Phone Street Photography – Film Emulation – Sweet Lou Collab

Phone Street Photography – Film Emulation – Sweet Lou Collab


Oh oh wait sorry that’s the wrong tape
there we go hello no you know noe’s fans followers
subscribers this is going great right off the bat I know you’re really into
that vintage 80s vapor wave aesthetics so I thought what was more vaporwave
than a cassette player and granted an 8-track but I didn’t have one of those
anyway we’re going down a rabbit hole here I have a challenge for you I know
you don’t like that word but I don’t know what else to call it the challenge
is the quote film challenge you’re gonna go out with your phone you’re gonna take
a bunch of pictures but here’s the catch your phone is your roll of film so once
you hit 24 exposures you’re done for the day you can’t delete photos and you
can’t look back on the photos you took you just gotta take the 24 and then go
home I’ll give you a choice here actually you could have a roll of 24 or
36 exposures all right this message will
self-destruct in ten nine eight one alright you heard man go check out his
channel it’s sweet Lou photography and today basically we’re going to be
shooting around Dongmyo market now the challenge is to shoot 24 pictures with
my phone as if my phone was a film camera so since this is a film themed kind
of challenge I downloaded this app called Huji Cam it’s like huji with an
H no I’m not sponsored by them or anything it’s just like the first film
app I saw and actually turn out to be pretty cool because it acts like a
disposable camera where you can’t see your pictures onto a way later after
you’ve taken them so that was the deal I can look at my pictures when I shoot
them now now this I made this hoodie film
challenge extra hard on myself because when you look at the fuji film app
there’s actually like a small viewfinder like a real camera and i thought you had
to hold it up to your eyes man the minimum focus distance on my eyes really
sucks to basically compose your pictures but like the thing is I couldn’t like I
was I kept looking through it I was like how the heck are you supposed to compose
like this I can’t see anything and yeah basically you have like a 1 by 1
centimeter little viewfinder to compose your pictures but I just found out right
now when I got home that you’re actually supposed to click on the viewfinder and
it actually gets to the size of your phone screen so I made this much harder
on myself than I should have anyways let’s check out the images don’t
know market in so pretty cool area very great for some photography especially in
the daytime if you’d like to collab someday message me we’ll do we’ll do
something we’ll figure it out and I check out Sweet Lou Photography channel if you’d like to
see more videos like this you know go ahead and like comment subscribe all
that jazz share this video with your friends read it it’ll read it really
helps out sometimes and yeah I’ll see you around whoa
what’s this

Still life photography ~ Bronica SQ-Ai and Ilford FP4

Still life photography ~ Bronica SQ-Ai and Ilford FP4


Today, we’re going to be doing something completely different. As you can see, I’m going to be doing some still life photography some country still life photography I’m here at my parents farm and I’m gonna be making images of the tools that they use in the garden and all the stuff that they have here, like old TVs and old radios. I think it could be very, very cool. My setup is pretty simple I’m using just a piece of plywood here with a backdrop that I bought on Amazon for some 20 bucks I’m pretty sure that there are much better backdrops out there but this one is more than enough for what I want to do I’m gonna leave the link down below in the description if someone wants to check it out. Camera wise I’ll be using my bronica with 150mm lens I’ll be shooting FP4 but, since this is my second time ever doing some still life photography, and I’m still not sure where to go with my style for this, I’m gonna be shooting my digital camera as well That way I can play with the RAW files in the next few days and see where I can go with them but I do think that FP4, I’m gonna be rating it at 100, plus the orange filter is gonna get me very very close to what I want to achieve here, but we will see This is gonna be my first image. In this one, I want to get some of the details of that blade I got a reading with my digital camera f/5.6, 1/200. The Bronica doesn’t have 1/200 so I’m gonna do 1/125 to make sure that those details are going to be there in the shadows, and then I have to compensate for the orange filter so I’m gonna have to decrease the shutter speed by 2 stops Now, as I said, I’m gonna make the digital version of this. As you can see, I’m using my big lens the 70-200mm f/4. This is an amazing lens but it’s just too much for me to carry it on regular trips because I have my vlogging gear and I have the bronica So yeah, I settled on the 55-210mm that is just perfectly fine to take photos on trips but this one is perfect for these kind of situations where you don’t have to carry it with you. Looks good. The histogram looks good. So I’m just gonna take it And that should be it So I’m taking two shots per subject, the settings are the same but I’m trying different compositions like in this case I’m farther away from the TV. I have more negative space on top of the TV I don’t know what’s gonna work best, but I wanna have the option of choosing between the two compositions So that’s what I’m gonna do here I’ve been using the mirror lock-up feature because at these shutter speeds, 1/30th of a second I’m using now with this lens, the 150mm, that would be adding some camera shake. And of course we want to avoid that All right, so that was the 4th shot I gotta say, I hate this tripod every time I bring it with me on a hike or something like that because it’s so big and so heavy, but it’s also so convenient for situations like this because you can do pretty much anything you want with it So look at this, this is amazing. It’s just perfect for this situation Took me a long time to come up with this composition I’ve had a hard time with this tool. What I was trying to do here is to capture the whole thing That’s why I moved the whole setup here because of the white wall here that would work as a background I thought that it could be cool. But the problem is on this part of the tool, the tool itself I find it really hard to capture and to create a composition of that, even if I was taking the whole tool this part wasn’t looking that good. I’ve settled on a close-up of this part of the tool I like the details here how the metallic part hugs the stick So I’m gonna be showing this in the center of the frame, a little bit of the stick and then I’m gonna cut the top part of the tool here. So it creates a little bit of mystery too. And you wonder what kind of tool this is So that’s what I’m gonna do now So I just found these two I don’t think they’ve been used in years because they are full of spider webs and everything. Actually, I think a spider bit me here Oh, well, we’ll see what I can do with these two. They look pretty cool. I’m not even gonna take the spider webs from there because they look awesome too. So let’s try Last image of the morning What I’m trying to do here is to have the stick going diagonally through the frame and out of focus I’m gonna be focusing on the tool. It looks pretty cool with all that dirt and spider webs I already took one with my digital camera, but the Bronica is gonna be so much better here because that medium format negative size is going to completely blur this stick, and it’s going to look very, very good. I hope All right, so this is it for today, I don’t have more time this morning, but I will be doing this again for sure I hope that the images look good I hope that FP4 was the right choice for the film stock, to achieve the look that I’m kind of looking for, but I have digital if if that’s not the case, so I can play with it, and now the film back doesn’t want to work There you go. Hope you all enjoyed this video. Thank you so much for watching and see you in the next one

