Landscape Photo Editing Workflow Part 4 Special Effects in Photoshop

Landscape Photo Editing Workflow Part 4 Special Effects in Photoshop


hello I’m Robin Whalley welcome to Lenscraft and this fourth video in my mini-series
editing this image in the first video we went through an assessment of the image
in the things I wanted to change in that video I mentioned that the Heather was a
little bit too sharp for my liking and I wanted to soften that we’ll be dealing
with that in this video which concentrates on special effects and I’ll
show you how I’m going to use the Orton effect to soften the Heather in the
second video we actually looked at processing our image in capture one
which is how we ended up with the image that you can see on screen now in
Photoshop and in the third video we then looked at how to edit that image using
the Nik collection to emphasize some of the elements in the scene and this was
the image we produced now if you miss the first few videos of this series
don’t worry I’ve put the links in the video information below I’m going to
start now by creating a frequency separation and use that to create a
norton effect now if you haven’t seen this done before you can find
information in a video that i’ve published previously and again I’ll put
the link in the video information below now to do this rather than we create it
manually I’m going to be using an extension panel for Photoshop called
whoa frequency equalizer Pro and again I’ve reviewed that and you’ll find a
link to the video in the information below now in frequency equalizer Pro
there’s this option here to create a quick frequency separation and I’m going
to do that and it will decompose my image into two layers and I’m going to
set a pixel radius and this effectively controls the level of blur in the image
and I want something around 30 pixels given the size of this image as a rough
guide work on the number of megapixels in your image as this is a 24 megapixel
camera somewhere between 20 and 30 produces the right level of blur let’s close that down now and I’ll show
you what the frequency equalizer has done so we’ve got our image now
separated onto two layers we’ve got this low-frequency layer and a high-frequency
layer no the low-frequency layers got all the color information from the image
and as you can see it’s blurred and that’s what we’ll use to create our
artifact the high-frequency layer has all the detail and if I turn off the
low-frequency you can see what that does but together the two layers actually
just create the normal image there you can see I’ve turned off the separation
that’s being created if I turn it back on there’s no difference this is how I
create my Orton effect so I’ll go to the high frequency layer and I’ll reduce the
opacity down to something around 80% and as soon as I do that we get this lovely
blurring effect on the header and it may be too strong but you can see it’s
soften the header up very nicely unfortunately softened up all the
hillsides as well and the sky and I don’t really want that I’ll show you how
we tackle that in a minute on the low-frequency layer what I’m next
going to do is duplicate it so I’ll use command + J on my keyboard to create a
duplicate and I’ll rename that soft glow and I’m going to reduce the opacity of
that layer down to something around 20% to start with and now I change the
blending mode of that layer to be soft light and that creates this lovely
glowing effect that enhances the saturation at the same time so if I turn
that off you can see the original turn it on and you can see this lovely
glowing Orton effect now that we’ve got now the thing for me is the Orton effect
shouldn’t really be plied globally to every element of the image it starts to
get a little bit samey after that I really wanted it to deal with the
heather in the foreground and possibly soften up some of the clouds in the sky
what I need to do know that is add a layer mask so that I can hide the effect
so I’ll add my new layer mask I’ll invert it and that hides the artifact
from my image next I’m going to use a luminosity mask to select the Heather in
my image now I could use a saturation mask and that would work as well but I
think the luminosity mask will work best and I’m going to use this panel that
I’ve previously reviewed called interactive luminosity masks and it’s a
free panel that you can get again I’ll put the link to that video in the
information below and I’m going to create a luminosity mask and in there
I’ll create a zone mask though the areas you can see in white and the areas that
are being selected by my luminosity mask and I can move this left and right to
either select brighter tones or darker tones so I want to select something
that’s picking up on the Heather and it’s probably slightly darker tones at
this stage and I can use these feather sliders to restrict or enlarge the range
that’s being selected now I don’t really want the effect to be seen in the
shadows I really want it to be seen more in the higher lives so I’m happy with
that and what I’m going to do now is create a selection from it I’ll hide
that panel and now I’ll hide the selected edges so that I don’t see them
anymore now over here I’m on my mask that’s attached to the entire group and
what I can do now is select a white paint brush so I’m using white with the
paintbrush and I’ve got the opacity set at about 50% I’ve got a soft edge to the
paint brush and the size is set suitable for this image I can adjust the size
using the bracket keys on my keyboard so the left bracket will reduce it the
right bracket increases it and now I’m going to just paint over the areas where
I want to see the artifact so the Heather here
is one of the areas where I want to see it and again the heather over here now
are painting the areas of the heather to start with just to create that softening
effect on the heather because that’s my priority and the thing you’ve got to
watch out for when you’re using this technique is that because I’m using a
soft blending mode here on the soft glow layer it will actually darken and
intensify the color so you may get a color shift involved here don’t worry if
you find that the whole thing makes it look too saturated we’ll deal with that
in a moment so let’s Oh turn it back on and you can see that
I’ve restricted my adjustment now just to the Heather if you look at the
maskers I’ve created you can see that it used the luminosity information that I
picked up in the luminosity panel now just soften the edges of the path as
well slightly I’m reasonably happy with that maybe we want to include a very
slight soft glow in the distance that looks reasonably good and now maybe just
on these clouds here to soften them up possibly
those clouds as well so let’s look that was the original and that’s my softened
image using my artifact so I just renamed that layer now if I think that
the image is looking a little bit too saturated now what I can do is add a hue
and saturation layer and just make sure that that’s outside of my Orton effect
on the layer stack now because I already had a hidden selection that I was
painting through it’s actually created that adjustment as a mask so I’m just
going to remove that mask and just add a new one in the human adjustment layer
we’ve got the master saturation and that will allow me to control the saturation
on the master layer which I probably don’t want to do too much and it would
also allow me to then pick a layer now in here we’ve got the magentas that are
in the heather and I can pick those and it’s actually saying that we’ve got them
as red now if I wanted to I could shift those and turn them into a different
color so maybe I do want to shift them very slightly
and I could also increase or reduce the saturation level depending on what I
felt was appropriate and I could actually change the lightness or
brightness of those now if I look back at my original image with that turned
off I’m actually happy with that so I’m not going to make any further
adjustments to this I’ll remove the hue and saturation lab and I’ll just accept
that I’m happy with that image now if you feel it’s a bit too light or too
dark I would suggest adding the curves layer
to it so that you can lighten it up or down it down I’m quite happy with that
now I think that looks like a good finished image I’ll just again make sure
that I’ve got that curves adjustment on the very top of the image and that’s me
complete now this has been the first mini-series that i’ve tried where i’ve
tried to demonstrate the end to end editing of an image right through from
assessment through raw conversion through enhancement using in this
instance the Nik collection and then onto special effects
now the first video a lot of people were very keen on this mini series now we’ve
finished it I’m hoping that you’ve enjoyed the series and thought it was
worthwhile if you did please leave me a comment below because I’m wondering
whether or not to do a number of other of these mini series where I demonstrate
different tools because I don’t always use the tools that I’ve demonstrated and
used in this series if you want to see something else another mini series with
another image and other tools please let me know in the comments below and I’ll
see what I can do in the future I’m Robin Whalley
you’ve been watching Lenscraft I’ll see you soon for another video

