Why and how to meter with a mirrorless digital camera


Hi guys, so i was just taking photos of this beautiful scene here. that’s Mt Hood And i thought that it would be a good moment to show you really quick how i meter for my photos, the photos i take With the film camera of course and why i do it the way i do it So the first thing that i used to meter my photos was a smartphone app I think there are a ton of them and all of them are pretty good and they are accurate enough the problem for me and that’s why i stopped using them is that they don’t give you too much flexibility and Also to be honest i don’t like to be messing with my phone while taking photos with the film camera, it kind of ruins the experience I don’t know if it makes any sense So then i bought a standalone old minolta light meter that i think i showed here before I used that thing for two days it’s not that i didn’t like it it’s not that it was not accurate but it was just not for me you see? i carry a lot of equipment with me: the bronica is a heavy camera and the lenses just make it worse and then I have the tripod, filters, film… and then I have this camera the 6500 that is the one i use to record these videos, so it’s yet another thing to carry with me so it didn’t work for me took me a while but i finally realized that i had been carrying with me the perfect light meter all this time, and it was the digital camera and i want to show you why okay excuse the squirrel I’m gonna use my old a6000 to show you how I meter. i of course usually use the 6500 but i’m using it to record this video right now so yeah One reason why i like to use the a 6500 is because it has a switch here on this wheel to switch between custom modes, and i use it to have a custom mode for video and another custom mode for photo so this is what the custom photo mode would look like in my 6500 i always have the iso set to 800 that’s the Speed that i shoot hp5 at but of course i’ll change it if i’m if i’m shooting a different film or different… if i’m pushing it or something and What i do is i just point the camera to a subject like these trees and i just copy or carry these settings that the camera is telling me 1/640 and f11 to my film camera but getting these settings, the shutter speed and the aperture is something that you can do with With your phone is pretty accurate at doing it but the camera has some key advantages The first of them i don’t know if you can see the screen but it’s previewing the image in black and white and i shoot black-and-white, so i can actually see Kind of what the photo is going to look like another reason is because not only we can preview the phone in black and white but we can preview the actual exposure meaning, just imagine that we want to blacken the trees with no details in the trees So we could use this exposure compensation dial and just turn it down all the way to say three stops And we will get a preview of what the look the photo would look like. not that we want to do that We could do the opposite though if we want to blow out the sky and we want to have a lot of details in the trees and just look the How many steps we have to compensate the exposure to have that and that translates in in new settings That we can carry to our film camera again and the last reason is this one it’s all about previewing the photo again now just imagine, this is our image that’s image we’re gonna take We have a shutter speed of one – one thousandth of a second, and the iso that we want But, we want to have more contrast, we want to darken the sky so we could just place the filter here in front of our lens and we will get once again a preview of the photo as you can see the sky is darker now and the most important thing of all is like we get new settings: we have a high speed of 1/400 of a second now that we can carry and copy to our film camera You see how it changes? 1/1000 1/400 Not only we get the settings but we get the preview the effect that the filter is gonna have in our photo And yeah that’s about it that’s the method i use to meter. it works perfectly fine, my photos are correctly exposed all the time using this cameras light meter of course i did some testing at first i copied the exact settings the camera was telling me and i took three shots one With the actual settings, one under exposed by one stop and one overexposed by one stop And then i checked which which one was the best one. it was actually the one with the actual settings, so i trust this camera Alright just one last thing i wanted to add to all this and it’s while i use the settings from the camera 90% of the time sometimes i overexpose the photo a little bit. for example if the camera is telling me f8, I’ll use f7.1 or even f5.6 depending on the situation because digital cameras have a really hard time with highlights film is the opposite, films struggles with the shadows for example if you take a raw file from your digital camera and you open that raw file with lightroom and you move the slider, the shadow’s slider all the way to the right you are able to recover a lot of detail, it’s not gonna look awesome but the detail is there. i’ve tried with raw files where i thought it was completely black and lost the shadows forever and lightroom was able to recover a lot of detail, crazy detail from the shadows but that doesn’t happen with the highlights so if you blow out the highlights they are gonna be white Forever and ever that’s why the digital camera is gonna try to be safe, it’s gonna try to expose for the highlights you don’t need to do that with film. actually the opposite you should be exposing for the shadows if that’s what you want, you might wan, to darken the shadows or you might not want to have details at all the shadows, but if you want to have details on both shadows and highlights you should expose more for the shadows with film, so either you modify the settings in the camera too to do that to expose for the shadows or you just trust the camera and overexpose a little bit. it works perfectly fine for me that way so yeah, and that’s about it thanks for watching and see you the next one but sometimes though if in really bright on the frame like the sky the sun or something i know So yeah i do this

Don’t Give the Camera to John!

Don’t Give the Camera to John!


Hey guys. It’s New Year’s eve and it is snowing
outside, which is awesome. So to celebrate I have hired a limo to take me where I want
to go today. Hi. Hello. Hello limo driver. Hello. Where are we going?
I don’t know. Okay. Okay. What ya got there John? Oh man. Um. Hang on… From the store I bought omelette bites. It was like $3.50. There’s two in there. I mean,
they’re gone but they were like that big. I was not impressed. So. Still hungry? Yeah. Are we done yet? Are we done yet? Hi guys! So we are at… well, right now we’re at the Hamilton Conservation Authority and
we’re heading over to Sherman Falls. I’m pretty sure it’s called Sherman Falls.
Come on driver! Come on! Ah ha! He doesn’t want to bring the Tim Horton’s cup with him.
So Sherman falls is really really beautiful. You used to be able to park right next to
it. You are no longer able to do that so we’ve parked up the road at Artaban Parking lot
Dundas Valley Conservation area… and we have to walk. It’s snowing which is cool.
Oh, and check this out. Our hats! These are the Robin-Ruth hats that they sent to me after
I requested them. They’re not paying me to say this. I love these hats. If you like them,
definitely check out their website. I will put it in the description. Oh the snow! Almost there! Almost to the entrance anyway. The pathway going in. Oh look! You can already see it! Awesome. Wow! Wow, wow, wow! What do you think? It’s awesome man. Wow. You seeing all those rocks? They’re pretty cool.
Eh? Wow. And look at the… This is just beautiful. Absolutely gorgeous.
I wish that I had rain boots on just to stand right in the middle at the bottom.
I think I’m going to have to come back in summer and go swimming. So, the camera is going to get wet. Not only is it snowing but there’s a lot of mist flowing
off the water. So I’m going to get set up. A wide angle for sure from the bottom here
and then see what we can do. Okay! Okay so this is going to be quick because
it’s so wet. I have the camera and tripod set up in the water and I’m at ISO 200, f/9.5.
It’s 30 seconds, and a 2 second timer. Now I’ve also done it at ISO 50, f/22, 10 seconds
without the filters. I have the 3 stop neutral density filter with graduated, and the 7 stop
neutral density filter on just to be able to bring down my f-stop and be able to take
this with a longer exposure. We’ll see how it goes. Everything is completely soaked and
it’s cold. What’s going on? Look I’m… peekaboo! Are
we done yet? Are you cold? No, I’m hungry. Those two little things didn’t do it man.
Yeah well, you know, you should’ve gotten the hash browns. I couldn’t remember the name.
Are you done yet? Seriously? No. Damnit. It’s still going. Oh look! 30 seconds! What are
you doing? Taking pictures. Of what man? The waterfall. That thing there? Yeah. What are you doing? Don’t worry about me man. Just do whatever
you’re doing. Uh oh. Alright there’s not much… Can you hold this?
Don’t drop it. He’s got my camera. There’s not much else to do here meaning that there
is a lot, hold on… there are a lot of beautiful pictures I could take here but everything
is soaking wet. So, uh, I do not have my rain gear with me and I think it’s time to… John’s
hungry. Let’s get some food! He ordered these two little omelette bites from Tim Horton’s.
Sorry. He didn’t order two. He ordered omelette bites and there were two in the box. This
big box and these two… haha. Still a sore subject… haha. Oh but look at the waterfall. Alright so thanks for coming along guys and
we’ll talk to you soon. Happy New Year! Happy New Year! Your pom-pom’s in the way. Bye!
Bye!