Slow Photography Issue One, Thanks Ady!

Slow Photography Issue One, Thanks Ady!


Alors Voyons ça Oh! Oh! So here it is: Slow Photography Issue One by Ady Kerry Ady I hope I’m not butchering your name too much because after all you’ll have to do with my very french accent anyways thank you Ady So Ady sent this first issue to my humble self for my viewing pleasure so I’m very grateful obviously and you can already appreciate the quality of this work the tones are superb the paper is magnificient I mean look at those tones so here are Ady’s contact details I invite you to check it out His black and white work is superb as far as I’m concerned: I love it so I’m not going to spoil the whole issue this is the center fold and obviously it speaks by itself these tones are incredible it’s really harmonious, it’s really superb the paper quality is heuu… for this type of magazine the paper is very very nice the touch is… very soft with a bit of grain, a bit of texture it is superb look at that I mean look at that all right so, this is not a review obviously just a thank you note or a thank you video to Ady and an invite to anyone who is listening or watching to check his work out you’ll have all details here as far as I understand there is another issue that is to be released on June or in the middle of this year as far as I understand and I’m very much looking forward to read
it or enjoy it look at that so! it gives ideas! the images really do shine in print look at this light, look at those tones Slow Photography Issue One You should get one!

Leica M10 – best Leica of all times for street photography ?

Leica M10 – best Leica of all times for street photography ?


