Amateur Photography Tips : How to Make a Double Exposure

Amateur Photography Tips : How to Make a Double Exposure


Hi everybody, I’m Franc Anderson, and I’d
like to tell you how to make a double exposure on a camera that uses film. A double exposure
is where two photographs are put onto the same frame of film. First of all, the first
photograph is made as normal, then the the shutter is worn down without advancing the
film and a second exposure is made, putting the second picture superimposed upon the first.
This requires a lot of experimentation, trial and error, but as a guide think very carefully
about the pictures before you begin and try to imagine the final result. So that for example,
if you want to put a cat into a glass you photograph the glass and then you photograph
the cat. The trick is to reposition the cat so it looks like it was in the glass. This
is not so easy with a live animal. It’s a lot easier with still life subjects. But it’s
fun to try, and it really is worthwhile when you get a good result. With a film camera,
normally after you take a photograph and you wind on this action cocks the shutter and
also advances the film inside. When you want to make a double exposure you want to cock
the shutter, but you don’t want to move the film so that the second picture is put on
top of the first. I can show you how to do this very simply. Let’s open the camera up.
There is no film in this camera, so let’s open the camera up. Normally, the film is
stretched across the back of the camera, and the film is driven by these sprockets here,
so that when I cock the shutter the sprockets advance the film. I can stop the film advance
happening by simply holding in the film rewind button. This disconnects the sprockets from
the wind on, and so now I watch when I cock the shutter this sprocket doesn’t move and
the film stays still. So, now I when I press the shutter again the second picture is made
on top of the first. It’s really that simple. All you have to do is make the first picture,
hold the button at the bottom, and cock the shutter. The film hasn’t moved, and when I
make the second picture it will be on top of the first, easy. All manual cameras have
a button on the bottom for rewind. All you have to do is remember to hold it in. Of course,
this is made a lot simpler if the cameras are on a tripod. Then the frame doesn’t move,
and you know exactly where the original picture was taken. This doesn’t apply to digital cameras,
because with digital cameras the same superimposition of two frames can be done in software, and
there’s no need to have a facility on a digital camera to be able to do this. It doesn’t use
film.