How to Use Manual Mode on ANY Camera in ~5 MINUTES!

How to Use Manual Mode on ANY Camera in ~5 MINUTES!


Good morning. Hope you guys had a wonderful Christmas. Today I’m going to teach you how to switch
your camera over to manual mode so you can stop fiddling with it and then take some pictures
like this. Okay, let me give you a tour. Hello and welcome back to the channel. Good morning, good evening, good afternoon,
wherever you are. Today we are going to learn how to use manual
mode in about five minutes. Look, when I first picked up a camera, the
most intimidating thing for me were all these buttons. I just wanted to go out and shoot and take
freken nice pictures and instead I was fiddling around with my camera settings. You know what’s really fun too in its own
way, but a lot of people just want to avoid all of that and just take really nice pictures
from the get-go. So I shoot Canon, but all these settings apply
to pretty much any phone, mirrorless, DSLR nowadays as long as you understand this holy
trinity of camera settings, then you’ll at least be able to establish your foundation
for using your camera in manual mode. All right, let’s get started. Okay, so the first thing I want to talk about
is ISO. So ISO is your camera sensitivity to light. You always want to keep it at around 100. The lowest, the better because the more ISO
you introduce, then the more noise you also introduce into your picture. Now on top of that, the higher the range of
ISO you go, then the brighter your picture will be. Depending on your camera, some cameras are
able to push ISO way further than other cameras before you start introducing noise. For the ADD, for instance, I never go any
higher than 800 ISO because after that pictures looks disgusting. But then on the 1DX, which I’m shooting right
now, I can push that to way, way higher amounts for ISO. But bottom line though, you want to keep your
ISO at the lowest possible setting. Now, a lot of the times when you’re picking
up a mirrorless or DSLR camera, a lot of professional pictures, they have a nice blurred background
and that blurred background is called bokeh. Now, the one setting that is pretty much responsible
for that is called the F-stop. So you have ISO, which is adjusting your camera
sensitivity to light. The second setting that we’ll talk about is
F-stop. The lower your F-stop is, then the more light
you’re letting in because you’re opening your lens up, and on top of that, the blurrier
your background will be. So a lot of times when people are talking
about lenses and they’re talking about how fast it is, if they’re saying a lens is fast,
then it means that it probably has a lower F-stop and also means that it’s way more expensive
than the other lenses because 1.2, 1.4 lenses, those usually go for a lot more than 2.4,
2.8, and so forth. But remember, you don’t want to abuse this
blurry background image. For example, let’s say I’m doing landscape
photography and you have this nice mountain range and a giant boulder in front of you. Do you want to take a picture of the boulder
or with a blurred background of the mountain range, or do you want a nice clear picture
of the mountain range? Probably the mountains, right? So in cases like that, that’s when you want
everything in focus. Or for family photos, all that I would recommend
you use F-stop of F-5 or higher. Okay, so let’s combine those two settings
and understand them together. Right now the lens I’m shooting in is that
an F-2.0, which means that the ISO, I don’t have to adjust too much because it’s letting
in a ton of light already from two studio lights here. If I were to crank that to F-5, F-7, the room
is going to get way darker and then I’m probably going to have to compensate for that by adjusting
ISO to make it brighter or else you won’t be able to see anything at all. So ISO, artificial in-body lighting, F-stop,
how much light you’re letting in. The third and final setting I want you to
understand is shutter speed. Let’s say you want to take pictures of your
dog. How often are they going to sit still? Probably not, right? So here you want to freeze your motion in
place, and to do that, that’s when shutter speed comes into play. Shutter speed is that click that you have
for your camera. It’s pretty much dictating how long you’re
going to let light hit your camera sensor. So that means that the higher your shutter
speed and the faster you can freeze motion. The slower your shutter speed, then the longer
it’s going to remain open. So the higher shutter speed, the less light
you’re letting come in and therefore your picture’s going to turn down darker. But in exchange, your motion’s going to be
frozen in place. Okay, so let’s combine all three settings
as an example. I’m in front of a beautiful waterfall. What do I want to do first? For me, I always adjust F-stop first because
I think about what is my subject and focus. In this case it’s the giant waterfall, so
you don’t want a low F-stop for that, you want a high F-stop. So landscape photography, you don’t really
want anything blurry, high F-stop. Now in exchange when you are cranking up your
F-stop, your picture gets darker. How would you fix that? You want to keep ISO at one to 100 if we can. It’s mid-day so there’s a ton of light coming
in, which means we can now play with these shutter speeds. But since I want a nice flowy smooth motion
of the water, I want to move my shutter speed to like 15 seconds. I want it to remain open for a long time that
way you get a nice long streak of water. So high F-stop, it’s dark. Slow shutter speed, it gets brighter, and
therefore I can leave ISO at about 100 and then boom, you get a nice smooth waterfall
picture. I also use the ND filter on my lens here just
in case so I can keep the camera settings a little bit darker, but more on that on the
next video. But I’m going to talk about specific camera
gear or specific essential camera gear in another video. So more on that later. Okay, let’s try another example. I’m outside mid-day and I want to take picture
of a miniature from Lords of Helis, so product photography. I want a nice blurred background but I don’t
want the background to take away from my main subject, which is the miniature. So I have a small subject, blurred background. What would you do first? F-stop, right? So you’re going to crank your F-stop down
that we have a nice blurred, delicious background. But the thing is, you’re letting in a ton
of light. It’s mid-day, so it’s way overexposed. How would you fix that? ISO is already at 100. The last thing you want to adjust now is shutter
speed. So now you can crank your shutter speed a
lot. I can even go to like 1/4,000 if I want to. It’s not going to take away from anything
really. So that’s what’s nice about photography. You can always compensate with shutter speed
once you adjust the other two settings because it won’t matter as much as it would for video. For video you would get these staticky motions
and then you would see individual droplets of water if you have a shutter speed that
doesn’t match your frame rate, but more than that later. Let’s focus on the photography aspect here. So low F-stop, subject’s in focus, background’s
blurry. ISO’s at 100 and then I compensate for shutter
speed to make sure it’s perfectly exposed and then boom, example number two complete. Okay, last quick example, one of my favorite
types of photos are long exposure photography. Now for that one, let’s say I have a miniature
and I want to do some steel wool, so I just want to whisk it around the back and get these
nice long streaks of light. Now to do that, we’re going to mimic the same
thing we did for the waterfall example and keep a slow shutter speed, so we’re going
to keep it open for 30 seconds. It’s pitch black at night so you can’t see
anything else anyway, so 1/30th is going to give a ton of light coming in. And then for F-stop, I actually like to put
my F-stop higher just so you can see complete details of what’s going on and keep your camera
on a tripod tube. And then here I played around with F-stop
and ISO just a little bit here and there until I finally got nice streaks of light which
were, some were in focus, some were out of focus. But the main focus here, I said focus like
five times, but the main subject here is of course the miniature, so I want to make sure
all the details of that can be seen super nice and crispy and then the background just
accents what’s going on here. In this case it’s the monument of light, so
naturally it fits with the whole light streaks in the background. And that is basic camera settings, pretty
much how to use manual mode in about five, I’m probably way over that by now, five minutes
or so. But I hope you enjoyed how we puzzle pieced
the trinity of camera settings that way we can take nice, beautiful photos. Hope you found it helpful. If you found all this helpful, please hit
subscribe so we can grow the channel together in 2020 get it to as big as it can possibly
be. I’ve also linked my social media here if you
want to keep up to date with daily content or what I’m doing, and until next time, see
you guys later.

