Why and how to meter with a mirrorless digital camera


Hi guys, so i was just taking photos of this beautiful scene here. that’s Mt Hood And i thought that it would be a good moment to show you really quick how i meter for my photos, the photos i take With the film camera of course and why i do it the way i do it So the first thing that i used to meter my photos was a smartphone app I think there are a ton of them and all of them are pretty good and they are accurate enough the problem for me and that’s why i stopped using them is that they don’t give you too much flexibility and Also to be honest i don’t like to be messing with my phone while taking photos with the film camera, it kind of ruins the experience I don’t know if it makes any sense So then i bought a standalone old minolta light meter that i think i showed here before I used that thing for two days it’s not that i didn’t like it it’s not that it was not accurate but it was just not for me you see? i carry a lot of equipment with me: the bronica is a heavy camera and the lenses just make it worse and then I have the tripod, filters, film… and then I have this camera the 6500 that is the one i use to record these videos, so it’s yet another thing to carry with me so it didn’t work for me took me a while but i finally realized that i had been carrying with me the perfect light meter all this time, and it was the digital camera and i want to show you why okay excuse the squirrel I’m gonna use my old a6000 to show you how I meter. i of course usually use the 6500 but i’m using it to record this video right now so yeah One reason why i like to use the a 6500 is because it has a switch here on this wheel to switch between custom modes, and i use it to have a custom mode for video and another custom mode for photo so this is what the custom photo mode would look like in my 6500 i always have the iso set to 800 that’s the Speed that i shoot hp5 at but of course i’ll change it if i’m if i’m shooting a different film or different… if i’m pushing it or something and What i do is i just point the camera to a subject like these trees and i just copy or carry these settings that the camera is telling me 1/640 and f11 to my film camera but getting these settings, the shutter speed and the aperture is something that you can do with With your phone is pretty accurate at doing it but the camera has some key advantages The first of them i don’t know if you can see the screen but it’s previewing the image in black and white and i shoot black-and-white, so i can actually see Kind of what the photo is going to look like another reason is because not only we can preview the phone in black and white but we can preview the actual exposure meaning, just imagine that we want to blacken the trees with no details in the trees So we could use this exposure compensation dial and just turn it down all the way to say three stops And we will get a preview of what the look the photo would look like. not that we want to do that We could do the opposite though if we want to blow out the sky and we want to have a lot of details in the trees and just look the How many steps we have to compensate the exposure to have that and that translates in in new settings That we can carry to our film camera again and the last reason is this one it’s all about previewing the photo again now just imagine, this is our image that’s image we’re gonna take We have a shutter speed of one – one thousandth of a second, and the iso that we want But, we want to have more contrast, we want to darken the sky so we could just place the filter here in front of our lens and we will get once again a preview of the photo as you can see the sky is darker now and the most important thing of all is like we get new settings: we have a high speed of 1/400 of a second now that we can carry and copy to our film camera You see how it changes? 1/1000 1/400 Not only we get the settings but we get the preview the effect that the filter is gonna have in our photo And yeah that’s about it that’s the method i use to meter. it works perfectly fine, my photos are correctly exposed all the time using this cameras light meter of course i did some testing at first i copied the exact settings the camera was telling me and i took three shots one With the actual settings, one under exposed by one stop and one overexposed by one stop And then i checked which which one was the best one. it was actually the one with the actual settings, so i trust this camera Alright just one last thing i wanted to add to all this and it’s while i use the settings from the camera 90% of the time sometimes i overexpose the photo a little bit. for example if the camera is telling me f8, I’ll use f7.1 or even f5.6 depending on the situation because digital cameras have a really hard time with highlights film is the opposite, films struggles with the shadows for example if you take a raw file from your digital camera and you open that raw file with lightroom and you move the slider, the shadow’s slider all the way to the right you are able to recover a lot of detail, it’s not gonna look awesome but the detail is there. i’ve tried with raw files where i thought it was completely black and lost the shadows forever and lightroom was able to recover a lot of detail, crazy detail from the shadows but that doesn’t happen with the highlights so if you blow out the highlights they are gonna be white Forever and ever that’s why the digital camera is gonna try to be safe, it’s gonna try to expose for the highlights you don’t need to do that with film. actually the opposite you should be exposing for the shadows if that’s what you want, you might wan, to darken the shadows or you might not want to have details at all the shadows, but if you want to have details on both shadows and highlights you should expose more for the shadows with film, so either you modify the settings in the camera too to do that to expose for the shadows or you just trust the camera and overexpose a little bit. it works perfectly fine for me that way so yeah, and that’s about it thanks for watching and see you the next one but sometimes though if in really bright on the frame like the sky the sun or something i know So yeah i do this

WEIRDEST Digital Camera from 1999 – Nikon Coolpix 950

WEIRDEST Digital Camera from 1999 – Nikon Coolpix 950


Hey Jon here with Prime Studios Photography and normally I know I talk about film cameras and film photography, but this camera recently fell into my lap and I just can’t help but be fascinated by it. So let’s talk a little bit about the Nikon Coolpix 950. So this camera is a consumer digital camera that was released in 1999. 20 years ago. And at that time the retail price for it was $1,000, which adjusted for inflation for 2018 is about $1,500 today. It’s a 1.9 megapixel camera. It takes Compact Flash cards for it’s memory. Let’s check this out. So you open up the bottom, flip this up, and push down to eject the card and here is my gigantic 32 megabytes Compact Flash card. The camera actually came with an 8 megabyte card and…uh… yeah… The camera uses AA batteries. It uses 4 of them, which is why I’m even able to turn the camera on today, but I think that’s pretty cool. But one of the things you’ll see is that with this camera, it eats batteries like crazy. That’s one of the main reasons why point-and-shoot cameras and DSLRs and all that don’t use AA’s is because they’re not very energy dense. They switched to lithium-ion rechargeable batteries. So the thing you need to understand about this camera is the time in which it was released was when consumer digital cameras were becoming more mainstream and available to the public. Before this it was difficult to justify getting a camera, even at this point it’s kind of difficult, for $1000. But you have to understand that the other option was a film camera. And so this compared to a film camera is…it’s kind of amazing. First of all, it also was made during a time where the physical design of point-and-shoot cameras was not