hello youtubers it’s awesome to see your
smiling faces once again Cris here with the Cris photography channel I am back
with yet another video I haven’t been filming a lot lately I apologize for
that but I thank you guys for subscribing we’re now over 400 people
subscribed to this channel which is amazing I’m sharing and sharing as we
know is caring and today I want to share a little bit about this guy right here
this little puppy the Leica m10 I got this landed to me by a good friend
of mine I only have it for the weekend so I will do this sweet and short all
right let’s dive right into it Okay so Leica m10 beautiful beautiful beautiful
little beast for those that don’t know Leica is a very particular specific type of
camera that has a very specific public and clients and there’s a very selective
type of people that would use Leica the reason is that it is not necessarily a
technology type of camera it is more of a nostalgia type of camera in terms of
design they simplified it a little bit they made it a little bit simpler you don’t have the continuous single recording and so on here you just have
the start and stop so that’s way simpler you have the exposure time that you can
set or you can just put it in auto mode okay one cool thing they did is they
finally brought back the ISO dial back into the camera so now we can just lift
and twist the ISO dial it can be set to auto which is what I usually shoot with
but you can at least access a little bit like Fuji does you can access the
settings right away which makes it more enjoyable and obviously on the camera
it’s a rangefinder style camera so you choose the distance
through the viewfinder and that doesn’t change now in terms of viewfinder I have
to say I prefer this viewfinder I find it bigger I find it more precise
more neat and it’s also simpler to see what you’re shooting to focus on what
you want to focus I believe this camera is finally a
digital Leica that’s worth having because like I said the form factor it’s way
faster has a bigger screen it has a live view and all those are awesome features
that I do enjoy having on the Leica camera I’m going to go out I’m going to do a bunch
of testing and we’ll see how it performs I’m going to take photos I’m not going
to edit them and we will see how it looks so let’s dive right into it okay
here we are on the streets and let’s go we’re going to check out how this little
M10 performance this guy is like we all know a manual rangefinder style type
of camera it’s a Leica M so obviously there’s no autofocus I’m not here to
talk expert like I already told you I’m here to do a quick little on the street
type of shoot today we’re kind of lucky because there’s clouds but it’s not
raining yet have a Summilux 35 mm I’m going to do a bunch of tests now so come
with me let’s do it so on previous models like the m6 for
example which is by the way my favourites
Leica camera and the m3 we could see how Leica was so pure in their design and it
was still very compact and they would still use this you know the sleek type
of camera that Henri Cartier Bresson so and other big photographers were using and they
then went into the digital world with the m8 m9 m240 they were a little bit
too thick and they started to be a little bit too you know too big and that lost a
little bit at least to me lost a little bit of its you know Leica feel now
having the m10 in my hands just the feeling of it is a bit back to the m6 so
you have that feeling of compressed solid brass quality camera and the
photos that come out of it I have to say they’re really good 24mpx
and honestly very very very good quality I mean it’s Leica yeah let’s go take some
more shots – let’s do it see the beauty of Switzerland is that we
have amazing landscapes I mean check that out you know what I’m saying like now
we’re talking yeah yeah you guys don’t have this in America so you should be
jealous we’re an Orbe right now the big city of Orbe 5,000 people live in here I
mean 5,001 with me I don’t live here but still here I am. Back to the
Leica M10 so I added a little thumb holder here I’m gonna be roll this
because I have it also I’ll show you in a separate video that I did but this
little thumb holder right here instead of the viewfinder is actually very good
because I remember with my 240 I had to literally grip it here it’s fine our
hands have five fingers they’re supposed to you know be able to hold things you
know this movement like this but if you have a little thumb holder here it’s
more comfortable this camera has been landed graciously to me by Todakin
you guys can go check his Instagram I link it down below I haven’t had a lot
of time to use it yet because well I just got it for a little weekend so I’ve
been doing a little bit of testing here and there you’ll see some photos during
this video but overall it really is sturdy I really enjoy the the quality of
it very pure design of Leica which is black with the little red dots which I
personally would remove to go street photography because it’s a bit more
discreet oh yeah and then one thing how does this compare to other modern
cameras because obviously one thing people want to know is does this compare
to I don’t know let’s say a Sony or a Fuji xt3 or some other cameras because I
normally shoot Fuji film honestly body-wise it’s very similar
but we’re talking M series cameras so you’ll have the manual focus you will
have the manual wheel everything is basically manual, I mean you can
still go ISO Auto and you can go auto exposure and things like that but at the
end the result is the Leica feel I cannot stress that enough you I mean you
saw in the photos I did not process those I did not touch them up those are
the actual photos that I took with the camera and then that black and white is
the Leica feel black and white so how does it compare again it doesn’t compare
so if you guys want to buy a modern quick autofocus camera just go for you
know whatever you want to buy it like a Nikon Canon Fuji Sony or whatever you
like but this is more for people that want to take their time I already said
that in another video but what else you want to say about Leica is for people
that like the tradition of it’s for people that like the the feel the look
and yeah okay so we’re back from the streets I really hope this helped you a
little bit if you’re thinking to buy a like m10 and I will be putting more
photos at the end of this video some more samples so you can see by yourself
these are untouched I did not process them in any way shape or form so if
they’re a little bit dark a little bit under or overexposed I’m sorry about that
I’m going to go now and do some more shooting with this amazing camera I hope
you enjoyed this video if you have any question don’t hesitate to put it down
below in the comments I urge you to subscribe if you’re not subscribed yet
click on that bell that would be awesome smash the like button if you like this
video if you want to see more and I will be back soon so enjoy your day keep
smiling keep shooting and see you soon bye folks

This Berlin Duo is Preserving the Art of Film Photography

This Berlin Duo is Preserving the Art of Film Photography


This whole digital age… There is a lot of photos that are manipulated. think that a lot of people feel that
analog photography is more authentic. Like with all the issues that the film can have… People are searching for…Happy accidents. Yeah, the happy accident. Yeah. I’m Chris Morgan.
I’m Alessandro Iotti. And we are “Safelight Berlin” Analog has become a thing again. You take a photo, and that is what it is. There is not like a million presets. You just have one. You have the film, that’s the preset. We have too many files. Sometimes it’s great to have in your hands, like a product of what you did. I came up with the idea of “Safelight”, because there is all these young kids that want to use these cameras. is a cool thing. There was a gap in the market. You couldn’t buy a camera that is working. We take all these cameras, test them, fix them. And basically give them a new home. think we are like a sort of filter, you know. Between eBay or Craigslist and the final customer. One of the biggest problems is finding our stock, our cameras. Most of the stuff that we deal with are things that no one is making any more. We can’t go to the wholesaler and say, we need 50 of these cameras. It is like a treasure hunt. But from problems you can find solutions. In the future I think “Safelight” will still be a camera shop. It’s always gonna be a camera shop. But we also want to expand and build this community around that. I’d like to do a kind of pop-ups to get to meet all the photographers in the scene in Berlin. There is a lot of good undiscovered talent and photographers. With “Safelight” we are pushing to make it easier for anybody to get into the scene. Most places, if you want to do a gallery showing, it’s kind of exclusive in a way. I think that art shouldn’t be exclusive We have probably 20 years of photography experience, messing with cameras. And, yeah, we’d like to share this knowledge with people.

