Photography, Camera & Lighting Tips : Compare Digital Cameras

Photography, Camera & Lighting Tips : Compare Digital Cameras


My name is Anthony Maddaloni and I’m going
to talk about how to compare digital cameras. One of the main factors in comparing or looking
at a digital camera is how many megapixels is this digital camera compared to another
digital camera. Now I have a pretty, I have an interesting take on the megapixel situation
with cameras. Its really what you want to do with your camera. Megapixels, I mean a
lot of megapixels, most cameras right now that are on the market that are let’s say
mid-level are between 8 maybe all the way up to 16. But I don’t know, I mean I always
think what would someone who’s really just into photography need with 16 or 24 megapixels?
That’s a lot. That’s almost enough to make a poster, a wall sized poster. Its sort of
overkill to me. So when I’m looking at cameras for some of my students, I like to look at
how easy a camera is to use. How does the camera feel in your hand? That’s one thing
that you want to compare with digital cameras. Does this camera just feel heavier? Maybe
heavier is good sometimes, it feels like the processor in the camera is really working
as compared to other cameras where it feels almost like a toy, but maybe you like that,
maybe its a lighter camera. You want to look at the screen on the back. Some of the newer
video cameras, excuse me, some of the newer digital cameras have a nice big screen on
the back. I like that personally. Some of them have what’s called live view where you
can look constantly through the camera and take a still image. Some people really like
that. I don’t, I find it distracting but some of colleagues love it. And in some instances
I can see how it is really handy. So these are all these things you want to look at.
Can I use my older lenses with my SLR camera? My film camera on my digital camera? Some
of the newer models of Canon and Nikon, you can and I think that’s pretty cool. You’re
going to save some money there. That’s an interesting, a pretty interesting factor for
me when I’m buying a digital camera. Its kind of, it is, its very time consuming when you’re
looking at all this stuff, its somewhat confusing. So those are some of the tips that I can give
to people on how to compare digital cameras.

