Photography Books: Stories Behind The Images

Photography Books: Stories Behind The Images


hey what’s up guys welcome back to my
channel and as always thanks for watching this will be a quick video I
just got done making my aperture MC Lyte video it’s a really cool inexpensive
light that packs on a ton of features and it’s RGB so if you haven’t checked
out that video I’ll link it up above but that’s not what this video is about this
video is about what are you guys doing this winter maybe you’re traveling
visiting family painting it at home because the kids are out of school and
you just want some home time maybe you’re chilling by a fire because it’s
cold outside so you probably no matter what you’re doing need a good book to
pass the time well as videographers photographers we’re all about capturing
images and sometimes we want to know the stories behind the images we see well
this new book that I picked up is one you’ll love it’s by Corey rich who’s an
adventure photographer his book is entitled stories behind the images this
is a really awesome book not about the images he captures but the stories
behind them what so for him to become a venture photographer how does he get
motivated and you know not really about technique but again about the stories
behind the images he captures it’s a really interesting read and the cool
thing is you don’t have to read it from chapter 1 all the way to the end you can
kind of skip around to whatever you know story catches your eye anyway thought
I’d recommend it check it out stories behind the images I’ll link it down in
the description as always thanks for watching and I’ll catch you in the next
video

3 tips to take better landscape photographs with your digital camera – easy tips for beginners

3 tips to take better landscape photographs with your digital camera – easy tips for beginners


Hi Photographers! Welcome to Easy Camera Lessons. We’ve designed these tips to help you with
your everyday photography, with the things that you love to photograph. We’re lucky enough today to be in this beautiful
part of Australia, the Flinders Ranges. We’re actually, I can see an emu over there and
if you’re lucky you may see a kangaroo or two pop behind me. Lets talk first about colour using this scene
behind us. A few days ago it was very grey here, the sky was looking very murky and not
so nice to photography but the cliffs were still gorgeous and red from the afternoon
sun. Now what we could have done to improve that scene is just crop off the grey sky.
If you have a drab sky, there’s really no need to include it, just bring your frame down
and include all of the best colours. The next tip is to put something interesting
in the front of your photograph. If you can find a cool tree, or a fence post, or something
to put at the front it can give real depth to your photograph. Even though this scene
is gorgeous we can make it even more interesting if we go back that way. So we’ve added something
interesting at the front. There’s lots of flies here today, sorry. So we’ve put these
rocks, I just took a few steps back so we could see these gorgeous rocks I was standing
on and we’ve still got our hills in the background, but it creates kind of, a bit more interest
in the front and you can do this with anything. As I said, have a go with just first off
choosing one tree and putting that in the foreground and see how you go. Last, but not least, and arguably the most
important let’s talk about light. The best times to photograph landscapes are quite early
in the morning and late in the afternoon. This is sometimes called the Golden Hour,
or the Magic Hour, because as you can see, like right now, it’s late in the afternoon,
the light passes through the atmosphere and turns quite yellow. It’s a great time to photograph
landscapes. Last night we set up a camera and filmed for 20 minutes during the Golden
Hour and we squished it into 20 seconds so you can see how much difference light makes
to your landscape photography. We would love you to share your photographs
with the community by tagging them #ECLlandscapes on Instagram or share them straight to our
Facebook page. If there’s anything you haven’t understood today, or you just want to read
it through, you can pop over to our blog which is EasyCameraLessons.com.

Windowless homes ~ Bronica SQ-Ai and Rollei Retro 400s

Windowless homes ~ Bronica SQ-Ai and Rollei Retro 400s


Good morning, everyone from the streets, in town I’m trying to photograph a thing that it’s always been there, but I only paid full attention to it lately and it’s that here, in this town, as you can see most of the buildings and houses have no windows on the sides, they have windows in the front facing the street or the road, or in the back facing the backyard, but most of them don’t have any windows on the sides and the reason is, I believe, that by law you can’t open a window within 10 feet of someone else’s property most pieces of land here are very narrow, what most people end up doing is to max out on the width otherwise if you have to leave 10 feet on each side of your property, you’ll end up having a very narrow house so what they do is they max out on the width and they install those little holes with glass bricks, I guess they are they don’t let you see through but they let some light through, so that’s allowed by the law that makes for very interesting architecture, it’s kind of ugly, but I think it’s a very interesting thing to document and photograph, I’ve been taking a few photos in the last couple of weeks with my digital cameras but today I’m out here with my Bronica because I wanted some of those images on film for this project so I loaded some Retro 400s this
morning and I’m out here it’s starting to rain quite a bit, so I’m going to need to get my umbrella out I’m gonna show you some footage of the Bronica in action and the images that I make with it and afterwards, I’m gonna show you the images that I’ve made with my digital cameras as well for this project I hope you enjoy this video, thank you so much for watching and see you in the next one!

Whats in My Camera Bag for Start 2020?

Whats in My Camera Bag for Start 2020?