5 EPIC Shots for Real Estate Drone Videos

5 EPIC Shots for Real Estate Drone Videos


(upbeat electronic music) – Hey, guys, what’s going on? This is Seth from the REtipster blog. In this video, I want to talk to you about 5 EPIC drone
shots that can do a great job of making just
about any property look amazing. When you’re shooting a video
or pictures of a property with a drone, it doesn’t take a genius to just take the drone,
fly back a little ways, point it at the property and shoot. I mean, anybody can do that, there’s nothing special about that, but I have discovered
as I’ve been playing with my drone for the past several months, that there are a few shots that look good on pretty much ANY property,
and it has a lot to do with being able to fly the
drone in a certain pattern, and usually moving it very slowly, and tilting the camera
in certain directions. If you shoot these shots just right, they can do an amazing job at making you look like you’re some kind of Hollywood movie producer, because they look so smooth and really show the property
in its best possible light. So in this video, I’m going to
show you five of the shots that I’ve kind of nailed
down as being standard requirements for every property. As I think you’re going to
see, they look pretty great, and it doesn’t take a professional drone pilot to do this. With just a little bit of practice, you can most likely achieve
these same kinds of results too, so stick around and I’ll show you what I’ve come up with. So this first shot, I call “The Descent” because the idea is to just
start above the property and slightly in front of it (or behind it), and then slowly lower the drone down while you’re tilting the camera up, so you can track with the property and get a nice, well-rounded view of the top and the side. Anybody can fly over a property without changing the
direction of the camera, but once you start developing
and using your skills as a cinematographer, it can
have a major and lasting effect on the final presentation of the property. A nice variation of this shot
is to do the exact same thing, but start from the
ground and then move up, tilting the camera down. Kind of gives a nice alternative view of the property that way. Both of these shots will give your footage a really nice cinematic
and professional look because it actually requires
some coordination to do. Not much, but a little bit. This next one is probably
the easiest shot in the list because all you have to do is
point the camera directly down and fly over the property, and whenever you use the
overhead shot, you can start by hovering low over the focal
point of the property, and then move the drone higher in altitude while doing a very slow rotation, and it’s very important to do this slowly if you want it to have
that nice, cinematic look. I like this shot because it
introduces new surroundings and it’s an exciting and interesting visual experience for the viewer. Another way to shoot the overhead shot is to simply start at
one end of the property and fly to the other side, as if you’re sort of traveling over it. This shot isn’t necessarily
the most informative because it only shows the
property’s roof and footprint, kind of like a survey, but it’s a nice way to add a perspective of the property that isn’t typically seen with other shots in this type of video. Probably one of my
favorite shots on this list is what I call the spotlight
or the horizontal spotlight. The objective behind this shot is to fly horizontally
around the house or the lot or the building, while
keeping the camera locked on the focal point of the property. And this kind of camera movement, it actually requires a bit of skill because you’ll have to
coordinate the timing of how fast you move around the property with how quickly you pan the camera to stay locked on the property itself. And I will say that some drones out there actually have a spotlight
tracking feature, which allows you to lock
onto any moving object like a car or a person,
and the camera will stay locked on that point
regardless of where you fly. In my experience, these
systems have a harder time locking onto objects like buildings because they don’t move, but nevertheless, if you’re able to get your drone camera to recognize a house or a building as your focal point of your shot, this could potentially make the
process much easier for you. This next shot I refer to as the reveal, and this is a great way to open or close any real estate video. In this shot, the idea is to
simply approach the property from a distance and eventually fly over it while keeping the camera on the property. And again, this is one that will take a reasonable amount of coordination, though with a little bit of practice, you’ll find it’s not terribly difficult, especially if you have the
responsiveness of your camera adjusted to be slower, which will make the camera movement much less jerky. I use this one all the time,
and every time I see it, it always makes me sit
back and just say, wow, that looks awesome. The great thing about this
shot is that in many cases, you can also reverse the clip, and it’s more of a backwards flyover, which keeps the spotlight on the property. Whenever I get this shot
right, it doesn’t really matter whether I play it forwards or backwards, it looks awesome all the time. So this is definitely a good
one to include in your videos. And the last important shot
is what I call the slider, and the idea behind this
shot is to put the camera at a level anywhere from six
to 20 feet up in the air, and just very slowly pan
the camera back and forth around the property, and the
effect that we’re going for is to give the viewer a
perspective as if they’re walking or driving around the property themselves, so it kind of gives them that on-site feel like they’re standing right there, looking at the property
with their own eyes. It’s a really nice shot, has
a really cool perspective, and I just think it’s a great one to include in your
videos whenever possible. (upbeat electronic music) All right, guys, that’s it. Those are five of my favorite drone shots. I’d say probably the
biggest challenge with this is the sensitivity of the
controls on your drone. Some drones act a little
bit differently than others, and ultimately I think what
I struggle the most with was just going slow enough so
that it really gave the camera a good opportunity to capture
every angle of the property that I was getting as I flew by. I think that’s probably
the biggest challenge, that’s probably the biggest
thing I still struggle with when I’m doing this, but
if you can pull it off, it does a pretty amazing job,
so hopefully that was helpful, thanks so much for watching,
and I wish you all the best with your next real estate drone video. See you.