The Kubrick Files Ep. 4 – Kubrick’s Photography

The Kubrick Files Ep. 4 – Kubrick’s Photography


Before Stanley Kubrick began directing movies,
he was a professional photographer for Look Magazine. His photos show his keen eye for
composition and storytelling. Kubrick had once said that it was his experience as a
photographer that often helped him as a filmmaker, so let’s take a look at Kubrick’s career
in photography. On April 12th, 1945, Kubrick was out on the
streets of New York City and happened to pass a newspaper stand. The headline that day was
an important one because, it was the day that President Franklin D. Roosevelt died. Kubrick
had just received a Kodak Monitor 620 camera as a gift and managed to capture the scene
of a distraught vendor amongst the newspapers whose headlines read “F.D.R. Dead.” Kubrick
liked how the picture turned out and thought he might be able to sell it to a magazine.
He had been an avid reader of several camera magazines, so he was already familiar with
how to go about submitting a photo (Quiz Kid 37). To his delight, his photo was accepted
by a few magazines who were interested in publishing it. Look Magazine offered more
than the other magazines, so Kubrick decided to go with them. Kubrick was paid twenty-five
dollars for the photo and, on June 26th 1945, it was printed in the magazine (Kubrick Exhibit). Kubrick would later admit that he had persuaded
the vendor into giving him the emotion he wanted (Kubrick Archive). Kubrick had around
nine hundred of his photos appear in Look Magazine between 1945 and 1951 (Kubrick Exhibit).
A lot of these photos were part of assigned photo essays for the magazine. One essay titled
“How people look to the monkeys,” had Kubrick work with the zoo at Prospect Park
in Brooklyn. The monkey house had an indoor and outdoor area. While the monkeys were in
the outdoor area, Kubrick [quote] “stationed himself in the indoor cage with his lens poked
through the food slit” so that he may capture the monkeys with the spectators in the background.
Reportedly, the monkeys were very interested in the camera, but quickly lost interest once
Kubrick let them look into it (Quiz Kid 41). Another essay he did was a series on the New
York subway. In order to get these pictures, Kubrick rode the subway “between midnight
and six A. M.” This way he could not only capture less inhibited subjects, but he could
show a side of the subway that many never see. Because the light was too low and because
the train rides were bumpy, Kubrick could only take a photo when the subway stopped.
To compensate for the low light he had to use a longer exposure, which would suffer
extreme motion blur if the camera or subject moved at all during the exposure. He would
pick his subject and aim his camera at them during the ride and when the train finally
stopped— *Click* For these photos, “Kubrick used a Contax and took the pictures at 1/8th
of a second” with an F-stop of 2.8” (Quiz Kid 152). He didn’t use any extra lighting
except for one photo on a flight of stairs where a flash was used—possibly this one.
And because there was such little lighting on the train, he also tripled the development
time to make the photos bright enough. He said, “I wanted to retain the mood of the
subway, so I used natural light” (Quiz Kid 41). Around half of Kubrick’s photo essays are
from his own ideas and one of these was a series of photos in a dentist’s waiting
room (Quiz Kid 40). Kubrick had visited the dentist and he noticed the concerned look
on everyone’s face as they waited for their turn. No one likes going to the dentist and
the anxiety on the faces of the subjects of these candids is something we can all relate
to. All of these shots were quote/unquote “stolen.” For these photos, Kubrick
wouldn’t frame the scene, he would let his medium format camera hang from a strap around
his neck and he had a cable that ran to a shutter control in his pocket. He wouldn’t
look through the viewfinder— when he found a good subject, he would just aim his body toward them and press the button in his pocket (Variety). Not all of Kubrick’s photos were truly candid,
however. In one series, he posed a friend of his with a woman named Toba Metz, for a
scene of a couple in the subway. She would become Kubrick’s first wife shortly after
these photos were taken. This would be among his first experiences
working with performers to elicit the specific emotion or mood he wanted to portray. Another staged photo series—his very first
photo series for Look Magazine—show a young man trying to flirt with a young woman in
a cinema. The piece was called “A Short Short in a Movie Balcony.” Although the photos looked candid, the young
man and woman were actually friends of Kubrick and the cinema they shot in was closed at
the time. Kubrick even had his little sister sit in as an audience member. Reportedly, he directed the scene by giving instructions to the young man and the young woman separately.
The young woman was supposed to slap the flirtatious young man, but when Kubrick took her aside,
he told her to really slap the young man hard, which provoked a genuine reaction for the
camera (Duncan 19). Kubrick had several of these photo series
published in the magazine and when he finally graduated from Taft High School, he was offered
a full-time job at [quote] “$50 a week” (Vanity Fair). Kubrick biographer Vincent LoBrutto said,
“He always took more shots than he could use for one of his photo essays and then chose
those that were most impressive for use in the photo sequence. There are no throwaway
shots in a Kubrick photo essay; each shot is carefully composed; he made every shot
count” (Kubrick Archives). It’s interesting that this practice—which