Boost the megapixels of your camera using this panoramic photography technique.

Boost the megapixels of your camera using this panoramic photography technique.


Thanks to Squarespace for sponsoring
this video. So I’m going to do a really nice simple
one for you guys today I’ve just got my 50mm lens on a Canon 5D Mark 3 and I’m
here at my home town of St Peter Port this lovely harbour scene with the
seafront and all these layers and terraces of buildings going up there and
this time of year is great because it’s early dark basically it’s now 4:30 p.m.
Sun has already set and by 5 o’clock it’s going to be Twilight and with it
being winter people are still at work at 5 p.m. and it’s dark so that means all
the lights are going to be on and most of those buildings which obviously
wouldn’t happen in the summertime at night because it wouldn’t wouldn’t be
dark till 10 p.m. and everyone would have gone home so I’m hopefully gonna
catch a twilight scene with the seafront illuminated and I’m going to do that
very simply without any filters anything like that necessary because I don’t have
a really bright sky to deal with or contend with that I need to darken down
so I’m just going to take a picture of that sea front on the self-timer but the
extra little trick that I’m going to do is rather than shoot it on a wide angle
I’m going to shoot it on three panoramic shots so I’ve already just leveled my
tripod up using the spirit level to make sure everything’s level and then I’m
going to take a shot here here here here here maybe three to five shots
overlapping each one that will give me a higher resolution image because I’ll be
able to join those images together so instead of just a twenty two megapixel
maybe like a twenty two or twenty to twenty two so it will be something more
like an 80 megapixel image that I end up with us a nice panoramic shot of this
seafront at Twilight so just gonna run some test shots let’s see how it goes okay so we’ve got our series of
panoramic shots when they’re not panoramic yet they’re individual shots
remember we shot them with about a 30% overlap which is about right for
creating a panorama and what I’m going to show you is I’m just going to show
you two really quick easy methods to put those together one in Lightroom and one
in Photoshop now the one in Lightroom I use Lightroom classic the one in
Lightroom couldn’t be easier there’s my five files that I’m going to use for
this panoramic I’ve kept a different five files for the Photoshop version
here you can see zooming in seeing all the little building lights and
everything going on there let’s click there is the first shot the
second shot third one the fourth one and then the fifth one now all I need to do
to create a panorama is to select all of the shots and then right click and then
from right click say photo merge panorama now that’ll put that together
looks like it already has given me a preview there I can
choose spherical cylindrical perspective auto crop can also put fill edges on as
well that’s if sometimes when it builds a panorama it leaves some parts in white
that didn’t quite have enough area to fill in the latest version of Lightroom
it’ll fill those edges for you so I just click merge and then we wait for it to
finish processing on that see it says creating panorama at the top left there and there we go
panorama is finished then we just click on it and you can see there is the
panorama with all that wonderful detail captured in there I’m just going to
export that file because there’s a few extra things I want to do to it in
Photoshop and we’ll also look at the other way of creating the panorama in
Photoshop with the other files so here is the panoramic that we just created in
Lightroom let’s zoom in take a look at that look at all that beautiful detail
and and you’re basically increasing the megapixels of your camera when you’re
creating panarin and Lightroom and Photoshop both use the
same engine so he can both create these great panoramic so you see how amazingly
it does it there’s so much detail in there and there’s not one error that I
can spot that’s been created in that panorama we’ve got all that beautiful
lovely Twilight lighting with all the the house and the building lights on
there over some peter port harbor now there’s a couple of little issues with
this shot the first one is there’s a few blobs of dust on my sensor so i’m just
going to use the clone stamp tool that’s just sampled from here let’s just remove
that blob of dust okay let’s move that out of the way let’s just clone stamp
that blob of dust out of there as well and it repeats over here and then if i
look at the shot we’ve got these three posts sticking up at the bottom there
that i didn’t want in the shot but nothing I can do about it I’m just going
to use the crop tool to crop this into more of a panorama I don’t want all that
stuff on the far right hand side there it’s not really necessary probably going
to crop that out and I’m going to crop a little bit of the left-hand side out as
well to about there to frame up the shot a little bit better so that’s more of
the panorama that I was expecting and then again we can just use the clone
stamp tool and then we can just clone that out there really quickly I could
probably do a little bit of a better job on this if I was going to pay a little
bit more attention to this but let’s just do this as it is at the moment just
to get rid of this nice and quickly but a bit of a repeat pattern there we could
have also used the patch tool would have been a good one so I’m just going to
sample in there I’m only doing this very roughly because we’re in a just want to
show you more quickly what this is going to look like right so there we have a
lovely panorama beautiful detail now we can enhance that detail a tiny bit more
I’m just going to go into filter sharpen unsharp mask
and I’m just going to have a look at a hundred percent with half a pixel
sharpen so in the preview there we go you can see half a pixel sharpen put one
pixel sharpen on on and off there you go that’s with it on looks like it could
benefit from a one pixel sharp and so I’ll say okay and there with a one pixel
sharpen you can see we’ve got that really large image now let’s check the
image size and the image size you see 13,000 pixels wide my Hasselblad h6 100
megapixel is about eleven thousand eight hundred so this image is wider than my
100 megapixel Hasselblad turns out which is what you get from using the blending
method of overlapping panoramas and creating panoramic images so I think
you’ll see there a really nice result that’s been achieved very very simply
and you saw how easy it was to capture let’s just take a quick look now in
Photoshop how you would do that in Photoshop as well so these are the other
set of images that we captured because I did it twice now in Photoshop I just
need to go into file automate and then photo merge and then I browse to choose
the files actually I browse to choose the files but I’m going to choose the
folder that the files are in browse find the panorama Tiff’s there they are say
open they’re in there now I’m going to say vignette removal geometric
distortion correction auto on the layout just say okay and then let’s let
Photoshop build that panorama for us and there we go
Photoshop has built the panorama you can see those white edges that I was talking
about that you get which we’d have to crop into now in this shot it’s a little
bit different cuz the rain started to come in and you can see all this
mistiness that we’ve got where with the rain coming down but I quite liked it so
I thought it’d be interesting to include this one as compare as
as well let me just crop out that excess stuff that we don’t need they’re
obviously in Lightroom it filled that in for us remember but crop a little bit
more off off the edges as well let’s crop that into there on this one let’s
crop that one into there looks like we need a tiny bit of contrast adjustment
so you can see there as well looking Photoshop it’s kept the layers with the
layer mask because of each section so you can work through the files and the
layers if you want to bring back a little bit from one shot all the other
I’m just going to grab hold of the curves adjustment here and pull up the
highlight ends pull down the mid-tones a little bit just to add a little bit more
punch and contrast in that and so there’s the one with the rain coming in
let’s get the other one that we just created in Lightroom and there’s the one
that we create in Lightroom before the rain came in let’s take a look at the
two so you can obviously see that turbidity and mist on the second one but
I quite like it it’s got a bit of atmosphere but you can see how simple it
was to create both of those one created in Lightroom one creating photoshop and
the photography techniques couldn’t really be any simpler hope you enjoyed
that I’m Carl Taylor we’ll see you next time
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My New Camera & Why YOU don’t need a new camera (2019)