– If you’re going to be
starting a new decade, then you need to kick it off with a “What’s in My Camera
Bag” for the start of 2020. What did I upgrade over the holidays and what do I still have in
the bag from the last video? Today, we’re gonna find out together. So I’m gonna give you a
“What’s in My Camera Bag” for the start of 2020, and we are gonna do that video next. (upbeat music) Welcome to my channel, my
name’s Brian The Camera Guy, and I review Sony cameras and accessories. If that’s something that you’re into, then consider hitting
that subscribe button and that notification bell so you don’t miss out on
any of my future videos. Today we’re gonna be doing
a “What’s in My Camera Bag” for the start of 2020. It’s been about six months since I did my last camera bag video. Link to that video will be
up here in the cards above, and down in the description below. I have some changes, and I have some stuff that
I’m still using today. Let’s not waste any more time and jump right into the camera bag. First up, my main camera. I’m still using the Sony a6400. I really like this camera as
it is a great budget option for anyone that is
starting out on YouTube. This camera offers a flip screen so you can frame yourself up. Makes it so much easier to create videos if you’re a solo content creator. The Sony a6400 has great picture profiles, as it has S-Log2 and three with Hybrid Log-Gamma one, two, and three. If you don’t want to color grade, it has a really nice
standard picture profile. It also comes with 4K, 24 frames per second and
30 frames per second. This is actually 6K
resolution downsampled to 4K, so you get extra resolution
crammed into such a tiny body. You also get Sony’s amazing autofocus. It has eye autofocus for still pictures, but for video, it has face detect. Not as good as the new Sony a6600, which has eye autofocus in video, but it is still really good
for these talking head videos. The cons with this camera are that it has no IBIS,
or in-body stabilization, so if you’re gonna go
out vlogging with it, it gives you some of that shaky footage. The standard 16-15mm kit lens does help with some stabilization, as it has built-in OSS,
optical steady shot. If you want the IBIS,
then you have to upgrade to the Sony a6600. Also, this has a five-year-old sensor. Even though you get the
6K downsampling to 4K, this camera has terrible rolling shutter. This could be fixed by
most editing softwares by applying a rolling shutter effect, but I really wish Sony would
have upgraded the sensor when they had released this
new line of APS-C cameras. I guess we’ll have to
wait for the Sony a7000. Also, this camera has
Sony’s older W batteries. Not really a deal breaker for me, because I rarely go through more than two batteries in a day, but if you’re out there all day shooting like a wedding
or something like that, I could see how these batteries
could become a problem. This is something that
Sony fixed in the a6600, as they upgraded that
camera to the Z battery. I absolutely love this camera. What camera are you using
and why did you pick it? Go ahead, let me know down
in the comments below. I’m still rockin’ that
Sony 16-55mm kit lens, and that came with my Sony a6400. It does a good job stabilizing the footage and help eliminating a
little bit of that shake. Not the best lens for image quality, but it gets the job done. Also, one of my favorite
lenses might be this next one. The Sony 16mm F14. I use this lens for all
my talking head videos. I really love the color
that comes out of this lens. The autofocus is really fast, and I have never had any
issues getting focus. This lens is amazing
for talking head videos, as it gives you the equivalent of a 24-millimeter focal length. Now, if you were on a full-frame system, you would have to get the
Sony 24mm G Master lens to compare to this focal length. The Sigma costs under $400, while the 24 G Master
will run you almost 1,400. Don’t get me wrong, the G Master lens looks
absolutely fantastic, but for the price, you
can get the Sony a6400 with the standard kit lens and the Sigma 16mm for
the same total price. If you’re someone on a budget or you’re just starting out, going with the latter
setup is a no-brainer. So one of my resolutions
for this decade was, I really wanted to get organized for 2020. For the cost of this next one, it was easy to get organized by picking up one of these. I picked up an electronic
organizer travel camera bag. This is more than just a cable organizer, as it has spots for chargers
and batteries and S-cards, both standard size and micro. It also comes with a nice pouch, so if you want to store any
miscellaneous small items, you can do that. Gives me a spot to store all my chargers along with all those Sony a6400 batteries. I also can carry some
lens cleaning equipment just in case I need it in a pinch. This one’s water resistant,
but not waterproof. It has my favorite orange color trim with this dark gray exterior. I picked up this bag for
only $15 during Black Friday, and I absolutely love it. If you’re someone
looking to get organized, I would highly recommend a bag like this. I’ll put links down
below in the description so you can check out everything that is currently in my camera bag. Do me a favor. If you’re enjoying this video, go ahead and smash that Like button. It really helps out the channel. Next up, ND filters and step-up rings. I’m still using those same
K&F Concept lens filters. I really love the look that they give and how they don’t overturn, as they do give you a
hard stop on both sides. I’ve been using these ND
filters for close to six months and they’re really great. I recommend this brand as it is a great mid-budget option. Of course, a lot of people rave about those Peter McKinnon filters. They look great, but
there’s so many other things that I want to get before
I upgrade to those filters. Right now, these K&F Concept filters are doing a fantastic job for me. In fact, because it’s winter right now, I’m mostly doing these talking head videos or videos around the house. I’ve not put on an ND filter
in probably three months. I’ve always heard that
it’s not the camera body that makes the difference in your images, it’s actually the lens. I had always thought that
it makes a difference, but not a big enough one
to make a huge difference. I mean, YouTube does a
great job of compression and helps make a lot of
these videos look the same. That all changed for me
when I got this lens. During the holidays, I
took advantage of the sale on a brand new Sony
16-55mm f2.8 G Master lens. This lens is absolutely beautiful, and the images coming out
of it are even prettier. I rented this lens for a
company Christmas party and I absolutely fell in love. I had to buy it. This lens is super sharp and is ridiculously awesome at autofocus. It is really an amazing stills lens. Unfortunately, it does not
have any stabilization, so it makes it a little tough for video, but that extra weight
does help stabilize it just a little bit. The question that you
have to ask yourself is, “How often, and am I walking and talking?” So I figured, “Do I really need the OSS “as much as I thought?” And the answer I came up with was, “No.” The real question you have to ask is, “Is this lens worth a $1,300 price tag?” I’m not 100% sure. Sony would probably sell a lot more if this lens was around a thousand bucks. Not sure if the extra $300 is worth it for the majority of the users. I’m thinking about doing a
full review of this lens. If you’re interested in seeing that, please comment down below
with, “Yes, please review.” If you have a “What’s
in My Camera Bag” video, do me a favor and put
the link to your video in the comments below. I would love to watch those videos and see what other people
are using on a daily basis. Make sure you like,
subscribe, and ring the bell. Brian, out. (claps) (upbeat music)