he has earned a reputation for in filmmaking—started as far back as his days as a professional
photographer. Kubrick once said about filmmaking, “I do
not always know what I want, but I do know what I don’t want” and it’s possible
that this has a lot to do with his custom of shooting a lot. The more you shoot, the
more choice you have and the more you can refine what it is you’re looking for. Of
course, some would argue against the merits of this exercise, but it seemed to work well
for Kubrick. Within two years of working for Look, he was
sent on more high-profile assignments. One of these was on Frank Sinatra during a trip
to Richmond, Virginia. For this series, Kubrick concentrated more on the faces of Sinatra’s
fans, which was a great way of capturing just how adored the singer was (Variety). Another
assignment had him photographing General and eventual President, Dwight D. Eisenhower during
a visit to Columbia University (Variety). One of Kubrick’s most interesting photo
series was on a boxer named Rocky Graziano— this was one year after his story about boxer Walter
Cartier, which he also made a short documentary on, but that’s a story for another episode. Rocky Graziano was fresh off a two-year suspension for [quote] “failure to report an attempted
$100,000 bribe” (mcny.org). He had grown up in the East Village as a hoodlum who was often found in reform schools and sometimes in prison. He was always a good fighter—in
fact he had [quote] “a dishonorable discharge from the army for punching a supervising officer.”
He also sold his first boxing medal for $15 (mcny.org). This series shows both the boxer and the family
man (mcny.org). We see him having breakfast with his wife and kids and we also see him
training his body for his big fight. This essay reveals the unseen moments in the life
of a boxer and it also seems to have an emphasis as the human body as both artistic and utilitarian.
The lack of privacy of the male body objectifies it as a tool, built for fighting and used
for earning money. We can see something similar in this series
where a nude female is used as a muse for an artist. All the while Kubrick practiced photography,
he was obsessed with cinema. He would see everything no matter if it was supposed to
be good or supposed to be bad. A friend of Kubrick’s during this time said Kubrick
would [quote] “watch a movie when it was silent, to see how the story was told, and
then go back to reading his paper when people started talking” (Duncan 19). He told an
interviewer, “I sat there… and I thought, well, I don’t know a goddamn thing about
movies, but I know I can make a film better than that” (Vanity Fair). Working on these assignments forced Kubrick
to tell stories using only still images, but it still allowed him to explore the medium.
These photo essays don’t necessarily have to show a sequence of events, but can instead
capture a setting or event through details, anecdotes, and spontaneity. Some photos seem to reveal a character or
tell a story in a single photo. Here are a few of my favorites: Look at the composition of this shot: There’s a beautiful deep-staging even though
this was likely a spontaneous image. The setting informs on our understanding of the man. He likely runs the business side of a circus. The low angle – likely to show the high
wire – also makes the man look important and his pose seems to tell us that he is in
charge. And then there’s this one: You can really get a sense of what these kids
are like and the setting they inhabit. It looks like they shine shoes for dimes and
then buy hot dogs with their earnings. This kid near the center looks like a tough guy
despite his smaller stature. These outfits are great. This one is really interesting: You can almost feel the movement of this shot.
There is a certain tension and claustrophobia in the setting and it sort of conjures up
a feeling of finite time quickly running out, despite the image being static. I’m not sure about the last one, but the
first two images are part of their own series, yet these single images say so much. Here
are some of the other images in the circus series: And here are some of the other images in the
shoe shine series: Perhaps Kubrick’s biggest inspiration was
a photographer named Weegee who also had a specialty in street photography. His photography
has been said to have a [quote] “noir-ish style—bold, visceral, [and] a little trashy”
(Vanity Fair). Here is Weegee and Kubrick on the set of Dr. Strangelove in 1963. [Kubrick
Weegee Strangelove set 1963.jpg] Looking back on his time at Look Magazine
in an interview with Michel Ciment, Kubrick had this to say: “It was tremendous fun for me at that age,
but eventually it began to wear thin, especially since my ultimate ambition had always been
to make movies. The subject matter of my Look assignments was generally pretty dumb. I would
do stories like: ‘Is an Athlete Stronger Than a Baby?’ photographing a college football
player emulating the ‘cute’ positions an 18-month-old child would get into. Occasionally,
I had a chance to do an interesting personality story. One of these was about Montgomery Clift,
who was at the start of his brilliant career. Photography certainly gave me the first step
up to movies. To make a film entirely by yourself, which initially I did, you may not have to
know very much about anything else, but you must know about photography” (Michel Ciment
Interview). Thanks for watching! A special thanks to my
Patrons over on Patreon. Because of your support I was able to acquire the rare photos of Kubrick
first photo series for Look Magazine. And if you’re new here, please hit that subscribe
button now because there are plenty more videos on the way for cinephiles like you! Thanks again for watching!