set. It was a whole new sort of territory. And so this swivel design which is actually very comfortable and kind of intuitive to use… It seemed novel, but it it works pretty well and compared to what was available at the time, it’s kind of cool. So here I’m going to turn the camera on. It has an “A” mode and an “M” mode, so automatic and manual. Although technically, you can’t shoot in full manual. But if I put it on the automatic mode takes a second to pop up here. So to have a screen that, you know, a live view screen like this, was kind of insane. Especially one with a swivel like this because you could swivel it and look, there’s I can see the ceiling, right? So, I mean that’s crazy. That’s not a thing that was available in film cameras at all ever…and the batteries just died. I’ve had it on for like 15 or 20 minutes playing around with it and the batteries are dead. They’re brand new batteries so here’s one of the issues of the camera. All right, let’s replace the batteries. And these are just regular alkaline batteries. This is fun. So one of the ways you could save battery life is it has this monitor button and you could hit that monitor button once and the symbols on the screen would disappear. Hit it again and it turns the monitor off, and that would save a lot of battery. Now you have this LCD screen up here, which is kind of broken. But presumably you could see all the settings you need to see. And then you could use this, the viewfinder. And this is really interesting because this was basically a required part of any film point-and-shoot camera, and so the fact that it’s included on here shows how much of a transitional sort of product this is. Because if you look at a point-and-shoot film camera from from around that time, and this is just a Pentax 35mm. It also has a viewfinder. And it’s just an approximate thing. The actual lens is not what you’re looking through. You’re looking right above it. Just like here. You’re not looking through the actual lens. Not only that, you can see on this camera it has two LEDs. One to confirm auto-focus and one to show you that the flash has been charged. The capacitor is charged. And the way it works is you would put your eye up to this and you could see like a red blue or a red or green LED turn on in your peripheral vision while your eye was up to the viewfinder. So it would tell you if you were actually locked on auto-focus or not. Or if the flash was charged. And it’s the exact same thing with the Pentax camera. It has two LEDs on each side for the exact same thing. And also, you know, comparing these two cameras, looking at the physical size. They’re almost the same physical size and that comes a little bit bigger. But also how the neck strap is attached. It’s attached to one end of the camera. And that’s where the neck strap on this one attaches. So you can see a lot of the same design elements are put into this digital camera, because that’s just how they were thinking at the time. You know, why wouldn’t you put a viewfinder in a digital camera? They eat batteries like crazy. So one thing that’s also pretty revolutionary about this kind of design for the time was that you could turn the camera back towards yourself and take your own photo. And you could see it live. That’s crazy. You could never do that with a film camera and have that kind of accuracy. Also, the fact that I had three times zoom is pretty cool. So this camera actually has quite a few features. Here I can turn the flash on, off, or switch on the red-eye. But it has, right here, is a redeye reduction pre-flash light that would come on if you have the red-eye turned on. It also does different modes in terms of focusing distance. So you can set it to be landscape, macro, and then also turn on a ten-second timer here. So in this camera in order to see the photos that are on the camera you could do it a couple ways. It came with what’s called a serial cord, a serial port. So one end of the cord would go here and serial ports were more ubiquitous than USB. USB wasn’t really as common then but it was being put in consumer cameras. So it is kind of strange for Nikon to have still have a serial cable in order to transfer pictures directly to the computer. Another way is to actually physically take the card out and have a Compact Flash card reader, which will probably also require, you know, a USB or serial and you may or may not want to do that. The more common way that people would use this camera is they take the card out and take it to a printer where you would normally get film developed. And they would have machines like they do today. Kiosks, or you just give it to them and they would print the photos for you. So if you go to the “Play” function, that’s to review your photos. And here we have a beautiful self-portrait. And I know I looked deranged, but keep in mind it says “Normal” right there…normal… Okay, so “Normal” refers to the actual resolution and “Normal” was less than 1.9 megapixels, which is kind of crazy. You can hit this button and the way the zoom works is there’s a wheel on the front here and I can turn it and it shows me the different segments that it’s showing up here of that photo. If I hit it again, I’ll zoom in even more. (laughter) Okay, that’s enough. Now I can also hit this button just like on modern cameras and I can see more photos all at once and then switch back and then I can delete a photo if I want to and actually use the shutter button as the “OK” button. And I’m going to go back to go to “M” mode here. So on “M” mode I can do…hit the mode button. I’ll hold this down and then turn the wheel…yeah…there you go. I can do Program, Shutter Priority, or Aperture Priority. So here that I can turn the wheel again and I can go f/11 or f/3.9. That’s all I can do right now. And then in Shutter Priority I can do up to 1/500th of a second to 8 seconds, but there is no Manual mode. It just goes through these three. So you you don’t always have complete control exactly. In order to change the ISO, the default. ISO is 80. It’s actually…you hold down this button, “S” for ISO and then you’ve got to turn the wheel. And I can do 100 ISO, plus one, which is 200 ISO, and then plus two, which is 400 ISO. Another cool thing is it has a “DC In” and it has a video out right here. So you could plug it into the wall to power it and then you could use a VGA cable for your CRT television and plug it directly into there. And what’s cool is on the play mode it also has…if I go to the menu here, it has a slideshow feature. So you could plug it into your TV, and you have to plug into the wall because it’ll like shut down because the battery life, and you could actually hide images that are on the card and then run the slideshow. So you could run a custom slideshow on your TV to show friends and family all these photos you took on your new fancy digital camera. You can also do things like print sets. So that’s where you would go through the photos and and say okay this specific photo I wanted to be a 4×6 and things like that. And then when you take it to the the printer, they’ll automatically know how to print it out. And the last thing I’ll talk about on this camera is just the… It’s got a diopter here with a viewfinder to adjust how, you know, clear it is and then it’s got this proprietary cable port for flash, for off-camera flash. So it has a built-in flash which it can use. But if you want something more powerful there’s a specific one from Nikon that you can get and plug it in there and have a wire go off to a bigger off-camera flash and it is actually automatic. It’s technically not TTL or through the lens because it uses a flash sensor which is…or light sensor right here. But you can do quite a lot with this camera and it feels pretty good. It feels pretty solid in the hands. So, besides the horrible battery life the Nikon Coolpix 950 was a pretty cool camera in it’s day and it really should be for $1,000. But I hope you guys find this interesting. Let me know if you have any questions down below. Thanks!