Capturing Movement With Continuous Shooting | I AM Different Tips ‘n Tricks

Capturing Movement With Continuous Shooting | I AM Different Tips ‘n Tricks


[Continuous shooting.] Hi, I’m Thomas from Nikon School. We’re here
on the set of the Blossom project and I will give you
some tips about photography. In order to capture
the moment you really want, especially when you take
some pictures of movement, the burst mode will help you to break down the movement
with many images. Especially if you have a moment
that will never happen again. You can use this burst mode
and secure your images. So about the D7200,
what makes it stand out is that there is a special burst mode
at 7 frames per second which is made by the crop mode. And then you’ll have
even more images to bring back
the right moment in your images. [Discover other inspiring ideas!
Explore more.]

Canon EOS 7D Shutter Speed Tutorial

Canon EOS 7D Shutter Speed Tutorial


a nice short episode of making I’ve made
I haven’t made any videos for a while but I just thought like this quick one
on this kind of 7d and today I’m gonna demonstrate how to change the shutter
speed and to get a really good shutter speed for like if you’re an Instagram
user or your loved shutter speed use an how to change you really on this model
so I’m going to switch it on first so that’s the switch ones them and switch
this on so you switch it on once I’ve switched it on I’m gonna put it into AV
mode so it’s already at the moment on AV mode as you can see so once I put it on
AV mode I can now play around with the shutter speed so if I click on this this
little cue button here okay so if I click on the little Q button it will
take me to the main menu ok so once I’m in the main menu I can then change
various things within there so if I go back to the queue and there’s my shutter
speed so essentially all I need to do is change that and how I would do that is I
can either I can revolve this rule little wheel bottom wheel button here
and that will allow me to change the shutter speed so if I just do that I can
change shutter speed so I can take your one 4/20 to the second 50 to the second
eighth of a second and I can take it back for through the way around so if I
take it 400 you can see it’s dead quick and if I turn it the other way so if I
can click on this cue button here and turn it the other way and I take it to
no one minus one point three seconds and take a picture this time moving my
camera around I should get a little bitch motion blur in the picture and you
can see it’s it’s overexposed the picture so I haven’t got card in here
but I’m just demonstrating this so if I do that again so if I see if I click on
the cue button there’s my shutter speed and if I take a picture move it around
you can clearly see there it’s overexposed okay so show speeds mainly
for using with in low-light you know you want to increase the shutter speed so
you got more like coming through to the aperture so therefore your pictures will
be better exposed you need to control it via the shutter
speed and aperture in order to get the right consistency you know obviously I
so plays a factor as well in low light so that’s something you need to think
about but summarize basically you just put your camera on to put it into AV
mode so it’s at the moment in AV mode there you go and then if I sort of press
my camera on click on the cue button that is my shutter speed and to change
you all I do revolve around this to increase and decrease my shutter speed
to get the best exposure for the before the image any questions about shutter
speed pleased to keep my shot so if you want to be low shutter speed like light
drawings and all that sort of so I’m really want to take this number down by
revolving this you know to get that nice exposure you might need to sort plan on
with your ISO as well and you have your aperture ratio to get the right noise
level down to get the nice image that you want okay this is obviously this
camera is not touchscreen so I’m not so I’m using the touchscreen features on
here because they don’t exist basically however you know it does you know it is
quite useful in terms of the your shutter speed you know I’ve got a live
mood live view here as well so as you can clearly see in my live view I’ve got
it in for camera mode here’s my shutter speed so I can also change you by the
wheel up here as well so there’s a weird there’s a wheel here and I can move this
in an at and I can also use this as well I want to do that you can see you can
see the number will change as you can see that okay if I bring a bit closer
maybe there you go so the number changes and then you know the more the more
seconds like seconds I’ll give it the more explaining focus it is the less
I’ll give it so if I take it dad you can see my screen starts to get out of like
it becomes white because there’s too much light going through to the sensor
so you know you’ll essentially what it is that the show is a gay and you are
controlling the matter light that goes to the sensor okay so as simple as that
okay so if you like you point and let’s see a visual then
obviously you can see by this but obviously if you want to see in your
quick time view which is this one here then you can see in your quick time view
and it will show you all the dials etc to show you what the views are okay
summarize I’ve just shown you shutter speed perfect for slow shutter speed if
you are thinking about taking those pictures in low light and you want to
create drawings like drawing shall I say sorry any questions please post and I
will be happy to respond to any questions you may have thank you for
watching guys see you next time

