Picture Frames with Morso Guillotine Cutter

Picture Frames with Morso Guillotine Cutter


A surprise package arrived! Two beautiful watercolor paintings! Let’s build some frames. The IKEA “as-is” section sometimes has cabinet doors/drawer fronts that are hardwood (oak?). Removing factory edges to square up the stock. Ripping the wood to width. Cross cutting the pieces to length. Planing off the factory finish. And planing down to final thickness. Routing out recess for glass, mat board and painting. Also routed a chamfer for decoration. The Morso Guillotine Cutter! Pedal operated for cutting perfect angles. Adjustable stops to support rabbets. Making the cut. Only man power required. Taking large bites takes quite a bit of force. Easier to nibble away and sneak up to your lines. Perfect 45’s Glue up. Cutting in slots for splines for added strength. Ripping some thin strips for splines. Cutting out splines on the bandsaw. Gluing splines into frame. Flush cutting the splines. Sanding flat. Sanding surfaces down to remove glue and burn marks. Ebony stain. 3 coats of satin spray lacquer. Cutting mat board to size. Marking cutout area. This tool cuts a 45° bevel into mat board. Taping the painting to the mat board. Cutting the backer boards. Drilling holes for picture frame hardware. Acrylic sheet Mat + painting Backer board Securing in place. Adding hanger hardware. Hanging in the living room. (adjust as necessary)

