Pixel 4 vs iPhone 11 Pro Camera Comparison! // Insane Results!

Pixel 4 vs iPhone 11 Pro Camera Comparison! // Insane Results!


All right welcome to the camera comparison,
this is the iPhone 11 Pro versus the Pixel 4 both these cameras right now are shooting
in 1080p, unfortunately the Pixel 4 can’t shoot in 4K for the front facing camera only
the iPhone can so that’s one of the drawbacks of the Pixel 4. If you wanted 4k crispiness for the front
camera, then you got to go with the iPhone. Now you guys let me know how this audio sounds
right now. Based on what I’m seeing both phones are doing
a pretty good job in terms of stabilization you guys let me know which one looks better
which one sounds better and which one is more stabilized. So again same thing with the front facing
camera. I kept the Pixel 4 at Full HD, iPhone 11 Pro
at 4K. You guys let me know if you see a quality
improvement! Based on what I’m seeing it looks like it’s
a lot sharper just because we are playing with a higher resolution. Backgrounds on both phones seem to be pretty
even in terms of exposure, maybe slightly better on the iPhone but it’s hard to tell
since I’m just looking at both of these screens. And last up is the 1080p stabilization test
we’re gonna do a little bit of running. Chasing my daughter since she’s on a bike,
you guys let me know which one looks the smoothest probably gonna have an asthma attack! You gotta do it for tubes! Now this is slow motion and the iPhone can
do up to 240 frames per second at 1080p whereas the Pixel 4 is limited to 120 frames per second
at 1080p both phones do a great job. I like the color quality on both of these
devices. I think they both look great in fact the colors
look better on slow motion with the Pixel 4 than it does with the regular video. Now if you want the best slow motion out of
these two you’re gonna have to go with the iPhone just because it can slow it down a
lot more since it uses 240 frames per second. So this is 1080p video on both phones using
the rear camera, stabilization is pretty good on both devices but my god the difference
in colors are night and day. The Pixel 4 just looks flat, washed out and
the detail comparison just looks better on the iPhone 11 Pro. Now we’re going again this time in 4k with
both phones. The iPhone can do 60 frames per second, but
the pixel can’t. I left them both on 30 fps. Out of the results it’s a lot clearer now
on the Pixel 4 but it just doesn’t look nearly as good as the iPhone. Same idea 4k video but at nighttime, both
phones are doing a pretty good job, stabilization is great. The Pixel 4 is brighter but it’s introducing
a lot more noise into the video to compensate. It’s also making the sky look a little bit
too blue considering it’s not that blue at this time of night. I will say though the iPhone 11 pro is doing
a better job of picking up the details. If you look at the sign that says Petman you
can read it a lot more clearly on the iPhone than you can on the Pixel 4. Now this is your first daytime shot I wanted
to test dynamic range and I have to say the Pixel 4 definitely looks better. The iPhone looks more vibrant and contrasty
but the Pixel 4 does a better job with white balance and exposing the faces on the subjects. Both photos are kind of blown out in the background
but overall I’m gonna give the slight advantage to the Pixel 4. Now this is another photo we’re indoors, we’re
taking a picture of the background being blown out because of the sun I wanted to see how
these cameras would handle it. This is a beautiful cockerel and I have to
say they both did a good job, but again, I’m gonna give the slight advantage to the Pixel
4. I think it did a slightly better job with
the exposure! You can tell with the reflection on the table
and with the trees in the background. This shows you the difference in terms of
color science again The Pixel 4 leaning towards those vibrant yellows and contrasty colors
where the iPhone just tends to look a lot more natural. I am finding the iPhone to look a little bit
sharper not by much but it is noticeable in this picture. So this is the same photo but this time we’re
using the 2x telephoto lens and I wanted to see the shift and color science between both
of these lenses. I am finding it to be more consistent with
the iPhone like when you switch from the main lens to the telephoto lens the colors look
very equal, whereas on the Pixel, it’s still pushing towards the yellows, but it’s not
as vibrant and contrasty as it is with the main sensor. So here’s another photo, color science is
different again. Pixel 4 contrasty, more yellows, more vibrant,
looks better straight out of the camera. iPhone 11 Pro a lot more natural so this is
very subjective but there is definitely more dynamic range with the Pixel 4, like look
at the side of the shed. It’s not crushing the shadows as much you
can actually see the leaves beside the shed compared to the iPhone where it’s just too
dark to make out those details. So again, same photo, but this time we’re
using the 2x telephoto lens zoomed all the way in same color science. Pixel 4 doing a much better job If you look
at the brick of the house behind the shed you can make out the individual bricks whereas
on the iPhone the highlights have been completely blown out. It’s funny though because the exposure on
both of these photos are pretty similar but you’re just getting a lot more dynamic range
with the Pixel 4. So the same concept as before if you look
beside the shed on the left hand side, you can actually make out the bush whereas on
the iPhone 11 Pro you can’t just because the shadows are a bit too dark. This is the exact same photo but this time
with the ultra wide lens on the iPhone 11 Pro. Just looks very different. Gives you a different feel, different type