How to Save 100,000 Cameras | A Look inside Camera Rescue Finland

How to Save 100,000 Cameras | A Look inside Camera Rescue Finland


The concept of film cameras having a
value is still out of the grasp of 90% of the population. One. Two. Two and a half. Three. Three hundred. Three hundred and one. Three hundred and four. Five hundred. Eight hundred. Two thousand. Three thousand. Six thousand. Seven thousand. Nine thousand four hundred and fifty two. Ten thousand. Eleven thousand. Fifteen thousand six
hundred and forty-eight. Twenty thousand Twenty thousand five hundred and sixty-nine. Forty thousand three hundred nineteen. One hundred thousand. That’s how many analog
cameras the small team inside this building has vowed to save by the year
2020 This is Juho. I’ve been working with
him remotely for about a year as his US business consultant with a lot of
exciting changes brought on by 2018 I decided to come to Finland chat with Juho and see for myself what he’s been up to. Today he’s invited me along for an
all-day drive up north to a Camera Museum has been closed since 2001. He
wants to buy the cameras – all the cameras, he’s not going to save a hundred
thousand cameras by surfing eBay. When we look at the whole picture
there’s around 30,000 different kinds of cameras, film cameras and I don’t want to
deprive the future generations from like this abundant choice pool that we have
now. The point we have at the rescue center is to move masses of cameras to
get them to new people We’re here today in the showroom of the
camera rescue center in Tampere where you have the goal of rescuing
100,000 analog cameras by 2020. What does that mean to rescue a camera and why
does the camera need to be rescued? Well rescuing a camera for us is a whole
process, taking a camera that is out of the market or circulation out of
anyone’s use and bringing it into use to someone else who is enjoying it who will
enjoy it, who is looking for it. There’s so many choices and keeping them alive
is something I don’t want to deprive the future generations from like this
abundant choice pool that we have now So where you at in your hundred
thousand – how many cameras have you saved so far? I think last week we just went over
41,000 rescued cameras. Most people will not ship a hundred cameras. So you
have to go and pick it up. we’ve done trips to Sweden, Norway, Portugal, Spain,
France, all around Europe this kind of trips to check something out and in most
cases we’ve all also bought it. What are some of the challenges you face trying
to save 100,000 cameras? Well our main challenge at this present time is the
amount of technicians, we have four technicians every single one we could
find in Finland and still all of them have over a half a year of work load
already in their calendar. what’s going to happen when this generation this
somewhat old generation of qualified repair men and women are gone? I cannot
speak for the whole world but we are preparing in Finland. So we took all the
guys we could find that have the experience they’ve been teaching newer
guys we also need that new new guys to to come and learn from them and we’ll
learn from the older retired masters that are willing to teach. What are some
of the other challenges facing analog photography today like outside of just
what you’re doing here in Finland? So there’s… film will be there, labs I
believe will be there, but then there are technical issues which I do not have
answers for. If we want new cameras we need a new shutter a mechanical shutter. The second technical issue is about scanning. most of the scanners that are
around are based on Windows XP and there’s absolutely no support for
Windows XP for – no, there hasn’t been for 5 years. We need a machine that does that. I mean it’s not rocket science it I mean good engineers will do it in a heartbeat but the problem is either money or – the main
problem is money we need three million euros for whoever does it
probably needs three million euros just to make the first batch of the item. If we want new people to come to film, we need to make the first roll very easy
and to make the first roll very easy it has to be cheap. So we need someone to
design an automated film developing machine preferably so that one that you could do
C-41 with, black and white with, and E6 with, not obviously the
same machine but you know versions of the same machine. I took a walk around and got lots of video of the different rooms and things going on here. I’d like to show it to you and if you could tell me kind of what’s
going on here? Well obviously this is the showroom it’s mainly glorified warehouse where you can visit and play with everything that happens to be at any
given time in the camera rescue center. We have a lab it’s for Finland, it
has a darkroom and then we have two mini labs for colored film. This is camera
rescue so it’s basically me on the right and Misa on the left. Now we’ve moved to
a repair department, upstairs every item is checked by an actual mechanical guy
and with a shutter tester and everything. That’s our warehouse room – I
mean spare parts warehouse it’s I mean it’s two rooms full packed from floor to
ceiling and I still say it’s not a lot the spare parts room has a lot of
technical gadgets that do amazing things which I do not all fully understand, but they look very cool and if it says Leica or something on it it looks even cooler.
This is the product photography room where all the items are photographed for
the internet. Depending on a day there’s two to four guys doing listing items
checking the condition again and putting them on kamerastore.com. And we have
some funny cameras right now and then this PINGO camera is fun. Here we have
the packaging department. Yeah this is Jussi, he’s awesome.
Jussi is also the CEO of Kamerastore he does four hours of
CEO-ing a day and then four hours of packaging and he likes it. There’s also a
Camera Rescue Center in Helsinki or it’s basically a drop-off point and we can
also have community meetings and talk about film. And this is us having the
interview looking a bit bored looking at the computer and I think the interview
was about here thank you for having me. – or having you. -Thank you for having me. Whichever way. Thanks. Yea.

Get Started in Film Photography!

Get Started in Film Photography!