LEE Filters – SW150 System Overview with Joe Cornish

LEE Filters – SW150 System Overview with Joe Cornish


A lot of ultra-wideangle lenses are simply
too large for LEE’s 100mm system. LEE has come up with a solution – the SW150
system. It was originally designed for the Nikon 14-24mm lens, but has now been adapted to include more lenses – you can find out which ones from the LEE
Filters website. The core of the system is the adaptor, which
comes in three parts. When you take it out of the box, you may not
be able to tell it’s in three parts. There is a lugged inner ring – the front ring. You unscrew it, keeping everything in the same
order and noting the orientation of the ring. This is a Samyang 14mm lens, and each of these adaptors is manufactured specifically for the lens in question. The four lugs on the adaptor ensure the front
ring stays in the correct place. Holding the lens by the petal lens hood, I’m going to reassemble the compression ring
– the red one – and, finally, the locking ring. The rings are all metal and very solid. Once it’s locked down, you’ll find it feels very robust. The SW150 Mark II filter holder comes with
two filter slots and a Lightshield. Like all LEE system filter holders, it can
be rotated through 360 degrees. Most landscape photographers use ND grads
as their primary filters. They are available in one, two and three stop
densities, in hard and soft gradations. They are large, so require a little more care
when handling. Once they’re in, it’s very easy to see the
effect through the viewfinder. If you have Live View, you may prefer to use that. A polariser is essential for most landscape
photographers. There is a polariser for the SW150 system. It’s square in shape, but perhaps confusingly,
is a circular polariser. There are two types of polariser: circular
and linear. The circular is generally better for cameras
with automated metering systems. It fits the holder in the normal way. It is important when you fit it to keep the
printed lettering top-left from the photographer’s point of view. One it’s in, it can be rotated and the effect
clearly seen. What if you want to use it with a graduated
filter? It’s important to emphasise that the graduated
filter will limit your options somewhat. That’s because the position of the grad is going to be the most important determinant
of the exact angle of the holder. If we need to use the grad at a particular angle, we are limited to using the polariser at the
same angle, which might not give optimum polarisation. However, if you turn the polariser through
90 degrees, generally there will be a significant difference
between the orientations. Then it’s up to you to decide which is more effective. If you were to have a round-shaped polariser, it would be so large that the whole rig would
be impractical to use. Although there is a slight compromise with
this polariser, it is still an extremely useful filter. One of the advantages of the Mark II version
of the SW150 system is the Lightshield. This means we can now use the Big and Little
Stoppers, and get perfect technical results. It’s important when inserting these filters
to note they have an asymmetrical design at the back. It’s important because the grooves at the
side are the ones that coincide with the guide rails. Always place it in the back grooves, so that
it is snug against the Lightshield. Push it down gently, but don’t keep pushing, apply
a little bit of pressure and that will ease the Lightshield beyond
the foam trap. Now there’s a perfect seal between the Lightshield
and the filter itself. You should still shield it from direct sunlight. If you own a Mark I holder and want to use
the Big or Little Stoppers, you can now do so, using the Lightshield,
which is available separately. It’s important to get the orientation right, because it has grooves that coincide with
the guide rails of the filter holder. Also available for the SW150 system is a Field
Pouch. It comes with a neck strap, a belt loop at
the back, but probably most importantly for landscape photographers, with a tripod loop. This is how I am deploying it here. The interior is gusseted and has a concertina
design that takes up to ten filters. The SW150 system is a complete professional
filter system for the ultra-wideangle photographer.

