner or down in the description then all you
need to do is change the exposure length if you’re doing the first way it’s
exactly like it is in the astrophotography video except you will
be using your intervalometer to get a large number of shots with exactly the
same framing around about an hour’s worth should be okay if you’re doing it
the second way you just extend your exposure time to about two minutes once
you have the images import them into Lightroom and then you’ll probably have
to do a little bit of editing before taking them into star Stax star Stax
doesn’t accept RAW files it just accepts TIFF files or JPEGs so I’ve got my 263
images here I shut them on the a 73 and there were twenty second exposures the
ISO was 6400 you can see 20 seconds I was using a manual lens I know this was
the 14 millimeter samyang and the aperture was F 2.8 so all the way along
here you can see my images what I’ve done I’ve processed them a little bit
already they were slightly underexposed so I brought the exposure up by 0.55 of
the stop I brought the sharpening down to zero noise reduction and Colour down
to zero and I’ve enabled profile Corrections and removed chromatic
aberrations so if you haven’t done that already make those changes and then sync
throughout and the way to sync is to select all of the images and then come
over here make sure you’re in the develop module and come over to sync
make sure everything’s checked and synchronize depending on how many images
you have this may take a while or sometimes it doesn’t take long at all
it also depends on processor speed so next it’s time to
export the files so click on file export in export location I have choose folder
later I prefer this method if you don’t you can just put in the details of the
folder that you’re going to save them to in this bit here next file naming if you
change rename to custom name and sequence this process only gives you one
figure and it won’t actually put them in sequential order so what you need to do
is click on edit then up here take away sequence with one number on and then
down here choose sequence with a 0 0 1 and insert so you’ve got custom text
sequence with a number done so now you can see with the example you’ll have 3
numbers now it’ll put them in a numerical order I’m going to export the
images as JPEG to speed it up you can export them as Tiff’s but you need a lot
of memory and a lot of time I’m not going to resize the image I’m going to
keep the original size I’m going to keep sharp and off and then export now I’ll
choose where I’m going to save them and this is a 7 3 star trails create and
open if you’ve taken lots of shots this process will take a while like this
process that I’ve done where I’ve taken 260 shots of 20-second exposures once
Lightroom has processed all the images next it’s time to bring them into star
stacks so open up star stacks and it’s a pretty simple bit of software so I’ve
got all of my images here so I’ll select them all and I’ll drag them to this
point where it says drop images here you can see it’s put them all down on this
left hand column next on this other side you have blending modes images and
general so the blending modes lighten or gap-filling works quite well I tend to
have it on gap-filling gap-filling basically means where you’ve had gaps in
between each of the poses there a little bit longer you’ll
actually get gaps in the streaks so the software will then process these and
fill in those gaps what’s the images processed you can then
work out how much gap filling you want to do you do have this option of comet
mode I’ll show you what this means in a minute so I have all my images down on
the left hand side you can see you’ve got these tabs along the top the first
one is open images the second one is for dark frames I’m gonna leave those for
now obviously I am got anything to save at the moment so this is ranked out then
this next one is processing over here we’ve got magnify pin and outs and a 1×1
Z so I have all of my images I have gap-filling selected so I’m gonna
click on blending again this may take a while depending on how many images you
have and how big they are what I found was if you scale your images down it’ll
be a lot quicker if you use the full size frames like I’ve done here it’ll
take a little bit longer especially as I’ve got 263 images as star stacks
processes the image you can see that it adds to the preview making the streaks
longer and longer you can actually output an image for each of these stages
then you can create a video sequence of the streaks getting longer
once star stacks has processed the image there are a few subtle changes you can
make before you save the image the threshold basically shows you where the
mask will be where it’ll start filling in the gaps so you can see if you have
the threshold high you don’t have much of a mask at all you can see some of the
lines are green and that’s about it the further you bring it down the bigger
the mask will be so I like to have it quite high and bring this amount up if
you go to a one by one crop you can see this mask as a green overlay if you take
it off that disappears so you can see if I don’t have any on at all because the
exposures are relatively short and the gap is really short at 3 seconds you
can’t really see them you’re looking at the images a whole
when you zoom into a one-by-one crop you can see it as almost made up of little
stutters what I tend to do with this gap-filling is bring it up to about to
when I’m using this process so now when i zoom in it’s made the lines a little
bit fuller when you get it to where you want it click on save file and put it in
the folder where you want it to live now we have the image in Lightroom you can
see because I used a really wide angle lens it’s produced some quite funky
distorted lines also a plane flew through the shot and the shot does look
a little bit busy because down the middle
we had the Milky Way and there were 263 exposures each of 20 seconds so I shot
this one over one and a half hours in a really dark location you could see a lot
of stars so the streaks have really filled the
sky ad gives star Stax another go with just 100 images and then 200 images and
maybe 150 images you want to play around and see which gives you the look that
you want if you like the image that you’ve processed that’s all there is to
it now all I do with this image is tidy it up a little bit even though the sky
looks quite good in this image it has produced a very strange pattern along
the bottom of the frame so you can see in this corner it’s produced a kind of a
checked pattern that might have something to do with the amount of shots
that I took you can see all the long exposure noise and there is a way of
getting rid of this so in taking exposures of 20 to 30 seconds with a gap
of 3 seconds you can get some really interesting looking at star trails so
I’m gonna try and use this initial set again but only 150 images not the 263
I’m also changing the blending mode to lighten and I’ve switched on this comet
mode just to see how it works now I’ll process and wait so now it’s processed this new image
let’s see what it’s got if you look at the image a comment mode has basically
tailed off the start rails so they’ll go from the bright head right down to
nothing so it will fade the Stars away this is
quite a different look it almost looks like there’s a huge comet or meteor
shower so now I’ll click on save and store it with the other image now I have
the two images side by side the foreground in these images isn’t
brilliant but I took these photos just for this exercise and I wanted the stars
to fill the frame as much as possible to show you the process of star trails so