Cheapest way to make your own Photography Zine

Cheapest way to make your own Photography Zine


today i’m going to be showing you three different ways to make your own photography zine for a very little amount of money the first way is using a company called curate space Our print on demand service which means they only print the book once someone has ordered a copy because of this the price per book is significantly lower than it would be if you just ordered one copy from a professional printer I’ve used create space now, to make my last two books and i couldn’t have been happier So the first thing you need to do is obviously have an idea or at least some sort of content put in your book now even though it doesn’t matter and you can put whatever you want in that i definitely recommend you have at least a basic theme or body of work after this you need to create two pdf files the first of which should be both the front and back cover together and the second one needs to be the internal pages i Used adobe indesign to create both the files and if you don’t have it don’t worry because there are plenty of alternatives And if you go to a school or university I’m sure they have access to it i also know a lot of libraries now have the adobe suite so it made sure to check that
You need to set the page size to a 5 and i’d recommend you have no less than 20 pages because you don’t want the Final book, to be too thin Once you’ve created the files you need to go to the create space website and make an account after you set up your account click on add new title Here type in the name of your book select paperback and then click on guided setup Once that’s loaded fill in the necessary details and then click assign a free isbn here you can customize the size of your book and whether or not you want it to be printed in color after you’ve set that you need to upload the interior pdf file you’ve created once it’s finished uploading and you’ve reviewed the file pick a finish for the book and upload the cover pdf once this is done you could submit the book, for review which shouldn’t take more than 24 hours When your book is approved you need to proof it after this you can either honor a copy directly from createspace which might take a few weeks to arrive or you Can publish it on amazon the benefit to publishing it on amazon is it gives people a trusted source to purchase your book from It also only takes a day to appear that so you can order a copy on amazon that will arrive sooner that one through crate space directly would to do this you need to select the channels for it to be distributed on i recommend early setting amazon comm and amazon eu as the other channels will drive up the minimum price you can set your booking if you’re looking to get a book only for yourself set the price at the minimum possible This will usually be no more than five pounds and it’s a great deal if you want to sell your book To a few people you can set the price a little higher in create space will pay the profits at the end of the next month If you’re expecting quite a large amount of people to buy your book i wouldn’t recommend use great space This brings me to the next way to make design which is getting it professionally printed Using a printing company isn’t really something that’s necessary unless you know you’re going to sell something like 50 plus books The reason for this is the more books you order the cheaper it cost to print per book for example getting one book printed might cost 15 pounds whilst getting 50 books printed might cost 200 pounds which equates to only four pound per book most professional printing companies will work with you whilst creating a book and they offer a much wider range of layouts papers and style so there multiple benefits i recommend getting in contact with one as they’ll usually give you a direct quote and talk you through the whole process finally there’s the polar opposite approach to all of this and that is diy create your own zine yourself i really like this method as it’s the most personal there’s nothing better than hand making something and being proud of what you’ve made The same goes when you buy a handmade product it’s really nice knowing how much effort has gone into making it and each product is slightly unique you get creative freedom and whilst it’s not the most cost effective and easiest approach it’s certainly my favorite photography is an art so why not put as much effort into displaying the photos as you do taking them thanks for watching authentic aesthetic bye

Jeremy Chou’s Hybrid Photography Story

Jeremy Chou’s Hybrid Photography Story


– Look over here, look where my hand is. Michelle, look over the shoulder, gently. Say something, say, “I like your tie.” Can we share a kiss like that? Keep going back. Say something crazier. Look at Casey, yeah. (gentle music) Not like this.
(woman laughing) Like the middle. I’m trying to capture the reaction, not the action. See, there’s some love, there you go. (camera shutter clicking) You have to know when the
moment’s gonna happen. If I give ’em direction, I’ll tell them, “Okay, do this, do that,” they will be awkward first, but then after about one second they’ll break into the most
genuine smile you can find. And I don’t take a photo
until that moment hits. You can only know that through experience. In my previous life I was an architect. I did it for almost 10 years. Towards the end, it just got really bored and wanted to do something
a lot more creative. I have two daughters, at the
time they were pretty young so I needed to take photos of ’em. So I started taking pictures
on a little point and shoot. It started off as a hobby. I needed a creative outlet. I didn’t know what else to do, and I loved taking photos. People saw it, they liked
it, and put it on Facebook. More people liked it, and
it just went from there. People started asking for family photos, engagement sessions,
eventually moved to weddings. I think weddings, they’re
such a fluid event, you don’t really know what’s gonna happen. Even with the best planning, even with the best planner you have, something will always go not as planned. I keep everything very minimalist. I don’t carry all this gear with me. I know exactly what I need
to get the shots I need. I shoot primarily with one lens, with a 51.2 lens for my digital
and the 81.9 for my film. I think it also forces me to
simplify my thought process and really create portraits for my clients with the gear I have. So as an artist and
photographer, obvious our style is constantly evolving. I call it a refinement, I don’t call it creating something new. It just is a continual refinement process of what I love to do, the type of photos I love to take. So I am constantly refining my style, looking for better light, different poses. I’m very specific with my clients on what the look I want. I think my clients hire me
for a very specific vision, and I can create those
visions with anybody. But I need to give ’em very,
very specific instructions. I allow them to be
themselves in front of me, and I don’t interject. Granted, I give ’em
direction on what to do, but I don’t want to interject
myself too much into it. It’s a fine balance I have to do. For a photographer who’s trying
to run this as a business, it sounds really cliche, but you have to run it as a business. You have to price your
services for profit. You can’t just say, “Hey,
I’m just doing this for fun, “I don’t need to make money.” The way I look at it, it’s because I am successful
at the business side of things that allows me to pursue my passion, which will allow me to shoot more photos. So business side definitely,
definitely is something that I would recommend every
new photographer to study, to find out exactly what you need to succeed financially
before you jump into this. In order to become an artist,
to really excel in the field, you need to be really in tune
with who you are as a person. ‘Cause every time you hit a shutter, you bring something of
yourself to the table. You compose a photo a certain way, something happened in your life experience that brought you to this point. People resonate with that
when they can see something they know is genuinely coming
from the artist themselves. (camera shutter clicking) (bells chiming)