My New Camera & Why YOU don’t need a new camera (2019)


all right I did it I bought a new camera
now a lot of people tend to get mad because I don’t tell them which camera
model I got or which lens or anything so to put all those hard feelings aside I’m
gonna show you right now all right so there you go you can buy this camera in
the affiliate links below just kidding undo any of that anyways this video is
not about me or my new camera this video is about why you don’t need to buy a new
camera now I’m a firm believer that you use the gear until it dies and died it did my camera did in fact I had my camera since around 2012 and over the past few months
it just stopped working like it wouldn’t turn on anymore
which is why I bought a new camera now this its not new in a sense that it didnt come out a few months ago or this week or anything like that it’s new as in it
hasn’t been used before actually this camera I bought came around two years
ago but if you’ve been watching my channel for a while you already know my
philosophy is that these days pretty much any camera is good like any camera
after 2012 it’s just flat-out amazing one of my friends here on YouTube
actually made a video he noted all the Hollywood movies that were made with old
cameras like Canon 5d or 5d mark ii i’m gonna link it down below cuz it’s
actually really eye-opening i want to ask you why do you need a new camera i
mean do you think buying a new camera is going to make you better youtuber better
photographer what is it i mean because a lot of people spend a lot of time a lot
of money upgrading their equipment thinking their quality is going to
skyrocket somehow magically without putting in all the work and there’s also
a lot of aspiring youtubers who actually turned gear obsession into a whole
sinkhole and they spend so much money upgrading equipment and they never make
any of that money back financially it just makes no sense buying a new camera
every time it comes out like there’s always a new camera just around the
corner it’s always going to be better than any other camera blows it out of
the water Canon is dead Nikon is dead oh my god Fuji film is not in touch
with any other users blah blah blah but you know youtubers and people on
reddit’s and people in the comments section they’re like a very very small
minority like what they want is really not in line with what most consumers
want you know like people just want to take a nice picture they don’t give a
crap about 4k or 6k or do card slots or any of that junk you know I mean there
are cameras for consumers and there’s cameras for prosumers and professionals
but this is especially true of like the techies here on YouTube I don’t want to
turn it into a run against them but there is no best camera all right now
I’ve said this many times before but if you’ve got a camera that can change
lenses and can shoot raw that’s pretty much all you need I mean if you have
good lighting any camera is going to perform amazing now I know there’s
professionals out there and I know there’s like prosumers and enthusiasts
and you know the the needs of a professional are different from the
needs of most people watching this video all right do you really need 20 frames a
second chances are you don’t I mean that’s more of a professional thing like
the birders the sports photographers those kind of people who who actually
rely on this as an income who need that shot but do you really need that
yourself do you need slow mode because slow motion on YouTube there’s very few
people who know how to use it well most of it sucks to be honest is I really
have no stomach for gimmicks kind of funny because I should say a punk for a
toffee but for me to life and then okay 4k we’re up to six K and a K now do you
really need 6 K because I can tell you right now most people don’t even have a
computer that can handle editing HD quality footage like let alone 4 k 6k
8k even most like friends I know who actually do photography for a living
don’t have a camera that can handle 8k footage duo card slots once again your
professional yeah you need it you know you need to have a backup in case your
camera fry for some reason it’s never happened to me but I’ve heard of it but
you are you going to lose anything by losing a few pictures here and there
this this whole nonsense about dual card slots like people fighting over it’s
just really really annoying and I really recommend that you don’t listen to gear
reviews here on YouTube like most of them are useless they are just nonsense
like I can tell you right now there really aren’t any professional
photographers I know they’re watching gear reviews on YouTube like they all have
some level of disdain for them because they they know they’re just misleading
you like we’re gonna be doing shooting pictures of walls or graphs looking at
the sharpness of um oh this lens is sharper than this one let me tell you
right now when you’re out there shooting your photos like that’s really the last
thing you think about you you you’re just worried about nailing the focus not
so much all right man this one is much more sharper than that one now again if
you’re like a professional and just someone on YouTube prosumer I dare say
this stuff doesn’t really matter for you like you don’t need 69 megapixels you
hear like portrait photographer like a portrait photographer that makes money
yes maybe you do need that you need to like crop in and stuff like that you
know but the average person doesn’t need 69 megapixels the average person doesn’t
even have the memory space to store all these files you know like just by the
reading the comments on YouTube like most of these people never even open
Lightroom in their life and they’re watching all this YouTube your view
channel saying you need the latest Sony cuz it shoots 14 bit raw and dual card
slots and 69 mega piece of files and it has ibis and like 400,000 I so I mean
you really need I was – I mean have you never heard of a tripod now I have heard
from people that they wanna do video and that
they need the ibis and ask yourself how often do you really really make video
because you know other professionals I know that make video they usually use a
gimbal and if you’re like a techie kind of person you probably own a gimbal
already so you don’t need a base gimbal and lens stabilization like seriously
now I’m gonna a photographer I should in the lowest of the lowest of the lowest
light my eyesore never goes over 6,400 I’m usually around 1800 3200 ISO something
right and there are these cameras for like 400,000 iso and ibis
and i don’t really know anyone else shooting in light and in order than me
alright okay I’m not gonna use an example cuz you know I can’t use myself
as a baseline for these kind of things I’m just saying do you really need that
I mean come on I wanna I want you to take a serious introspection here why do
you need a new camera does that camera do something that your camera can’t
currently do because the only reason I need I see for upgrading a camera or
only two reasons are one your camera dies and you need to buy a new camera
now my new camera is actually like two years old yeah it’s not really new it’s
also really discounted but the only the second reason I see is that you have a
job but you can’t perform that job with the current limitations of your camera
so you actually need to upgrade now but then it becomes a financial matter I
mean I know watching YouTube channel somehow seems like every professional is
upgrading camera bodies every time there’s a new camera released or
switching systems and you know what those aren’t professionals those are you
two photographers you know and they don’t actually buy those cameras they’re
just loan those camera by the company so that they can promote their services and
you can buy those affiliate links professionals don’t buy a new camera
every time a new camera comes actually has some kind of feature because if you
did you’d be broke you wouldn’t have any money all the time you know it just you
know how expensive these things are you think you’re gonna be switching systems
because oh this camera has I this and this one is this camera I’ve had is
trash now because it doesn’t have a base or come on like get serious we don’t buy
new cameras every time a new camera we tend to buy a camera and then use it
until either it breaks or you have a job that you can’t do because you need a new
camera with certain features so yeah that’s that’s something to think about
you’re thinking of buying a new camera my real recommendation to you is to just
focus on lighting learning composition learn the out of the camera you have now
and then later once you want to do things that you’re seriously limited by
your camera then you can upgrade it’s all about the light I mean if you have
if you have a good light then the oldest camera does the trick just fine given
that this video but really it’s all about the light you know if as long as
you got good light then everything else is worth taking care of you know and if
you are going to if you’re dead set on buying a new camera make sure you’re
doing it because you can make the money back or if you’re just like a hobbyist
or enthusiast I really suggest you learn your camera you have right now really
really well because then you just throw money into a sinkhole and thinking buy
lenses or new camera body it’s going to make you better photographer it really
is just nonsense anyways thanks for dealing with me and yeah I mean I’m
really nobody but thanks for watching my photography videos see you