Joe Cornish with the LEE 100mm camera filter system

Joe Cornish with the LEE 100mm camera filter system


I’m a UK-based landscape photographer I’ve been photographing landscapes
ever since I started taking pictures. I’ve been using filters
for over 30 years for my landscape photography. In this video, I would like to show you
how the LEE Filters System works and why I’ve been using it
for more than 20 years. The foundation of the LEE System
is the adaptor ring. There are as many sizes of adaptor ring
as there are lenses. To find the right thread size
for your lens, look on the inside of the lens cap. This is a 77mm. It’s also written on the back
of the adaptor ring itself. The ring fits very simply
onto the front of the lens. Essentially, there are two different types
of adaptor ring in the LEE system: the standard, and the wide angle which holds the filter holder
a little bit closer to the lens. The idea of the wide-angle adaptor
is to avoid vignetting with super-wide
and wide-angle lenses. Generally they are considered essential for very wide lenses of around 10-21mm
on full frame or APS sensor cameras. They fit in exactly the same way
as the standard adaptor ring. You can use a wide-angle adaptor
on any lens, but they are considered more essential
for super-wide lenses. The filter holder itself is a beautifully simple,
very robust design. It comes ready assembled
with two guide rails for the filters. It fits using two chisel-shaped lugs
on one side at the back of the holder and a spring-loaded brass plunger
on the other. That is the key to fitting it. It goes on like this. It really couldn’t be easier. It comes off just as easily. You fit the lugs on one side and the plunger releases
to fit it on the other. I have had this holder
for nearly twenty years. It’s exactly the same
as the current model and still works perfectly. That’s a real tribute to the robustness
of the design. It’s generally best to put the filter
in the holder off the camera. The filter simply slots
into the guide rails. I would also suggest using
the rear guide rails if you are only using one filter. It is also important
not to cross thread the filter, which is possible to do
when you have two guide rails. If the filter isn’t parallel
with the back of the camera, it can cause a shift in focus. The great strength of this system
is that it can be rotated through 360 degrees. It’s possible to use the filter inverted,
on its side, or you can just clip a tiny corner. It’s extremely flexible and versatile. The effect of the filter can be observed
through the viewfinder as well as on live view. It’s very important in bright or sunny conditions
to avoid direct sunlight falling onto either the lens
or the filter holder. I carry a black flag to cast a shadow or you can just put
your head across it. The idea is to avoid flare
or any kind of optical imperfections caused by direct sunlight. It’s really not a good idea
to carry the camera on a tripod over your shoulder with the holder
still attached to the lens. I strongly recommend
you take the holder off if you are going to carry the camera
on a tripod.

Why and how to meter with a mirrorless digital camera


Hi guys, so i was just taking photos of this beautiful scene here. that’s Mt Hood And i thought that it would be a good moment to show you really quick how i meter for my photos, the photos i take With the film camera of course and why i do it the way i do it So the first thing that i used to meter my photos was a smartphone app I think there are a ton of them and all of them are pretty good and they are accurate enough the problem for me and that’s why i stopped using them is that they don’t give you too much flexibility and Also to be honest i don’t like to be messing with my phone while taking photos with the film camera, it kind of ruins the experience I don’t know if it makes any sense So then i bought a standalone old minolta light meter that i think i showed here before I used that thing for two days it’s not that i didn’t like it it’s not that it was not accurate but it was just not for me you see? i carry a lot of equipment with me: the bronica is a heavy camera and the lenses just make it worse and then I have the tripod, filters, film… and then I have this camera the 6500 that is the one i use to record these videos, so it’s yet another thing to carry with me so it didn’t work for me took me a while but i finally realized that i had been carrying with me the perfect light meter all this time, and it was the digital camera and i want to show you why okay excuse the squirrel I’m gonna use my old a6000 to show you how I meter. i of course usually use the 6500 but i’m using it to record this video right now so yeah One reason why i like to use the a 6500 is because it has a switch here on this wheel to switch between custom modes, and i use it to have a custom mode for video and another custom mode for photo so this is what the custom photo mode would look like in my 6500 i always have the iso set to 800 that’s the Speed that i shoot hp5 at but of course i’ll change it if i’m if i’m shooting a different film or different… if i’m pushing it or something and What i do is i just point the camera to a subject like these trees and i just copy or carry these settings that the camera is telling me 1/640 and f11 to my film camera but getting these settings, the shutter speed and the aperture is something that you can do with With your phone is pretty accurate at doing it but the camera has some key advantages The first of them i don’t know if you can see the screen but it’s previewing the image in black and white and i shoot black-and-white, so i can actually see Kind of what the photo is going to look like another reason is because not only we can preview the phone in black and white but we can preview the actual exposure meaning, just imagine that we want to blacken the trees with no details in the trees So we could use this exposure compensation dial and just turn it down all the way to say three stops And we will get a preview of what the look the photo would look like. not that we want to do that We could do the opposite though if we want to blow out the sky and we want to have a lot of details in the trees and just look the How many steps we have to compensate the exposure to have that and that translates in in new settings That we can carry to our film camera again and the last reason is this one it’s all about previewing the photo again now just imagine, this is our image that’s image we’re gonna take We have a shutter speed of one – one thousandth of a second, and the iso that we want But, we want to have more contrast, we want to darken the sky so we could just place the filter here in front of our lens and we will get once again a preview of the photo as you can see the sky is darker now and the most important thing of all is like we get new settings: we have a high speed of 1/400 of a second now that we can carry and copy to our film camera You see how it changes? 1/1000 1/400 Not only we get the settings but we get the preview the effect that the filter is gonna have in our photo And yeah that’s about it that’s the method i use to meter. it works perfectly fine, my photos are correctly exposed all the time using this cameras light meter of course i did some testing at first i copied the exact settings the camera was telling me and i took three shots one With the actual settings, one under exposed by one stop and one overexposed by one stop And then i checked which which one was the best one. it was actually the one with the actual settings, so i trust this camera Alright just one last thing i wanted to add to all this and it’s while i use the settings from the camera 90% of the time sometimes i overexpose the photo a little bit. for example if the camera is telling me f8, I’ll use f7.1 or even f5.6 depending on the situation because digital cameras have a really hard time with highlights film is the opposite, films struggles with the shadows for example if you take a raw file from your digital camera and you open that raw file with lightroom and you move the slider, the shadow’s slider all the way to the right you are able to recover a lot of detail, it’s not gonna look awesome but the detail is there. i’ve tried with raw files where i thought it was completely black and lost the shadows forever and lightroom was able to recover a lot of detail, crazy detail from the shadows but that doesn’t happen with the highlights so if you blow out the highlights they are gonna be white Forever and ever that’s why the digital camera is gonna try to be safe, it’s gonna try to expose for the highlights you don’t need to do that with film. actually the opposite you should be exposing for the shadows if that’s what you want, you might wan, to darken the shadows or you might not want to have details at all the shadows, but if you want to have details on both shadows and highlights you should expose more for the shadows with film, so either you modify the settings in the camera too to do that to expose for the shadows or you just trust the camera and overexpose a little bit. it works perfectly fine for me that way so yeah, and that’s about it thanks for watching and see you the next one but sometimes though if in really bright on the frame like the sky the sun or something i know So yeah i do this