The Cinematographer: Crash Course Film Production #8

The Cinematographer: Crash Course Film Production #8


Movies are made up of series of images. Some are beautiful, some are harsh, and some
stick in our minds forever. Like the gently rolling spaceships in 2001
A Space Odyssey. Or Peter O’Toole riding out of the desert
in Lawrence of Arabia. Or Darth Vader emerging from the smoke in
Star Wars. But who actually takes these pictures? If the director is the one who sets the vision
for the film, whose job is it to bring that vision to life? That’s the person who puts the pictures
in motion pictures. The cinematographer. [Intro Music Plays] Cinematographers must be artists, engineers,
photographers, and storytellers, all at once. Sometimes you’ll hear the cinematographer
referred to as the director of photography or “DP.” But don’t be confused, it’s the same job. In some parts of the world, they prefer one
title to the other, but generally speaking, the two titles are interchangeable. And no matter what they call themselves, their
basic job is to translate the director’s vision into things like framing, lighting,
and camera movement, so that the film’s story, emotions, and themes are conveyed visually. A cinematographer must not only possess great
technical skills, but also understand the fundamental narrative beats of the film, the
arc of the characters, and how the shots might cut together in the editing room. And the job begins long before the cameras
start to roll. During pre-production, the cinematographer
assembles the camera department, plans shots with the director, and determines any special
equipment that might be necessary for the shoot – from cranes and dollies to steadicams
and special lenses. They also help the director decide what kind
of film stock or digital cameras to use and what the overall look of the film will be. During production itself, the cinematographer
oversees the lighting and shooting of the film, shot by shot. This includes supervising the camera department
and working very closely with the lighting department — the head of which, you’ll
recall, is the gaffer. Since pictures are technically just a record
of light bouncing off objects, the gaffer is fundamental to achieving the images that
make up the film. And when it comes to the lights themselves,
the cinematographer has a lot to choose from. For example, there are Fresnel lights, which
use special lenses called … Fresnel lenses … to produce a wide, hard light that softens
at the edges. Commonly used for stage lighting, these lights
can get very hot very quickly. Fluorescent lights are much cooler and softer,
but they’re quite fragile, which matters on a film set when the lights are being moved
around so frequently. LED lights create very little heat and are
favored by a lot of independent and DIY cinematographers because they’re cheap and use less power. However, the colors and shadows they cast
can be unreliable and difficult to match, bulb to bulb. Incandescent lights, meanwhile, generate a
lot of heat, but they generally give a warm, yellow light that can be very appealing. And then we have HMIs, or… this… These are massive lights that give off an
enormous amount of heat. They’re so bright that they’re often used
to simulate daylight. As in, the sun. So, that’s the hardware, but in addition
to choosing which of these lights should be used, the cinematographer also has a say in
how they’re arranged. The most basic style of lighting, used in
everything from formal interviews to fiction films, is 3-point lighting. You start with a key light, which is the brightest
light, often positioned so that it shines most directly on the subject of the shot. Then you add some fill light, which is a dimmer
and more diffuse light used to fill in the shadows created by the key light. Finally, back light, which is usually brighter
than the fill light, shines from behind the subject of the shot. This creates a “halo” or “edge” of
light that outlines the subject and separates it from the background. One of the questions the cinematographer grapples
with is figuring out where the light is coming from in the world of the film. This will determine the direction, color,
intensity, and quality of light that illuminates the shot. Sometimes cinematographers will use practical
lights, which are light sources you can actually see in the shot, like desk lamps or windows. Other times they’ll deliberately use artificial
lights, or even turn to a more radical strategy to light their films. Cinematographers Néstor Almendros and Haskell
Wexler famously shot Terrence Malick’s Days of Heaven using natural sunlight, mostly that
brief period of the day immediately before sunset, often called magic hour. While working on Catch-22, David Watkin said,
“I’m going to do something rather daring. I’m going to light the actors with only
explosions.” And he did! Cinematographer Ellen Kuras relied on a unique
combination of practical and artificial lights to create the unusual transitions and effects
of Jim Carrey’s memory loss in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Malik Hassan Sayeed is a master of style,
shooting everything from Spike Lee’s He Got Game to Beyoncé’s Lemonade. When Gordon Willis decided to light The Godfather