this first image was of the 263 images stacked together and the second one was
the 150 images with the comet mode switched on it gives a very different
look for each image you can just about make out the Milky Way in the middle if
we switch back to the other one it’s more of just a white patch in the middle
for me this first image is a little bit too busy and I’d want less going on in
the sky the second one looks almost better it looks like the stars are
coming out of the sky and almost gives a three-dimensional look to the shot so
now we’ll look at the a7r two images so these are the two-minute exposures and I
have 48 of these images again like before in the develop module have made a
few changes have dropped the sharpening down to zero a noise reduction and color
noise reduction down to zero I took this with the zeiss batis 25 millimeter and
I’ve enabled profile Corrections and removed chromatic aberrations that’s the
only changes I’ve made then I’ll select them all and sync all of these settings
once that’s done I’ll export these images so I’ll go to export
and like at 4 choose folder later I just like this setting and then again on
custom settings I want it having two zeros before the
one this is the a7 – star trail again I’m going to export to JPEG not going to
resize it sharpening off and then export so I put this on my desktop and you
folder a7r to create and then you just wait for these to be processed next
we’re going to open up star stacks so you want to clear the images of what
you’ve had before and then a7r to and select all of these images you drag them
to this area again you can see I have my 48 images they’re gonna take comet mode
off and I’m gonna have a gap-filling then I’ll click on process with this
image with the a7 r2 and 25 millimeter batis I worked out where the north star
is and put it on the top third of the image as you can see this is producing a
circular pattern around that pivotal point so with this image I had slightly
longer gaps between the shots as you move to the edge of the frame the gaps
become more prominent this is because the stars are moving over a longer
distance relative to your camera frame obviously in the middle of that
rotational point they don’t move too much when it comes to the frame of your
camera towards the edges of the frame they’ll move a lot more and this is
similar to where you have a bicycle wheel the center point doesn’t move much
at all but the outside moves a lot therefore a 5 second gap between the
shots will produce a gap in the streaks and this is where gap filling comes into
play so if we look at them there and then we bring it up a little bit you can
see it’s starting to fill the gaps so we’ll put the threshold on so we can
see what it’s going to affect we’re going to bring it up a bit more
take your threshold off look at the whole image that seems okay
once you’re happy with it it’s time to export it so again click on save as
eight seven four two and while I’m here I’m gonna set it to comet mode just to
see how different it looks what you’ll find with the image is if any cars of
shot past because it’s blending all the lighter parts of the image if the
foreground has been lit by cars by your light by anything it’ll start to build
on these images once you’ve done that bring the images back into Lightroom so
this is the one where I set star trails and the second one is where I’ve set the
comet setting to on when you look at each star it’s quite a subtle difference
the comet setting doesn’t seem to work too well on the really bright stars but
it does work on the slightly dimmer stars so you can see these ones down
here fade into the distance also looking at these I should have increased the gap
setting you can just about see gaps in between these on a one by one crop
although when you look at the image as a whole you can’t see this as much when
you have the comet setting set to OFF the stars do seem a lot brighter it
actually affects the foreground as well so when the comet setting on the
foreground is quite dark comment setting off the foreground is a little bit
lighter this may have something to do with a different blending mode that I
used the final thing to do with these images is to get rid of the long
exposure noise in this shot that I took with the a7r and a 25 millimeter batis
it was quite warm so with the longer 2 minute exposures the long exposure noise
was there so if i zoom in on this you can see it just down here in the show
has lots of green red and blue speckles you can see it up in the sky a little
bit as well so we want to get rid of that there’s a few ways you can get rid
of this one way is to take some dark frames I forgot to take them on this
night so that’s going to be a subject for another video the other way you can
do it is use some of the filters in Photoshop so if I take this image right
click on it and edit in Photoshop I’m going to edit with Lightroom adjustments
so once it’s opened the image in Photoshop go to filter noise dust and
scratches when you click on the image you have live before and when you let go
that’s the after now play around with a radius and thresholds if you take your
threshold up to the maximum doesn’t do anything if you bring it down to the
minimum it affects the whole image so I normally have this on about 10 for
radius about 2 if you bring the radius up too much what’ll happen is it’ll
start to smooth out the image and give it that painterly look so that looks all
right to me we’ve got rid of most of that long
exposure noise without losing too much detail on this road and the car streaks
then I’ll save that image that’ll bring it back across and what Lightroom does
is creates a copy so this is the edited TIFF file and this is the normal file so
if i zoom in down here you can see on the TIFF file we’ve still got a few bits
of noise but nowhere near as much as that normal one and the last thing to do
is just edit your image after doing this exercise I found that
you can get some quite unique and different looking images than normal the
next time I go out I’m gonna take a lot more of these shots I think this would
look really great if you took a shot in the mountains with the stars streaking
above them you’re basically ignoring the 500 rule because you want your stars to
streak now I’ve learnt a few things from shooting these sequences you can get
different patterns of streaks in the sky depending on which way you point your
camera and also depending on which focal length you use if you’re in the northern
hemisphere and you point it towards the North Star you’ll get a rotational
pattern around this pivot point if you point it in other directions you can get
some interesting looking patterns wider lenses seem to distort and bend the
streaks whereas longer focal lengths produce
slightly straighter lights they will still have a slight curve to them due to
the rotation of the earth if any aircraft fly through your shot and the
lights are quite bright on them they’ll put a line of light through the shot
which can be quite distracting with this first shot you can see when I included
all 263 images towards the end of that sequence a plane flew through the shot
which causes this long line down on the right hand bottom corner when I use the
first hundred and fifty images the plane hadn’t come through the shot which made
it less distracting now the one great thing with this is you can take as many
shots as you want and then in post-processing use as many as you need
so you get to choose how long the streaks are so I’d say take as many
shots as you can afford to with the time that you have and then process those