Landscape Photography | Rained Out of Glencoe.

Landscape Photography | Rained Out of Glencoe.


So that’s the sun just coming up over Rannoch Moor. And its lovely. What a glorious morning. I am planning on doing a bit of a hill walk come wild camp and obviously the landscape photography. When I drove up last night… I got here about 9pm… But the weather looked really bad. It was looking a lot worse than I thought it would be. Especially with the rest of the UK having the hottest days on record. But this morning it is just stunning. I am going to do a wildcamp. Also have a new tent to try out as well. So I am really looking forward to this. I am just going to stay about here for now and try and get some images. Then I am going to go to the Glencoe Ski Centre… for a lovely cooked breakfast. to get me ready for the day before I set off. Then we will set off up into the hills. This will let us have a look about… and actually thinking about heading up to the Aonach Eagach ridge and if the weather plays ball should make for a fantastic camp spot. and also get some nice images hopefully. hello, can I get a full breakfast please and a coffee. Thank you. So that’s it a lovely cooked breakfast at the Ski Centre. It is a really nice breakfast you get. Excellent value for money. So I am going to.. head along to the Devils Staircase. Now before that… was open I actually nipped down to Glen Etive and had a look, about the waterfalls to get a few images there. So I am hoping that they have turned out pretty good. I will put one up just now whilst I am talking. and see what you think. Now the weather here at the moment..l is a bit all over the place. One minute it is really nice and the next… it looks like the end of the world, so. I am hoping that… stay good so I can have a good wildcamp. Yeh, Yeh. Shhhhhhhhh! Can you hear that. Bloody rain…!!!, unbelievable. Couldn’t make this up. Theirs the mountain I was planning on going up. Yeh, its just chucking it down with rain. Wow Wee, Scotland… the weathers a peach. It really is. So the weather is nothing like I had thought it was going to be. Or predicted the day before. So I am in the Mountain Weather UK, App. I am just going to check round and about the area. ‘North West Highlands’ and see what it is going to say. Today is… Clear and sunny intervals with showers… Mainly in the West first and then heading East. Colder air arriving and potential wintry element to the weather. Snow showers on Munro tops and wind gusts of up to 44 mph. E Buy Eck.. So temperature at 900m 1 degree to 2 degrees celsius. Oh deary me. Yeh, you are looking at 37 mph winds. So the computer says no. Yeh the App… is confirming my worst fears. Its just really grim just now. Really bad. So what I am going to do is try a plan B. See if we can find somewhere to camp… a bit further East. So as I drive I am just going to see what the weather is like, but… that’s just the Scottish climate for you. It just changes so fast. Yeh it is so unpredictable. The forecast yesterday morning was looking really good , hence why…. I headed up last night. But its decided to change… (Laugh) So that’s it, lets head on further East… and see if things improve. Then take it from there. Yeh, that’s Spring inScotland.