in such a way that Marlon Brando’s eyes would often be in shadow, it was seen as a
risky and daring strategy. Cinematographers were supposed to light
a character’s eyes. That’s just how it was done! Instead, Willis chose to use this lighting
“mistake” to illustrate the dark and unknowable soul of Don Corleone. Now, the cinematographer also works closely
with the production designer, who’s the head of the art department. The production designer is in charge of carrying
out the whole look of the film, particularly the physical elements like sets, costumes,
props, hair and makeup, but also non-physical elements like computer-generated images and
how they interact with the physical objects on camera. The cinematographer and production designer
work closely on everything from the color scheme of a set to how reflective its walls
should be. And for sure, in addition to the lighting,
cinematographers have to consider all kinds of factors when setting up their shots. Not only do the shots need to cut together
to tell the story, but they’re often constructed to have a beginning, middle, and end all their
own. The director and cinematographer must decide
how much of the frame should be in focus, using lens choice, film
stock, and aperture. Related to that, the cinematographer has to
think about what’s featured in the foreground, middle ground, and background of the shot. The arrangement of these features within the
frame can have a profound impact on the audience. Color and contrast also fall within the cinematographer’s
aesthetic toolkit. Color can be used to draw our eye to or away
from one part of the frame, make narrative or thematic links, or – as in The Wizard
of Oz – transport us to an entirely new place! Contrast, which refers to the ratio of the
darkest parts of the image to the lightest parts, can perform many of the same functions. Before there was color in film, contrast was
a particularly powerful tool for cinematographers. Noir classics like Carol Reed’s The Third
Man use deep, dark shadows cut by bright shafts of light to convey a sense of mystery and
menace . Cinematographers might also decide to move the camera to evoke a particular feeling or psychological effect. This movement might be as simple as a pan
or a tilt to follow the action, or as involved as Citizen Kane’s dramatic crane shot in
through the top of a nightclub. Moving the camera in toward a character can
convey a variety of emotions, from fear closing in on them, to some kind of internal revelation. There are some pretty entertaining supercuts
of push-in shots on YouTube. It makes you realize this technique is used
everywhere. Now, what happens after the film is in the
can? The job’s over, right? Of course not. The cinematographer is heavily involved in
a film’s post-production, too, because the editing process offers a lots of opportunities
to manipulate the images that have been captured. If a movie’s been shot on film, there are
all kinds of options to change color or exposure by altering chemicals and timing, as the exposed
negative is developed and processed. But whether the film was shot using traditional
film stock or a digital process, most feature films are digitized at some point, to make
the editing easier. And once the images have been converted into
digital information, even more options open up for manipulating the footage. Filters on photo apps like Instagram give
you some idea of how drastically you can change a digital image after it’s been shot. In order to maintain the look of the film,
the cinematographer is almost always deeply engaged in this process, working hand in hand
with the director, the editor, the post-production supervisor who’s overseeing this phase of
the process, and the special effects department. So, yeah, it’s kind of a big job! There’s a fantastic documentary called Visions
of Light that traces this history and art of cinematography. It’s out of print, but if you can find a
copy of it, you can hear some of the original masters of the medium share their stories
and see examples of their work. As with much of film production, there are
guidelines and customs when it comes to cinematography, but no actual rules. The right style of lighting or camera movement
for one film will be completely wrong for another. It’s up to the cinematographer to work with
the director to realize their vision for the film, translating int into images that will
cut together to tell the story. Today we learned about the multi-faceted job
of the cinematographer. We covered the various roles of the camera
and lighting departments and how they work together to realize a director’s vision. And we considered some of the tools and strategies
available to the cinematographer. Next time we’ll look at the fascinating
on-set work of set designers, costume designers, and special effects make-up! Crash Course Film Production is produced in
association with PBS Digital Studios. You can head over to their channel to check
out a playlist of their latest amazing shows, like It’s Okay to be Smart, Physics Girl,
and The Art Assignment. This episode of Crash Course was filmed in
the Doctor Cheryl C. Kinney Crash Course Studio with the help of these nice people and our
amazing graphics team is Thought Cafe.