10 Inappropriate Images In Disney Films

10 Inappropriate Images In Disney Films


Disney films have always been rich territory
for conspiracy theorists. Ranging in legitimacy from baseless accusations to full-on proof,
fans and critics love to discuss their new findings with every new release. Talk of subliminal
messaging continues to sweep the internet, ruffling the feathers of anxious parents everywhere.
Some are right in your face, others need some freeze framing to find… You might have seen
our other video entitled 10 Inappropriate Scenes In Disney Films where we covered a
similar topic, but if you haven’t, stick around until the end for a link to it! Here
is more of Screen Rant’s Dirty Disney: 10 Inappropriate Images in Disney Films. The Rescuers While on assignment in New York City, Bernard
and Bianca scour the city for clues. The two travel by albatross as they soar through the
maze of NYC high-rise buildings. However, some more astute viewers noticed something
a little extra in the background. In one of the apartment windows, a topless woman faces
the audience. When played at normal speed, it’s almost impossible to see. But if you
slow it down, she’s clearly visible. Disney issued a recall of the home videos in 1999,
but by that time, most of the tapes were probably worn out in that spot anyway. The Hunchback of Notre Dame After being locked in the bell tower by Frollo
his whole life, Quasimodo has a very personal stake in his demise. Life isn’t all bad
for Quasimodo, though. His friend Esméralda is a smart, beautiful gypsy who doesn’t
take crap from anyone. And she proves herself to be a good friend, too. One of her scenes
made some parents take notice though. While performing a dance in the flames, some argue
that her body is unnecessarily top-heavy. While others contend that her dress becomes
a little too invisible, and leaves nothing to the imagination. The Lion King The tale of Simba’s life from cub to king
is sure to tug on viewers heart-strings. But there’s one noteworthy scene that makes
some people do a double-take. As Simba lays down on a cliff’s edge, he stirs up a cloud
of dust that dissipates in the air. Where most saw dust drifting into the night sky,
some hyper-vigilant parents claim that Disney’s animators had a more sinister motive. If you
look closely, you can almost make out a naughty word hovering in the sky. When they say love
is written in the stars, we don’t think this is what they meant. This was at the center
of a controversy in the 90’s and has never been confirmed by Disney, other people say
it says SFX as in Special Effects… we’ll let you decide if it’s real or not! Tarzan First impressions are important, and frankly,
the titular character from Tarzan makes a bad one. Raised under the watchful eye of
a gorilla named Kala, he has some interesting social quirks that come out when in the company
of other humans. When he and Jane meet for the first time, he crosses the line in more
ways than one. Tarzan awkwardly fondles her foot, peeks up her skirt, and buries his face
in Jane’s chest. What’s worse, she’s clearly uncomfortable. His intentions may
be pure, but the whole exchange is kind of creepy. The Little Mermaid Given the meticulous nature of animation,
it’s pretty amazing that some of these other scenes made it through dozens of rounds of
editing. But this image from the 1989 Disney classic was found in the film’s cover art.
Just like an optical illusion, some people see it right away, whereas others need a little
more time to figure out what’s… UP with Triton’s castle. Apparently, the artist
completed the picture at 4 in the morning, and didn’t even notice the resemblance until
a friend mentioned the controversy months later. Toy Story A benefit of using toys for characters is
that storytellers and animators can push the envelope a little farther, and probably get
away with it too. In fact, there’s a whole character built on a mature play on words.
The Hooker is a mash-up of sexy lady legs, and a hook mechanism hanging off a long arm.
Toy Story 2 has it’s share of innuendo, and shows Buzz Lightyear’s wings springing
to attention after Jesse, the new girl in town, executes an impressive feat of acrobatics. Cinderella Cinderella wouldn’t have gotten her happy
ending if it wasn’t for her backup: a fairy godmother, some birds, and a few mice were
her keys to salvation. Occasionally, the mice have to do some lousy tasks in the name of
friendship, including threading beads onto Gus’ tail. But as soon as one fan paused
the image at just the right moment, one of the funniest, most adult images ever to appear
in a Disney movie was captured forever. A Goofy Movie Toy Story isn’t the only franchise incorporating
visual puns into it’s repertoire, A Goofy Movie gets in on the fun as well. At one point
during the fishing trip, the fellas catch Bigfoot. Luckily for them, his rage fades
and he quickly becomes distracted by some knick-knacks in a box. He emerges from the
rubble with underwear covering his head, only part of his face visible. He holds open a
gap in the briefs and peers out, while adults are chuckling about the literal one-eyed monster
being depicted on screen. Bambi While exploring the snowy woods one day, Bambi
and Thumper take to the ice. Swirling and skating, the rabbit is clearly having a better
time than Bambi, who can barely stay upright. Like any good friend would, little Thumper
helps get his friend back on his feet. More than once, we see him move around behind Bambi
and start by lifting his back end off the ice, his legs following after. The positioning
is a little unsavory in certain frames. If you watch with a skeptical eye, we’re confident
you’ll understand what we mean. We get that it’s not obvious to animate such an action,
but we have to ask ourselves “why is Bambi in THAT position and not another?!” That’s
why you should never pause a Disney movie… Cars 2 Champion race car Lightning McQueen is on
a hot streak and headed to the World Grand Prix with his partner in crime, Mater. Accidentally
embroiled in an undercover plot, Mater meets some real nasty old guys. Referred to as “lemons”
the old, broken-down cars get together for a party, and the lemon-themed decor has conspiracy
theorists drawing some pretty graphic parallels – since a “lemon party” is also the term for
a… slippery fetish… Do yourself a favor and DON’T Google that! So, what do you think of our list? Did we
miss any inappropriate images from Disney movies? Tell us about them in the comments
below, and don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube channel for more videos like this
one, including our first instalment of Dirty Disney by clicking on the link at the top
right! Thanks!

Buying a Kid’s Camera : How to Find the Best Digital Camera for Kids

Buying a Kid’s Camera : How to Find the Best Digital Camera for Kids


Hi, I’m Frank Anderson. I’d like to talk to
you about how to buy the best digital camera for your kids. Of course, the first thing
is, it’s got to be trendy. And it’s got to be the latest design. Kids want the coolest
thing. And specially, when it’s brightly colored, is probably the best option. You should look
on TV. Try to ask the child, what they’re really interested in. It will probably be
the latest model. You should think of something which is compact, fit easily into your pocket.
You should also consider, what software is bundled with the camera. You might be able,
for example to have fun backgrounds. You might be able to attach interesting surrounds to
it. And of course, you should always be able to upgrade the camera. So start with a cheap
camera. And then you can always upgrade, later. Durability is also a big feature for kids.
So go on-line, check reviews and choose a camera which is going to stand up, to some
hard use. At the beginning of course, it’s probably best to choose a very simple point
and shoot camera. However, later on, you can always upgrade to a camera which has facilities
such as an optical or digital zoom. Which will have anti red eye facility. And perhaps
is got a built in macro attachment on it. If you really have the money, you might even
be able to afford image stabilization. Lastly, don’t worry too much about mega pixels. Try
to find a camera that’s easier to use. The easier it is to use, the better your child
will like it. And remember lastly, don’t buy a camera that you like. Because they will
probably hate it.