of emotions. Something that the Pixel 4 can’t do because
they decided to omit an ultra wide lens. In this photo, we’re facing the sun and this
is a good way to test out dynamic range and I’m finding it to be pretty good on both of
these phones, but again the slight edge for the Pixel 4 just look at the door. You can make out those details much better
even though it does look like there’s a bit more noise. The iPhone looks a lot more natural, like
this looks like a typical photo at this time of day, but the Pixel 4 kind of looks cool
kind of looks like a nice vintage shot. Now it’s time to test portrait mode using
the rear cameras the Pixel 4 definitely blurs the background a lot more than the iPhone
but you can change the blur amount using the app on the iPhone. So you can fine-tune it to whatever blur you
like in the background. I do like the colors they’re better on the
iPhone this time. I think they look a lot more vibrant they’re
a little bit more punchy and find them to be a bit too flat on the Pixel 4, but when
you zoom in to check out which one did a better job around the edges of the subject. On The Pixel 4 look at the hair, on the bottom
of the hair for both of these phones. It didn’t do a good job but when you look
between the hair and the jacket the iPhone completely missed the background and left
it in the foreground whereas the Pixel 4 completely blurred it out. Same with her pom-pom on the top of her hat. The edges on the iPhone 11 Pro are just way
too soft. The Pixel 4 just did a much better job of
picking out the individual tussles on her pom-pom to make it look more realistic. So this is a nighttime shot we’re using a
subject which happens to be myself, the pixel has night sight, the iPhone 11 Pro has its
own night photography baked into the camera app. They both did a pretty good job. The iPhone 11 Pro did a better job with the
color science like that’s actually how my jeans looked rather than the Pixel 4 they’re
a little bit too blue but the Pixel 4 did a much better job with the rollout. Like if you look at my shirt, look at my face,
the highlights are just not rolling off properly on the iPhone 11 Pro, they’re kind of blown
out a little bit too much. Whereas on the Pixel 4, it did a much better
job of exposing them. This is a furnace room. It is completely dark and the results kind
of surprised me 11 Pro did a better job. It’s cleaner, there’s less noise you can see
stuff in the background. I find the Pixel to do a good job but it’s
pushing more towards the blues. I just find there to be a bit too much noise. So this nighttime shot is kind of tough because
they both look really equal except for the color science. It just depends on the mood you’re in. Do you want the cooler tones like you have
on the iPhone, that looks a lot more representative at that time of night or do you want more
of a warmer tone that makes the picture a little bit more inviting I will say this though
the Pixel 4 did a slightly better job if you look at the open sign and the other two lights
beside it. It’s slightly better exposed with the 11 Pro
but the differences are so minor. Flipping the camera to the front facing shooter
Pixel 4 just has the advantage because it has night sight whereas the 11 Pro does not
have any sort of night mode for the front facing camera. As you can see here, it’s just brighter. It looks better and you can see everything
in the background. In this nighttime photo, I want to test out
exposure both of these phones are doing a pretty good job. Pixel is definitely a little bit brighter,
so if you look at the building on the left-hand side, you’re gonna see a bit more noise, but
at least you can make out the details of the balconies on that building. Color science, same idea Pixel 4 is boosting
the contrast in the grass You are getting a bit too much blue around the lights whereas
the iPhone looks a bit more realistic. Flipping it back to the front facing shooter
and this is a tough one. I think they both do a really good job. I think the Pixel 4 did a better job with
highlight exposure but the iPhone just looks a little bit more vibrant. This is a tough one. I think this one is purely subjective. And last up front facing camera again portrait
mode, both did a great job. This time the iPhone is a little bit more
punchier. They both look good. I think I look a little bit older with the
Pixel for as it tends to be a bit more aggressive but again the Pixel 4 is doing a better job
with blurring the background like if you look at the sides of my head. It’s getting the hair better compared to the
iPhone 11 Pro. This was a very interesting camera comparison
because the difference between both phones for regular stills, we’re very small. Yes, the Pixel 4 has more dynamic range and
mostly takes better pictures, but the gap is so small. It’s not like previous years where the Pixel
was just completely destroying the competition. Nighttime photography, these both are pretty
much tied unless you’re talking about front facing camera and the pixel does a better
job just because it has night sight on it. Video iPhone just destroys the Pixel in terms
of video quality except for the front-facing cam pretty even but overall the video is better
on the iPhone. Now, I still prefer the iPhone overall just
because it has the ultra wide lens, it has more features to play with giving you more
options to use as tools when you’re using the phone as a camera. The Pixel 4 is great, but I think they missed
out big this year by not including the third lens and the extra features that a lot of
people want. Anyways that wraps up this camera comparison. Let me know your favorite in the comments
below, like the video if you liked it, subscribe if you haven’t already and I’ll see you guys
in the next video!