San Diego City College – Photography Program

San Diego City College – Photography Program


>>DAVID KING: We have an incredibly extensive program. We have 40 some odd courses, ranging from the beginning of the film classes up through very advanced studio-based commercial classes.>>DAVE EICHINGER: We try to provide a really wide
variety of fine art classes and commercial classes. Most of the students that
come in as a photo major obviously need the commercial classes and need to understand digital fully and Lightroom and Photoshop. When they leave here, primarily
you’re a freelancer. And if you’re a freelancer you need to wear all lot of different hats.>>Jason Reimer: A student can come in here and learn the in’s and out’s of how to run a photography
business; giving them really good grounding in the fundamentals but also
trying to stay on top of latest trends in the industry so that when they
leave here they’re prepared to be able to hit the ground running in an industry
that’s constantly changing.>>DAVE: We have one of the few programs still
around that have a pretty strong analog darkroom program. We do have one of the
best facilities – maybe the best that I’ve ever seen or one of the very best
that pretty much anybody has ever seen. So we do have a great facility; we have
great studios, great equipment, and great people here.>>MONICA: I’m from Brazil, I came here 15 years ago. I noticed that I needed to improve my English and I went to the Continuing Education. After Continuing Education, I came to City College. The experience that I have
is amazing. Photography is my passion and then with the program the instructors,
they helped me a lot. I’m really happy with the result.>>DAVID: We want them to be the best because if
the students come out being the best and somebody says, “hey where did you learn it” and
they say City College – man, that’s what we need!>>DAVE: For the past 15 years or so I’ve been taking
groups to Europe. They’re getting units – there’s a travel photography class. They’re out doing their own portfolios again, some are digital, some are film, some
are people photographers. I typically do a different itinerary each year. Last year was Barcelona and then northern Italy.>>DAVID: We would like to make City College, here, the
place you come to because that’s where the education is. We have a one-of-a-kind
program here and it would be wonderful if we could get that word out and let the world know about it.