Film photography can seem so intimidating. But don’t worry, I’m here to take away the mystery and give you all the information you need to get started taking your own photographs on film. I’ve tried to make this video as easy as possible to follow. So I’ve split it up into different sections, which you can see the timestamps for each section here. And I’ve included these timestamps in the description below. So you can click on one of them and jump to exactly what you want to learn about. Keep in mind this is a general introduction to film photography and I do have other videos that are on specific cameras, like the Canon AE-1, the Pentax K-1000, the Nikon F3 and others. So this video is meant to complement those. I will put links to those down in the description below. So what is film and how does it work? Well film is a recording medium for light. So instead of using a digital sensor, it uses chemical means to record the light information. Film is essentially a piece of plastic that has a very thin microscopic layer of gelatin on it, and suspended within that gelatin are light-sensitive granules. For a black-and-white film it’s what are called silver halide crystals. These crystals interact with light that falls upon it, and then we can use other chemicals to wash away the silver that hasn’t reacted, and thus we get a film negative. Color film works in the same way. Instead of having one layer, it has three layers. Each layer sensitive to either red, green, or blue light. So the two main formats of film that you’re likely to start with are 35mm film, which comes in this kind of canister and looks like this once it’s developed. And medium format film, which comes rolled up around a spool and when developed looks like this. Here you can see the 35mm, used in a 3D camera called the Nishika N8000. Here you can see, using a regular SLR. Here for the medium format, this is the same film used in three different cameras, allowing for three different sizes of photographs. This is what’s known as a 645. This is a 6×9 and this is a 6×6. So the physical size of these microscopic granules are what determined the film sensitivity to light. The larger these microscopic granules, the more likely that photons will hit them, and thus it doesn’t take as much a light in order to produce an image. This is what’s called ISO (eye-soh) or I-S-O. It doesn’t really matter how you say it, no one who is important cares. The thing to remember is that it’s conveyed by this number here. So 100 is one of the most common ISOs. There’s a trade off… The lower the ISO, the higher the quality of the image. The higher the ISO, the less light you need in order to record an actual photograph. So here you can see this color film has an ISO of 400, which means it will be easier to take a photo in lower light conditions, but you are more likely to see the grain in the photograph because the granules are literally larger. 400 ISO is literally four times as sensitive to light as 100 ISO. There are even color films like Fujifilm Superia 1600, which I’m not sure is made anymore. But you can still find this and similar films for very high ISO color photography. Most 35mm film cartridges have what’s called DX Coding, which is this bar code and these silver and black squares in a certain arrangement here on the canister. If your camera has contacts in it where the cartridge goes that look like this, then it’s able to read the DX Coding and set the ISO itself. So if you are buying film for your camera, you’re probably asking yourself. What film should I buy? The first choice you have is between black and white and color. Black and white tends to be a little more forgiving when it comes to exposure and developing, whereas color gives you more information. You can always take a color photograph, and after you scan it digitally, you can turn it into a black and white photograph. The next question to ask yourself is, do you want a low ISO film that’s very high quality, or a higher ISO film that’s easier to shoot in lower light situations, but can leave a lot of grain. If you’re really not sure which ones to start with, some easy ones to recommend are Ilford HP5, Kodak Tri-X, Fujifilm Superia, and Kodak Gold. So how does the camera actually work? Let’s get back to basics. This is a pinhole camera, the simplest camera you can possibly have. It’s a box, which you can open. Now in this box, what you do is you’ll put a piece of film back here. And on the opposite side is a hole. So once you’ve loaded your camera and you’re ready to take your exposure, you take a light reading with what’s called a light meter. Most cameras have light meters built into them. This one obviously does not, so you would need to use a handheld meter. But most of the time you can just use the one in your actual camera that will allow you to determine how long the shutter door, which on this camera, is this big door right here, stays open. And since this is a pinhole camera, we can see our little pinhole right there. And that pinhole is the aperture. Meaning the circular opening that the light goes through. That light is then projected through the camera onto the light-sensitive material, whether that be film or a digital sensor and is recorded. Now this is closer to the kind of camera you’ll actually be using. We of course have our lens and if we open up the back of our camera, here we can see we have our shutter door. If we take the lens off our camera, it can be easier for us to see the aperture inside. So as a photographer, it’s your job to decide how big is this aperture opening and how long does that shutter door stay open? This is the way in which we control the light that lands on the film known as the exposure. It’s called the exposure because we are exposing the film to light. So as I said before, most film cameras do have light meters built-in, but not all of them. If the camera does have a light meter, it will likely require a battery and you will be able to use the light meter by looking through the viewfinder and seeing different indicators based on the brand of camera that you’re using. So because we are recording light in a controlled way by using the camera to control the amount of light falling on the film, as a photographer, we have to be able to talk about the amount of light that we’re letting into the camera in a specific way. This is where the concept of a stop of light comes in. If you are increasing your exposure by one stop of light, that means you are doubling the amount of light that comes into the camera. If you are reducing your exposure by one stop, it means you are cutting the amount of light coming to the camera by half. So the concept of a stop of light can apply to the aperture, it can apply to the ISO, and it can apply to shutter speed. But it’s easiest to understand when talking about shutter speeds. So shutter speed is in intervals of time. Specifically, fractions of a second. So if I have my dial here set the 60 on this camera, it means 1/60th of a second. Meaning the shutter door will be open for that period of time. If I increase my exposure by one stop, that means I’m doubling the amount of light coming into the camera, and I can do that by doubling the amount of time that the shutter door remains open. So I go from 1/60th of a second to 1/30th of a second. If I go the other way, and reduce my exposure by one stop, that means I am cutting the amount of light in half. So in this case, it would actually be 1/120th of a second, but the next setting on the camera is 1/125th. So it’s really close to one stop. But let’s say I go two stops. I double the amount of light coming into the camera. So 1/30th of a second, and I double it again by going to 1/15th of a second. So now I’m letting in four times as much light as I was at 1/60th of a second, but that’s two stops. And it goes the same the other way for reducing the amount of light at 1/250th of a second. So what kind of film cameras should you get to start off? Well, that really depends on your preference. There are quite a few choices, And the first one is disposable cameras. Disposable cameras are one-time use cameras that have the film preloaded in them. They have a single lens that’s of a fixed zoom, which is usually about 35mm, so a little wide. Some of the advantages of having a disposable camera are that it is not an investment. They’re fairly inexpensive. They’re easy to use. As long as you have enough light, you can take some pretty decent photographs. It’ll give you a taste of film. Disadvantages are that you can’t change lenses, it doesn’t do well in low light, the lens is small and not