images afterwards if you have the Milky Way in your image the more shots that
you stack will tend to blur the Milky Way another thing that may cause an
issue is air quality where we were at in this location there was quite a lot of
dust and sand and you could see this towards the horizon where the stars
started to disappear you can see this in the circular shot when I was looking
north the closer you get to the horizon the less star streaks there are and this
shows how much dust and sand was in the air and that’s about it if
you want to do star trails I suggest getting photos over at least an hour
keep the gaps in between the frames as short as possible use an intervalometer
to keep the gaps in between each of the frames the same and then use the program
star stacks to blend the images I’m not sponsored by star stacks but I think
it’s a great program it makes the whole process really easy and straightforward
the best thing with this is just to go out and try take a sequence and bring it
back into your computer and use star stacks to blend all of the shots
together once you’ve taken a few different sequences you’ll learn what
works best and what you like ultimately it’s up to you how you compose your shot
and how you like the stars streaking as always if you like what you see give me
a thumbs up if you didn’t give me a thumbs down and for weekly tutorials
hints and tips in photography and videography subscribe and turn on
notifications I’ll see you in the next one

How to Edit Infrared Photos in Lightroom

How to Edit Infrared Photos in Lightroom


welcome to this infrared processing
tutorial in the previous video I taught you guys how to use the DNG profile
editor to create a profile in Lightroom or Camera Raw so you can edit your
photos and then this one I’m going to show you how to process your image once
you’ve done those three things now here’s one image I was a I edited myself
and we’re going to take this photo right here and make it look more like this so
first step we have Lightroom opened already your photo would look something
like this don’t worry as you can see we can make
it any more cooler it’s still really red but luckily we already made a new
profile that the Dng editor so I’m going to go down to camera calibration go to
profile and you should see your new newly made profiles on selected now our
image is really blue no problem what we have to do now is to open this in
Photoshop now if you’re using only Photoshop you’re probably editing this
with Adobe camera so kudos to you editing Adobe Photoshop now some of you might
not have Photoshop maybe you only have Lightroom and that’s okay
luckily a few weeks back or months actually Adobe released free versions of
Adobe cs2 so all you have to do is go to the Adobe website login are the
downloads go to Adobe Creative Suite cs2 oh yeah you got aaccept first find your
language and you are able to download all of these Adobe products for free now
this is an old version of Photoshop Adobe cs2 but luckily you only need the
channel mixer so once we have our image open to image adjustments channel mixer
and this is where the magic happens we are going to mess with the red and
the blue channels so you see red you’re going to swap it with the blue so we’re
gonna put 0 for red 100 for blue then we’re gonna go to the blue channel we’re
going to swap the blue with red so 100 red zero
for blue now you have a choice you can continue editing in Adobe Photoshop is
all up to you for example image adjustments you can go
to hue and saturation and this is where I would release your hand
no I can’t teach you what to do from here you have to be the creative one you
have to decide what kind of colors you want in your infrared picture but here
we have a lot of oranges so I’m gonna go to the Reds and I’m gonna mess around
with saturation the lighting or the hue so I feel like still kind of pink too
saturated though increase so he’s gonna got a tinker around with this and find
what you like all right so I’m gonna cancel that image adjustments
hue/saturation it’s mess with the yellows instead
so yeah this part you have to figure out on your own you gotta play around with
it find out what you like alright but as for me I prefer to work
in Lightroom so we’re gonna save this why we say that maybe it should be open
in Lightroom here we are so I’m gonna show you what I like to do
first I want to set white to the foliage of the leaves now I like to go to the HSL
panel right here or if you prefer the color blocks it’s all up to you it’s the
oranges because they were orange to begin with and change the hue a little
bit that saturation make it a little bit more pink and I want it kind of bright
so now it looks more like this now it’s important to keep in mind when you shoot
infrared and you start editing you’re going to lose contrast fast so you might
want to crank up the contrast a little crush the blacks a little bit more maybe
you reduce the highlights so like I said this is all up to you however you want
to make your photo look kind of like that so this is just one example of what
you can do you can get really crazy with colors but I like to keep them pretty
pretty relevant pretty steady so we’re gonna change the blues a little bit more
I think I like the hue right there so lower luminance so yes this is just a
quick edit to show you what you can do with infrared let’s do another photo so
we’re gonna go find one of these pictures all right let’s do this one you
can go to develop once again camera calibration right now it’s set to Adobe
standard I’m gonna go to my infrared profile looking good editing in
Photoshop you might have to export file and open it in Photoshop if you don’t
have bridge that’s fine image adjustments channel mixer switch swap
the colors and we have something like this now
personally I like to take the white balance off of the clouds it’s not
always the case there go and here we have a lot of orange I think I like it
kind of pink though so we’re gonna make this orange look kind of pinkish move
the hue all the way you look strange but trust me on this we’re gonna lower the
saturation and we have a nice pink hue all right now it is looking really flat
so like I said when you know when you edit infrared photos you lose a lot of
contrast crank up some contrasts you reduce the highlights some whites it’s
looking a little bit better still a little bit too much contrast over here
so I can say you gotta play around how you like your photos to look and actually I
don’t want the sky to look like that I want to make a little bit more a little
bit more natural if you can say that’s natural and always infrared photo okay
so that looks all right so this just for demonstration purposes you can do
anything you will anything you wish really and yeah I hope you guys enjoy
this infrared tutorial and yeah thank you for watching and if you like these
tutorials please subscribe to me really helps out and check out my Instagram
because I often post infrared photos that’s kind of my thing so thank you
have a nice day you

Landscape Photography – How to Get A Good White Balance

Landscape Photography – How to Get A Good White Balance


Getting the right white balance in our
landscape photography images or indeed any image be it travel through to
portrait is key to the success of that image. Why? Because the white balance
helps to give us an overall feel of that image whether it’s a nice cool image or
a warm image. If we’re not looking at the image and thinking that looks and so
nice and it speaks to me because the white balance is out then
really we’ve lost the game. We need to first get that white balance right in
our images before we do anything at all with them.