DIY Photo Props! | Tay from Millennial Moms

DIY Photo Props! | Tay from Millennial Moms


(sweet guitar) – Hey guys, welcome
back to Millennial Moms. I’m Tay, and that means that it’s Tuesday. (smooching) Alright guys, today I’m
gonna be sharing with you another fun prop we made for
Landice’s tenth birthday. This is really easy, and it’s inexpensive, so let’s get going. (cheerful strumming) (camera click) Alright, so we’re gonna start
by cutting out some images, picking out what we want, lips, bow ties, hats, all that is good. I’m using my Cricut,
because Cricut design space has all of these already,
although you can go onto Google and find all the images you want, print them out, and then
cut them out onto paper I found these stir sticks
in the Target Dollar Spot. And I just cut all my pieces of paper out, and then glued the pieces together. For some of them, I cut
out two different sizes, so that I could layer them, so that they were more sturdy, and had a fun little pop
of color behind them. And then I just glued all the
little pieces, well actually, Landice glued all these
little pieces together. So we had ties, bow tie, lips, masks. Just make sure that you
make them nice and big. So you can also cut them
out onto regular paper and trace them onto card stock. So then I took the stir
sticks that I found, and you can just buy, like chopsticks, or any type of stick that you can find, but I like these because
they had a big base that I could use to hot glue to the back. And then a way to decorate them, I used chalk pens for some of them, and I just used the hashtag that we were gonna do for the party, #PartyLikeAPanda animal. Most of these girls
don’t have social media, so this hashtag really didn’t get used. And then the other ones, I
used glue and some glitter, because you always have to have
a little glitter at a party. You just have to, it’s
just one of the rules. So my favorite way to do glitter is just to make, like,
a crazy mess with it, dump it out onto a paper towel, and then fold it in half
and dump it right back into the glitter container so
you don’t waste any glitter. So then I went and I embellished
all of the little crowns and things like that that I did. Just made ’em really cute. And these’ll be nice, because
you can store them away, and use them for more parties later on. And they’re always good to have on hand. (casual guitar) If you guys want to see yesterday’s video, check out right there. If you guys want to see more
from me at Millennial Moms, check out right there. And if you guys want to subscribe to Millennial Moms, Millennial Moms, check out right here. Alright you guys, thanks for being a subscriber if you’re
already one already. I love you guys. Don’t forget to check out my own personal channel, Auntie Tay. Love you guys, bye. (smooches)

THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE UPGRADING YOUR CAMERA | PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS HINDI

THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE UPGRADING YOUR CAMERA | PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS HINDI