How Art Inspired the Google Pixel 4 Camera | Inside Story

How Art Inspired the Google Pixel 4 Camera | Inside Story


Marc: Computational photography has been defined
and redefined many times. When I first made up the phrase for a course
that I was teaching at Stanford what I meant was somehow combining a bunch of images together
in the computer to make one, better image. Marc: The reason that we started combining
multiple images to make one image is to extend the dynamic range. But there are certain things about color and
certain things about tone mapping meaning darks & lights that we can learn from art. Marc: I’ve always been a fan of Caravaggio. This is his ‘Supper at Emmaus.’ Shadows are dark, there’s a lot of depth
and a lot of contrast, and that has been sort of the signature look of HDR plus. Marc: Averaging multiple images together cleans
up the shadows, makes them not noisy, and that allows us then to boost the shadows,
so you can see both the shadows and the highlights at the same time. That’s high dynamic range photography. Marc: We look at a lot of different art. So for example, we’ve been looking at a
lot of Titian’s paintings. This is Titian’s painting of the ‘Danae
Receiving the Golden Coins.’ It’s a great example of lighter shadows. Marc: We’ve moved a little bit toward that
this year. Not crushing the shadows quite as much. Baratunde: Crushing the shadows is a great
name for a song. Marc: Is that really a song? Baratunde: It’s a great name for a song… Marc: Oh it’s a great name for a song, crushing
the shadows. Baratunde: I’m offering this to you. Marc: So you know, this year, we’re extending
Night Sight. Baratunde: Ok… Marc: To Astrophotography. Baratunde: Of all the types of photos to apply
this computation resource to, why’d you choose Astrophotography? Marc: I just think of all the things I would
like to take pictures of that I have not been able to take pictures of with a cell phone
and the stars at night has been that sort of holy grail for me. Marc: All right, and. So let’s see what that looks like.

Google Pixel 2 Camera Test / Epic Road Trip

Google Pixel 2 Camera Test / Epic Road Trip


Hey there, I’m Nat
and I make a YouTube series that goes behind the
scenes at Google. I just released a video about how
the Pixel 2 camera was created and learning about that made
me want to do my own camera testing. I asked my friend Lo to be
my partner on a mission to take as many photos and videos
as we could on a weekend road trip. This video was filmed on the Pixel 2
with no colour editing. I hope you enjoy. – Bye Google.
– Bye Googs. We have your phones with us. – Alright so got a real fun day…
– Yeah! – Cow’sies.
– Who you calling a cow? – You are… e
– Whoa, you’re gonna go right underneath us. – Oh hi!
– Keep your eyes on the road. Oh geez, I’ll just wave.

Nest Hub Max hands-on: Google’s first smart display with a camera

Nest Hub Max hands-on: Google’s first smart display with a camera


(upbeat music) – This is the Google Nest Hub Max. It is a smart home display that
also uses Google Assistant, shows your photos. Actually, if you’re familiar
with the old Google Home Hub, it’s the same thing, just
with a bigger ten inch screen and a camera for doing video calls. The Google Nest Hub Max
has a ten inch display, and it’s an HD display which
means it’s probably not ultra high resolution, but it’s HD. More importantly though,
is that it has this magical color temperature matching
thing that they did with the original Google Home Hub. So, photos look like actual photos, instead of just a TV screen
sitting on your counter. (soft relaxation music) So you look at the front of the device, you’ll see there’s a
couple of microphones. It only needs two. And then there’s the
color temperature sensor which does the magical
color temperature thing. And then of course, there is the camera. If you’re wondering, there is
a physical switch on the back. – [Device] The mic and camera are off. – Which disconnects the camera
and the microphone physically even though you don’t see a
little shutter on the front. It’s a six point five megapixel camera, but you shouldn’t care
about the megapixel count The important thing is that
it’s there for duo video chats. It has a 127 degree field of
view, which is super wide, so it’ll pick up the whole room and even though this thing is angled up, it should pick up little
children down near the counter. It does another neat trick where it will follow
you if you want it to, so it’ll try and keep faces in frame and zoom in on them just a little bit, so it looks like a nicer video chat. All of that’s kinda table
stakes for a smart speaker. We’ve seen all of that stuff before, even ones that have a display. What’s new here? I mean they’ve got a couple
of front-firing tweeters and a ‘woofer, but I wanna
go back to that camera, because that is why this
is a Google Nest product, not just another Google product, ’cause it does a bunch
of Nest-like things. One, it can become a best security camera. So you can, from your
phone, open up the Nest app and turn this thing into
a Nest security camera. So, that’s cool. But the Google Nests sort
of tie up the rebranding the whole division into Google Nest now. Means that this does a few
things that Google thinks is really forward looking
towards what ambient computing in your home is gonna look like. And one of those things is this camera can recognize your face. You set it up in the phone and then it stores your facial
recognition data locally, on the device, so it doesn’t
have to go up to the cloud. And then, when you walk
in the room it sees you, shows a little icon showing your head, and then it’s able to give
you your personal information instead of just general,
random Google information. Oh, there’s one more thing
the camera lets you do. It lets you play and pause
videos with a gesture. You just kinda hold your
hand up and it’ll pause. And then you can hold your hand up again and it will start playing again. (soft relaxing music) So the Google Nest Hub Max costs $229 and it’s coming out in July. And if you’re curious, the little guy is also getting a rename. It’s gonna become the Google Nest Hub. But the rest of the Google Hub products aren’t getting renamed. This is a new division, new tie-up inside the company, and so they’re gonna release more products under the new branding as time goes on. Anyway, we are excited
to try this thing out. It comes in both charcoal and white, even though the bezel is always white because it looks like a photo frame, and honestly, photos look great on it. Hey, thank you so much for watching. Would you buy a Google Nest Hub Max? Let me know in the comments. And also, Google I/O is happening and we have a ton of
Google I/O content coming, so keep it locked to The Verge.