particularly sharp. It looks okay, but it’s not nearly as nice as actual nice glass you might put on an SLR camera. But all in all, a disposable camera can be a lot of fun and a great way to just experiment with film if you’re not sure about getting your own film camera. The next category of camera are cameras like this. What are called point-and-shoot cameras. Some advantages are their fairly inexpensive, they’re pretty easy to find they tend to have more features than you would think they do. They largely shoot on automatic. Some disadvantages are it’s unlikely you’ll find one that allows you manual control over the camera. They’re small enough, like a disposable, to be able to fit in your pocket or a small bag. And gosh darn it, don’t they just look so cool! Some cool things that these cameras have: so this one has a weird filter that like flips down to make things softer, and this one, this Pentax, actually has a time-lapse mode. Now most likely you will be using what’s called an SLR camera. An SLR camera is an interchangeable lens camera, so you can change the focal length, or zoom of your camera. Also, they’re probably what you think of when you think of film cameras. Nice things about them is that they are very versatile. They are pretty plentiful still, they tend to give you great photographs. They’re fairly easy to use. There’s not a lot of downsides. They’re a little bigger, a little heavier, they tend to cost more. Typically anywhere between 50 to 150 dollars for a camera and a single lens. But prices can vary and change especially with the resurgence of film. Now what does SLR or single lens reflex mean? Well, it means that a single lens is used both for the viewfinder and to expose the film to light. It does this with the help of this mirror here. So when you actually take a photo, the mirror lifts up out of the way. So let me do a one second exposure. So there you can see that the mirror lifts up out of the way and the shutter door opens to expose the film in the back to light. Now this is different from what’s called a TLR or twin-lens reflex. This is where it has two lenses, the top one is used for the viewfinder, which is up here, and then the bottom one is used to actually expose the film to light. Another type of camera you can get is an automatic SLR like this Pentax ZX-30. So this camera has all the advantages of being an SLR, in that it has interchangeable lenses, so you can make the focal length whatever you want. But it has a ton of automatic features, which is really nice. They also tend to be pretty inexpensive. I got this ZX-30, I believe it was $30 and then this battery pack that lets me use double A’s with it, for another 10 dollars. (Without Lens) These cameras can be awesome to start out with because they have a full auto mode. They have all these presets: portrait, landscape, macro, sports, night time, turning the flash off. Oh yeah, and they often have a built-in flash, which is really nice. They’ll also have manual and semi automatic settings as well, and not to mention auto focus. Auto focus is awesome on a film camera. Now if anybody tries to make you feel bad that you’re shooting a more automatic film camera than a manual one, tell them to be quiet. So where should you buy your camera? Your best bet is a local camera store, but if they don’t have the selection you want, there’s always online. Amazon, of course is one. KEH.com is another good one. They specialize in only used photography gear. And the used section of B&H online. So let’s talk more about the shutter. The shutter is one of the primary ways that you as a photographer control how the light comes into the camera. So this right here is the shutter door. On this camera the shutter door is made of silk. Although it’s often made of very, very thin slats of metal, of aluminum, that move out of the way. So here when I take a photo, you can see the shutter door gets out of the way and then when I advance the film, which is what these spinning things would be doing, you can see it resets the shutter door as well. So the way you control the shutter on any camera is shutter speed. So you decide the duration of time that that shutter door stays open and this is usually in fractions of a second. Now that picture I just took, you can see the shutter speed is set to one full second. If I set it to two, that means 1/2, four means 1/4th, and so on. This particular camera, the Pentax K-1000, goes all the way up to 1/1000th of a second. Now as with all things in photography, there is a trade-off. Here, as you change the shutter speed, the less amount of time the shutter is open, the less light comes into the camera. But you need a certain amount of light in order to expose the film correctly and actually make a photograph. So that’s the primary thing that happens when you change the shutter speed. But there’s a secondary effect of changing the shutter speed and that is making an object that is moving, either seem to stand still or make it blurry. So by using faster shutter speeds, you will freeze movement much more easily than using lower shutter speeds. If you use a slow shutter speed, like one full second or more, then you will have streaking, because you’re getting light from the object here, here, here, here, as it moves across the frame. You’re recording all that light. Those of you curious the “B” represents bulb mode. That basically means as long as I hold down the shutter button, the shutter will stay open. So I can have it be open for as long as I like. So next let’s talk about the second control you have, the aperture. So inside the lens is an iris, which we call the aperture, and this works just like the iris of your eye. It opens up to let in more light and goes down to let in less light. So in the way that fractions of a second are the settings for the shutter door, F-stops are the settings for the aperture. So here we can see these numbers on this dial represent the f-stop settings. So as I turn this dial, it changes the size of the aperture. So an f-stop is usually represented by the letter F, a slash, and then one of these numbers. The actual meaning of an f-stop is is as a ratio between the diameter of this aperture opening versus the focal length of the lens. So for example if I set my f-stop to f/4, I get an aperture of this size with a specific diameter. f/4 means that for this particular lens, this diameter, this distance right here from edge to edge of the opening, it takes four of those distances to go the focal length of the lens. So this is why the F-stops are inverted in terms of lower numbers mean bigger openings. So if I switch it to f/2, which is the largest aperture this lens can do, it’s a larger diameter, a longer length between the edges of the opening. So then it only takes two of those to go the focal length of the lens. So besides letting in more or less light, the aperture also has a secondary effect the way the shutter has a secondary effect. This is what’s called depth of field. Essentially what depth of field is talking about is the amount of things in focus. So if I have a large aperture, like the f/2 I was just using, and I took a picture of say, my hand, at the right distance, there’s a certain amount of things that will be in focus in front of and behind my hand. If I’m at f/2, very little is gonna be in focus. I’m going to have what’s called a narrow depth of field. So the amount of space in front of and behind my subject is very narrow. But as I close the aperture down to say f/22, and I would take the same picture, then everything, or most everything in front of and behind my hand, or the subject of the photograph, is going to be in focus. So as you can see, using a larger aperture gives you those blurred-out backgrounds most commonly referred to as Bokeh. This can help isolate a subject from the background. Especially if that background doesn’t look very good or if that background is filled with lights, you can get some really cool background orbs. So to help you understand depth of field a little bit better, let’s talk about the markings on the lens, because they’re here to help guide you. Turning the lens like this changes the focus and you can see all these numbers on the lens. So here you can see feet and meters. These are of course the distances in English and Metric measurements, but just below that you can see all these different numbers, and the numbers are mirrored on each side with an orange marking in the middle here. So if you look, you can see these numbers correspond to the aperture settings. You can see 4, 8, 16, 22, on both sides. So this is actually a depth of field