So let’s today look at the white balance of our images and how we can attain a
good white balance in our landscape photography images. My name is Julian
Elliott. I’m a professional landscape and travel photographer. If you are
interested in keeping up with what I do as a professional photographer, make sure
that you click on subscribe down there in the bottom right hand corner. So where
do we start with the white balance in our images? The first logical step for a
lot of people, and certainly beginners, is to start with the auto white balance in
our cameras. But it’s not the be-all and end-all. It’s just the beginning of what
we do and can do with the white balance in our landscape photography. So let’s
just start with auto white balance and work up from there to see how we get
from in the field to post-production. And how those images will differ as we come
from the field literally to post-production. Auto White Balance Okay so for the first and easiest method,
especially for beginners if you’re new to photography, you’re going to set your
camera on Auto White Balance and you’re going to let the camera decide the white
balance of the scene in front of you. So at the moment so you can see on the
back of my camera there is a nice vineyard seen here in central France. And the sun
is kind of going in and out so it’s playing havoc really with the white
balance. But if I just take an image right now on auto white balance it will
then record the white balance as it feels is correct for that scene right
now. What’s the second method? Kelvin. Judging by eye. The second method to be able to get
white balance in our landscape photography images and any other
images is to custom manage the white balance. So Canon for example I can turn
on the kelvin so you can see flicking through there all the different white
balances. There’s cloudy, there’s tungsten so it’s very blue. If I go to the Kelvin
and then turn on info I can then look at the scene in front of me and I can try
and judge what I believe is the correct white balance at the moment for that
particular scene. If I can just lean over my camera and just look. It probably
looks somewhere just turn it back on again… It’s looking quite blueish. Blueish green in
that grass down there in the vineyards. Somewhere maybe around there. So if I
take an image that’s how my eyes are registering the scene at the moment. So
that’s dialling in a custom white balance. What’s the next method that you can use
to get a white balance in your landscape images? The Grey Card Something else that we can do to get a
good white balance in our cameras is to use a good old grey card. Now this isn’t
the perfect solution to getting a good white balance in camera because we’re
just working from the grey itself. There’s other things that we really
should be taking into consideration. But it’s at least a good starter for ten to help
you find a good white balance when you get into the post-production stage. So
it’s frustrating at the moment the sun’s gone behind a cloud. I don’t think it’s
going to reappear again when I’m filming this but I’m going to take a picture
without the grey card in scene and then I’m going to take a picture with the
grey card in scene and then we’ll see what difference that it makes. So there’s
three different methods that you could use in the field to help along the white
balance of your images. But that’s not the end of the story. The end of the
story does in fact lie at post-production because we want to be able to look at
the RGB values. The Red, Green and Blue values of our image because we need to
be able to identify where any color cast is to be able to neutralize it. So let’s
get the kit broken down and then get back to the office. Back into Lightroom
and then let’s go on to the next stages of our white balance story. Post Production So we are back in the digital
workstation in front of Lightroom at the moment. And what this segment is going to be about is showing you the different ways of which you can color correct your
white balance in your images and also to show you how the different lighting can
affect those particular images as well when we’re looking at the RGB values. So
there’s the three images that I took when I was doing the vlog. There’s also
an image that I took before the blog had actually started when the light was
playing ball and there’s another image that I’m going to show at the end and it
will become evident why I’m doing this. Now the reason that I want to do this is
because I know there’s a lot of people out there they sell presets and stuff
that you can do these wonderful things with Lightroom and Photoshop etc. It is
really just a shortcut to trying to achieve something that really it’s not
teaching you anything. It’s better to to look at individual images, on an
individual basis and just be looking to see what you can do with them and how
things work. And applying things yourself rather than just relying on a preset
from somebody. It just doesn’t translate all the time. So anyway, so let’s look at
these different images. So this image here this that I’m on right now. This is
the image that I took with the auto white balance set on the camera. Now if
you come over to the histogram up here if you remember from the last video that
I did on Lightroom processing that’s when I looked at the white and the
highlight area up here you could see where the RGB values were and
whether there was any colour cast or not. So here you can see this may be a tiny
bit of a blue color cast where this blue peak is just coming out at the end of
the histogram here. So that’s the first one. So overall as far as color casts go
this particular one it’s not too bad the camera it didn’t do too bad with the auto
white balance.This next image here this is what I took with the Kelvin setting
on my camera. So I was trying to match it how I thought my eyes were actually
seeing the scene so if again you look up at the histogram up here.
You can see that there’s a definite blue color cast here as it’s coming out from
this mid-tone area here. This grey mid-tone. So there’s this definite blue color cast in the image. And then finally these two images
here represent, you can see where the camera move there as I are obviously knocked the camera, there’s the gray card that I took just
afterwards to try and use this mid-tone area here to translate back into the
image here. So what can we do with these particular images? Well let’s start with,
for example, this image here. So if I want to color correct this what do I do? Well
the first thing that I want to do with this one is you’ll see up here there is
a potential of a bit of a blue color cast. Now you remember from the Basic Panel you’ve got your temperature slider and
your tint slider. So if we just move that slider over ever so slightly then we can
just remove the blue color cast so it looks a bit more warmer. It looks a bit more
pleasing. So that’s that particular image. And I can do the same with the others
here. Now with the gray card what you can do why you would use a grey
card or a color target such as the X-Rite kind of color target you can
take this the white balance tool and if you come over here. And so the grey card
is supposed to be neutral now if you look on my screen what you’ll see is
you’ll see the RGB values. So it says forty three point two. Forty three point
two and forty five point nine. So what that says is there is a definite blue
color cast shift in the image and if you look up in the histogram up around here
you will see that that is exactly the case. There is a blue color cast in the
image. So what you can do with the white balance tool is if you click here on
this neutral area. The supposed neutral area. Then if I click on there it will
then get rid of that color cast. If I just move it slightly you’ll see it’s
changed all of the values so they are now equal. Forty three point six. Forty
three point six and forty three point six. Again, if you look up in the histogram you will see that it has shifted. So that’s removed the color cast
from there. And then all you would need to do if you’ve used a color target is
then just go up here to the settings; copy settings so if I just uncheck all
of them; check the white balance; copy that; go back to the previous image and then paste it in and there you go. So if I press the Y key on my keyboard you
will see the before and then the after. So you’ll see on the right hand side the
image just looks that little bit warmer against the image on the left hand side.
Another quick tip is if you hold down the shift key and press Y you can cycle
through these different views so you can see exactly where they are if I get rid
of the white balance tool and zoom in just so I can hover around this image.