Don’t Give the Camera to John!

Don’t Give the Camera to John!


Hey guys. It’s New Year’s eve and it is snowing
outside, which is awesome. So to celebrate I have hired a limo to take me where I want
to go today. Hi. Hello. Hello limo driver. Hello. Where are we going?
I don’t know. Okay. Okay. What ya got there John? Oh man. Um. Hang on… From the store I bought omelette bites. It was like $3.50. There’s two in there. I mean,
they’re gone but they were like that big. I was not impressed. So. Still hungry? Yeah. Are we done yet? Are we done yet? Hi guys! So we are at… well, right now we’re at the Hamilton Conservation Authority and
we’re heading over to Sherman Falls. I’m pretty sure it’s called Sherman Falls.
Come on driver! Come on! Ah ha! He doesn’t want to bring the Tim Horton’s cup with him.
So Sherman falls is really really beautiful. You used to be able to park right next to
it. You are no longer able to do that so we’ve parked up the road at Artaban Parking lot
Dundas Valley Conservation area… and we have to walk. It’s snowing which is cool.
Oh, and check this out. Our hats! These are the Robin-Ruth hats that they sent to me after
I requested them. They’re not paying me to say this. I love these hats. If you like them,
definitely check out their website. I will put it in the description. Oh the snow! Almost there! Almost to the entrance anyway. The pathway going in. Oh look! You can already see it! Awesome. Wow! Wow, wow, wow! What do you think? It’s awesome man. Wow. You seeing all those rocks? They’re pretty cool.
Eh? Wow. And look at the… This is just beautiful. Absolutely gorgeous.
I wish that I had rain boots on just to stand right in the middle at the bottom.
I think I’m going to have to come back in summer and go swimming. So, the camera is going to get wet. Not only is it snowing but there’s a lot of mist flowing
off the water. So I’m going to get set up. A wide angle for sure from the bottom here
and then see what we can do. Okay! Okay so this is going to be quick because
it’s so wet. I have the camera and tripod set up in the water and I’m at ISO 200, f/9.5.
It’s 30 seconds, and a 2 second timer. Now I’ve also done it at ISO 50, f/22, 10 seconds
without the filters. I have the 3 stop neutral density filter with graduated, and the 7 stop
neutral density filter on just to be able to bring down my f-stop and be able to take
this with a longer exposure. We’ll see how it goes. Everything is completely soaked and
it’s cold. What’s going on? Look I’m… peekaboo! Are
we done yet? Are you cold? No, I’m hungry. Those two little things didn’t do it man.
Yeah well, you know, you should’ve gotten the hash browns. I couldn’t remember the name.
Are you done yet? Seriously? No. Damnit. It’s still going. Oh look! 30 seconds! What are
you doing? Taking pictures. Of what man? The waterfall. That thing there? Yeah. What are you doing? Don’t worry about me man. Just do whatever
you’re doing. Uh oh. Alright there’s not much… Can you hold this?
Don’t drop it. He’s got my camera. There’s not much else to do here meaning that there
is a lot, hold on… there are a lot of beautiful pictures I could take here but everything
is soaking wet. So, uh, I do not have my rain gear with me and I think it’s time to… John’s
hungry. Let’s get some food! He ordered these two little omelette bites from Tim Horton’s.
Sorry. He didn’t order two. He ordered omelette bites and there were two in the box. This
big box and these two… haha. Still a sore subject… haha. Oh but look at the waterfall. Alright so thanks for coming along guys and
we’ll talk to you soon. Happy New Year! Happy New Year! Your pom-pom’s in the way. Bye!
Bye!