Holiday Card Series 2019 – Day 24 – Snowflakes & Mail Art

Holiday Card Series 2019 – Day 24 – Snowflakes & Mail Art


(“O Christmas Tree”) – Hey, everyone. Kristina here. Welcome to Day 24 of the
Holiday Card Series for 2019. Today’s card is actually one that I made for Simon Says Stamp for their
YouTube channel and blog, using the latest card kit. This is the January 2020
Card Kit from Simon, and it has the most fun stamp set in it, where you build your own snowflakes, using different colors of
ink or embossing powder, things like that. I’m gonna show you a
little bit of both today. I’m gonna be making a circle card, and then I’m also going to
make a mail art envelope to go with it. So I hope you guys enjoy,
and let’s get into it. Hi, everyone. Kristina Werner here. Welcome to another video
for SimonSaysStamp.com. Today I’m going to be using the Snowflake Builder
six-by-eight stamp step. It is included in the January
2020 card kit from Simon. Now when I was designing this stamp set, I was thinking of the end user in mind, and I wanted to make
it as easy as possible to pair these stamps together to create perfectly
layered snowflake images. So notice that there are dashed lines connecting the different
groupings of snowflakes. So that gives you an indication on which ones need to go together. I’m starting out with the
largest snowflake image, and I’m going to stamp this in some Teal ink from Simon Says Stamp. I’m going to do some Teal ink now, and then I’ll do some embossing on the second layer of
the snowflake later. So the first I did was I inked that up and then pressed it down
onto my white cardstock. Now even though I did
ink it up pretty well, there was one side that didn’t
really transfer as much, so I stamped it again, and that’s the advantage
of using a Misti stamp tool for this because then
you can just stamp it in the exact same spot
where you did before. And that gave me a really good impression. So now I’m going to take
some Mint ink from Simon and also a blender brush. This is a blender brush from Honey Bee. And I’m going to just take this Mint ink and bring it out from the
center of the snowflake. I want it to be a really pale green ink. I don’t want it to compete too much with the Teal ink that
I’ve already stamped. Now it was looking pretty
good at this point, but I did want to
intensify the center area of that snowflake. So then I did break out that Teal ink and just added it very
lightly in the center. Now this isn’t going to compete too much with the snowflake image. I just wanted to have a little
more intensity in the center. Now I’m gonna be doing some heat embossing for my second layer of the snowflake. So I want to make sure that this ink that I’ve already worked with, that I’ve ink-blended and
stamped, is completely dry. So I’m doing a test run to see if this embossing powder
is going to stick to it. So I heat-set it with my heat tool to dry it as much as possible. I added a powder tool, and then I put some
heat-embossing powder on it, and it still was sticking a little bit. So I heat-set it again, and then when I put the
embossing powder on, it slides right off. So now I know that it’s
ready to do some stamping. So I’m going to grab the secondary image from this snowflake pairing, and I’m going to line it
up right over the top. Now I want to take note of
how the snowflakes look. On the first layer with
the larger snowflake, I had the little circular ball on the end of that snowflake segment. It’s pointed straight down. And then on this other segment, it’s this other snowflake layer, you also have one segment
pointing straight down. So when you look at the stamp set and you go to stamp the snowflakes, I want you to know that when
I put the stamp set together, I made sure that the stamps,
the snowflakes themselves, stayed in the same orientation. They’re not rotated at all whatsoever. So as long as you keep
them exactly how they are on the stamp packaging, you should be able to line
these up without any problem. So I used some Sterling embossing
powder from Brutus Monroe for the silver embossing, and then I heat-set it with my heat tool. For my greeting area, I am stamping the banner
image from the stamp set onto some Soft Navy cardstock from Simon. I’m putting some Sterling
embossing powder on that, heat-setting it. And once I have that there so
I can see the entire image, then I stamped one of the
greetings from the stamp set, and these greetings are
just curved just slightly so they perfectly fit inside this banner. I sprinkled on some
Sterling embossing powder, this is the same embossing
powder I’ve been using, and then heat-set that with my heat tool. Now I don’t have a die for this one, so I’m using my scissors to
fussy cut around this banner. It’s a fairly simple shape,
so it didn’t take long. I thought this large snowflake just lends itself to a
circle card perfectly. So I grabbed some nested
circle dies from Simon, held that in place with some washi tape, and then ran that through my Gemini Junior die-cutting machine. I also used those same dies
to prepare a circle card base. So I’m going to break out
some Soft Navy cardstock. This is the same blue cardstock
that I used for my banner. And I’ve scored that so
that it’s folded in half, and then I’m placing my circle die right over this cardstock
while it’s folded, and I’m having it hang
off the end of the fold. That’s going to preserve