Have you ever thought that the camera that you own is probably outdated? Probably its time for a new camera I hope I had that expensive, beautiful camera but then with the budget constraint I am unable to buy that… 🙁 If you own a camera already, is it the right time to upgrade? is there a need to buy a new camera , right now? Do you feel you will improve on your work with your new camera? Lets discuss on that..! 🙂 Firstly, let me tell you I was very confused if I should make videos in English or Hindi then, I created a poll and based on the result of the poll I have planned to make videos in Hindi, but you may find me speaking in English.. here n there… Coming back to the topic, let me share with you.. until some days back…. I have been thinking about upgrading my current DSLR to something really new and expensive one.. like.. Canon 1DX M2 OR Sony A7RIII with which I could make more beautiful pictures and videos with them….!! I used to get these thoughts consistently so, i thought that I need to have very strong reasons to either BUY them OR drop my plans of upgrading….!! So, when I thought of upgrading , they were technical advantages of the new Camera…. but when I thought about it logically I felt, probably its not the time for me and then I decided NOT to… Now let me share the reasons why it was not necessary for me to upgrade and I feel these reasons are going to help you as well to decide for yourself if you indeed need an upgrade..and eventually you may cancel your plans …. Why I thought about this….. I figured out there were so many things in my own Camera that I did not know very well… the reason could be that, I have not yet completely exploited my Camera..!! and even before I exploit my camera to the fullest, i am falling for new and expensive ones… So, the thought of going for a new camera is not great… My 2nd question was have I applied all possible techniques and skills in my genre of photography and then decide that the only thing to pending is to buy a new advanced camera? there are many things actually that I can do with this camera..! 3rd important question was … its a general tendency to think about a new camera for getting good quality photos…. but is there anything SPECIFIC that I am missing out on this camera, related to my interest/ work which I see in the new one? I had a 500D canon DSLR camera I had upgraded it to 5D M3 5D M3 was so important for me because I was into wedding photography…. I desperately needed a full frame camera specially to exploit my wide angle lens. I also needed a Camera with 2 card slots obviously because I did not want to change cards during an event and miss out on any important moments.. 5D was the only camera that was having 2 card slots those days… I rented 5D for around 10 weddings I really liked it ad I thought I should buy… So, even you need to think if there are any SPECIFIC TRIGGER POINTS which is compelling you to upgrade If the answers to all the 3 questions are ‘YES’ then you can go ahead and get a new/ expensive Camera If not..! its high time that you start exploiting your current camera.. Let me tell you… when a beginner photographer looks at a picture clicked by me and asks me ..” which camera? actually the question is wrong the question is irritating and invalid if the questions would have been could you let me know the settings…. which time of the day you did this shoot? whats lens did you use to get these result? All these are important questions…! In fact DSLR body’s contribution is negligible… except for clicking the picture and saving it to your memory card..! this can be done by any DSLR…. Yes, we can differences in ISO sensitivity, colour range and dynamic range… but its very negligible…. Potato jet- is a youtube channel, this guy is a film maker… he has compared Canon 80D , a mid range DSLR with ARRI ALEXA a Hollywood film making camera… If we look for differences we don’t find much.. Of course, we see differences … but nothing that can make a difference to you creativity …. the link for the video is in description, look for yourself….. One more important information…. Photographers find it difficult to handle flash after watching a lot of youtube videos, after a lot of trial and error, after experimenting in a lot of different lighting conditions…. I learnt how to use and so will you…. you will slowly understand the relationship between the flash power and shutter speed…. but without understanding the concept , if you just go for a high end flash for a better light… I can assure that you will not have it… the result will not be good…. So… expensive flash, expensive cameras, expensive accessories won’t help you… Then… What will? Its always about techniques, knowledge, skill and experience …. you need to develop this.. if you develop a skill today or understand a technique no better investment than that…… By using your knowledge and skills, you can even make beautiful photos out of a 7 year old camera… And … keep on thing in mind… Best camera is the one … on which you have maximum expertise.. And even big budget Hollywood films have used cameras like 5D M2 and 5D M3 in many of their sequences If a 1 – 1.5Lkh camera can replace 5+ lakh body…. then we can definitely use our old, existing heap cameras to make very beautiful pictures.. Parker walbek – one of my fav youtuber he shows in his video how a simple room can look cinematic when recorded with a mid range simple camera.. this happens with experience and understanding of light….! the full video link is in the description… do have a look.. Today, I have shared enough instances/ examples, given you some reasons.. to give a second thought on buying a new camera body…. Do expensive cameras really make a difference well, we will see a difference… but very little…. Major difference is made by your knowledge, technique, skill and experience … rather than thinking I wish I had an expensive camera…. Please give a thumbs up and let me know if you have liked this video… 🙂