guide. Depending on where your focus is. So let’s say your subject is 4 feet from the camera and let’s say your aperture is set to f/8. Well, if you look you can see an 8 on this side and an 8 on this side, so this is telling you approximately what distance in front of your main subject and behind your main subject will be in focus. Anything in front of, say, looks like about 3 and a half feet and anything further away than 5 feet will be out of focus. But anything between say five and three and a half feet at f/8 when you’re focused at four feet away will be in focus. So let’s talk about lenses. Lenses have what’s called a focal length. So that is measured in millimeters, which you can see here. So the focal length refers to the zoom level of the lens. A 50mm lens on a regular 35mm camera gives you a zoom level that’s approximately the same to the human eye, just way more narrow and cropped down. Sometimes you’ll see lenses that have a single focal length like this one. That means it’s a single zoom level, you can’t change it. If you want the subject to appear bigger in your frame, you have to get physically closer. The actual physical focal length of a lens is technically the distance, approximately, from the front of the lens to where the light comes out the back and converges. If you have a zoom lens, you’ll see multiple focal lengths. Both the minimum and the maximum listed on the lens. The higher the focal length number, the more zoomed in the lens will be. The lower the focal length number, the more wide-angle the lens will be. Some things you’ll also see on the lens are you’ll often see a 1 with a colon and then a number. (1:4-5.6) So in this case, it’s two. This is referring to the max aperture performance that this lens can do. So 1:2, that means a maximum f-stop of f/2, and if we look here we can see it’s f/2. For this lens we can see it’s a 1:4 – 5.6. This is referring to the maximum aperture performance both at 70mm and 300mm as it changes. So even if we have this lens and it’s a maximum aperture of f/4 here, but then we zoom it out, what we’re doing is we’re making the focal length of the lens longer and thus changing the ratio between the aperture opening and the length of the lens, so the f-stop changes. As far as focusing a lens will either be only manual focus, like this one is here, or it will have the ability to do auto focus, with most older lenses that do auto focus relying on a motor inside the camera. Although some later models will rely on a motor in the lens itself. You can usually find a switch like this one here, to switch between manual focus and auto focus, if you have an automatic camera. So how do you load film into one of these cameras? Well, if it’s a more traditional SLR like this, it will almost certainly have a rewind knob here where you can lift it up and open up the back of the camera. You’ll then take your film cartridge and insert it into the left side. You can push down the rewind knob to hold it in place. You’ll then take your film tab here and pull it out so that you have enough slack to be able to take this tab and put it into the take-up spool through one of these slots. You want to make sure to get that tab all the way through the take-up spool. Next, you can go ahead and advance the film. So once I know that that’s wound correctly and it’s in there, I’m going to close the back of my camera, push down the rewind knob, and next I’m going to turn my rewind knob clockwise in order to make sure that there’s tension on the film. So what this is doing is it’s winding the film in the cartridge, just to make it tight. That way, when I advance my lever next, this will turn counterclockwise. And that way I know that the film’s advancing. So here on my camera I also have a counter. So I can take photos and advance the film until I reach zero. Now the last thing you want to make sure to do is set the ISO. On an older film camera like this it’s not going to know what the film’s sensitivity is. So for the black and white film I just loaded, it is 100 ISO, which on older cameras is also represented by ASA. So here you can see I have a little 400 here. The way this works is I pull up and change it that way. So then you should be ready to go. Now. If you have a more automatic film camera like the ZX-30 here, it’s a little different. You’ll probably find a switch similar to this on the side to open it up. It will also probably have a little window here to let you know if there’s already some film in there. If there is already film in there and you want to rewind it, this symbol right here is a pretty universal symbol for rewinding film. You can take a paper clip and you can push that button and it will force the camera to rewind the film all the way back into the canister, regardless of how many photos have been taken. So you can open up the back of the camera by pulling down there. Then take your film, same thing, you’ll load it into the left side. And if you look you can see there’s almost always some kind of marking on this side showing you where the camera wants the film tab to be. So you’ll take this film tab and here I’m going to insert it. So the tab is right there. So here you can see that there are little hooks that have grabbed on to the sprocket holes. The film tab is laying exactly where the indicator says it should. You can close the back of the camera and you’re good to go. So let’s talk a little bit about composing your photographs before you take them. When you’re looking through the viewfinder, the very first thing you should do is check the edges of the viewfinder. The important thing to keep in mind is that the photograph you take in the camera is not the final photograph. You are recording the information you need to make the final photograph. So you should always leave just a little bit of room all around the edges for the photograph you actually have in mind to be able to crop it out later, exactly how you want. Giving yourself this extra space can be extremely helpful and make it way easier to get that final photo you want. The most common type of composition is center. Meaning the subject is directly in the middle of the photograph. Now this can make for some excellent photographs. There’s no reason to shy away from it. It is tried and true. The next method of composition is rule of thirds. This is where you can split the photograph into thirds, both horizontally and vertically, and at the intersection of these thirds you can place your subject. Another type of composition technique is leading lines, where you have lines going from the front of the photograph to the back of the photograph in some way, leading the viewers eye along that line. Keep in mind there are a lot of different ways to compose a photograph. These are just some of the most common and well-known. So let’s talk about P, S, A, M, or in this camera green smiley face, Tv, Av, and M. So these are settings that you will see on pretty much any modern DSLR or a nicer electronic SLR film camera. What do they mean? Well Program means fully-automatic, S or Tv, meaning time value, means shutter priority. Meaning you choose the shutter speed and the camera will choose the aperture. It’s a semi-automatic setting. The other semi-automatic setting is A or Av, aperture value, meaning aperture priority. Meaning you choose the aperture and the camera chooses the shutter speed. And manual is where you are controlling both the aperture and the shutter speed and they will be exactly what you set them to and the camera won’t mess with them at all. A lot of electronic cameras also have these preset modes. These are pretty universal symbols. So you’ll see portrait, landscape, this little flower pretty much always means macro, or close-up shot. Running guy means sports. You have night time and then another one where the flash just never goes off. It can be fun to experiment around with these to see if they give you the results you want, or if you’re not familiar yet, or practiced enough with the manual settings, you can try these out. So let’s say you’re on the Program, or green smiley face mode, and you want to change the brightness level of your photograph, but you don’t really know how to use the manual settings yet. Well, don’t worry, there is a setting that allows you to change the brightness levels without you having to know anything that’s called exposure compensation. And it’s represented by this square with a plus and a minus symbol in it. So what you can do is you can find the button on the camera that has that same symbol, which is right here. I can hold this down, this button and then I can change my exposure