the fold and not cut it out so that my card base has a
little folded area at the top. So I ran that through
my die-cutting machine. And then you can see
that when I open it up, I have a perfectly shaped circle card. For my stamped piece, I
ran my VersaMark ink pad along the edges of that circle,
and then I dipped the edges into that embossing powder once again. This is going to give sort
of a rustic silver edge to the outside of my circle piece. After I heat-set that, I put this stamped piece
on some foam adhesive and then put that directly
onto my card base. So this card is actually, I think it’s just shy of
four-and-a-quarter inches all around ’cause that’s
the size of the circle, so it will fit inside a standard envelope. So I thought it’d be kind
of fun to create an envelope that goes along with
all of these snowflakes. So now I’m going to break out
one of the white envelopes that’s included in the card kit, and I’m going to do some stamping. I’ve got four different colors
of Simon Says Stamp ink. I have Soft Navy, Blue
Jay, Teal, and Mint, and I’m going to be pairing
these up in different groupings. I’m starting with Blue Jay first, and I’m stamping directly
onto the white envelope. And it’s just hanging off the side of that envelope a little bit. And now when I go in to
stamp the second layer, I’m going to line it up just perfectly, and then I’m going to use Soft Navy ink. So this is a kind of a lighter blue with a darker blue grouping. I then grabbed the second grouping, which is the green shades,
and I started out with Mint. And this Mint ink is very, very light. So I did end up stamping
the snowflake twice. That just gave me a little
bit of a better impression, and I could see that green
color a little bit more. So after I had that stamped,
I then grabbed the Teal ink and lined up the other
little snowflake image that goes with this one. So I’m gonna ink it up with Teal ink, and then I’ll stamp that down. At this point, I was thinking, well, maybe I want to mix
up the colors a little bit, so I’ll maybe I’ll put a
blue with a green shade. So I went back to Blue Jay, and I stamped the first image
for the snowflake pairing. And then I grabbed that Teal color, or I’m sorry, Mint, I grabbed Mint, lined that up, and then stamped that as well. And like I did with the
Mint stamping before, I did end up stamping this
particular snowflake image twice so that that ink could really darken up and show the best as possible. So I continued stamping with
some more snowflake images. For these last few, I went
back to my original pairings. So this one is going to be
with the color Blue Jay, and then I’m going, for
the second snowflake, I’ll be using Soft Navy. So I want to just remind you that when you’re lining
up these snowflakes, you can kind of look at the
center of the snowflake. There are some indications that will help you get
it lined up just right. You could also do this
with an acrylic block, although I don’t know
how precise it would be. Using a stamp-positioning
tool like a Misti makes this super, super easy. So I stamped one more little
smaller snowflake there at the bottom, and now I have the basic
design of my envelope done. I added a blue postage
stamp in that top corner and then penciled on the recipient’s name. I’m using a gel pen to
write her name and address, and since this does take
a little bit of time and all I’m doing is just writing, I’m going to speed it up and turn on a little bit of
holiday music for you to enjoy. I’ll be back shortly. (festive music) So that finishes my card
and envelope set for today. You can pick up the January 2020 Card Kit at SimonSaysStamp.com. And thank you so much for watching. I’ll catch you guys in
another video very soon. Big, big thank you to Alison for allowing me to use her
address in today’s video. I love doing mail art like this. If you would like to submit
your address for consideration in a future mail art video, just know, if it’s chosen,
it’s gonna be online on public, it’s gonna be on the internet. But you can submit your address. So I’ve got a link down below. It says like, for monthly
giveaways and for mail art, go ahead and click there. I do update that form every single month, and this makes it so much that
the addresses stay current. So if you have submitted
an address in the past, you’re gonna want to do it again if you want to be
considered in the future. And also, once you’ve had
an envelope done once, I probably won’t pick your address again just ’cause I want to try a
bunch of different addresses and different names. Thank you so much for
watching today’s video. If you want to check out the stamp set that’s included in the card kit, it’s called Snowflake Builder. You can get it over at SimonSaysStamp.com. I’ll have a link down below. You can go straight there
and either get the card kit, subscribe for future card kits, or even just buy the stamp set on its own. Onscreen, I’ve got three
more videos to check out. These are all gonna be Day 24 videos from 2018, 2017, and 2016. And if you want to see
all of the Day 24 videos for the Holiday Card
Series seven years past, I’ll have those linked up
above the video description. Thanks so much for watching. I will see you guys on Friday for Day 25 of the Holiday Card Series. It’s our very last official
holiday card for this year. I do hope you guys are as excited as I am.