Landscape Photography – A beginner’s guide to woodland

Landscape Photography – A beginner’s guide to woodland


If you’re interested in woodland
photography and you’ve always struggled on how to compose your images within
the woods and the forests, this is the video for you. My name is Julian Elliott
and I am a professional landscape and travel photographer. If you want to keep
up with my exploits as a professional landscape and travel photographer make
sure you click on the subscribe button just down there The absolute first step when it comes to
woodland photography is to go to somewhere that you know and that you can
practice. Why? Because you know it. And if you’re familiar with your surroundings,
like this woodland here which is about five minutes drive from where I live in
France, then you’re going to be able to create more successful images from that
particular area and also you’ll get to know the intricacies of this particular
woodland. So for me for example I know when it rains heavily where I’m stood
floods. I’ve had images, I think it was back in April or so, whereby this
whole area was flooded I had a really nice sunny day with blue sky white
fluffy clouds and I was able to get the reflections all in this woodland plus
the reflections of all the tree stumps here. So that is the first step to
creating your successful images within woodland. Get to know one of your local
areas. The next step to think about when
creating your woodland images is the light and the quality of the light.
Woodland is great in that it works both in flat light and also sunny light and
also when you have that low mist and there is the sun breaking through the
mist in the early morning creating those really nice ethereal looking images.
Absolutely wonderful soft light in the morning. You can’t beat it. So as I said
it works great in flat light. Today we have flat light. It’s a very overcast day,
there’s no long shadows anywhere and it pretty much works as you will see, not
necessarily here, but certainly in the next location
that we’ll be working on further on into the video.So that’s the next step you
must think about is light and the quality of the light in your woodland. Once you’ve got to know your local
woodland, and you’ve thought about the quality of the light that you want in
that woodland, the next step to think about is lens choice. Obviously we have
wide-angle; 50mm; short telephoto and long telephoto. Each of those
lenses will work in a particular area of woodland. Wide-angle, for example, is great
if you’ve got some foreground interest. We don’t really have any foreground
interest in this particular woodland so the next step up is to think about is it
somewhere around 35 or 50 millimeters that we’re going to work in. Here, because I
visit it very often, I know that around 50 mil and above works. Why? Because it
helps to compress a lot of the trees together and create a very nice
composition. Telephoto it kind of works in here but it brings things maybe too
close. So here, for example, I’m always thinking it’s around 50 to 70
millimeters. So 50 millimeters how our eyes see and then 70 millimeters so it starts
to compress things just a little but not too much. But what I’m going to do is I’m
going to take a picture.The same picture, the same composition and show you why
each of them does and doesn’t work so you can see what it is that I’m talking
about here in this particular woodland. I’ve set up my camera and I’ve put on a
zoom lens which is 28 millimeters to 70 millimeters and that’s because it gives
me most of the focal lengths that I would use in this particular woodland
specifically for me 50 millimeters and 70 millimeters. At the moment it’s set at
28 and you can see it’s it’s okay is probably maybe a little bit too wide. But
what I’ve done is I put this central trunk here in the middle this is what I
really want to focus on and you can see on the third’s here there is actually a
trunk and a trunk as well and the foreground is maybe just off the bottom
of the third and going toward the middle but not quite. But it’s just too wide and
especially on a day like today there’s nothing in the sky and it’s just white
and it’s going to be blown out so that’s 28 millimeters wide angle and that for
me is why this particular scene doesn’t work at wide-angle. If I turn live view back on again and I
go into 50 millimeters you will see, if I slightly adjust my composition just a
little bit, just around here that things start to become more compressed these
trunks in the background are becoming more prominent whereas they were quite
far away because of the wide angle of the lens so they’re starting to become a
lot more compressed into the scene and it’s how we see it with our eyes as our
eyes see around 50 millimeters focal length. So you can see there on the 3rd
we’ve got these trunks here so they’re starting to come in nicely. The
foreground is dropping down just a touch we’re losing the sky so when losing the
emphasis on what’s going to be an overexposed sky. Things are starting to
look that lot nicer. Let’s go in just a little bit more so if I go to roughly
here, and what I’m doing if I just turn live you back on, I’m paying very close
attention to these corners here. So this here this branch, this trunk here is
frustrating for me so I’m zooming in just to remove it from the frame then
I’m going to push this down just a little bit and then what you’ll see is that we
have an image that’s starting to look a lot more composed and a lot more
organized and we’re starting to see the wood for the trees so if I take that
image then you’ll see the difference between this image and the wide-angle
image and how using 50 millimetres and longer in the woodland can help
emphasize those tree trunks. Bring things closer together. Compress them and help
to create a more balanced image. As I said, you can use wide-angle but I think
you’ll find a lot of the time you’re probably working 35 millimetres and up
where you’re starting to get more of an emphasis on bringing things together and
creating a more balanced image. For the composition of our images it’s
good to start somewhere like this and the reason is because it’s an orderly
wood. It’s actually a man-made wood everything’s been planted in an orderly
fashion and so you can work things out a lot quicker than if you were to go in
just to a woodland, in your local woodland that’s been there for hundreds
of years. Because everything’s planted we can start to find compositions a lot
easier and then we can take that knowledge and transport it into a normal
woodland that’s been there for hundreds of years and it’s just a tangle of branches,
trees, trunks and whatever else. So I’ll just
explain some of the compositions that you can do here in this particular type
of woodland so you can get an idea how we’re going to transport it back
into a proper woodland and that’s been there for a few hundred years or. So this
is the first type of composition that you could do in this managed woodland.
You can use the avenue here and here to create a line of interest going in and
in to go back towards here. The only slight problem with this is there isn’t
really anything back here to create any interest. There is some moss or something
up there in the tree I think it might be mistletoe back there it’s lying on that
third. Detail-wise what I am looking at, and I might do in a bit, is just here
there’s a huge mushroom which I might go and take a shot of. It looks quite
interesting. But that’s the kind of first kind of composition that you could do
here in this managed woodland. This is another example of a composition
that you could do here in this managed woodland. It’s similarish to when i was
demonstrating the focal length in that the tree trunk is in the middle and