Google Pixel Back Camera Lens Replacement – CLEAR  Back Camera Mod!

Google Pixel Back Camera Lens Replacement – CLEAR Back Camera Mod!


Since Google started pumping out new color
combinations with their Pixel 2 this week, I figured I’d take matters into my own hands
with the original Pixel and assess some of our own color options by swapping out the
back glass. This also works if your camera lens is broken
of course, and you just want to replace it like a normal person. It’s surprisingly not that difficult of a
project. Let’s get started. [Intro] Now, breaking your glass camera lens on purpose
would be pretty dumb. Only a crazy person would abuse a perfectly
good phone. But I am going to stimulate this repair on
a phone that does have glass that’s already broken, and I’ll let you know what to watch
out for as I go along. Heat is going to be our best friend during
this repair. It does soften the adhesive under the glass
– which there’s actually not very much of, surprisingly enough. But it is pretty strong stuff. Apple honestly should have attached the back
glass of their iPhone 8 with this same method, and saved everyone some major time and money. But I’ll save that conversation for a different
video. Once I got that tiny gap open by using the
sharpness of my razor blade underneath the glass, I was able to slide my slightly thicker
metal pry tools around the edge and then lift up a pretty major chunk of the glass. There are a few different important ribbon
cables that you have to watch out for under that glass slab; one being the fingerprint
scanner ribbon, which I’ll show you in a second. And the other is this little antenna thing
on the right side of the back. Avoid these fragile ribbon cables as you’re
peeling off the glass layers because they can tear. The adhesive is only along the sides of the
back lens, so the glass is pretty easy to lift up and off of the phone. Also remember that glass is the same hardness
as glass and can scratch itself, so try and keep the glass dust and larger shards of glass
out from underneath the screen. Getting closer to that fingerprint scanner. I’ll very carefully push it down with my finger
and then lift up the rest of the glass up and away from the back of the phone, leaving
the home button in place. If you pull too hard, it will tear and stop
working. Applying the replacement glass is pretty straightforward. I’ll link these replacements down in the video
description. The Pixel and Pixel XL are both different
sizes so make sure you buy the right one for your model of phone. I’ll pull off the little but of adhesive protection. I forgot to move over the flash diffuser from
my previous glass, so maybe you’ll want to transfer that before pulling off the adhesive
protection. Also, needless to say, make sure the inside
of the lens is clean, because you don’t want no dust specks in your pictures. I’ll just set the glass down in place inside
the phone, making sure it lines up with all sides of the rectangle cut out before the
adhesive can grip too hard. Once it’s in place, it’s hard to remove. This is the black and blue version which looks
pretty solid, and I like it. But I also want to try out the white glass. The picture taking capability it still working
great. The exterior glass of any cellphone is there
for protection and not for focusing, so as long as the lens is visibly clean and clear,
it won’t be messing with the functionality of the camera. If the camera itself is not working or focusing
correctly, it’s a hardware issue inside of the phone. And now it’s time for the white lens. I think this one’s going to end up looking
pretty cool. The back glass was already adhered pretty
tightly to the phone body, so I’ll apply some more heat and lift it off with my metal pry
tool. And then again, prematurely pull off the adhesive
protection on the white lens before adding the flash diffuser. I’ll orient the diffuser like shape of an
upright 8 to line it up with the dual LEDs right below it. I also cleaned out all the extra black adhesive
out from underneath the glass so that the new lens will sit super level and flush with
the phone body. Getting that fingerprint scanner lined up
in the center of the white lens here, and I think this color combination looks pretty
awesome. The white and really blue combo is legit. I’m probably going to keep this visually appealing
set up. But I do want to try one more lens and it’s
pretty clear what it’s going to be. The coloring on all these Bonafide Hardware
glass lenses can be scraped off. It wasn’t totally perfect, but it still looks
pretty clean. What color do you think looks best…the black,
white, blue, or this new clear version? I’ll still need to add some of my transparent
double sided adhesive to hold it down, but it’s ready to go. I’ll link all these replacement lenses in
the video description right below this video. Come hang out with me on Instagram and Twitter
to see some of the projects that don’t make it all the way to my YouTube channel. And thanks for watching. I’ll see you around.