These photos ended child labor in the US

These photos ended child labor in the US


Sadie Pfeifer was 9 years old when this photo
was taken. Operating heavy machinery that’s nearly
twice her height in a cotton mill in Lancaster, South Carolina, in 1908. She was just one of many children working
in mills, fields, factories, and mines. And although these kids were spread across
the United States, working in separate industries, they all had one thing in common: They all met Lewis Hine. At the turn of the 20th century, the United
States knew it had a child labor problem. The 1900 federal census revealed that 1.75
million children under the age of 16, more than one in five, were working at this time. The Industrial Revolution had mechanized American
and European manufacturing, and a cheap labor force was needed to complete repetitive tasks
for hours on end. Children from poor families were targeted
for these jobs because they would work for next to nothing and were less likely to strike
than adults. State legislatures and the American public
knew this was happening on a mass scale, but didn’t act. Until they saw what it actually looked like. Starting in 1908, the newly formed National
Child Labor Committee hired a photographer to investigate and report on the industries
employing children. That photographer was Lewis Wickes Hine: educator,
sociologist, and member of the Progressive Movement. A period in the United States that saw a wave
of political activism and social reform. Hine emphasized the potential power of photography
as a tool for social reform in a speech he gave in 1909 called “Social photography:
how the camera may help.” He said, “The dictum, then, of the social
worker is “Let there be light;” and in this campaign for light we have for our advance
agent the light writer — the photograph.” He traveled extensively, gathering information,
interviews, and images of working children across the country. He visited coal mines in Pennsylvania. Where adolescent “breaker boys” worked
underground for hours, separating impurities from coal. Sardine cutters in Maine. Oyster shuckers in Louisiana, some as young
as 4 years old. Tobacco pickers in Kentucky. Cranberry pickers in Massachusetts. Beet farms in Colorado. And young messengers and newsboys in cities
all over the country. Many of the photos captured adults nearby,
supervising the children while they worked. When Hine wasn’t allowed access to the mills
and factories, he waited outside and documented the comings and goings of its
workers, whose shifts often lasted late into the night. Laborers would pose for portraits and tell
Hine a bit about themselves, their wages, and their work conditions. Sometimes they showed their horrific injuries
and described what happened, like this boy from Bessemer City, North Carolina, whose
hand got crushed in the gears of a cotton spinner. We know that because each photo, numbering
over 5,000, includes a detailed caption written by Hine. Hine coined the term “photo stories” to
describe this marriage of images and text, and it’s a big part of how the photos humanized
the lives of child laborers to an indifferent public. But it’s also his photographic technique
that makes them feel so personal. Let’s use the photos of cotton mill workers
like Sadie as an example. First, many of these photos are framed the
exact same way, just substituting a different worker. Hine was trying to show that each child’s
experience was part of a widespread problem, and the repetition in the images signals that. You can really see how intentional the framing
is when you look at how the image of Sadie appeared when it was first published in a
Progressive magazine, in 1909. It’s opposite a nearly identical photo of
a different worker, set so that the symmetry of the two images makes the machinery seem
to go on and on. The left-hand caption says, “Spinner. A type of many in the mill.” Hine’s photographs are also shot with a
very shallow depth of field, which basically means a narrow part of the photo is in focus,
and the rest is blurred out. A photo with a deep depth of field would look
like this one by Jacob Riis, who was photographing New York City slums around the same time as
Hine. Notice how the playground in the background
is in focus, just like the kids in the foreground. Now look at Hine’s portraits. In this one, the factory this boy works at
looms behind him, but it’s almost totally blurred out. This was a recurring visual theme — to include
the machinery or the workplace in the frame, but obscure it, favoring the worker instead. This narrow point of focus, combined with
shooting from a lower angle — the eye level of these children — is why these images
are so effective at humanizing their subjects. Photos like the ones from the South Carolina
cotton mills changed the public perception of child labor in the United States, ultimately pressuring state legislatures to
introduce laws regulating work for those under the age of 18 — and sending kids back to
school. Lewis Hine went on to photograph the construction
of the Empire State Building in New York City, using the same dignifying techniques he photographed
child laborers with: Considering the perspective of his subjects with a narrow focus, emphasizing the worker,
not the machinery. Hine was one of the first to use a camera
as a tool for social documentary, to shine a light on the mostly unseen. He understood early on the power images have
to tell stories. As he said in that 1909 speech: “Take the photograph of a tiny spinner in
a Carolina cotton mill. With a picture thus sympathetically interpreted,
what a lever we have for the social uplift.” Hey everyone, that was Darkroom season 1! I’m going to take a break from it and work
on some other stuff, like History Club with Phil. If there are photos you think would make good
stories for the next season, make sure to leave a comment below. In the meantime, if you’re looking for more
great videos on photography in history, check out the documentary “The Man Who Shot Tutankhamun”,
available on CuriosityStream. CuriosityStream is a subscription streaming
service that offers thousands of documentaries and nonfiction titles from some of the world’s
best filmmakers. You can get unlimited access starting at $2.99
a month — and because you’re a Vox fan, the first 31-days are free if you sign up
at curiositystream.com/Vox and use the promo code “vox.” Curiosity Stream doesn’t impact our editorial,
but their support makes videos like this one possible. So go check them out!