You can see the definite blue color cast in the grass there. So that’s one way
that you could remove a color cast in your images. You’ve got this grey
balance here. There’s the grey card. You can use the white dropper tool to click
on that and then it will give you a neutral color in your images so let’s
cycle back through to the full scale image there. There’s another way that you
could do color correction in your images. So let’s explore that particular method.
If I go back to my image whereby I thought that the color temperature was
this around five thousand or five thousand one hundred degrees Kelvin it
is what I dialed into my camera you can see that there is a definite blue color
cast up here now one way another way you can add color correction into your
images is if you look at the white and the black values of your images so I
want to look at the highlights first and identify where the whites are now
obviously there’s some white up in the cloud there there’s a bit of maybe white
on these buildings around here if I take the white slider and I push it
to the right-hand side now make sure your shadow indicator and your high
light indicator is set to jakey or these squares up here if i push this value up
here the white and start to see that the red comes in here to indicate that this
is where the whites are so if I double click on whites to reset that if I hover
over this you’ll see it says ninety six point eight ninety six and ninety five
so if I take this white balance tool here again what I could do is if I hover
over there you’ll see it says ninety six point four ninety five point six ninety
four point six so there’s obviously a bit of a color cast somewhere in there
and again I could click the tool just to remove that so you’ll see it says ninety
six point one nine six point one ninety six point one but they see the image has
gone blue but according to Lightroom that’s now color corrected so if I just
put this back here if I press control Z let’s try a slightly different method
again so if I click the eyedropper and then click on the temperature tool go
back up here what I can do here is I can see the RGB the RGB values the ninety
six point eight ninety six point one ninety five and what I want to do is get
the blue is is an obvious blue color cast to match the red and the green so
let’s start removing the blue Telecaster the strange thing is I’m actually going
to have to go towards the blue to remove it
apparently so this is what I’m saying is that at times don’t always rely on
presets so I’m just pressing the down arrow key on my keyboard and you’ll see
that the blue is going up there so it’s going up it’s going to match in a minute
somewhere just around there so you’ll see since 96 point six ninety six point
two ninety six point three says it’s pretty much neutralized the white in the
cloud in the sky however the conventional wisdom says that we
should have a color a near enough kind of color corrected image but you’ll see
that up here you have this blue color cast that’s coming in again and you can
see the images looking blue however more howevers is that when I was out there it
was a cold day and it pretty much is how the scene would have been so if I press
the before-and-after you can see it’s called the image down and this is where
we’re starting to get into d like your images looking cool or do you want them
looking warm or do you want a neutral color cast it all it really is coming
down to science and art which is the better of the two something else that
you can do to further correct your image is if you bring the blacks slider down
then you’ll notice where the black start to blowouts as I bring it down so down
here in these vines if I double click on the black slider and then zoom in here
if i zoom in just more than one to one if I actually put it three to one or
four to one so you can see down here this and detailing in the dark area down
here if I hover over it you’ll see up there in the histogram that says nine
point three eight point nine ten point one so there’s a definite still blue
color cast down here where I want my detail so what do we do you can go to
the tone curve to remove that blue color cast so let’s go to blue on the RGB so
remember you’ve got two different types of time curve you’ve got this one here
highlights lights darks and shadows but I actually want the RGB one and you can
have overall RGB or red green and blue on what the blue I’m then going to grab
hold of this color picker here are then going to go into the vine and then I’m
going to pull it down the black and you’ll see the blue is starting to shift
so just put it down again done zoom out and that is a fully
colored corrected image whereby our red green and blue match in the whites and
then down there in the shadow detail as I said it may be that it’s color
corrected but it actually looked quite blue you could if you wanted to apply
the trick of pushing across the temperature slider so that this blue
comes over here so let’s do that so then it warms the image back up again so
that’s that particular way of doing that it’s another tool in your toolbox to be
color correcting images you can fully color correct it it might not look color
corrected but it is but it may be that you look at the image anything well
actually just want to warm it up again so that is a situation whereby we have
an image we color corrected and actually the white balance isn’t how we really
want it to be so this is what I’m saying as far as presets are concerned that
they are they might be just a starting point but they’re certainly not the
be-all and end-all so don’t necessarily just think oh I’m going to buy a preset
and it will make my images look amazing it’s not the case it’s not always the
case that they’re going to work that particular way
now before I finished this particular this particular episode for this week I
wanted to go to a different image an image that I took in the Dolomites a
couple of weeks ago and I want to show you an image that has a blue color cast
and I’m going to correct it and you’ll see that by using exactly the same
methods but it will actually banish that blue color cast and warned the image up
just a little bit so I’m going to go to this photograph down here
this is saben abbey which sits above cue sir in the Dolomites and there’s the
road that basically runs up from italy right up to Austria so you see this when
you drive up along the main road fantastic location as you can see and
this is around nine o’clock or so in the morning now when you’re looking at the
that’s this image you can see that there is a certain color cast to it although
when you look up at the histogram it’s not necessarily evident what that color
cast might actually be but you can see here at these trees they look they’re in
direct sunlight the Sun has come over the mountains that were over behind my
shoulder when I took this image but they look quite blue and again down here the
trees down here they look quite blue again how do we correct this image let’s
look at this photograph let’s see what we can do with it so I’m going to use a
combination of the white balance tool and the tone curve to color correct this
image and you’ll see what I mean where I’m saying that settings bar the user
presets in Lightroom and not necessarily the be-all and end-all that that every
single image his in fact has to be treated on its own and color corrected
on its own so let’s start that color correction process now if you remember I
was looking at those RGB values so if I start hunting around the image if I go
for example in the vines down here you’ll see it says sixty five point two
sixty two point five fifty three so there’s a shift towards the blue end if
I go in these well lit rocks over here it says eighty five point three eighty
five point four eighty three point six again showing a blue color cast the well
lit trees over here forty eight point three fifty fifty six point nine so
again the RGB values are showing that there’s a blue color cast so let’s find
a good highlight to work from now when you’re working from highlights I don’t