Pixel 4 XL vs iPhone XS Max: Camera máy nào hơn?

Pixel 4 XL vs iPhone XS Max: Camera máy nào hơn?


Hello everyone, welcome back to ReLab! I have here Google Pixel 4 XL and iPhone XS Max And today I will bring you a overall comparison and a in-depth camera review to know the camera quality of this Pixel 4 XL. Let’s go. English subtitle: Blog Đào Lê Minh Before we begin, let me remind you again, this Pixel 4 XL is only a demo version, not the commercial version. So this is just a quick comparison to know the performance of this version. Firstly, the design. This Pixel 4 XL, as I said,
it has a back surface with matte material. And at the top of the phone, we have 3 — One of these is not a camera, it is a laser sensor to focus faster. With the iPhone XS Max, you’re probably familiar with its dual camera. On the front, we have a dual camera on the Pixel 4 XL, a telephoto camera and a main camera – 12.2 MP, f/1.73 This is just a Demo version, so I’m really not sure about those specification when the official version is launch. Next is the camera interface. Both phones have a simple interface. The swipe feeling on both are very smooth. And on this Pixel 4 XL, we have night mode, which helps you take better shots at night. On the XS Max, it’s not available, it’s only on the iPhone 11 Pro. Besides, we can turn on other modes, like “Motion”, similar to Live Photo on the iPhone XS Max. Its feature is quite complete. About video recording, this Pixel 4 XL could record in 4K on the rear camera, while with the front camera is only Full HD, and can be saved in H264 and H265 format. Quite good. It’s about the interface, now we come to the image quality of both. In the first picture, you can see that iPhone XS Max has something like an overlay, the image color on the Pixel 4 XL is fresher than iPhone XS Max, but it has a bit warm tinge.
About dynamic range, both are very high. But in the second photo, iPhone XS Max seems to push the red tone up, make it look more warm tinge than the Pixel 4 XL. But overall, both offer good color reproduction. Among flagship phones and in daytime condition, there’s nothing to blame for these two phones. But in low-light conditions, this Pixel 4 XL has brighter images, brighter colors and more realism. The details is slightly better than the iPhone XS Max, but because it pushes the light up, it has a little noise, but overall the Pixel 4 XL is better. Next, bokeh photo. iPhone XS Max has a lighter skin tone, more face handling, this will be very good for those who want “colorful” images. However, about blur the background, it’s just fair. the best is Pixel 4 XL. Once again, this is just Demo version, but its bokeh image is amazing, it could handle every single hair, and the edges are quite smooth, not as blurred as XS Max. About the front camera, Pixel 4 XL is pretty good but it is not stable yet so I won’t comment about it. Video recording on both are good, but audio recording of the iPhone is smaller. The details of both are the same, but I like the iPhone’s color better, it’s fresher. About video stabilization, however, the Pixel 4 XL is better than the iPhone XS Max. Overall, even if it’s in Demo version, it’s really okay. When placed next to the iPhone XS Max, it’s even better. It is well worth waiting for. You are listening to audio from Pixel 4 XL and iPhone XS Max in quite noisy conditions. I will pan the camera quickly to see if there are image tearing. And that’s all about camera quality on the Pixel 4 XL and iPhone XS Max. Which one would you choose? #Pixel or #iPhone? Please leave your comment below! Don’t forget to like, subscribe for more videos like this on ReLab! And that’s the end of this video. Bye for now! English subtitle:Blog Đào Lê Minh