other things start dropping in behind it. However this time the grass is more
along the top third but it’s another example of something
that you could do here in this managed woodland when you’re starting to see the
wood for the trees. Hopefully you’ve seen in this managed
woodland how I started to create compositional elements to be able to
bring some kind of order into a final image. So what I’m going to do from here
is decamp into an ancient woodland and we’re going
to see how we can manage that and bring some kind of order to the chaos of an
ancient woodland. So we’ve swapped managed woodland for chaos. Ancient woodland. Where do you look? Well if you take some of those elements of composition like
the rule of thirds or like the managed woodland where we placed the tree trunk
in the middle. If you start to look around and start positioning yourself;
the tree trunk here or here and just move so when you move here you’ll see
behind in the background that the other tree’s move. Try to position things in
such a way that you order the chaos of this ancient woodland. So I’ve found
something it’s taken me about 15 minutes or so just wandering around in here just
to have a look see what it is that I could find and I’ve started to pick
things up. I’ve never actually walked in this woodland. I’ve driven past it many
times. It’s only five minutes from my house. But I’m taking the time today just to have a look; see what’s here and see what
I can do with the chaos of this ancient woodland. As a first composition and the
first time here this is something that I’ve found just wandering around as I
said to see what it is that I could come up with. So I’ve placed this tree here not
it’s kind of on the third but not really is actually off the third itself and
then I’ve placed the foreground so it’s just up shy of the middle and then
there’s a color here and the background from all the autumn leaves. As well as
that I’ve started to try and make some sense of the background. So I’ve used a
corner up here for one of the branches that’s going off and up here as well. It
could possibly be just adjusted slightly there and the very simple reason is so
I’ve got this branch going up in this corner here and also here I’m creating
some separation which I didn’t have before. So that it’s not just a tree trunk in the corner here there’s actually some
color going here so you’ve got these bands of color and the tree trunks
themselves. Down here you have this new tree that’s growing up which is creating
interest on the third. So that’s the first composition that I’ve done here. I’ll
just take a snap and then you can see when the image pops up in a minute how
that looked when we were here in this part of the woodland. Let’s move on to
something else and to show you how to bring more order to the chaos that you
see in front of you. There’s two more elements that I want to
add into composition within your image. The first is leading lines and as you
can see that’s running through me there’s this path that’s probably just
been created by animals such as deer and boar that we get here in central France.
They’ve created a pathway through the woodland. And that is another
compositional element that you can add in. Leading lines will always take your
viewer from the edge and bring them into the image let them look around and let
them explore. The next thing that I want to talk about and it’s extremely
important in woodland is the polarizing filter. And what that does is it
removes any glare from the leaves so yesterday it was raining a lot here so
there’s a lot of water on the ground. A lot of water on the leaves in the trees.
That polarizer filter is going to cut through the glare and be able to add
in more saturation to the image. So I will just show you what it is that I’ve
set up at the moment to give you an idea of how it is that I’m looking at this
scene and what you might be able to take away from it and be able to put into
your own images. This is the image that I’ve set up. I saw this path here while I
was walking along the main path. It’s not the main path obviously as I said it
looks like it’s been made by animals as it’s indistinct but it’s distinct enough
to give us an idea of a compositional element. And as you can see I’ve started to
arrange things here so this tree here the trunk is on the bottom third then
which is going out and then up to the top. I’ve cut out a lot of the sky as
it’s distracting and I’ve just started to arrange everything else so I’ve made
sure that there’s no trunks that are intruding on the edges here of the frame
and there’s no unwanted elements there at the top. So that for me, it starts to
create some order again out of the chaos that we have here in the woodland and
also as I said there’s a polarizer on the front which is taking the glare away
from the water that’s on the leaves that was from the fallen rain
yesterday so that’s helping to saturate the image a lot more than it is. So I’ll
take it a photo with the polarizer and without the polarizer so
you can see the difference and why it is that you should actually make sure you
have that polarizer with you and that it’s not just for those blue sky days. For this last sequence on woodland
photography, I want to use a blue sky day combined with the color in the trees to
help enhance the composition because very often all we hear about is the rule
of thirds; leading lines and s-curves. All these kind of things in composition.But
we never really hear about color. So if you look at a color wheel you’ll see
that yellow and blue are near to one another on the color wheel
thus they complement one another in any composition that you might
choose to use them in. The other thing that I’m going to do is I’ve changed my
lens to a wide-angle lens. So here I’ve got a Canon 17-40 millimeter lens. So
very, very wide angle of view. And when I look up, which is the last thing
that I want to do, it’s actually going to help the trees loom in above me while
looking up at the blue sky and the golden colors of the yellow leaves up
there. All the autumn color. So let’s take a shot and then see what it is that I’m
doing with that shot. So what am i doing when I’m looking up at those trees
trying to get an image that pleases me? Well the first thing that I do is I put
my camera in aperture priority and that’s very simple. The only reason I’m
doing that is just to take a few things off my mind what I’m composing my image
handheld. And in aperture priority I’m then adding in around one stop of
exposure compensation just to open things up a bit. The 6D has enough
exposure latitude that I know it will give me what I want for around
two-thirds of a stop or a stop over the the middle point on your exposure meter.
The next thing that I’m doing is I’m enabling the back button focusing on my
camera so that when I’m looking up my thumb is doing the focusing so I press
where I want to in the image to focus the camera and then when I’ve got what I
want my index finger then clicks the shutter to get the composition that I
want. So that’s it for this tutorial on
woodland photography. Hopefully you’ve picked up a few things here and there
and see how I finely compose some of my other images although it’s done in
woodland it might give you an idea as to how to really look at what it is that
you’re doing when you’re composing your images on the back of your camera. Will
there be more tutorials? There will be more tutorials! There’s going to be a
tutorial on a 10 stop ND filter very soon. As well as a few others so
make sure you click the subscribe button down there in the bottom right hand
corner and you’ll get notification whenever it is that I upload any videos.
So thanks very much for to all of my subscribers. See you again soon!