want to work for example from a highlights that are down here these are
blowing out ninety-nine point nine ninety-nine point nine ninety-nine point
eight they serve me no purpose at all I want to look for something around 95
percent and that’s because it around 95 percent we’re getting good detail in our
highlights so let’s see if I can find a good highlight to work from so around
here I guess this is showing 95 seven ninety five point three ninety
five point one may be up around here ninety eight point three it’s too much
let’s look around here eighty seven eighty six point eight eighty seven
point one again as soon as I start moving the mouse around you can see just
very slightly how these values change so I want to this have a look at this one
down here so this says is actually matching and
again up here but I know that there’s a blue color cast so I really need to find
somewhere to work from a good area let’s pull this up so the whites just go down
here ninety eight ninety seven point five ninety six point three again let’s
maybe actually let’s maybe work from the rocks down here so if I take this color
picker here and I click on there to activate the temperature if I click down
here it says eighty six point nine eighty six point two and eighty four
point nine so let’s try and remove that blue color cast so if I start pressing
the down arrow key to shift the blue upwards you might be thinking why on
earth is he adding more blue in but you will see how things change when we start
working somewhere else so at the moment you’ll see those values there they’re
starting to match eighty six point four eighty six point one eighty six point
three so if I come off of that and I dock my white balance tool you will see
if I click before and after the image looks a bit cooler but it’s probably a
good color corrected image so you see they’re in ninety-eight ninety-seven
point seven ninety seven point two so values are starting to to be just a
little bit more than they were now I want to find a dark area now this is
where you’ll see how image to image things do change as far as processing
goes and relying on presets isn’t necessarily the arts
so let’s bring the blacks down and see where we’re getting a lot of black so
down here in this tree area down here so if I double-click on this blacks there
if i zoom into this area down here let’s look at those RGB values again so I’ve
got twenty eight point eight twenty three point seven and thirty three point
eight so again we can see there is a colored difference as a definite blue
color cast and let’s open up the tone curve let’s go to the blue is I always
seem to be on blue let’s take this slider here so you position it there
where you see that color cast is so we’ve got twenty point four twenty one
point four thirty two it’s obviously changes pixel depicts all as to what
you’re going to get so let’s click and then drag down the slider and then
you’ll see when we get to around twenty one or so let’s just get it in there
very quickly 21.7 twenty points twenty-one point for twenty point three
so it’s a bit of a shift in the red let’s grab hold of the red so those push
the red up ever so slightly just around there now I know they’re not exactly
matching if I go back over there’s our T but RGB values but they are close enough
because really a point something isn’t that much so if i zoom out of the image
you will see now that where I had the blue color cast before by correcting the
whites I then by going down to the shadows I’m able to bring back the
warmth that was there that morning so if I click the before and then after you
will see on the left hand side the before which looks quite blue to the
more inviting image of the after so if I shift Y so you can really see up close
if i zoom in the treeline there you can see the blue color cast and these trees
here this just color at all it seems as no color and
yet it was autumn there was color everywhere so you can see there so I
know it looks fuzzy but it is actually at 3 2 1 not 1 2 1 you can see that tree
line there if you see this color here when I push it across there how blue it
looks so there you go that’s a bit of white balance tutorial in Lightroom so
going from the field into Lightroom inspecting RGB values having a look
around and seeing what it is that we can do with our images and seeing how those
RGB values affect things and also that from image to image it’s not necessarily
the case of the scientific method worked at times we are going to be relying on
our eyes to do how we feel the white balance is going to be because a neutral
white balance isn’t necessarily the right way is a good starter for 10 so
that’s it for this week’s vlog which has been centering around white balance in
our landscape photography and of course you can transpose that particular theory
into other genres of photography like portrait and into tribal photography as
well the more general area of photography that I do so that’s it
what’s coming up next I’ll be in Paris next week I’m hoping to be able to vlog
when I’m in the city of Paris then really like logging around cities just
because trying to vlog and keep an eye on everything that I’ve got at the same
time is never the easiest thing to do but if I can vlog and the weather plays
ball then I will be vlogging in the city of Paris thank you to all the
subscribers that have come along in the past week or so no there’s been a lot of
you again I think it’s nearly 200 or so in the last week thank you to my whole
subscribers and thank you to everybody that keeps commenting as well on the
vlogs that I’m putting out it’s really appreciated and I will always answer you
where I can when you’re asking me all those questions so thanks so much for
helping me to keep this channel alive and keep it alive with just your own
thoughts as well and what I’m doing and of course if there’s something that you
want to see in a future vlog do ask I’ve already noted down things like the tilt
shift lens I know people have asked about that and
different ways of using graduated filters so they are on the list it is a
long very long list that I have to do of vlogs over the next year or so as well
as all the travel as well that’s likely to be done next year
so until the next time hopefully next week I shall see you again soon
on my youtube channel

The POWER of COLOUR in LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY

The POWER of COLOUR in LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHY


I want to talk about something in this
episode that I’m super passionate about and that’s color and how it can
massively improve your landscape photography if you just understand the
color wheel and understand how to use color in your photos so I’m going to go
through some of the photos that I think do this really well of mine and talk
about how you can use Lightroom to just tweak things and it can really step up
the quality of the images that you produce so this episode all got started
by this photo here so this is a photo that you’ll have seen in the last but
one video and I talked about I didn’t do any video footage taken it but it was
one of the favorite shots of I took over the summer and I spoke about editing it
and and whether you wanted to see how I did it edited it and I was just gonna do
an editing video but then I realized that a lot of my photos I was having a
look at them have this sort of painterly look and then what I really looked into
it I realized that a lot of them don’t have a huge color palette so as I was
looking at it I was looking at the color wheel and and tried to understand cuz I
often have the color wheel on my phone and when I’m taking photos think what
works together and you know is it good to have the sky in or is that what
you’re what can I turn together well with the ocean if I’m taking some
seascapes I realized that what works really well is when you have an
analogous colors to cause are close together in the color wheel that
complement each other really well or colors opposite on the color wheel and
what I want to do is talk to you about some of the photos but then really talk