Pixel 3A vs. OnePlus 7 Pro: let’s talk cameras

Pixel 3A vs. OnePlus 7 Pro: let’s talk cameras


– OnePlus has always been known to give you a high spec experience without those high price tags
of other flagship phones. But they always kind of fell
short with their cameras. Pixel, on the other hand,
started off expensive, but they always maintained
amazing photo quality. But now they’re trickling that technology down to less expensive phones, while OnePlus is getting
a little more expensive and souping up their camera technology. So who does it better? The souped-up OnePlus 7 Pro, or the pared down Pixel 3A? Let’s put them to the test. Before we get into quality, you can’t take a photo
without opening the app. So who does it faster? To test this, I made a little rig. And I asked my friend Carrie to join me. We’re gonna be closing
the camera out, entirely, then opening the app and taking a photo as quickly as it allows us to. All right Carrie, let’s do this. One, go. – [Together] Oooooh. – [Becca] Two, one, go. – Okay, there’s something going on. – [Becca] Two, one, go. – Oooh! – Damn, okay. – [Becca] Go. – Fun. – That’s it. OnePlus wins, thank you Carrie. – Good game.
– Good game. And now we’re gonna see
whose shutter reacts faster when the app is already open. (clicks) Oh! One point Pixel. Two point Pixel. Three point Pixel. Okay, well that was fun. So the Pixel takes the photos faster when the app is already open, but from starting at nothing, the OnePlus will the open the app and take the photo just a bit faster. Now, I wanna look at the apps themselves just their interface,
because although they look really the same much
like all photo apps do, they act in different ways that makes one just a little bit better for me. The Pixel: my biggest qualm with this app is that every time you close it, whether you close out of it entirely or you just go to check a notification, it’s gonna default back to the rear camera every time you reopen it. So, say I am taking a selfie. And I have it on the front facing camera. If I close the app, and
say, check a notification, then open the app again,
it’s gonna go back to that rear camera, which is
more annoying than you think, especially when it comes to
shooting entirely in night mode. When it’s night time and I wanna just be shooting in night mode, I have to navigate to the more tab, and then hit night sight every single time I wanna take a photo at night. It seems small but it’s really annoying. So OnePlus’s app looks pretty standard and what I really appreciate is that, say, I’m taking a selfie,
every time I open the app, it’s gonna reopen the selfie camera. Now the only exception to this is that when you are in photo
mode using the rear camera, it’s always gonna default
back to the standard lens as opposed to the wide
angle or the telephoto every time you reopen the app. I also appreciate that you can swipe up on any of the options on the bottom column and it’ll bring you to
all of your photo modes. But what about hardware? What are we working with
just base level here? Well, on the OnePlus, you have
three cameras on the back: an eight megapixel F2.4 telephoto lens, a 16 megapixel F2.2 wide angle lens, and a standard 48 megapixel lens that scales down to 12 megapixels when you’re not using pro mode. And that’s an F1.6. And then on the front, or located atop, you have that really cool
pop-up 16 megapixel F2 camera. And then on the Pixel 3A, you have a 12.2 megapixel F1.8 lens on the back, and an eight megapixel F2
selfie camera on the front. Whoo, it’s a hell of a lot of numbers. Anyway, for the last three days, I have taken these phones
everywhere with me, and every photo I would
have taken with one camera, I’ve taken with two, and
yes, it is just as much of a pain in the ass as
you think it would be. I still have friends that print photos, so for this review, I wanna
go and I wanna print photos and then also compare them on my laptop. So we have a little bit of both worlds. I mean, when we’re only
taking photos with our phones, inevitably they will get printed or put on calendars, or if
you’re lucky, even a mug. So let’s go to Walgreens. All right, let’s do it. Took a really long time. Quick focus and audio test, here we go. Number one, how do you hear me? Is the sound better over here, or does it sound better over here? Now I’m back over here,
is it better over here? Or is it better over here, you tell me? Now I’m gonna go away. You guys focus? Still focus? One more? How’s the focus? All right. Oh yeah. Here we go. Alix, how did you beat me back here? Holy cow. Wow, okay, let’s first talk about selfies. These are some things you might print, say it’s you and a friend. So, right off the bat, I can notice the color difference
between the two photos. On this side is OnePlus
and this side is Pixel. OnePlus is definitely warmer, whereas Pixel as we know, is much cooler and there’s more blue and
green tones to the photos. I found that the OnePlus fills in shadows, brightens the photo,
and smooths absolutely everything more than the Pixel, even with the beauty mode turned off. Anyways, both cameras have
front-facing portrait mode, and although I like the
Pixel’s selfie camera for general use, I find
that selfie portraits put way too much blur on the background. All right, enough fooling around. Let’s talk about the main camera. Oh gosh, this portrait mode. The OnePlus takes smoothing
a whole nother level. I mean, I absolutely have no idea what happened to Alex’s
freckles, they’re even gone. Now, sure, the cutout is passable. OnePlus is cutting the contrast in detail level way too much. I took photos of Maria and printed them. The Pixel’s just way over
blurring the background. I do enjoy that it keeps details, especially in her forehead and her shirt, but in general, I just
think that this blur is too much, and I think that on OnePlus, it’s a little more natural. Where the OnePlus really surpasses the Pixel is its versatility. I mean, it simply has more
cameras than the Pixel. And it’s something that
I ended up using a lot. I mean, in New York City,
everything is so cramped and profound, so having a wide angle lens where you could be close to something yet show all of it, is really valuable. The wide angle lens is amazing. The details and the edges of the frame, they fall apart and they warp just a bit, but I didn’t find it to be a deal breaker and it’s better than no wide angle at all. The telephoto is really sharp too. There’s certainly way more detail than digital zooming on a Pixel. Those extra lenses, they allow OnePlus to really shine when shooting landscapes. And without faces to smooth,
the OnePlus does really well at keeping the whites white, as opposed to the blue-leaning Pixel. But when it comes to shooting at night, there’s no denying that
Pixel’s night sight is a lot better than OnePlus’s nightscape. The Pixel does a really nice job of keeping the details in,
say, the bricks in this photo while smoothing the pixels in the sky, which overall produces a higher, brighter, more balanced photo. It does take a few seconds
longer to take the photo, but for the clarity it
provides, I think it’s worth it. If we look at the main camera alone, putting aside the wide angle and the telephoto lenses on the OnePlus, I think the Pixel has the OnePlus beat in almost any lighting condition. It just comes down to the detail level. But if we’re talking about life in the grand scheme of
things, the versatility that the OnePlus provides is unmatched. I mean, having all those
lenses in your pocket at any time is really helpful. So as it is with all cameras, it’s gonna come down
to what you value more. What I will say, though, is last night, I bought way too many plants at Home Depot and I wanted to send a picture to my mom. I had both phones on me, and I chose the Pixel to take the picture. Okay, so, the age-old question. Sound off: Pixel or OnePlus? What are you guys shooting with? Do you care about lenses? Do you care about image quality? What are you doing with your photos? Does anyone still print pictures? That’s all I have to say. We’ll see you next time.