The Truth Behind Instagram Pictures

The Truth Behind Instagram Pictures


(bell rings) (slow music) (camera clicks) – I’m just gonna take a nap first. (dramatic music) (bell rings) (dance music) – Woo hoo. Get a pic. Uh, you know what, this
really isn’t my aesthetic can I borrow your sunglasses? Okay, there. (camera clicks) Yes, perfect photo. – I’m done. (bell rings) (dramatic vocal music) (slow music) (bell rings) – Okay, okay, move the pillow. Move the pillow. Good.
Alright, don’t smile. Big eyes. Open your eyes,
but give me the eyes. Chin up. Okay, not that much up. Bring it down. Good. Okay, hair. Need more hair. Alright, I think we got it. – Okay. Oh, you know what, let’s
just take like 20 more, just 20 more. (bell rings) – Oh my God, shut up. Eww, these trash cans stink. That’ll look good on Instagram. (bell rings) (breathy music) – Oh shoot, I forgot to
post something today. – We’re gonna be late for dinner. – We’ll just take a
quick selfie. It’s fine. Actually, you take it. Okay, look like we’re really happy. (bell rings) (dance music) – This looks terrible. This isn’t gonna work. (silly music) (horn and bell music)

How to Use a Olympus XA 35mm Pocket Film Camera


Hi, I’m Jon and this is Prime Studios photography. In this video I’m going to show you how to use the Olympus XA 35mm film camera. This is easily my all-time favorite camera. It’s combination of small size, useful features, whisper quiet shutter, and sharp lens make it a wonderful camera to have with you all the time in lots of different situations To get your own Olympus XA, as well as the batteries and film to go with it, you can follow the links in the description down below. If you like this video Feel free to hit that “Like” button and subscribe to my channel for more film photography videos. The Olympus XA uses two v76 PX batteries, more commonly known as LR44s. The battery compartment can be opened using a quarter and the batteries need to be placed positive side out. You can check the health of the batteries by flipping the lever on the bottom of the camera to the “Check” position and listening for a tone and looking for a small red LED on the front to light up. To load the film you can open the back of the camera by lifting up on the film rewind knob. Make sure to check the light seals along the edge to ensure no light will get in and expose the film. If the seals are damaged you should be able to take the camera to most camera shops for repair. Insert the film into the left side of the camera and push down on the rewind knob to hold the film canister in place. Pull the film tab to the other side and insert the film tab all the way through one of the slots in the right take-up spool. You want to make sure that the sprocket holes are also lined up with the sprocket here on the bottom. Close the back of the camera and make sure it locks in place. Gently turn the rewind knob clockwise until you feel just a little bit of tension. Slide the camera open and set the ISO using the small switch at the front of the camera. If you look carefully you can actually see the light sensor moving right above the lens. Wind the film forward by using the wheel on the back upper right of the camera. You can verify the film is moving forward by making sure the rewind knob is turning counterclockwise. Activate the shutter button by pushing down softly and continue to wind the film forward and push the shutter until the counter, reads one. Keep in mind that the shutter release on this camera is very sensitive by design, which makes it very easy to take a photo whether you intended to or not. Making sure to close the cover when not in use will help prevent accidentally taking a photo. To take a photo, make sure the camera is opened and that the film has been wound forward as it also primes the shutter. The Olympus XA is an aperture priority camera. This means that you choose the aperture and the camera chooses the shutter speed based on how much light is hitting the light sensor. The aperture can be set with the aperture lever on the front of the camera. Here you can see the aperture getting bigger and smaller as I adjust the f-stop. Note that the aperture is actually made up of two blades, each with two sides which can result in a subtle square shaped bokeh. You can also see a shaped piece of metal in front of the light sensor moving back and forth. As you adjust the aperture you can see the shutter speed that the camera is going to use on the left side of the viewfinder. The XA has a maximum shutter speed of one 1/500th of a second and in all of my testing a minimum shutter speed of approximately 5 seconds. Going above one 1/500th of a second will push the needle into the overexposed area. You can force the shutter into a bulb mode by moving the lever on the bottom of the camera into the “Check” position before you push the shutter button. This will cause the shutter to stay open for as long as you like until you move the lever back to its original position. The annoying part is that the loud tone will be on during the entire exposure. Also, keep in mind the camera is not specifically designed to do this and it may cause your battery to down very quickly. The Olympus XA uses a manual rangefinder style focusing system. You can see both the window for the viewfinder and for the rangefinder on the front of the camera. This presents you with a small yellow square in the middle of the viewfinder Which you can place over your subject and line up the split images to achieve proper focus. The focusing lever also has some knurling just above it’s main handle in case you need to manipulate the focus while on a tripod. The camera also has a distance measurement in feet just above the lens. You’ll notice that the 8-foot mark is colored orange, along with the f/5.6 F-stop, as these settings are believed to be a good balance for general shooting without having to focus for every shot. The Olympus XA also includes a few other features like backlight compensation and a self timer. Both of which can be activated on the bottom of the camera by moving this lever. The backlight compensation feature tells the light meter to overexpose the photo by 1.5 stops of light in order to compensate for a dark subject in the foreground with a bright background. The self timer feature turns on a 12 second timer that activates when you push the shutter button. While it counts down it makes an audible beeping sound and flashes the red LED light on the front of the camera. Take note that it does not change the pitch or frequency of the beeping to indicate that it’s about to take a photo. Another nice feature of the camera is that it can be operated entirely with one hand. This combined with its extremely quiet shutter, and ability to fit into most pockets, makes it an excellent camera for stealthy candid shots or street photography. The XA is compatible with several attachable flashes with the most common being the A11. The flash can be attached easily to the side of the camera simply by screwing it on. The A11 flash takes a single AA battery and works well as a fill flash up to a maximum of about 18 feet at full power. You can turn on the flash by moving the aperture lever all the way to the top and firmly pushing it towards the blue flash symbol. It’s designed to give a little more resistance when moving it to this position. This will cause the flash to start charging, which is indicated by a light popping up and turning orange when fully charged. Leaving the aperture lever in the flash position sets the camera to a default of f/4 and 1/30th of a second. The flash itself can be adjusted for either 100 ISO, or 400 ISO film, or put to it’s full power by using a small switch to the left of the flash tube. Through some testing with my light meter, I’ve discovered that the output of the flash stays the same regardless of what aperture or ISO I set on the camera. The only thing that changes the actual output power of the flash is adjusting the lever on the flash itself. With 400 being the least powerful, then 100, then “Full” power being the strongest. Changing just the ISO switch on the camera, and not changing the ISO of the film itself, will change the shutter speed but have no effect on how bright the flash appears in the exposure. Even at higher shutter speeds the flash will still sync as the XA has a two-bladed leaf shutter. Taking the camera off its default flash mode, by changing the aperture, will both change the shutter speed as well as how bright the flash appears in the exposure. You can figure out which aperture will give you a proper exposure by setting the flash to the “full” setting and focusing on your subject to determine their distance. Then you can calculate the correct aperture to use with the formula “f-stop=flash guide number / subject distance. The guide numbers for the A11 flash are 33 at 100 ISO and 66 at 400 ISO. So for example, if we are using a 400 ISO film, and our subject is 8 feet away, then we’ll be using an f-stop of f/8. If our subject is 2.8 feet away, then we would use an f-stop of f/22. You can turn the flash off simply by pushing down on the charging light. You will know you have reached the end of your roll of film when you can no longer advance it. Make sure you do not try to wind the film by force once you feel resistance, as this might cause it to rip. To rewind the film, first close the camera cover and push the rewind or release button on the bottom of the camera. Lift up the rewind lever and begin to rewind the camera back into it’s canister. Once you feel the film physically come loose from the take-up spool and go entirely back into the film canister, you can lift up the rewind knob, and open the back of the camera, and remove the film. Thank you so much for watching and I hope this video has helped you. Please “Like” this video and subscribe to my channel for more film photography videos. If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below. Thanks!