How to Shoot on 35mm Film Cameras

How to Shoot on 35mm Film Cameras



this video is sponsored by Skillshare I've really been enjoying shooting on 35 millimeter film again recently but I've realized that I've never really covered the basics on this channel maybe you're shooting exclusively digital photography you take some occasional photos on your iPhone or you're just looking to try out some film today I'm going to cover the basics of how to shoot on 35 millimeter film it always starts with the camera so look around some thrift shops or your relatives place for 35 millimeter cameras they were built to last forever and most likely if they're still laying around they're probably still working it seems like in today's world Sony Canon and Nikon bring out new cameras every couple months with newer and better features leaving us as the consumers with the impression that the key to a good photo is more megapixels Wi-Fi capabilities but I think there's a lot of value to the slower more deliberate process of shooting on film whether you're just starting out or your photographer with years of experience the lack of a screen a limit of 36 shots on a roll and the tactile process of film has a lot to offer cameras come in a variety of styles like range finders point shoots and SLRs batteries for these cameras are also readily available and generally only need to be replaced every couple of months when it comes to choosing a film stock things can get a little more complicated there are three main types of film color negative film color positive film as well as black and white I recommend you start with color negative film as it's the most forgiving and it has beautifully soft colors most of the films are gonna give you either 24 or 36 exposures the other thing to look out for is the ISO number of the film the higher ISO films like portrait 800 are better for low-light while something like ektachrome 100 is great for super bright daylight set the camera to the correct ISO of your film and you're ready to shoot focusing is done with the front ring and you'll know your shots and focus when the two patches in the center of the viewfinder match up in terms of exposing the auto exposure mode on most of these cameras will probably do just fine if you're working with color negative film set your camera to a half or even a full stop of overexposure because it's generally safer to overexpose your film than it is to underexpose it the next and arguably most important part of the process is figuring out what you want to photograph document your hometown your friends or anything around you good stories are rarely ever things that just look pretty think about photographing and experience or something that makes you unique but most of all just have fun with it as well think about things like the light in your scene that you're photographing and what the photos mean to you once your roll is finished you can release the film with a button on the bottom of the camera and wind it back there's a ton of places that will develop your film most likely if you live in a city you can drop it off at a local lab and if not there are plenty of places to mail your film to if you're feeling adventurous why not try developing the film yourself there's definitely a little bit of an initial cost but in the long term it saves a ton of money and it's just really fun developing your own film and being in control of every step of the process then you can enjoy some beautifully grainy photos that will make you feel nostalgic about last week I know this video was a little more basic but I feel like I should have a dedicated video to the basics of film photography just sitting on this channel for anyone who finds it and needs an introduction I want to thank Skillshare for sponsoring this video Skillshare is an online learning community with thousands of classes covering dozens of creative and entrepreneurial skills explore classes in everything from photography and graphic design to music production and fine art premium memberships give you unlimited access to high-quality classes from experts working in their fields to help you gain new skills and live your best life skill show is also incredibly affordable with the name membership starting at less than $10 a month Skillshare has some incredible photography related classes but personally I've really been enjoying this graphic design course by chip kid he talks about book and book cover design which is super applicable to the world of photo book making and it's definitely really fun seeing all these different courses and learning something new for me graphic design is very new but it definitely influences photography in a lot of ways you can use my link in the description to get two months of Skillshare for free so why not give it a try as always you can check out my Instagram it's at willow herb liked the video if you liked it and you can let me know what you thought in the comments down below I try to respond to most of them that's it for now peace