I’m Not Getting Out…

I’m Not Getting Out…


Okay! So I headed downtown and I was driving
around and I thought that maybe I could do a street photography shoot from my
car. The problem was not lack of seeing things to photograph, but the lack of
parking spaces. Already I’m having a huge challenge. I
can’t find a place to park. Downtown here, it’s more rain and less
snow. I can’t find a place to park. Alright. So I looked everywhere. I
finally found a place to stop that was actually meant for taxis. Says taxis and no parking. And all of a sudden I heard all of this
honking and people not too happy. It don’t think it was meant for me but it was definitely time to go. So today I am driving around. We have
some beautiful, beautiful snowy weather and I would like to see if I can take
some pictures just from my car without getting out. The truth is that the snow
is very, very wet and it is landing like rain, and so I know that if I go out
with my gear, I’m going to have to completely protect everything like I
would in the rain, which is fine. I love doing it, and in fact I am just dying to
get out there, but it is a “short on time” day and so I thought I would challenge myself to a landscape photography photoshoot where I don’t get
out of the car. So I’ve come back up onto the mountain now… our “mountain”… I don’t actually live on a mountain and the snow is coming
down. It’s so beautiful. Right in front of me where I’ve parked
is an orange tree that still has the leaves on it. I’ve seen it like this
before. It’s beautiful and it’s just in the
middle of a park and there are much larger trees all around it, and I think I
would like to just try capturing it. I have on my 70 to 300 because I am in the
parking lot and yeah just gonna see see what it looks like. ISO… I’m on ISO 640, 1/250th of a second and f/6.7. I’m a bit farther away so I don’t need major depth of field or anything
but I do want a bit of a fast enough shutter speed to catch the snow looking
like snow. Even if it’s kind of blurry, that’s okay. It looks kind of soft and
pretty but I don’t want it to look like rain, and if my shutter speed is too slow
then sometimes it just it ends up streaking and looking like rain. So ISO
640. That’s so beautiful. I’m leaning on the
car because it can hold the camera steadier than I can, especially with the
telephoto zoom. So I’ve gone vertical and I’m zooming in and what I love is how
it’s kind of compressing the trees behind the main tree. Now I have to be
careful because I don’t want to cut off the edges of the tree, because the top
part kind of goes out a little bit, but if i zoom out, then I don’t get as much
compression and I really like that so yeah. I think I’ve gone into at least 200mm. Very very pretty. There’s this tree right in front of the
car and the snow is just landing on it. There’s nothing special about it. It’s
just a bare tree, except it’s so beautiful with the… with just the
gorgeous, almost monotone colour and yeah. So I’ve zoomed right in on it and
again 1/250th… 1/250th of a second with a very low f-stop at 5.6. That’s all I can
do on this lens with these conditions. Even if you can’t get
out guys… Even if you can’t go on a hike or say you’re, you know, getting over a
cold or you’ve got an injury or whatever and you can go for a drive but you can’t
get out, there are still pictures to take. There are still beautiful, beautiful
things to see, and it’s okay to just get in your car and go for a drive and
take some pictures. Okay. Now I’m going to head back and I want to thank you so much for
coming along with me. I will talk to you very, very soon. Bye guys. Thanks for
coming.

Photography Tutorial: Essential Photo Skills That Will Quickly Transform Your Photos

Photography Tutorial: Essential Photo Skills That Will Quickly Transform Your Photos


Light is the magical stuff that we use
to create our pictures. It’s found all around us and comes from a variety of
sources both natural and man-made. It also comes in many forms and colours, each
one affecting the atmosphere of our pictures differently. To help us
understand light I’ve broken it down into four main categories: transmitted
light, reflected light, soft light and hard light. Hard light comes from any
light source that is apparently small. Now the sun on a clear day is a prime
example. Now we know the sun’s not actually small but it appears small
because it’s so far away and it acts like an extremely bright but small light
bulb in the sky. Soft light comes from any light source that has a large
apparent surface area. Now a great example of that is like the light we’ve
got right now and that’s where the sun is shining through an overcast sky or a
large blanket of cloud and that large blanket of cloud has now become the
large light source and that large light source is what’s giving us the soft
light. The characteristics of hard light are that it has a very high contrast
because that high contrast it gives very sharp hard-edged shadows. It also has a
certain sparkle and sharpness to the light because of the high contrast and
it also reveals texture very strongly if the light source is at the right angle,
whereas soft light is very low in contrast and hardly gives any shadows at
all. In actual fact if soft light is used
incorrectly it can look quite dull. So what type of light is best for
photography? Well right now is what photographers call the ‘Magic Hour’ and
that’s because it has all the magic ingredients. We’ve got soft light from
this large light source above us which is the sky, but we’ve also got hard light
from the sun which is setting over there and it’s cutting through the earth’s
atmosphere so it’s reduced in intensity to a much more manageable level and by
combining hard light and soft light makes the photographs much more
interesting. Now to add to that we’ve also got transmitted light and that
means we can see the light source in the picture, plus we’ve got reflected light
reflecting off the surface of the water and off the wet sand and by putting all
of those things together we’re going to get a fantastic image, and if I can just
get this piece of driftwood to stay still I think we’re going to get the
shot that we want. That’s coming together really nicely, just going to move that
over a little bit. Some beautiful reflections off of the bit of wood, it’s
a little bit too close, just going to move it back down there. I want to be
quite precise.Oh no, she moved out the way again! Oh still that’s quite a good
result quite, a good result. We’ve got the water flowing by, got the bit of wood. As you can see sometimes you need to get
your feet wet to get the best shot. For this shot I was using a super wide
angle lens and experimenting in manual mode with shutter speeds from one to six
seconds. I used a small aperture for maximum
depth of field. To balance the light in the sky with my dark foreground I use ND
filters, which we look at in depth in our travel and landscape DVD. To understand
light better start looking at it in different situations and try to figure
out what you are seeing – is it hard light or is it soft light or is it a
combination of the two? For the best light try to shoot at least half an hour
before and after sunset, if the weather conditions are right then this will
usually be the most attractive light of the day. We’ll try a couple more shots before we pack
home and I can change out of these wet socks and shoes. Fantastic! The ‘Magic Hour’ is not the only time or
light that we can shoot in. You can even take advantage of hard light at midday
by shooting indoors. I’m going to show you how you can create stunning
portraits with nothing more than a window and a reflector for lighting. Now
a great lighting set-up that you can easily use in many different locations, even in
your own home, is simply a large window. Now here we’ve got Vicky modelling for us
and we’re using this large window light to illuminate soft light all the way
down the side of Vicky’s face. Now one of the problems when you just have side light
like this is that the other side of the body will be in shadow, now a great way
to get around that is simply to use a reflector and reflectors are great tools,
now you can get a variety of different reflectors. This one here is a
commercially available reflector that just pops open like that and you can
take out on location with you and then if you look at Vicky’s face here you’ll
see the difference that that reflector makes as I put that light in and out of
the shot like so, so a huge difference. Now it’s silver on one side and it’s white on
the other so the silver side gives a harsher light, but if you don’t want to
use a reflector like that you can even use something as simple as a piece of
white card like this, here I’ve got a little bit of white board, just a bit of
white foam board, and again watch the result here what we can do there. So this
side of the face is dark and in shadow, simply bring white board in and we’ve
got a great reflector, great fill in panel to illuminate that shadow side for
us. So very simple technique – large window, nice soft light beautiful for portraits,
fantastic for portraits, and then simply a reflector on the other side to fill in
the shadow side. So I’m going to get Vicky leaning in against this window and
then we’re going to use a couple of different reflectors and we’re going to
see what results we get. Okay Vicky. That’s great, come down towards me a bit more. And head over the other way, that’s it. This shot uses a white reflector close
to our subject, here the reflector is further away resulting in less fill
light and more shadows. In this shot no reflector was used at all, and in this
shot the white reflector was close to our model. That’s good. Great. Okay just give me a
little hint of a smile there Vicky, that’s good. Just chuck that light there, perfect. Same
pose, that’s it. The difference without the reflector and then with the
reflector, without, with. And you can see that even without the reflector can be
quite nice, in that case there’s actually a little bit of light bouncing back from
the other side of the room anyway which is filling in a little bit and then on
the one with the reflector it’s almost a bit too strong so I think what we do
Fab is just get you to go in with the white card this time, we’ll just go from a
little bit further away. Much softer light, which is fantastic for filling in
all those creases on Vicky’s face. That’s it good, okay, excellent. I’m just
going to drop that down a little bit. Okay turn your head towards the window
Vicky, that’s it good keep that there. That’s lovely.
You can see from this that the surgeon is going to have to do the reconstructive work round about here and then probably shrink the nose a little bit,
expand the head, lift those out, yeah lift those out, maybe make your fingers longer,
so they they drag on the floor like an orangutan, which would probably suit you quite well but yeah. So I think it’s worked out quite nicely. For the picture on the left we used a white reflector from approximately two
meters away, giving a slight fill to the shadow side of our image. For the shot on
the right the reflector was moved further away, resulting in a stronger
shadow. Notice how in both shots I have used a
large aperture to blur the background, concentrating the attention on our
subject