compensation, which is here. So at 0 that means that the camera will expose the way it thinks it should which right now is 1/250th of a second at f/6.7. But let’s say I want the photo to be darker. I can just go negative one stop, negative two stops two and a half. Or I can go the other way, plus one stop, plus two stops, plus three stops. So you can see 1/125th of a second at f/3.5. It’s slowing…It’s letting the shutter stay open longer, it’s opening up the aperture, because I’m trying to make it brighter. The only thing to keep in mind, and this is really important, is that the camera will stay there. It will stay at three stops overexposed if you don’t change it back to zero. So don’t forget that you’ve done exposure compensation. Otherwise your entire role could be overexposed. So I’m sure you’re saying to yourself, “Well, okay, I understand what the shutter is, I understand what the aperture is, and I know I can change them. But what do I change them to if I’m shooting in a full manual?” Well, that’s where the light meter inside the camera comes in. In this camera the light meter is represented by a needle that will move up and down, indicating the amount of light coming into the camera based on the current shutter speed and aperture settings you have selected. So as you manipulate the different settings of shutter speed and aperture, the light meter peg goes up and down with the goal of getting that light peg in the middle, indicating that the correct amount of light is entering the camera during the photo in order to get a correct exposure. So this is the time in which you have to think about things like, okay, well, it’s darker. So I could let in more light by slowing down the shutter, keeping it open longer. But I need to make sure that if my shutter speed goes too slow, that I’m either sitting really still when I take that photo, the subject isn’t moving necessarily, unless a blurry subject is what I want, or I’m using a tripod. With the aperture, same thing. Go, well, I can let in more light by opening up the aperture, using a lower f-stop number. Or I could let in less light by doing a bigger f-stop number and a smaller aperture. The trade-off being that more or less of the photo is in focus. So if you’re taking a landscape shot, having a wide open aperture isn’t necessarily a good idea. Because not a lot is going to be in focus. It’s just going to be focused on the one thing your lens is focused on and everything to the horizon behind that will be out of focus. So you can use a lower f-stop number, but then that lets less light. So you go, okay, well, I need to compensate by making the shutter stay open longer. It’s this balance. This is exactly what photography is. As a photographer you are balancing all these considerations of what you want the photo to look like, how much light there is, what your camera is capable of doing in terms of letting in light. That’s what it means to be a photographer. For unloading film on an electronic camera, once the roll of film reaches the last picture, it will actually rewind itself, and you’ll be able to easily hear it. It’ll be kind of loud. As I stated before, you can always rewind the film any time you want by looking for this symbol on your camera and using a paper clip to hit that button to force the camera to rewind when you want. If you’re using a more traditional camera like this, to rewind the film you’ll wait until you get to the end of the roll and then you’ll hit the rewind release button here, and just push that in, and then the rewind knob, flip that out, and then you’ll turn it clockwise and you’ll be able to feel the film going into the canister. Once you reach the point at which you’re not really getting any resistance, then the film should be all the way back in the canister, and you can pop open the camera, and take out your film. So you’ve taken all your photos, you’ve unloaded your film, now it’s time to get it developed. If you get it developed by somebody else, that’s the easiest way. It’s definitely more expensive, usually about 10 to 15 dollars a roll and this is what you’ll get back, is negatives cut and put into a sleeve of some kind. Now you can also get digital scans which I recommend. But getting actual prints can be nice too. Getting actual prints which 4×6 is the most common format that you’ll get. The lab will crop and color balance your prints for you, so they’ll look the best they can look. Now speaking honestly, if you develop your own film using equipment like this developing tank here, it will save you a lot of money, especially if you’re going to be using film on a regular basis. There’s a big misunderstanding that you need a darkroom in order to develop your own film and that is not true at all. You don’t need a darkroom, but you only need a darkroom if you are developing photos, making your own prints. That’s when you need a darkroom. But to develop film, no, you don’t need a darkroom for that. In fact, I have an entire video on how to develop black and white film at home. I will put a link up here in the right and in the description so you don’t miss it. And color film development is actually almost identical to black and white film development. It’s just that you use different chemicals and color film tends to be a little bit more temperamental in terms of timing and temperature, but otherwise, they’re basically identical. Once you have your films scanned into your computer, you can edit it digitally without having to buy any editing software. So some free options are Adobe Photoshop Express, which is a free software program. You do have to create an Adobe account in order to download it and they do try to get you to buy the actual software within that software. But it’s a great way to just get started with basic photo editing. It’s very user friendly. If you want something more advanced that’s also free, there’s GIMP. GIMP is an open source photo editing software that is basically a Photoshop alternative and it’s very powerful. Although it can be complicated. So Those are two options that are free so you can try either one of those out for editing your photos digitally. As far as needed accessories, a cleaning kit is always a good idea, with a microfiber cloth, a brush, and a blower. I will link down below to a Giottos brand cleaning kit, which I can easily recommend. If you’re interested in an entry-level tripod, there are a lot of tripods that are twenty-five or thirty dollars. I would steer clear those. Instead I recommend the SLIK U8000. It usually costs around forty five dollars and it is a great entry-level tripod. It is quality. It’s not going to break on you. It’s not going to fall apart. It’s easy to use and easy to recommend. So listen, once you start shooting with one of these cameras, you are going to make mistakes. You’re going to mess up. You’re going to lose rolls of film. Things are going to go wrong. You’re going to have light leaks, whatever. Don’t worry about it. That’s normal. Making mistakes with these kind of cameras is understandable. Keep in mind that photography is a lot different from the way it used to be. It used to be something that took a lot of effort for you to get a great photograph. These days with digital cameras and artificial intelligence software, it can take a great photo for you by just pushing a button. But film is a little harder. So don’t be discouraged if you mess up. In fact, you should expect to mess up, plan for it. But once you do get the hang of things it can be extremely rewarding. Also know that whatever camera you get, there’s going to be a learning curve for it, and if you switch to a different camera, it will take a little while to start taking good photos with a new different camera. If you practice enough, you’ll get to the point where you won’t even have to look most of the time down at the controls. You’ll just have them memorized by feel and be able to focus more on the composition and getting the exact photo you want. My final piece of advice is when in doubt, hit the shutter button. Don’t hesitate, don’t treat film as some precious commodity. There’s still a lot of it. You can still buy it for fairly cheap. Just shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot. So thanks for watching my video! I hope this has helped you out in getting started in film photography. If you have any questions or comments, please leave them in the comment section down below. And if you feel I’ve deserved it, I’d love to get a thumbs up and if you’re interested in film photography or film cameras, go ahead and subscribe to my channel. Thank you so much for watching!