Samsung Galaxy S8 Camera vs LG G6 vs Google Pixel!

Samsung Galaxy S8 Camera vs LG G6 vs Google Pixel!


Hey guys, It’s Krystal! And I think it’s about time we put the two
newest android phones to the test and see how their cameras do against each other! I got the Samsung Galaxy S8+ and the LG G6
and I’m also going to throw in the Google Pixel because, even though it’s 6 months
old, there’s still some people out there who think it has the best camera. With the S8 and Pixel – they both have 12
megapixel sensors. Aperture of 1.7 and 2.0 and on the LG G6 we
go up to a 13 megapixel sensor, aperture of 1.8. And a cool thing about this one is we have
a second lens on there – a wide angled one that also has 13 megapixels just like it’s
main camera. But it has an aperture of 2.4. So anyway, let’s go take some pictures! So I took a lot of pictures here in New York
City on a somewhat cloudy day but pictures on all 3 phones came out really nice and colorful. I think right off the bat, you’ll notice
one of these phone’s sticks out with a different photo style. And that’s the LG G6 – it has a bit more
of faded look than the others – the S8 and Pixel look pretty similar – both with deep
blacks and with nice HDR modes exposing the sky. The G6’s faded might make it seem less interesting
than the others – less eye catching I guess but this does make for a more realistic picture
I think. With the Pixel’s camera there’s tons of
software processing going on. It doesn’t just have an HDR mode it has
an HDR PLUS mode which does a lot more than you’d think. If we zoom in you can see that the Pixel’s
image has a bit of a warmer tone than the others. It also looks like it some artificial sharpening
going on but still has a lot of detail if you look at my jacket. The S8 almost looks a little soft. And I don’t know if you’ve noticed by
now but the LG G6’s photos look a little more zoomed in. The lens definitely is a bit more tight. But that really doesn’t matter because you
can easily switch over to the wide angle lens. And you cant really do it justice in portrait
mode… I find it to be much more awesome shooting
in landscape, allowing you to take photos you would never be able to take with the S8
and Pixel. Now now the LG G6 tends to usually lean a
little towards the cooler side than the S8 and Pixel – you can really see this when looking
at the sky. And even the small leaf buds on the trees
look much brighter and greener than the others. Whether that’s a good or bad thing is up
to you. I really do like it though. It does look like there’s a lot of sharpening
going on kinda tricking you into thinking you can see each individual leaf. Oh and course, let’s check out that wide
angle lens with the LG G6. Yeah it looks cool but kinda unnecessary here… But there are going to be times where it could
be necessary like here. Sometimes you can’t get far away enough
to get everything you want in the shot. But you can just switch the wide angle lens. And this year the G6’s wide angle lens has
the same amount of megapixels as the standard lens but I’ve found since you end up getting
more of the bright sky in the shot when doing this, your subjects come out a little darker. I mean the HDR mode on the LG G6 does work
very well but in extreme situations like this, it’s definitely not up to par with the Galaxy
S8. So the sky is pretty much totally washed out
with the G6. The Pixel does show what’s going on with
those clouds better though. That HDR+ mode really does work WONDERS but
the pixel also does usually take overall darker photos in extreme situations like this so
even though the sky looks good, the flowers might be too dark for some people. It’s hard to say which is better in really
any of these outdoor shots… so I’m curious to know what you guys think so make sure you
leave a comment below telling me which phone is doing the best so far! I guess what I get from these outdoor tests
are the LG G6 has the brightest photos at the expense of making the colors of the sky
disappear sometimes, while the Pixel has darker photos but that allows that sky to punch on
through! The G6 usually has a tad more natural image
while the others darker areas are crushed a little more. And the Pixel is by far the warmest of the
bunch, shifting all those colors which I think looks great but some might hate it haha. Now when it comes to selfies, The Galaxy S8
and the Google Pixel have 8 megapixel sensors while the LG G6 is stuck at only 5 megapixels. So in order to compensate for that, once again
we have that artificial sharpening going on with the G6, kinda tricking you into thinking
you get more detail. And it works alright I think. Overall, the same characteristics we saw with
the rear camera we can see here. The LG G6 is the brightest of the photos with