How to Use Manual Mode on ANY Camera in ~5 MINUTES!

How to Use Manual Mode on ANY Camera in ~5 MINUTES!


Good morning. Hope you guys had a wonderful Christmas. Today I’m going to teach you how to switch
your camera over to manual mode so you can stop fiddling with it and then take some pictures
like this. Okay, let me give you a tour. Hello and welcome back to the channel. Good morning, good evening, good afternoon,
wherever you are. Today we are going to learn how to use manual
mode in about five minutes. Look, when I first picked up a camera, the
most intimidating thing for me were all these buttons. I just wanted to go out and shoot and take
freken nice pictures and instead I was fiddling around with my camera settings. You know what’s really fun too in its own
way, but a lot of people just want to avoid all of that and just take really nice pictures
from the get-go. So I shoot Canon, but all these settings apply
to pretty much any phone, mirrorless, DSLR nowadays as long as you understand this holy
trinity of camera settings, then you’ll at least be able to establish your foundation
for using your camera in manual mode. All right, let’s get started. Okay, so the first thing I want to talk about
is ISO. So ISO is your camera sensitivity to light. You always want to keep it at around 100. The lowest, the better because the more ISO
you introduce, then the more noise you also introduce into your picture. Now on top of that, the higher the range of
ISO you go, then the brighter your picture will be. Depending on your camera, some cameras are
able to push ISO way further than other cameras before you start introducing noise. For the ADD, for instance, I never go any
higher than 800 ISO because after that pictures looks disgusting. But then on the 1DX, which I’m shooting right
now, I can push that to way, way higher amounts for ISO. But bottom line though, you want to keep your
ISO at the lowest possible setting. Now, a lot of the times when you’re picking
up a mirrorless or DSLR camera, a lot of professional pictures, they have a nice blurred background
and that blurred background is called bokeh. Now, the one setting that is pretty much responsible
for that is called the F-stop. So you have ISO, which is adjusting your camera
sensitivity to light. The second setting that we’ll talk about is
F-stop. The lower your F-stop is, then the more light
you’re letting in because you’re opening your lens up, and on top of that, the blurrier
your background will be. So a lot of times when people are talking
about lenses and they’re talking about how fast it is, if they’re saying a lens is fast,
then it means that it probably has a lower F-stop and also means that it’s way more expensive
than the other lenses because 1.2, 1.4 lenses, those usually go for a lot more than 2.4,
2.8, and so forth. But remember, you don’t want to abuse this
blurry background image. For example, let’s say I’m doing landscape
photography and you have this nice mountain range and a giant boulder in front of you. Do you want to take a picture of the boulder
or with a blurred background of the mountain range, or do you want a nice clear picture
of the mountain range? Probably the mountains, right? So in cases like that, that’s when you want
everything in focus. Or for family photos, all that I would recommend
you use F-stop of F-5 or higher. Okay, so let’s combine those two settings
and understand them together. Right now the lens I’m shooting in is that
an F-2.0, which means that the ISO, I don’t have to adjust too much because it’s letting
in a ton of light already from two studio lights here. If I were to crank that to F-5, F-7, the room
is going to get way darker and then I’m probably going to have to compensate for that by adjusting
ISO to make it brighter or else you won’t be able to see anything at all. So ISO, artificial in-body lighting, F-stop,
how much light you’re letting in. The third and final setting I want you to
understand is shutter speed. Let’s say you want to take pictures of your
dog. How often are they going to sit still? Probably not, right? So here you want to freeze your motion in
place, and to do that, that’s when shutter speed comes into play. Shutter speed is that click that you have
for your camera. It’s pretty much dictating how long you’re
going to let light hit your camera sensor. So that means that the higher your shutter
speed and the faster you can freeze motion. The slower your shutter speed, then the longer
it’s going to remain open. So the higher shutter speed, the less light