Photography Self Assignments – Motivate Yourself to See Progress

Photography Self Assignments – Motivate Yourself to See Progress


Hello, I’m Helen Bradley. Welcome to
this video tutorial. Today I’m going to talk about photographic self-assignments. What is a self-assignment. Self-assignments are short self-assigned
photo projects that you shoot just for the sake of shooting. And typically they shouldn’t require you
to go out and buy anything special or to go anywhere special to do them. They are the sort of thing you could go and do
immediately after you’ve finished watching this video —
grab your camera and you’re ready to start. It’s a good idea to do self-assignments
regularly and when you are not under pressure to capture anything at all
worthwhile so you’d never undertake one when you
are the main photographer at a wedding for example. Self-assignments are generally quite short
so you can spend as little as a few minutes at a time on them — but of course they can consume a lot
more time if you have it available. Self-assignments technically have a
topic — you’re not just out to shoot, you’re out to shoot a something
or to practice something — you’re not aiming to shoot ‘keepers’ so
much as you are aiming to learn something. Self-assignment should take you out of
your comfort zone and help you see things or experiment
with techniques and your kit. Preparing for a self-assignment When you’re preparing for a self-
assignment, firstly you need to allocate the time to work on your self-assignment. Often you can find it by repurposing
time you already spend doing something such as walking to the bus
station — make this the time that you work on
your self-assignment. Or you could park a few blocks from your
office and walk there, walk at lunchtime or walk when you get
home at night and, as you walk, you can photograph for
your self-assignment. If you don’t get out a lot
then photograph inside your house or your backyard or spend the time waiting at an airport
or train station catching shots
for your current self-assignment. You will also need to take a camera with
you — everywhere. It doesn’t have to be your good camera
but it’s good if it is. It might seem strange to carry your
camera with you all the time but the more you do so, the less uncomfortable you will feel and
you’ll really notice it when you don’t have your camera handy.
Topics and subject matter Plan your self-assignment —
You’ll need a topic or a focus for your shooting. It should be something that challenges
you and forces you to learn something new or to look at the world a little
differently. Some topics which you might want to
pursue are: saturated colors, circles,
paint marks, streetlights, the color blue, doors,
shadows, repetition, food, street art, reflections, or alphabet which is a great one for the airport. Don’t expect to always nail the project on
day 1 — so if you’re shooting something like
circles — it’s worth going over the same territory a couple of days in a row —
notice how many more circles you see on day 2 than you did on day 1. Your assignment might also be
related to a piece of your kit — perhaps you have an unused or little
used lens in your case — unused because you really don’t know
how to use it — and because you can’t trust yourself to use
it for important situations the cycle becomes self-repeating so you
never use it. Set yourself a self-assignment to
shoot with the lens for a couple of weeks. By the end of the two weeks you’ll know a
lot more about the lens and how to use it. If you’re someone who always uses
the Auto mode on your camera now is a good time to start using Aperture
Priority or Shutter Priority mode and start learning what creative
possibilities they might offer. Determine the topic or focus of
your self-assignment and a timeframe to work in. Once you’re done with the first assignment
you’ll ready to start on the next but don’t be surprised if you continue to
shoot these self-assignment themes in other situations. Assess the results When you are working on a self-
assignment, download the images as often as you can and view the results. Assess how you’ve gone in your project. How easy was it for you to ‘see’ things
that matched your topic. Assess the technical aspect of your
shots — are they in focus, is the depth of field used appropriate for the subject matter — how would you improve the shot next
time and what will you do differently tomorrow? If you’re working on a self-assignment
to learn how to use a piece of kit, ask yourself what have you learned about
it. What worked and what did not work. Analyse the results in front of you to
determine what you’ll try that will be different tomorrow or the next day. What you’ll gain Self-assignments are creative learning
projects so approach them with a sense of wonder and enthusiasm for your topic — reward yourself when you see something
you wouldn’t have noticed if you hadn’t been doing your self-assignment. Self-assignments can help you see the
world different and they’re guaranteed to make you a better photographer. If you are a creative person who wishes
they could photograph more but have to juggle photography with
other commitments then self-assignments provide a creative
outlet that can be fit into even a few minutes of your spare time. I’m Helen Bradley. Thank you for joining
me for this video tutorial. I encourage you to subscribe to my YouTube channel and visit projectwoman.com for more
photography tips and tricks.