about how I edited this this photo so first of all let’s just have a look a
couple of photos so so this one here is a land that time forgot it’s at one of
my favorite photos I took a year and so ago of Iceland
Wester Hornung and Iceland it’s just a beautiful location
and what you can see here is it’s predominantly sort of an orangey yellow
color maybe a little bit Browns in it and then black and white really so it’s
sort of duotone in its look you know there’s another shot here that I took of
these sheep again there’s not a lot of color in there and the color that there
is complements each other so the colour in the Sheep complements the colour in
the trees again this shot here is a shot that I took of this gorgeous lake and
blue Tom in in the Lake District and you can see that it’s predominantly greens
this shot here there’s got a little bit of yellows and greens but again those
colors are really close together on the color wheel and what I think is that
when you use those colors and you use them correctly then you can create a
very painfully look and it’s sort of my style of photography I like the way that
that looks and then the other types of shots that I have are like this where I
may have used colors that are opposite on the color wheel so you know we’ve got
this beautiful sea and then and then the land which is more of a brownie orange
and these are opposite colors on on the color wheel which also give this
simplistic look because I’ve only got two colors in the image
and when I look at all my photos it tends to be like that I’ll have colors
really close together or if they are different they’ll be opposite on the
color wheel and then I won’t have any other colors in the shot and I think
that helps to create a very pleasing image but then I got thinking and I
thought I wonder if landscape artists do this as well and my favorite artists are
Turner Gainsborough Frederik so I looked at some of their photos and what I found
was that that when they painted their photos you know they were really careful
obviously about the the palettes that they use in their photos and they use a
bit of artistic interpretation obviously when you’re painting something you’re
creating something from scratch but their skies and their light tones and
their images and their shadows and their images tend to be toned in a certain way
and that was really interesting to me because that
what I do when I’m using Lightroom I’ll tend to tone the shadows a little bit or
tone the highlights a little bit or lose a luminosity mask just to change the
color balance of the highlights or all the shadows there’s different ways that
I’ll show you how how to do it but buying actually just toning these things
together looks really good and it does give your images this sort of painterly
look now obviously I don’t want my photos to look like a painting I don’t
want to have brushstrokes on that’s not what I’m talking about I want them to
look like a photograph but I quite like that pleasing simplistic look of the
sort of 18th and 19th century artists so whose notice I’m not wearing a cap yet
I’ve actually got a package here which I just came through the post this morning
I’m going to open it’s not a new cap but it’s sort of some sort of headgear
you’ll see you see anyway let’s have a look at this photo so this one here and
we’ll go back to the beginning and I’ll go through how I edited it so I’m gonna
do some of these things fairly quickly you know I’m not gonna go into a lot of
detail in each of these tools I’m just gonna show you my process of going
through this so if you want to know a little bit more about this and you can
probably look back at some of my other lightroom videos where i might have gone
into these individual tools or if you haven’t got it already
a bit of a plug for my master class which I go into these tools in a lot
more detail and you’ll find a link below ok so so this is the image that I took
now obviously you know I helped a little bit by a bit of fog in this image you
can see that it already goes back into the distance here and there is fade into
the distance so the first thing I probably do is just crop it a little bit
so I’m just going to go and crop that bottom off and I might just crop out
that little branch at the top there off and I might do another crop later but
for now I’m just gonna crop it there then what I want to do is just start
from the top and go down really so what I’m going to do here
is first of all just play around with the white balance so I probably wanna
make it a little bit warmer maybe just add in some green now I think I made
this too warm now the actual tree trunk but I’m unliking the Greens a little bit
better I want to increase the exposure globally blowings creek crease the
contrast no it’s going to look a bit weird to begin with and because that’s
now when you increase contrast you’re increasing saturation as well so I might
then go back and just cool it down a little bit now this tree trunks not
looking good so I might have to do something separate to this tree trunk I
want to increase the shadows so I’m gonna increase the shadows there and
probably the blacks as well so yeah I want it to look quite light and you know
like it was on that morning so I’m gonna increase the black slightly and then
probably just reduce the clarity to just I don’t want to I don’t want to look
like that it’s gonna look really little poor so I just want to reduce the
clarity a little bit and then I’ll probably just reduce the saturation of
globally a little bit as well which I tend to do and then add in saturation on
a color basis because this is all about color this image it’s you know that that
the tones in the image what makes the final image I feel so I’m not going to
look at the tone curve at the moment sometimes I do sometimes it just depends
on what I think for that that image I don’t think I need to for this
particular image so then I’m going to go to the h SL slider which is changing the
hue of each individual color the saturation and luminance now I probably
have a play with this and then it’s a bit of an iterative process going
backwards and forward so I’m gonna play with all these and see what they do so
that doesn’t do much the orange changes the orange of the
leaves at the bottom so I’m going to I want those to look a little bit more
brown but I don’t want to go too far away from the sort of look of the
the greens as well I’m gonna reduce the yellows probably yeah so so the yellows
is changing the color of the you can see well that’s doing it’s changing the
color of all the wood in in the image really
so probably want to reduce that because I want to pull out some of those orangey
yellow tones in the branch here then on the greens I don’t want it to look like
that I don’t like to look like that in fact it greens probably not far off I
don’t want to change that too much so then in terms of saturations I probably
want to just bring out some of those oranges a little bit more of the leaves
and I don’t think I wanna change the saturation too much of anything else and
that’s just a luminance then just want to pull up the luminance of the leaves
and then maybe just the luminance of that branch there so this branch down
here which I think looks really good now so if I just compare that to before and
after you can see that I’ve just brought it out a little bit and flatten the
image a little bit as well which I think looks really good in these sort of foggy
woodland images so now I’m just I’m still not happy with this bark I just
want to pull out a little bit more of those oranges so think to do that before
I go to the split tone in I might just now you can do this with one or two ways
I could just brush in an adjustment layer on there or I could do something
simpler and just do an adjustment layer like that so this is just affecting that
area so mostly the tree trunk and then I can use a range mask so I can sense a a
color range mask and I can just select the colors that I want to change which
so the colors of this bark here so I’m just going to select that bark and then