Beginning Photography Tips & Techniques : Loading Film in 35mm Camera

Beginning Photography Tips & Techniques : Loading Film in 35mm Camera


Hi, I’m Scott Vallance on behalf of Expert
Village.com. We are going to do a video clip today about loading film in a 35mm camera.
All cameras are a little bit different. Most of them have the release for the back over
on the slide take up spool. Just open the spool, it has a lever in the middle, and then
pull it up and the back should spring open. At this point, hold it upside down; blow in
it gently to get any extra dust out of there. If you have one of those manual blowers it
works real well. Take your film out of the canister that holds it. It has a leader on
it. There is a sprocket over on the left hand side of your camera, right hand side as you
look at it. Stick the leader into the little slot, about a ¼ inch, advance your film advance
lever, fold your film across, make sure that this spot that holds are lined up with the
spot that is on the gear drive, fold your film across, drop into the slot, turn your
film take up wind lever down on it, close the back, leave the little lever up on your
film wind lever and then advance it a couple of times and watch and make sure that the
little handle turns. If it does not turn, your film did not load correctly. Shoot a
couple frames, tighten that up, set it down and you are ready to go shoot.

Photography Tips : Photography Framing Techniques

Photography Tips : Photography Framing Techniques


This is Anthony, and we’re going to talk about
framing in photography, framing your shot. When you look at an image, when you’re photographing.
This is what I love doing, is I like looking through my viewfinder, and thinking about,
Well, how do I want this to look? How is this going to look interesting? Well, I just want
to put the subject matter, or whatever I’m photographing, smack in the middle. No, I
don’t think I want to do that. I want to make it look interesting, so for framing my image,
there’s a couple of different ways I like to do it. I like to just put it a little bit
off center. Not right in the center, but just a little bit. If you really think about the
math and the science behind that, it’s kind of interesting, and I like looking at things
differently. I really play around with perspective, and I move. I physically move my big body,
and how I want something to look, and that’s how I frame something up. There are a few
different descriptions I’ve made for myself, about how I do it. One, I like to call it
cornering, or I like to just like, put my subject in one of the corners, and kind of
put other things in the rest of the corners, and give the image a little bit more weight
on one side, and a little bit more air on the other side, and that’s something that
really interests me, in all kinds of art, is I look at, well how is this framed? I’ll
go and look at classical painting, renaissance painting, and see how did they frame this
painting? so when I’m actually photographing, I refer to that in my head. It’s just one
of these ways, that makes photography really, really, interesting to me. The other thing
about framing, is that I find, people don’t often turn their camera around enough. We’re
so used to being able to edit digitally, that actually I’ll get really close to somebody.
I’ll back off, or I’ll switch my camera around, a lot, because I know that, I’m not really
a lazy person by nature, but I would much rather edit it, than actually do it, but when
I’m actually out there photographing, I think sometimes, I would rather just do it that
way, when I’m really looking at something, because after all, photography, that’s really
what it’s all about, because how am I looking at something? It’s the physical act of taking
that picture. To me, that’s what real photography is, and the framing, sometimes is actually
the most fun, so that’s how you frame a picture.