Food Stylist vs. Ramen Bowl | How to Style DIY Ramen for Photo | Well Done

Food Stylist vs. Ramen Bowl | How to Style DIY Ramen for Photo | Well Done


– Yes, I went to culinary school. I also could have bought a Mercedes-Benz, but instead I learned to cut scallions. Never compare your education
to buying a car, edumacation. I’m a food stylist. Consider me a makeup artist for food. I take boring, everyday average food and make it look amazing. I’m gonna show you guys how I style my version of a traditional bowl of ramen. (upbeat music) We all grew up eating the packaged ramen with the little packet of
powdered chicken flavor, which probably led to the reason why true, traditional ramen
is so popular these days, because we had this little sentimental place in our heart for it, and then we grew up and realized it was actually, like, pretty legit. So we’re gonna start prepping our veggies for our ramen bowl. First thing we’re gonna do is just prep this really cute baby bok choys. So we’re just actually gonna
cut these in half lengthwise. These are beautiful, they
call ’em Fresno chilies, or a red jalapeno, and we’re just gonna do thin slices on that. The next thing I wanna
work on are my carrots. I just really love the addition of a matchstick carrot
or a julienne carrot. It’s gonna add length and texture, but it’s also a really
beautiful, precise cut. I’m gonna trim the tops off, and then cut them in about two to two and a half inch pieces, which is basically in half. Then I’m gonna take a mandolin. We’re slicing the carrot into a plank without slicing my fingerprint off, and then we’re going
to julienne the carrot, and that just basically means at an angle I’m slicing it lengthwise
into thin strips. I’m just going to take a
paper towel or a cloth, dampen it, and just
rest it over the carrots to keep them looking fresh. The next thing I’m gonna do is work with my shiitake mushrooms. I’m actually, the only thing I’m gonna do with these guys right
now is take the stem off. Yeah, so most of the time
it just pops right off, just like that, and you’re left with this really nice little mushroom cap. Okay, so I think the last veggie we have to prep is the green
onions, or the scallions. Something that you might be familiar with, something you possibly
have seen before is, it’s like a Japanese cut on a scallion, which is a very, very strong bias or diagonal slice onto a scallion. I feel like every time
I’ve seen a bowl of ramen with scallions on it,
it’s just like a pile or a mountain of scallions, so I definitely want to
make sure I have enough. Sometime on a green onion you’ll find this really cute little sprig that hasn’t quite matured as much as the other, larger pieces. Actually, that is a really fun
addition sometimes to have. I think that most herbs, like the petite, the better. You don’t want them to overwhelm whatever it is that you’re making. So we have prepped our veggies. We’re gonna get set up to blanch veggies and cook our noodles for our ramen bowls. So, the first thing we’re gonna do is blanch the bok choy. If you watched my episode
on making a holiday dinner, I did talk a lot about
blanching green vegetables. It keeps them crispy,
but makes them tender. It retains their color
without overcooking. It’s just a really great
thing, you should try it. Okay, so we’re putting
our bok choy in the pot, and then putting them
directly into the ice bath. So, a bright green vegetable
really lets you know that it’s fresh, it’s well-cooked, it’s gonna be tender, but
it’s still gonna be crispy. It’s almost like seeing
the color allows you to feel the texture in your mouth. Now I’m gonna take my bok choy and lay it out on a paper towel, just kinda let it dry. Laying it out like this also helps me see which pieces I probably want to use, like which ones are the prettiest. Like the inside of it
has a really nice shape and it looks full, whereas
this one, it’s not as full. It doesn’t have the same look to it. So this is the winner, and this is dinner. And now we’re basically
gonna do the same thing with the shiitake mushrooms. The mushrooms look a little cooked but not really overcooked. So now I’m just gonna put
them in my little bowl and set them to the side. They are still hot. They will continue cooking
’cause I am not blanching them, because I want them to
continue to cook down just a little bit, get
a little bit softer. The one thing that I really
want to be able to see in my ramen bowl when I make it, are this beautiful inside of the mushroom where the scales are. That is really iconic
to a shiitake mushroom, and so that’s what I wanna see. Scales, gills? I retract what I’ve said about scales, the gills inside of the
mushroom is what I want to see. Whatever. Now we’re gonna cook our ramen noodles. So, I just have a couple versions of noodles to show you. These ramen noodles are
a little bit more like the ones that you just
get at the grocery store in a three for a dollar kinda thing. And then I also have these, which are the product
that I’m gonna use today. I’ve worked with this product before, and I think they’re very beautiful and they’re very elegant. It’s also a fresh noodle product. Okay, so I’m going to
par-cook the noodles, pretty much like you would
regular pasta noodles. I would like them to be a little al dente, so they are not too soft. They’re a little easier
to work with in this case. They come in these really
nice little bunches. A bunch, would you call that a bunch? Bundle, bundle, that’s the word. It’s a bundle! (laughs) Just give that a little
stir so they break apart. All right, so the noodles
cooked for about a minute. They’re very starchy. Oh, like I literally got every single noodle out at one time. That’s awesome. I’m gonna turn my water off,
’cause I’m done with that, and I’m gonna give the
noodles a quick rinse in cold water, so that they stop cooking, and then we’ll get ready
to finish our ramen bowls. So now we have everything we
need to build our ramen bowls. So the first thing’s first,
is adding our noodles. So we’re going to wrap
and twist our noodles. We’re layering them, and
wrapping them, and twirling them, and supporting them
with love and kindness. The ramen noodles are creating a base for everything else that’s going to be put on the top of the bowl. I’m wetting my noodles. These ramen noodles, in particular,
are very, very, starchy, so they get more sticky
the drier they get, and in order to create
this really lovely twirled nest of noodle, they have to be damp. But it’s really lovely. It’s a tight little nest. It’s very appealing to the eye. It doesn’t seem chaotic. I mean, you can see the
shape is so well-defined, the noodles just kinda like
flow throughout the bowl, different movements catch
your eye in different ways. So even once I do have toppings on them, you’re still gonna be
able to see those noodles and the way they move through the broth, and it’s just gonna be really lovely. Now I’m gonna work with just
slicing this pork belly. This is a precooked pork
belly from Trader Joe’s. What we did for this, for our ramen bowl, is I marinated the pork
belly in a soy sauce mixture, and then we just seared it off so it has a really nice browning on it. So now we’re just gonna get some really nice slices out of it. And I’m doing thin slices. They’re probably 1/4 of an inch thick. So now I’m gonna start
adding our toppings. There are gonna be like natural divots where the noodles are placed in the bowl, so I’m just kinda using that as a place to put my bok choy. So these mushrooms are
actually a little large. I don’t want them to take up
too much space in the bowl, so I’m gonna slice them in half. You can still see those beautiful
gills inside the mushroom. A nice little pile of carrots. So I also have store-bought ramen broth, which is a thing now, thank goodness, and I am going with a
matsutake ramen broth, which is a mushroom broth. Since we’re playing with our
shiitake mushrooms today, I thought it would be really nice, and this just is a really
clear, beautiful broth. So now we’re gonna add our pork. One last really wonderful
traditional thing to put in a bowl of ramen
is a soft-boiled egg. And so what we have
done is soft-boiled eggs for six to seven minutes. Once the eggs are finished cooking, then you go immediately into an ice bath. Once the eggs are cool, you peel them, and then we marinated our eggs in soy sauce, and sugar, and
a couple other ingredients. They have a little spot on them from where they float in
the liquid, of course, because eggs float, but
you’re not gonna see that. So when we cut into
it, this’ll be the side of the egg that’s in the
broth, in the soup bowl, so you actually won’t be able to see it. All right, guys, we have
done as much as we can here in the kitchen, so
now we are going to take our beautiful photo-ready
prop bowls of ramen over to our photo set, do a
couple finishing garnishes, and show you what a beautiful
setup we have going on. You guys, this ramen set is so beautiful. All of the colors, both
from the props and the food play off of each other so well, and it’s bright, and fresh,
and it just looks great. I have our photographer back here who has done an amazing job of capturing this beautiful set, this
ramen dinner for two. I’m gonna do just a couple
of additional food changes now that I have the food on set. I’m increasing the level of
the broth in the ramen bowls so that it really looks
like it’s full and brothy like ramen is supposed to be. Even tucking a couple of the food items into the broth, so that
it really looks like they’re truly incorporated. Now I’m gonna add my scallions. I’m gonna do just a little
pile kinda right in the middle. A couple of our sliced red chilies, and then a couple of sesame seeds on each bowl for garnish, and I have both white
and black sesame seeds. And so now I’ll do a
little chili oil finish on each bowl. Guys, this ramen set
turned out so beautiful. It’s delicious, it smells great, and everything we did today
is completely edible and real. Why don’t you let us know
what you thought about this in the comments below. While you’re at it, make sure to subscribe to “Well Done” on YouTube,
and follow me on Instagram. Share with me everything
that you’re doing, if you pick up any tips
from watching the show, and please let me know what you want to see me food style next. (gentle instrumental music)