if I just hold over that now I can then just reduce that down a little bit so
it’s just changing this bark so then just to see if it’s check what it’s
changing you can just like change the exposure so that’s still changing
are too much in the image I’m just gonna reduce it a little bit more that’s
probably not far off now what I want to do is just change the tones of that I
just want to bring out I’m just gonna bring out some of the Browns of that so
I’m gonna change the tents slightly just make it a little bit more purpley which
will bring out some of the Browns in that it’s super subtle less so I’ve just
brought out just a little bit of those sort of Browns and golden colors really
in this tree trunk which you can see now so I’m quite pleased with that I think
that looks gonna probably come tweaked it a little bit more so then when I’ve
done that and you can do that in multiple ways you could do it with a
brush as well and just paint it on so then what I want to do is look at toning
and probably also gonna bring out some of the some of this area here but if I
go and tone it so split tone in basically is a way of toning so coloring
the highlights or the shadows of your image so if I just do it to its maximum
if I go and split tone I could make all the highlights blue by doing that and
that obviously looks horrible but what I want to do is bring out some of the
warmth of the morning so I’m gonna go round about here so I want the sort of
yellows and the greens and I’m gonna just increase a little bit what you can
see now is that when I’ve done that split toning it’s also changed this tree
trunk so I might have to go back to that tree trunk can change it back a little
bit so quite happy with that and then what I could do is in the shadow area I
could go and just tone it slightly blue now higher up you go the more saturated
it is that don’t want to go that far but I just want to bring out some of that
blue again in the shadow area and I tend to do that so my shadows tend to be
turned a little bit blue and my highlights tend to be
turned a little bit yellowy orange a greeny depending on the image now don’t
do this on every image but I feel that that’s starting to look a little bit
better but I feel that this I’ve lost some of those orangey tones now in this
tree trunk so I might then go back Gretsch back to my graduated filter here
I just want to just then tweak it a little bit more so I’m gonna bring back
some of those sort of nice sort of golden tones in that tree trunk so it
just feels like it’s getting that warm light on on the tree trunk there which I
think looks looks really pleasing so that’s looking a lot better so the the
the next thing that I want to do with this is just look at this area here
because I feel that I can I can make it slightly softer in this particular area
and probably bring out again some more oranges in here so I can just put a
radial filter here and then if I just invert it and hover over it you can see
it’s gonna affect this area I might want to increase the feather a little bit and
then in this area what I might want to do is just increase the exposure maybe
reduce the highlights a little bit and I’m just going to warm that up so I just
want to warm up that area down there and just add that to be slightly greener so
there we go so I’ve added that warmth in in that highlight area there just just
to just to create a the feeling that I had when I was there in the morning
really which was this sort of really calm warm Sun coming through the fog
that was being burnt off I saw I did another radial filter but this time I’m
just going to do it as a vignette really so so what I want to do is put that read
your filter on it you can see it’s just going to affect everything around here
and then I can just maybe just reduce the exposure a little bit and the
shadows are quite like doing vignette with the shadows sometimes because it’s
a softer being yet it doesn’t it doesn’t darken it down too much but it still
brings your eye into the image so that’s good and then I’ll probably go
back to the HSL slider and play around with the saturation of some of the
colors so I’m gonna bring out some of the yellow a little bit maybe just
dampen down the saturation of the green a little bit I want to create I can’t
only create this sort of warm look and then I’m just gonna change the tone of
the green and yellow so I might spend a little bit of time playing around with
that I probably gon make a cup of tea have an apple and then come back to it
and then tweak it a little bit because it’s difficult to actually get it right
first time you’ll you’ll get a much better result if you actually just go
away maybe for a day or two and then come back to it and then tweak it again
they maybe go away and then come back to it and tweak it again so that was what I
just did now this one is the one that I’d spent a lot of days off so let’s see
how different they are so this is the one well not actually that much this
one’s probably got a slightly more orangey yellow trunk to it than the one
that I just did now but the fairly similar now the one thing you will see
that’s different is that I removed this sign here now I’m not gonna go into how
I did that in this video because otherwise it’ll just get stupidly long
but I will do that in a separate photographers toolkit video I think well
just do a small thing about how I remove things I did that in Photoshop using the
content-aware fill fill tool now there’s a lot of debate on the comments and the
last one about whether I should remove it or not remove it I feel personally
that it looks better without it because I think it draws the eye too much now I
realize that I’ve removed something that was there in reality but I’m quite happy
with that I feel fine about that it is art after all and often I remove sticks
or branches that maybe just don’t look quite right
I don’t remove huge things but that’s probably about as big as as big as I go
and never add anything into my images ever
so I never add things into my images but if I remove something that I think it’s
distracting then I think that adds to the whole look of it so there we go
we’ve got that image now which I think looks really really pleasing I was
really pleased with it and the actual print of it looks fantastic so much so
that I’m gonna add this now and I’ve had it any portfolio prints to
my website in a long time I am gonna refresh the whole website shortly that’s
that’s my next project and I’ll be adding a few new ones but I wanted to
add this now because I’m talking about it so I’m going to add this as a limited
edition print in a three size which is this size here and a to size to my
website so if you want one of those they are going to be limited editions and you
can click the link below and order them and I’d really appreciate that you know
I feel that it’s the best way to support my channel because I think you get
something out of it in terms of a bit of my art and I feel great because
somebody’s got got my photos hanging on the wall which I think it’s just one of
the best things so thanks ever so much for that if you do get one okay before I
go let’s open this package said this this is exciting so this is a new hat
from my favorite hat manufacturer in the in the Lake District now same
manufacturer it’s a lady that I don’t think she’s got a huge team and she
produces the most amazing wool hats from from sheep in the Lake District so I’ve
not tried this on it’s got amazing packaging as well it’s called guilin
crag they don’t sponsor me for this video at all i just like supporting
small companies and they’ll open the shop not gonna be a big fail now isn’t
it sometime later okay here we go right sighs this is
looking good this is looking so good and that this bobble here is made from herd
WIC sheep if you’ve never seen herd with sheep in fact herd with sheep are these
type of sheep here and they’re just the cutest type of sheep so there we go
expect to see a lot of this hat in the next videos anyway thanks ever so much
for watching and until it’s Sunday or maybe Thursday thanks for watching bye my heart is sweet