Phone Street Photography – Film Emulation – Sweet Lou Collab

Phone Street Photography – Film Emulation – Sweet Lou Collab


Oh oh wait sorry that’s the wrong tape
there we go hello no you know noe’s fans followers
subscribers this is going great right off the bat I know you’re really into
that vintage 80s vapor wave aesthetics so I thought what was more vaporwave
than a cassette player and granted an 8-track but I didn’t have one of those
anyway we’re going down a rabbit hole here I have a challenge for you I know
you don’t like that word but I don’t know what else to call it the challenge
is the quote film challenge you’re gonna go out with your phone you’re gonna take
a bunch of pictures but here’s the catch your phone is your roll of film so once
you hit 24 exposures you’re done for the day you can’t delete photos and you
can’t look back on the photos you took you just gotta take the 24 and then go
home I’ll give you a choice here actually you could have a roll of 24 or
36 exposures all right this message will
self-destruct in ten nine eight one alright you heard man go check out his
channel it’s sweet Lou photography and today basically we’re going to be
shooting around Dongmyo market now the challenge is to shoot 24 pictures with
my phone as if my phone was a film camera so since this is a film themed kind
of challenge I downloaded this app called Huji Cam it’s like huji with an
H no I’m not sponsored by them or anything it’s just like the first film
app I saw and actually turn out to be pretty cool because it acts like a
disposable camera where you can’t see your pictures onto a way later after
you’ve taken them so that was the deal I can look at my pictures when I shoot
them now now this I made this hoodie film
challenge extra hard on myself because when you look at the fuji film app
there’s actually like a small viewfinder like a real camera and i thought you had
to hold it up to your eyes man the minimum focus distance on my eyes really
sucks to basically compose your pictures but like the thing is I couldn’t like I
was I kept looking through it I was like how the heck are you supposed to compose
like this I can’t see anything and yeah basically you have like a 1 by 1
centimeter little viewfinder to compose your pictures but I just found out right
now when I got home that you’re actually supposed to click on the viewfinder and
it actually gets to the size of your phone screen so I made this much harder
on myself than I should have anyways let’s check out the images don’t
know market in so pretty cool area very great for some photography especially in
the daytime if you’d like to collab someday message me we’ll do we’ll do
something we’ll figure it out and I check out Sweet Lou Photography channel if you’d like to
see more videos like this you know go ahead and like comment subscribe all
that jazz share this video with your friends read it it’ll read it really
helps out sometimes and yeah I’ll see you around whoa
what’s this

Still life photography ~ Bronica SQ-Ai and Ilford FP4

Still life photography ~ Bronica SQ-Ai and Ilford FP4


Today, we’re going to be doing something completely different. As you can see, I’m going to be doing some still life photography some country still life photography I’m here at my parents farm and I’m gonna be making images of the tools that they use in the garden and all the stuff that they have here, like old TVs and old radios. I think it could be very, very cool. My setup is pretty simple I’m using just a piece of plywood here with a backdrop that I bought on Amazon for some 20 bucks I’m pretty sure that there are much better backdrops out there but this one is more than enough for what I want to do I’m gonna leave the link down below in the description if someone wants to check it out. Camera wise I’ll be using my bronica with 150mm lens I’ll be shooting FP4 but, since this is my second time ever doing some still life photography, and I’m still not sure where to go with my style for this, I’m gonna be shooting my digital camera as well That way I can play with the RAW files in the next few days and see where I can go with them but I do think that FP4, I’m gonna be rating it at 100, plus the orange filter is gonna get me very very close to what I want to achieve here, but we will see This is gonna be my first image. In this one, I want to get some of the details of that blade I got a reading with my digital camera f/5.6, 1/200. The Bronica doesn’t have 1/200 so I’m gonna do 1/125 to make sure that those details are going to be there in the shadows, and then I have to compensate for the orange filter so I’m gonna have to decrease the shutter speed by 2 stops Now, as I said, I’m gonna make the digital version of this. As you can see, I’m using my big lens the 70-200mm f/4. This is an amazing lens but it’s just too much for me to carry it on regular trips because I have my vlogging gear and I have the bronica So yeah, I settled on the 55-210mm that is just perfectly fine to take photos on trips but this one is perfect for these kind of situations where you don’t have to carry it with you. Looks good. The histogram looks good. So I’m just gonna take it And that should be it So I’m taking two shots per subject, the settings are the same but I’m trying different compositions like in this case I’m farther away from the TV. I have more negative space on top of the TV I don’t know what’s gonna work best, but I wanna have the option of choosing between the two compositions So that’s what I’m gonna do here I’ve been using the mirror lock-up feature because at these shutter speeds, 1/30th of a second I’m using now with this lens, the 150mm, that would be adding some camera shake. And of course we want to avoid that All right, so that was the 4th shot I gotta say, I hate this tripod every time I bring it with me on a hike or something like that because it’s so big and so heavy, but it’s also so convenient for situations like this because you can do pretty much anything you want with it So look at this, this is amazing. It’s just perfect for this situation Took me a long time to come up with this composition I’ve had a hard time with this tool. What I was trying to do here is to capture the whole thing That’s why I moved the whole setup here because of the white wall here that would work as a background I thought that it could be cool. But the problem is on this part of the tool, the tool itself I find it really hard to capture and to create a composition of that, even if I was taking the whole tool this part wasn’t looking that good. I’ve settled on a close-up of this part of the tool I like the details here how the metallic part hugs the stick So I’m gonna be showing this in the center of the frame, a little bit of the stick and then I’m gonna cut the top part of the tool here. So it creates a little bit of mystery too. And you wonder what kind of tool this is So that’s what I’m gonna do now So I just found these two I don’t think they’ve been used in years because they are full of spider webs and everything. Actually, I think a spider bit me here Oh, well, we’ll see what I can do with these two. They look pretty cool. I’m not even gonna take the spider webs from there because they look awesome too. So let’s try Last image of the morning What I’m trying to do here is to have the stick going diagonally through the frame and out of focus I’m gonna be focusing on the tool. It looks pretty cool with all that dirt and spider webs I already took one with my digital camera, but the Bronica is gonna be so much better here because that medium format negative size is going to completely blur this stick, and it’s going to look very, very good. I hope All right, so this is it for today, I don’t have more time this morning, but I will be doing this again for sure I hope that the images look good I hope that FP4 was the right choice for the film stock, to achieve the look that I’m kind of looking for, but I have digital if if that’s not the case, so I can play with it, and now the film back doesn’t want to work There you go. Hope you all enjoyed this video. Thank you so much for watching and see you in the next one