20 Amazing Science Experiments and Optical Illusions! Compilation 2017

20 Amazing Science Experiments and Optical Illusions! Compilation 2017


Warnung: Die folgenden Experimente mit Feuer können sehr gefährlich sein, mache diese nur mit Aufsicht eines Erwachsenen! 0.5L Händedesinfektionsmittel (v.l.n.r.): Coca-Cola, Pool Chlor Kerze (v.l.n.r): Alkohol, Glasbehälter Bohre ein 1cm großes Loch (v.l.n.r): Essig, Backpulver und Wasser 440g Backpulver hinzufügen 0,5L Essig hinzufügen (80%) Warte eine Stunde Nach einer Stunde Ein 1 cm breites loch bohren 440 gramm Backpulver Lass es für eine Stunde so stehen nach einer Stunde 1 dL Wasser Zucker Sand Zippo Feuerzeugbenzin 10 gramm Backpulver zu 40 Gramm Zucker Backpulver Feuerzeug 2x Schneller 4x Schneller nach 20 Minuten Seife Wasserstoffperoxid Lebensmittelfarbe Kaliumjod 1 EsslöffelKaliumjod in 0.25 ml Wasser geben 75 ml Wasserstoffperoxid einfüllen Vase Teekerze Spiritus Wasser Seife Papier poolchlor bremsflüssigkeit Glasflasche Alufolie Ballon Rohrreiniger 2x Schneller Bitte sei vorsichtig, denn das Wasserstoffgas, das durch das Mischen von Aluminiumfolie mit einer Säure aus dem Abflussreiniger erhalten wird, ist leicht entflammbar Abwaschseife Feuerzeuggas Wasser Fahrradpumpe Plastikflasche Reifenventil Alkohol Sifte Reißverschlusssäckchen Wasser