How to timelapse professionally

How to timelapse professionally


Today I’m going to teach you how to do a time lapse professionally So here’s the thing anyone can do a time lapse the problem is can you do a time lapse Correctly, my name is noe and I sell time lapse professionally to TV stations and movies I’ve even been on National Geographic and I think I am pretty qualified to teach you guys how to create time-lapse Professionally now, let’s get one thing out of the way first first of all there’s two different kinds of time lapse one is made by speeding up the video and To be honest, it doesn’t look so good. I mean it’s it’s an easy way to do it and anyone can do it, but actually The time lapse itself does not look very professional so what we’re going to be doing today is we’re going to be shooting stills and Turning that into a time lapse because stills you can actually manipulate many factors It looks a lot smoother and in post-production, you can actually look make a look much much better. So Usually gear is not so important when it comes to photography when it comes to time lapse it is and can be quite important especially if you want a professional Looking time lapse most importantly you’re going to need a tripod. That should be a given in any photographers arsenal You’re going to need an intervalometer now these costs anywhere from ten to twenty dollars You can get them on Amazon or Ebay or pretty much any photo store different camera brands have different Intervalometer some cameras don’t need an intervalometer I like I know Sony cameras usually have an inbuilt intervalometer, but Canon sells them separately. So depending on your camera brand you might have to buy an intervalometer or you might not Next you’re going to need and most important you’re gonna need a camera of some sort whether it be a DSLR or a mirrorless camera It’s actually easier to do with a mirrorless camera than a DSLR But I’m going to go over the differences and you’re going to need And the filter depending on the time of the day that you’re shooting now the reason you need an ND filter is because when I look at time-lapse footage either it’s very choppy and amateurish I mean see people just kind of flying in and out of the frame or it can be very smooth and it just it just flows very Very nicely it’s hard to explain but you can see it very clearly when you shoot with an ND filter, you can use lower shutter speeds during the daytime, but if you shoot with a faster shutter speed without an ND filter You’re going to be having very choppy footage and maybe for you guys. You don’t know the difference but me as professional I notice this right away, so Please get an ND filter depending on the time of the day. If you’re shooting a night. You won’t really need it But if you’re shooting in the daytime, you will definitely need an ND filter for a professional-looking time lapse So let’s go back to talking about gear and this is actually very important because when we do time lapse, there’s this phenomenon called flicker so most amateur time lapses don’t notice this but it stands out like Day and night to me usually when I saw time lapse two movie stations if there is some sort of flicker in the footage, they will not accept it and Here is how timelapse flicker is caused When you use when you create a time lapse with a DSLR for example what happens is that every time that the camera takes a picture the aperture opens up so you can see through the mirror and then it will close down To take the picture Now you would think that every time it takes a picture. It has the exactly exact same F-stop, for example, you shouldn’t have f/8 it always closes to f/8 But that is not exactly correct because there’s very very small fluctuations between each picture photo So what happens is when you’re doing a time-lapse with a DSLR camera? Sometimes one picture is just a little little bit brighter or a little bit Darker than the previous picture and when you put this time-lapse together you get flicker in your footage now I know most of you will know and probably won’t care. But if you want how to time-lapse correctly Professionally you will care now You might ask yourself. How can I get rid of? timelapse tlicker now you can use software to get rid of flicker, but actually that doesn’t always work and the software is Expensive there’s two ways to get rid of time lapse flicker completely first method is to Shoot with a manual lens. So if you use those old manual lenses, they don’t have electronic contacts and When you take a picture the aperture stays the same it doesn’t change at all So there won’t be any changes in exposure between each picture That’s one of the best ways to do it The second method of preventing flicker is actually the lens twist method now. This is a little tricky and it is kind of risky But actually I’ve been doing this for years and I’ve never had a problem the way you do. The lens twist method is You’re going to have to hold down the depth of field preview button on your camera. So what that happens is The aperture is going to open up and then to prevent the aperture from closing and resetting You’re actually going to have to unscrew the lens, but you’re not gonna take off the lens You’re just trying to do it so that the electronic contacts are not touching with a camera. So when you do this The aperture stays consistent it’s not gonna open or close between shots and what that’s gonna do is going to prevent flicker now there is a third way to prevent flicker and This is not always consistent because they’re different it differs between cameras but if you’re using a mirrorless camera, I’ve noticed that most mirrorless cameras the aperture stays the same and There isn’t flicker in the footage But if you notice that your mirrorless time-lapse has flicker Then you might want to consider trying what I told you or using a manual lens next. Let’s talk about timelapse Shutter speed so you have your camera ready? And people always ask Should I shoot time lapse in aperture priority mode and as a professional I tell you know Don’t shoot in aperture priority mode. I want you to shoot time lapse in manual mode So you’re going to expose for the scene now? If you’re doing something like a sundown sunrise time lapse there are ways to change the exposure over time Manually, and I’m going to do a separate video about that But for now, let’s imagine you’re doing a regular time-lapse and you’re going to shoot in manual mode So you’re gonna set your picture you’re gonna set your exposure. However, you want it Typically you want the ISO as low as possible Depending on how much broken or not you want in the scene you’re probably going to be shooting at f/8 or higher and when it comes to the shutter speed and this is the important part you’re going to be wanting to shoot at a shutter speed of One second or somewhere around one second now This is very important because you want your picture. You want your time-lapse to flow So you want to take pictures that have a little bit of blur a little bit of movement in them? that way when you play back the time-lapse video everything just Smooths out like ebb and flow if you use a high shutter speed like one sixtieth of a second Then your time which is going to come out kind of choppy The people are going to move very unnaturally. And if you’re an amateur, you’re just gonna think wow at a time That looks great. But if you’re professional this kind of thing stands out As clear as night and day so you’re going to want to be using a low shutter speed and that’s why earlier I told you guys if you’re shooting in the daytime, you’re going to need an ND filter Now there are exceptions to this For example if you’re shooting a landscape, and there’s no people or movement directly in front of the lens then it’s okay because you’re just focusing on nature and you focusing on the clouds and The movement is so slow that you don’t really notice it however, if you’re using a time-lapse for people or for cars or for anything directly in the vicinity Then you should use an ND filter. I mean you can do the time-lapse without the ND filter But remember this is making a time lapse professionally so settings Iso 100 as low as possible aperture a fader above shutter speed should be Any word on the area of one second, so these settings are not going to be exactly correct for you? But you’re going to want a low ISO you’re going to want a shutter speed of a second or around a second for sure and Your aperture should be higher than F8, even if you’re using an Indy culture So I will leave the correct exposure to you guys But you should keep the ISO and the shutter speed at what I told you now if you’re doing clouds and stuff like that, then the shutter speed doesn’t matter so much, but if you’re doing people or Movement in front of you. You’re going to want to show you’re going to want a shutter speed above About one second. So next is the interval or How much time should you take between each picture and I’m going to give you a general? Guidelines, I mean you don’t have to do this this is just what I typically do when I’m doing a time-lapse of people of driving or of cars moving or Something in front of the lens nearby. I like to keep the interval at one second. That means I take one picture I wait one second and I take another picture and I just keep it at that if I’m doing landscapes And there’s fast-moving clouds in the sky. I typically shoot at an interval of about three seconds However, if the clouds are moving relatively slow Then I usually keep the timelapse interval at about ten seconds. So I’ll shoot a picture ten seconds. Later I’ll take another picture for sunrise or sunset I keep it anywhere between ten and fifteen seconds usually around twelve seconds and When I’m shooting stars, I keep it anywhere from 15 seconds to 30 seconds Normally, I just do about 20 seconds. That’s your time lapse calculator. so the last thing when you talk about are the frame rates because when you put your pictures into the computer You need a good frame rate if you’re doing Ten pictures per second as a video as a movie Your time lapse movie is going to be very very choppy. Actually anything under 20 seconds is going to look very choppy and amateurish I typically shoot my time lapses settings anywhere between 24 pictures per second or 30 pictures per second. It’s really up to you so that usually means I shoot about a hundred and sixty-eight pictures or Sometimes up to two hundred pictures per timelapse session that gives me at least around seven or eight seconds of time-lapse footage So now that I’ve gone over all the timelapse camera technicalities of shooting a time-lapse Let’s put it all together and I’m going to show you guys exactly how I do my time-lapse First of all, I set my tripod and I set my timelapse camera next I would compose the picture How I would like it to be now first You have to compose your picture because next we’re going to put the ND filter on our timelapse camera So after our ND filter is on the camera We have to figure out the exposure here is where you’re gonna play around with timelapse settings and try to get a perfectly balanced photo So my ISO is 100. My shutter speed should be about a second if I’m taking pictures of people and it doesn’t really matter So much if I’m taking pictures of clouds, so if you’re taking pictures of clouds You don’t need the ND filter once I have these settings set. I set my aperture to get the exposure that I need typically, it’s anywhere between f/8 or f/11 or above so once I have set my exposure I Hold down the depth of field button and I unscrew my lens so that I don’t get any flicker in my photos That’s if I’m shooting with a DSLR Sometimes I’ll use a manual lens and I don’t have to worry about flicker. But like I said if you’re using a DSLR You’re probably going to be worried about flicker So either use a manual lens or do the lens screw method Now if you’re doing if you’re using a mirrorless camera, you might not have to worry about this But it does vary between mirrorless cameras So if you notice you’re getting timelapse flicker, you might have to do either either of these So once I finish preparing my time-lapse now I set my timelapse intervals Like I said for people I usually do one second same thing for traffic and same thing for driving If I want to do fast-moving clouds, I’ll do one picture every three seconds if I’m doing slow moving clouds I’ll do one picture every 10 seconds if I’m do sunrises or sunsets I would do Anywhere between 12 and 15 seconds finally if I’m doing a time-lapse of the stars, I’ll do about 20 seconds But you can go as high as at once every 30 seconds Now next step comes timelapse post-production and I’m actually going to make a separate video about post-production also if you guys are interested in hyperlapse tutorial, I will be making Tutorials on hyperlapse videos, but this is an essential first first you need to do first You need to know how to do a time-lapse guide before you can do a hyperlapse vs timelapse. So thanks for watching this video Please like leave a comment. If you’re having any trouble any problems, let me know. I will help you And actually I have a really really really old video About how to do a time-lapse if you’re doing interested in watching it I’ll put the link below but it’s really old. The audio is bad. That’s why I remade this video and I updated it So thank you very much, and I’ll see you next time