Worst Wedding Guests

Worst Wedding Guests


[background music
and conversation] [Jeff] Gosh you guys, what a
beautiful service. [Susan] Yes hey, to the
bride and groom. [glasses clinking] [Lois] Cheers.
[Man 1] So rose, [Wayne] your Jen’s sister right?
[Lois] Yeah, big sister. [Lois] Can’t believe she’s
married. [laughing] [Rachel] Such a gorgeous venue.
[Susan] Isn’t it. Oh my God. [Jeff] Does your family have
a lot of money? [Susan] Jeff…
[forced laughter] [Susan] Of course they have a
lot of money. They must be [Susan] very rich people, Rose.
This husband has been wonderful. [Susan] You have to thank your
family for having us here. [Lois] Oh, I will. [Jeff]
It’s such a beautiful event. [Jeff] It’s such a wonderful
day. It’s all about family. [Jeff] Really the best of times
but, gets me thinking about [Jeff] the worst times too,
you know? [Susan] Me too, I am so
interested. Just in people. [Susan] Like what the worst
times that people have had. [Susan] Oh wait, let’s play a
little game here. [Jeff] Oh yeah.
[Susan] This is great. [Susan] We can all go around
in a circle and then everybody [Susan] says what’s a horrible
family memory that you have. [Jeff] Yeah, it could be
anything. It could be when was [Jeff] the last time you
saw your mother cry. [Susan] Yeah, but say like was
it from something you did… [Jeff] From abuse. [Susan]
Yes, anything. Any abuse. [Susan] Physical, mental
sexual even. [Susan] Go.
[Jeff] What do you want to say? [Lois] My mom cried at
the ceremony. [Jeff] No, those were happy
tears. We’re talking about [Jeff] something that makes you
legitimately upset, like [Jeff] Statistically speaking
over half of this table… [Jeff] comes from a
broken home. [Susan] Whose parents here
are divorced. [Susan] Wayne… [Jeff]
Clearly lots of crying and [Jeff] tears in your family.
[Susan] Yes. Oh God. [Susan] And now we have a
great conversation started. [Jeff] When we’re talking
we broke the ice. [Susan] Brian, after your dad
left your mom, did he [Susan] support her financially? [Susan] Hey, let’s go around the
table and say [Susan] our class levels
going up. Lower middle. [Jeff] Upper middle. Lois I
heard you make a reference to [Jeff] horseback riding in your
speech, so you must be [Jeff] upper upper.
[Susan] Upper upper. [Jeff] That’d be great for you.
[Susan and Jeff laugh] [Lois] Thank you.
[Susan] Both of us. [Susan] We are just so
interested in other people. [Susan] It’s our curse.
We make friends forever. [Susan] Here’s something. What
is something everyone would [Susan] change about
your bodies. Ok? [Jeff] I’d like a new haircut.
How about that, Brian? [Brian] I could lose
a couple pounds. [Jeff] Isn’t if
funny neither of us [Jeff] said penis? That’s good
for us though. [Jeff] Chris, your
penis something? [Susan] It would
be so interesting [Susan] to know. Would you
change your penis? [Lois] Can we
change the subject? [Susan] Oh yeah,
there’s a million [Susan] things to talk about.
[Jeff] Here’s a million one. [Jeff] Rachel, my question for
you. I saw you did your toast [Jeff] with water. Are you
an alcoholic? [Susan] Yes, are you addicted
to alcohol? [Rachel] I used to drink and
now I don’t. [Susan] Oh Rachel.
[Jeff] What’s your rock bottom [Jeff] moment? Chris and I
are just dying to know. [Chris] No, I’m not.
[Susan] Yes you are. [Jeff] Yes you are, man.
[Susan] Yes you are. [Susan] It’s so fun to share.
[Jeff] Share train. [Susan] Eric Clapton’s “Tears in
Heaven” was written about [Susan] the death of his son. [Susan] Have any of you ever
lost a child? Either through [Susan] miscarriage or after
the child is born. [Jeff] They say that the loss of
a child is actually hardest [Jeff] on the parents.
[Susan] Oh God, Jeff you have [Susan] so many facts.
God, can we all have a toast [Susan] to my
boyfriend, Jeff. Rachel, you just
toast with water [Susan] because of your
addiction to alcohol. [Susan] To Jeff.
[everybody] To Jeff. [lady] We’re having a baby. [Jeff] Well. Andrew, Jenny. [Jeff] Hold on to your seats
because she’s like [Susan] We have equally
exciting news. [lady] Stop it. Stop you guys.
[Susan] We went on the logs [Susan] for the great adventure. [Susan] If you like what you
just saw, click the link [Susan] below to subscribe.
[Jeff] I want you to click it. [Susan] No, I want you to
click it. [Susan and Jeff] Let’s click
it together.

Photography Tips : Start-Up Costs for Photography

Photography Tips : Start-Up Costs for Photography


This is Anthony and today we are going to
talk about start up costs in photography. Now photography is very complex business and
the fact that technology is changing all the time and it is probably changing as I am speaking
to you right now. So what I buy today six months from now really has the potential of
not really being worth anything, an extremely frustrating part of photography so you want
to think when I buy this piece of equipment is it going to suit my needs five years from
now, two years from now, a year from now and you can do that by just doing some basic research
talking to other photographers. I like to keep this as simple as possible meaning that
well if I decide I want to do pet photography I want to keep it as simple as possible. There
is no reason for me to buy strobes. There is no reason for me to have a studio. I can
go to peoples’ houses, I can photograph them with their pets in the park. How much will
that cost me, enough for an on camera strobe, enough for an off camera strobe, a tripod,
a camera, a couple digital cards, a laptop and those are the things I would write down
in my business plan as to how much they would cost. Then I think about how much am I going
to charge. I want to make the money I spend on that equipment back as rapidly as I can
and these are just little simple things and it is really not that simple, it is actually
quite complicated and the other important factor that I like to see is where am I going
to get this money, is it going to be from my savings account? Am I going to have an
investor? Am I going to have a family member help me out with this? It is very murky tricky
water to get into so I always tell people to really try to think these start up costs
through. As far as the bottom line how much money you would really have to spend to start
up a simple photography business, personally I believe you could probably start one from
about $3,000 to $5,000 and that is a lot of money for me but if you want to do it I mean
that is really, unless you are running on a complete shoestring budget which some photographers
do you know, that is going to give you the confidence that your equipment is going to
be fine, you are going to have a place to work, you are going to have the ability to
deliver clients a job well done. I would say in my opinion, 3 to 5 thousand dollars is
basic start up cost for a photography business.