you’re letting come in and therefore your picture’s going to turn down darker. But in exchange, your motion’s going to be
frozen in place. Okay, so let’s combine all three settings
as an example. I’m in front of a beautiful waterfall. What do I want to do first? For me, I always adjust F-stop first because
I think about what is my subject and focus. In this case it’s the giant waterfall, so
you don’t want a low F-stop for that, you want a high F-stop. So landscape photography, you don’t really
want anything blurry, high F-stop. Now in exchange when you are cranking up your
F-stop, your picture gets darker. How would you fix that? You want to keep ISO at one to 100 if we can. It’s mid-day so there’s a ton of light coming
in, which means we can now play with these shutter speeds. But since I want a nice flowy smooth motion
of the water, I want to move my shutter speed to like 15 seconds. I want it to remain open for a long time that
way you get a nice long streak of water. So high F-stop, it’s dark. Slow shutter speed, it gets brighter, and
therefore I can leave ISO at about 100 and then boom, you get a nice smooth waterfall
picture. I also use the ND filter on my lens here just
in case so I can keep the camera settings a little bit darker, but more on that on the
next video. But I’m going to talk about specific camera
gear or specific essential camera gear in another video. So more on that later. Okay, let’s try another example. I’m outside mid-day and I want to take picture
of a miniature from Lords of Helis, so product photography. I want a nice blurred background but I don’t
want the background to take away from my main subject, which is the miniature. So I have a small subject, blurred background. What would you do first? F-stop, right? So you’re going to crank your F-stop down
that we have a nice blurred, delicious background. But the thing is, you’re letting in a ton
of light. It’s mid-day, so it’s way overexposed. How would you fix that? ISO is already at 100. The last thing you want to adjust now is shutter
speed. So now you can crank your shutter speed a
lot. I can even go to like 1/4,000 if I want to. It’s not going to take away from anything
really. So that’s what’s nice about photography. You can always compensate with shutter speed
once you adjust the other two settings because it won’t matter as much as it would for video. For video you would get these staticky motions
and then you would see individual droplets of water if you have a shutter speed that
doesn’t match your frame rate, but more than that later. Let’s focus on the photography aspect here. So low F-stop, subject’s in focus, background’s
blurry. ISO’s at 100 and then I compensate for shutter
speed to make sure it’s perfectly exposed and then boom, example number two complete. Okay, last quick example, one of my favorite
types of photos are long exposure photography. Now for that one, let’s say I have a miniature
and I want to do some steel wool, so I just want to whisk it around the back and get these
nice long streaks of light. Now to do that, we’re going to mimic the same
thing we did for the waterfall example and keep a slow shutter speed, so we’re going
to keep it open for 30 seconds. It’s pitch black at night so you can’t see
anything else anyway, so 1/30th is going to give a ton of light coming in. And then for F-stop, I actually like to put
my F-stop higher just so you can see complete details of what’s going on and keep your camera
on a tripod tube. And then here I played around with F-stop
and ISO just a little bit here and there until I finally got nice streaks of light which
were, some were in focus, some were out of focus. But the main focus here, I said focus like
five times, but the main subject here is of course the miniature, so I want to make sure
all the details of that can be seen super nice and crispy and then the background just
accents what’s going on here. In this case it’s the monument of light, so
naturally it fits with the whole light streaks in the background. And that is basic camera settings, pretty
much how to use manual mode in about five, I’m probably way over that by now, five minutes
or so. But I hope you enjoyed how we puzzle pieced
the trinity of camera settings that way we can take nice, beautiful photos. Hope you found it helpful. If you found all this helpful, please hit
subscribe so we can grow the channel together in 2020 get it to as big as it can possibly
be. I’ve also linked my social media here if you
want to keep up to date with daily content or what I’m doing, and until next time, see
you guys later.