the Google Pixel being the darkest – although you can see the sky sometimes which I also
love haha. The Pixel also shifts all those colors to
a warmer temperature and that HDR+ mode makes my face seem a little… more artificial looking…. And overall definitely creates an unflattering
look sometimes. But sometimes it looks pretty decent. The Pixel does however capture the best detail
I think. Now, no we don’t get a second selfie lens
on the LG G6. There is only one….. But what’s kind of crazy is by default,
your selfies on the G6 are actually cropped in. It’s not using the entire sensor. There’s a button that you can push within
the camera interface that allows you to zoom out in a sense, using the entire sensor! Once again, the LG G6 is being tricky little
rascal, trying to trick you into thinking you two selfie cameras. I really do love this because not only can
you fit more friends in the shot but you can just get more of the background for context
as to where you are. Ok now let’s get into lowlight shots – with
Selfies…unfortunately…. the LG G6 kind of gets spanked. It’s very noisy and hard to get a non blurry
shot. Although of course you can switch to that
full wider shot. The Galaxy S8 and Pixel do a really good job
though – although I do think I like the Pixel a bit more – it seems a little sharper and
clearer especially if you look around my eyelashes and eyebrows. Going back to rear facing cameras and shooting
some low light images – first thing you probably notice is look how well the pixel is doing! It’s nice and bright – has some beautiful
colors and isn’t very grainy. Once agains thats thanks to the crazy processing
power of HDR+ mode. The LG G6 has some ok color to it, although
miles behind the Pixel but there is a lot of grainyness going on here! It is pretty sharp though….but so it the
Galaxy S8 and it does this without having pretty much any noisy grainyness. Still though, the S8’s colors just aren’t
as vibrant as the Pixel’s but the S8 still does look fantastic. I think I’m going to have to give it to
the pixel here. Oh, and yes you can still use the G6’s wide
angle lens in low light but… for some reason it looks a lot worse. Here’s a more simple low light shot and
it’s a little more closely matched now. The G6 has that more faded and natural look…
where the S8 and Pixel almost look identical until you realize the Pixel for once actually
shifts its colors to a cooler side. And when we zoom in, the Pixel actually comes
in last in terms of detail and sharpness – probably because there is no optical image stabilization
with the Pixel and the LG G6 captures the most! The common theme with low light is the LG
G6 is going to have that faded look – although has some nice detail. The S8 takes great low light pictures with
decent color, no noise and some good amounts of detail. But the Pixel is crazy colorful which I think
makes it my favorite low light shooter, even if it’s a little soft. You do have to be careful though with those
lens flares and little halo effects though when shooting in low light with the pixel. So now let’s talk about video recording. All 3 phones can shoot in 4k and that’s
what you’re seeing here. They all look really good… the LG G6 I think
has some more saturated colors…. And also has that sharpening processing going
on. It’s hard to say which is the best but if
I had to pick my favorite, I’d go with the Galaxy S8. It’s pretty natural looking here, I feel
as though the G6 with it’s saturated colors and sharpening effect is a little too much
sometimes and the Pixel has pretty dark image and crushes the blacks. But really, I’d be happy with any of these
phones for video. It’s when testing the optical image stabilization
in each camera, we have some more obvious differences. The Pixel is by far the smoothest but what’s
crazy is that… it HAS no optical image stabilization! It’s all software haha. But it can make it look a little unnatural
and janky at times. The S8 doesn’t seem to be doing the best
job… it’s pretty jittery… and the G6 is a little bouncy but it’s not too bad. Ok so after looking at all these pictures
and videos, it’s hard to say which is better because not only do they each kind of have
their own style but the LG G6 has a big feature that the others don’t. So I’m really curious to hear what you guys
think is the best overall camera. In outdoors it’s really hard to say – but
in low light I’d have to go with the Pixel, with selfies, the S8 and with Video maybe
the S8 too. But be sure to comment below and share your
thoughts. And if you’re wondering how the Galaxy S8’s
camera ranks up against the iPhone 7 Plus, and even a chance to win an S8 check out that
video right here – thanks for watching guys! I’ll see you later!