Half the Picture ft. Ava DuVernay, Lena Dunham & More | STARZ Documentaries

Half the Picture ft. Ava DuVernay, Lena Dunham & More | STARZ Documentaries


Action for camera!You know,
for the past 17 yearsthe number of women
directing has actually declined.Researchers found
that directorsare overwhelmingly male.I mean, what is going on? You just see more male
counterparts getting that shot. They pretend like they like
women and want women to directbut they’re not really
that supportive.The industry is so much
a patriarchythat it thrives on not giving
anyone else that chance. We need the needle
to move because this is a
civil rights issue.There’s so much telling women
that their stories don’t matter.It’s really powerful when
someone says no to that. Our job to disrupt,
change the story,we are gonna continue
with our movie.

Photography, Camera & Lighting Tips : Using Digital Cameras Efficiently

Photography, Camera & Lighting Tips : Using Digital Cameras Efficiently


My name is Anthony Maddaloni and I’m going
to talk about how to use digital cameras efficiently. Now when digital cameras first came out, a
lot of my students bought them and they were an excellent teaching tool on how to show
people really how to take pictures with automatic results. You didn’t have to bring your film
to the lab, you didn’t have to spend time in a darkroom and wait and see what the results
were. And in a way, it was really awesome. But this is what start happening was that
a lot of my students because that they had the ability to shoot so much on their cards,
literally shot so much they would come to the lab, the digital lab and they would potentially
maybe 300 or 400 images on their card. Now what they found out pretty quickly was that
they had to edit 300 to 400 images and they didn’t really like that so much sitting at
a computer going through that many images was extremely time consuming. So one thing
that I try to tell people about efficiency with digital cameras is when you shoot, shoot
wherever you are and then if you have a second, go back and edit out the ones you don’t like
quickly. So this way when you get back home or you get to the lab where you drop your
card off, they’re not looking at 500 images essentially of very much the same thing. So
that’s how I would use a digital camera efficiently.