Boost the megapixels of your camera using this panoramic photography technique.

Boost the megapixels of your camera using this panoramic photography technique.


Thanks to Squarespace for sponsoring
this video. So I’m going to do a really nice simple
one for you guys today I’ve just got my 50mm lens on a Canon 5D Mark 3 and I’m
here at my home town of St Peter Port this lovely harbour scene with the
seafront and all these layers and terraces of buildings going up there and
this time of year is great because it’s early dark basically it’s now 4:30 p.m.
Sun has already set and by 5 o’clock it’s going to be Twilight and with it
being winter people are still at work at 5 p.m. and it’s dark so that means all
the lights are going to be on and most of those buildings which obviously
wouldn’t happen in the summertime at night because it wouldn’t wouldn’t be
dark till 10 p.m. and everyone would have gone home so I’m hopefully gonna
catch a twilight scene with the seafront illuminated and I’m going to do that
very simply without any filters anything like that necessary because I don’t have
a really bright sky to deal with or contend with that I need to darken down
so I’m just going to take a picture of that sea front on the self-timer but the
extra little trick that I’m going to do is rather than shoot it on a wide angle
I’m going to shoot it on three panoramic shots so I’ve already just leveled my
tripod up using the spirit level to make sure everything’s level and then I’m
going to take a shot here here here here here maybe three to five shots
overlapping each one that will give me a higher resolution image because I’ll be
able to join those images together so instead of just a twenty two megapixel
maybe like a twenty two or twenty to twenty two so it will be something more
like an 80 megapixel image that I end up with us a nice panoramic shot of this
seafront at Twilight so just gonna run some test shots let’s see how it goes okay so we’ve got our series of
panoramic shots when they’re not panoramic yet they’re individual shots
remember we shot them with about a 30% overlap which is about right for
creating a panorama and what I’m going to show you is I’m just going to show
you two really quick easy methods to put those together one in Lightroom and one
in Photoshop now the one in Lightroom I use Lightroom classic the one in
Lightroom couldn’t be easier there’s my five files that I’m going to use for
this panoramic I’ve kept a different five files for the Photoshop version
here you can see zooming in seeing all the little building lights and
everything going on there let’s click there is the first shot the
second shot third one the fourth one and then the fifth one now all I need to do
to create a panorama is to select all of the shots and then right click and then
from right click say photo merge panorama now that’ll put that together
looks like it already has given me a preview there I can
choose spherical cylindrical perspective auto crop can also put fill edges on as
well that’s if sometimes when it builds a panorama it leaves some parts in white
that didn’t quite have enough area to fill in the latest version of Lightroom
it’ll fill those edges for you so I just click merge and then we wait for it to
finish processing on that see it says creating panorama at the top left there and there we go
panorama is finished then we just click on it and you can see there is the
panorama with all that wonderful detail captured in there I’m just going to
export that file because there’s a few extra things I want to do to it in
Photoshop and we’ll also look at the other way of creating the panorama in
Photoshop with the other files so here is the panoramic that we just created in
Lightroom let’s zoom in take a look at that look at all that beautiful detail
and and you’re basically increasing the megapixels of your camera when you’re
creating panarin and Lightroom and Photoshop both use the
same engine so he can both create these great panoramic so you see how amazingly
it does it there’s so much detail in there and there’s not one error that I
can spot that’s been created in that panorama we’ve got all that beautiful
lovely Twilight lighting with all the the house and the building lights on
there over some peter port harbor now there’s a couple of little issues with
this shot the first one is there’s a few blobs of dust on my sensor so i’m just
going to use the clone stamp tool that’s just sampled from here let’s just remove
that blob of dust okay let’s move that out of the way let’s just clone stamp
that blob of dust out of there as well and it repeats over here and then if i
look at the shot we’ve got these three posts sticking up at the bottom there
that i didn’t want in the shot but nothing I can do about it I’m just going
to use the crop tool to crop this into more of a panorama I don’t want all that
stuff on the far right hand side there it’s not really necessary probably going
to crop that out and I’m going to crop a little bit of the left-hand side out as
well to about there to frame up the shot a little bit better so that’s more of
the panorama that I was expecting and then again we can just use the clone
stamp tool and then we can just clone that out there really quickly I could
probably do a little bit of a better job on this if I was going to pay a little
bit more attention to this but let’s just do this as it is at the moment just
to get rid of this nice and quickly but a bit of a repeat pattern there we could
have also used the patch tool would have been a good one so I’m just going to
sample in there I’m only doing this very roughly because we’re in a just want to
show you more quickly what this is going to look like right so there we have a
lovely panorama beautiful detail now we can enhance that detail a tiny bit more
I’m just going to go into filter sharpen unsharp mask
and I’m just going to have a look at a hundred percent with half a pixel
sharpen so in the preview there we go you can see half a pixel sharpen put one
pixel sharpen on on and off there you go that’s with it on looks like it could
benefit from a one pixel sharp and so I’ll say okay and there with a one pixel
sharpen you can see we’ve got that really large image now let’s check the
image size and the image size you see 13,000 pixels wide my Hasselblad h6 100
megapixel is about eleven thousand eight hundred so this image is wider than my
100 megapixel Hasselblad turns out which is what you get from using the blending
method of overlapping panoramas and creating panoramic images so I think
you’ll see there a really nice result that’s been achieved very very simply
and you saw how easy it was to capture let’s just take a quick look now in
Photoshop how you would do that in Photoshop as well so these are the other
set of images that we captured because I did it twice now in Photoshop I just
need to go into file automate and then photo merge and then I browse to choose
the files actually I browse to choose the files but I’m going to choose the
folder that the files are in browse find the panorama Tiff’s there they are say
open they’re in there now I’m going to say vignette removal geometric
distortion correction auto on the layout just say okay and then let’s let
Photoshop build that panorama for us and there we go
Photoshop has built the panorama you can see those white edges that I was talking
about that you get which we’d have to crop into now in this shot it’s a little
bit different cuz the rain started to come in and you can see all this
mistiness that we’ve got where with the rain coming down but I quite liked it so
I thought it’d be interesting to include this one as compare as
as well let me just crop out that excess stuff that we don’t need they’re
obviously in Lightroom it filled that in for us remember but crop a little bit
more off off the edges as well let’s crop that into there on this one let’s
crop that one into there looks like we need a tiny bit of contrast adjustment
so you can see there as well looking Photoshop it’s kept the layers with the
layer mask because of each section so you can work through the files and the
layers if you want to bring back a little bit from one shot all the other
I’m just going to grab hold of the curves adjustment here and pull up the
highlight ends pull down the mid-tones a little bit just to add a little bit more
punch and contrast in that and so there’s the one with the rain coming in
let’s get the other one that we just created in Lightroom and there’s the one
that we create in Lightroom before the rain came in let’s take a look at the
two so you can obviously see that turbidity and mist on the second one but
I quite like it it’s got a bit of atmosphere but you can see how simple it
was to create both of those one created in Lightroom one creating photoshop and
the photography techniques couldn’t really be any simpler hope you enjoyed
that I’m Carl Taylor we’ll see you next time
this video is brought to you by Squarespace from websites and online
stores for marketing tools and analytics Squarespace is the all-in-one platform
to build a beautiful online presence and run your business head to squarespace.com for a free trial
and when you’re ready to launch go to Squarespace comm forward slash Karl to
save 10% off your first purchase of a website or domain