Long Exposure Photography at Trillium Lake, Oregon

Long Exposure Photography at Trillium Lake, Oregon


Good morning from the Mt Hood National Forest It’s still pretty early, not even 6 in the morning. I came to Trillium Lake today I was hoping to find the road open, but as you can see it is closed So I have to walk the last 2 miles to the lake, which is fine because I get to do some exercise But I’m afraid that I’m gonna miss the light It was beautiful just a few minutes ago, and I’m afraid that when I get there, it’s not gonna be that good But I should still be able to make good images in this place because it is beautiful It is stunning and breathtaking, all of those things It’s been a while since I was here for the last time so I’m really looking forward to this Let’s do it This is a beautiful place, isn’t it? Actually, that’s the problem of this location: the view of the lake and the mountain in the background is so stunning and so beautiful that steals the show. It’s really hard to focus or to look for different compositions here that is not the obvious one that is right in front of you, and there is nothing wrong with taking that, with making that image. I actually made a couple earlier slightly different but the same shot, and I made a couple of long exposures. Most of my images, if not all of them this morning have been long exposures. As you can tell, I love long exposure photography, for me It feels almost like cheating because the images don’t look like photographs They look more like paintings and that’s something that I really, really wanna achieve with my photography There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking a regular shot of this scene, this is a beautiful setting I mean, you can’t really go wrong with it There are some things in this scene that a painter wouldn’t paint For example the contrails from the planes in the sky The clouds are not the most beautiful clouds this morning So those are the things that I’m trying to get rid of with a long exposure, and I think it’s working And I think it’s taking this already beautiful scene to another level and it’s making for almost a perfect painting and I love this place because of this So, I’m not really sure what’s going on here I don’t know if it’s the remote or the camera that is not working properly But I’m not able to take more long exposures. That kind of sucks. So this was the last one from here I was using this as a frame for the mountain and the lake, kind of, and talking about frames I’m gonna go for a walk, there is a beautiful boardwalk along the lake I’m gonna be looking for frames for the mountain. Hopefully some trees and branches, stuff like that. That’s what I’m gonna be doing now