How To Shoot Top Down Photography For Instagram | Photography Tips for Instagram

How To Shoot Top Down Photography For Instagram | Photography Tips for Instagram


Hey everyone, my name is Jamie Whiffen,
welcome back to another video! In today’s video I’m gonna show you how to create a
top-down photo like this, that you commonly see on Instagram! So the next
step that will you need to be doing at home today as you watch this video is to
find some items that you’re gonna put on your desk I have a few here I’ve got a
couple of like notepads I’ve got a couple of books I’ve got another notepad
you know a nice red one. It’s from the YouTube Space in London I also have the
5-minute journal and then I have some stuff that’s not like paper related
which might be like my headphones I also have another lens and then I also have
my macbook so these are a couple of things that springing to mind right away
I might go look for some other items but I basically want to have a bunch of
different stuff that comes in different colors different shapes different
objects basically if obviously if you’re going for a theme I thought were going
for all camera equipment for example or if you’re going about makeup or all
about plants whatever it may be then obviously you can group things together
but for me right now I’m just thinking what is I’m gonna be doing I’m gonna
make a variety of different stuff maybe my mouse I don’t know but there’s
what I’m gonna do just find some stuff in your house that you want to have in
your top down photo organize them into categories and then maybe go through
there and make different kinds of backdrops I guess in a way different
desks that you want to have taken photos of so you haven’t sort of a variety a
piece you could do a random one as well but these are so other items that I’m
gonna be going for all right so what I’m gonna do is I’m gonna take this tripod
that you’re on right now I’m going to change it into the downward facing style
that I need for this tripod so boom this is what it looks like this is going to
be my tripod which is going to be aiming straight down as you can see here I
actually have one of the tripods that allow you to bring it up to the top and
come out and across and be able to aim down to here as well I’m gonna be
placing my camera on its base place and then we’re going to be aiming straight
down which is where I then have my light here which is lighting the scene so let
me show you a little bit more about that so the next
important part of this step a probably the most important part of this whole
entire process is the lighting you want to make sure that you have so much light
in case you want to go for something a little bit more Moody and shadowy for me
I like to go really white bright light and make everything have no shadows or
very minimal shadows and what we need is this over here which is a lighting rig
basically so what I have here is I have a diffuser which is simply just a piece
of like a number Ella you can basically use like a piece of cloth like for your
bed sheeting you can hold it up in front of a light if you have it in front of a
window like I have here this is that other light source you can see off my
hand you can diffuse this because it would
just give it that nice soft edge and take away though sort of like the hard
sharpness of the shadows now on the back here if I turn this off real quick you
can see that I’m just having this be trying on with the umbrella
I bring that along like so you can see that this here we’re just used with a
clamp this was going through here and we’re just holding on so I’ve taken that
off and basically what you’re left with is just a simple panel you know it’s
used by a Sony Factory this is a light that I have and it’s pretty great I find
this is very good dissuades for most of my videos I tend to just use one light
and try and use a reflector or something to reflect the light from the opposite
side to help fill it out I like shadow sometimes or more one side than the
other and basically this light can go different colors I don’t if you can see
that on the screen I’m gonna turn it down you might be able to see but we can
go like very warm colors you can see the lights are changing there and this just
basically just allows me to determine what kind of light but I want to have
where I want it to be very bright very dark if I want the colors you can see
here though I can make it very very different and well to be honest I just
think it’s great to have a light like that that you can really change around
when it comes to these kind of photos so for me because I’m having a white
desktop I would like to have it also be like daylight setting and so I’ll just
turn that down to say something like that and so for me that’s what I’m gonna
do in this video if you have like a wooden desktop
sometimes that’s a little bit nicer to have a bit of a also cooler temperature
cuz I feel like it just has that nice contrast between the sort of like the
darker warmer wood and then the lighter cooler color it’s totally up to you
obviously everything is gonna be different depending on what it is that
you’re also shooting with the objects but yeah let’s let’s just jump over into
this real quick you want to arrange the objects in a way
that they’re either sat on the rule of thirds or in the center of the
composition alternatively you can spread them around the outside of the frame to
get more objects in the photo I think it’s best to group items together in
categories either by subject or by color so by having darker items together like
a camera lens and some headphones I think would look really nice and
sometimes a notepad a white coffee cup white earphones and maybe a grey laptop
also working nicely together you have to experiment and switch objects in and out
to find which ones work together and then fiddle with the placement of the
objects it’s really hard to find a perfect composition as there are just so
many ways to do it also remember that sometimes you can
take a better photo through simplifying and only having one or two objects in
the scene don’t feel like you have to put everything in I recommend that you
also switch out the desk for wood marble or maybe metal these textures I think
are a little bit more interesting for your photos as they can add depth and
contrast quite nicely with the objects I found that the white desktop isn’t that
nice for this style of top-down photography as it really highlights the
shadows and looks pretty endless there isn’t much depth to the photo I hope you
enjoyed this video and got something out of it
hopefully that the biggest thing that you took away from this was the lighting
I’d say that’s probably the most key part of this is to put an umbrella in
front of your light source and do that for all of the light sources surrounding
the desk and just blast it with light and then once you’re in Lightroom fix up
all of the highlights and shadows to get something that really really pops
be sure to check out Instagram for inspiration with this type of
photography as a lot of users out there are masters of this type of thing the
more you practice the better you’re become with all that said and done I’m
trying to reach 500 subscribers, please hit the subscribe button and the
notification bell if you enjoyed this video and give the video a like! Thank
you for watching and I hope to see you all next time. Goodbye!