Creative Photography Projects: Disposable Camera #3

Creative Photography Projects: Disposable Camera #3


welcome for those that have been
following along my name is noe and I’m a photographer here in Seoul South Korea
now I’ve been doing this kind of side project involving these disposable
cameras now some of you have actually never seen these which makes me feel
quite old these are old film cameras you can buy them you can use them and after
you’re done with them you turn them in you get them developed and they throw
them away but you get your pictures now what I wanted to do was give these
cameras to different students around Seoul students that have never held a
camera before and just let them take pictures to students
I already did two videos on to students pictures they’re much older one of
them’s in high school one of them was first year in middle school and I just
got back maybe another three cameras so one more
camera we’re doing today is actually from a sixth-grade student it’s girl the
camera I have an eye in my hand is from a fourth grader no way from a fifth
grade boy and today I got a camera from a fourth grade gross so there’s only one
camera out there left is from a from a third grader and there’s actually one
more camera where I haven’t really heard from the person ever again it’s from a
high school student but you know what these kind of things happen but I’m
still pretty excited anyways I gave him these cameras they shot
around the city they gave them back to me when they finished and after this
whole project thing is over I’m going to print out some of the best pictures and
I’m going to have them print it and put on the wall kind of a little small art
exhibit at a local cafe so the students can come and visit with their parents so
without further ado let’s go over some of the pictures that
this sixth-grade growth took now I did get a sneak peak when I was transferring
over the files to my phone but you know what I tried not to the first picture we
have is actually well I told her she could take a picture of anything she
wanted preferably avoiding people because I don’t know if they want me to
show them but here is a man maybe it’s her father it looks about
that age out there in the mountains it’s an alright photo you know next wait who
is that wait maybe that was for uncle and this next couple is her parents my
guess is that uncommon there’s a lot of hiking here in Korea
because you’re sick mountains everywhere so that’s pretty much what there is to
do you know and given that they’re smiling I figure there is some level of
familiarity between them so it’s a nice photo ah actually this is a really good
picture like this is the kind of picture I would print they’re kind of backlit
but there’s still enough ambient light where you can see their faces so I
really like the scenery I really like how there are the kind of pose and
sitting so this is a good picture I like that that’s gonna be pretty for sure
next photo looks like the first guy for the beginning maybe it was a brother of
movies or uncle I don’t really know but it’s alright it’s a little too far
I think but who am I to criticize really here we have another picture it looks
like the same guy back with the kind of suits so I’m not really good at
critiquing you know people always ask me to critique their photos like I’m
someone worthy of critiquing them I already have a video explaining why I
don’t like commenting on people’s pictures or critiquing them because
basically I’m not qualified even though do I am a professional but that’s that’s
check out the video if you want to know why I don’t go around critiquing
people’s pictures with the exception of my students here it looks like they’re
uh well it’s a monument I would like to see a little bit more of their face you
know you’re closer you can see their expressions but then if you’re closer
you probably won’t get the monument in the photo it’s actually more composed
you can see the whole thing so she’s got the fundamentals going here’s another
picture again I would have kind of zoomed in with your feets now there’s
always this big debate about like Prime versus zooms and personally I think it’s
just a bunch you know I think it’s a bunch of that you know it’s just just
take a photo you know don’t really matter too much maybe this is her
grandpa it looks that way she puts the people in the middle a lot
well she doesn’t know about the rule of thirds but we’re not really gonna go
into that you don’t always need the rule of thirds
I think it’s an okay photo like this photo is like more of a close up and I
like this much more because you can see like the expressions and the mom and the
dad and you get some of the scenery and she is following the rule of thirds here
so it’s actually good photo I would print it too and yeah they’re different
they’re this decently exposed maybe just a little bit of tweaking with the light
but white balance in Lightroom oh and here is the same photo but with a flash
so these cameras actually kind of have a self flash like they flash by themselves
if you’ve never used one I used to use them a lot when I was a high school
before I got my first camera I would use these a lot and they were cheaper back
then back then you had like the one hour photo but now since they’re getting rid
of the film development’s sometimes it takes a week or two to get your film
back so it really sucks well in the States because I live in Korea now I
could still do it here fastly but I like this picture with a flash much poor
much more this next photo of her parents is okay no I would’ve liked to seen it
more closer but I also like the scenery here we have maybe her uncle and her
grandpa it’s alright you know I wish I could see your Grandpa’s eyes looking at
the camera here is the shots with the sunset and her mom using a flash
actually this is a good picture you know so many people fail at taking a decent
picture like this like they’ll take the picture of the sunset but the mom will
be like really underexposed like tomorrow you can even see her or the
model will be exposed and the background will be like all blown out you know most
of the time you watch all these YouTube channels and they always telling you to
buy the latest the greatest camera or the greatest lens the best thing you can
actually do is buy some decent lighting you know buy a softbox by an LED lights
or buy a flash even the cheapest ones will make way better results in the most
expensive camera and lens so that these come with built-in flash and you think
it fires automatically so already she takes better pictures and most people
out there because most people water can’t even use a flash like everyone’s
afraid to use it ah now we have a photo just with the
landscape and are you probably going to print this you know you may not know
this but I’m actually I started off as a landscape and cityscape photographer
like I have a lot of videos about landscapes and cityscapes on my older
channel I’m gonna I’m gonna move them to this channel because there’s got a lot
of information for some people who come to saw and want to know about these
places it’s another shot with her mom and her grandpa we’re gonna that one’s
okay I like this one much more the one were like kind of kind of padlet but a
Lango and it’s kind of golden a shower it looks like this was a
sunrise like maybe they spent the night on the mountain like in a cabin or
something they’ve got sunset or or maybe they got there early in the morning and
they were just getting like the first sunrise
that’s that might be it but we saw the other pictures and they were there in a
day time so it’s kind of hard to tell to be honest maybe their pictures are
just all out of order you know when they get unprocessed I like this photo we
have another beautiful landscape and oh there’s there’s an s-curve you know for
those of you are into composition and landscape you got blouson USS that’s
really really well done I mean I don’t think that was her intention but it’s
quite beautiful I always liked looking at s lakes and rivers no it’s just just
landscape photography thing she even cut off most of the trees on the bottom like
that’s that’s some good shit so she’s got the eye for it we’re gonna print
down for sure – here’s another pictures more of the same another photo or this
time she did the rule of thirds just goes to show that just after some
practice with the camera you naturally start doing these things and she kind of
cut off their shoes but not by very much this is actually more like a rangefinder
camera so uh so maybe she wasn’t trying to cut off the shoes but she couldn’t
see she you can’t really tell with these like she might have framed that like
perfectly we’re not cutting off the feet but then just a little bit of range cuts
it off so she’s doing good it’s another shot with the mom and her
grandpa Darwin’s all right another one for Mom
I wonder if she just kind of hurried up and used up the film camera cause it was
it was she had it for like two or three months so either way she’s got some nice
shots and it’s good to see what she’s doing shot of her grandpa on the path
it’s alright I would have moved to counter a little bit more like
the path closed up it’s okay and that was the last one so yeah like I said I
have a few more of these cameras coming up this is all out-of-pocket expense for
me like I don’t know how much these cost in the states anymore but each one cost
like $15 in Korea so if you do the math how many cameras are given out three
four five six maybe like seven right cameras each one at $15 each and then to
get them developed is another six dollars and then to get the prints each
prints like twenty dollars but I’m not gonna print every picture just my
favorite ones so you know sometimes we tend to want to spend a lot of money
like on lenses or cameras or gear but it helps to spend your money on more
artistic things like this cause like uh at least two of the people that are
given these cameras to now have now enjoy photography you know because uh
one of my students because one of them was my students I gave her my Fuji x100s
cameras like a thousand bucks but I know she’s making good use of it now I
wouldn’t have just given it 20 random person I gave it to her because I knew
she was generally interested and she tried to take photos and she’s also one
of my models so yeah you never know what you can do you know once all this is
said and done I’m going to buy a few more of these and kind of place them
around the city with my address and just message to take photos or whatever you
want and we’re done mail it to me probably not many people are gonna mail
it to me but I’ll be happy if I get one camera back and I don’t mind spending my
money on that kind of thing you know because I’m not really a expensive
person like I don’t go around buying expensive fancy things or clothes or
food just enjoy photography anyways see you
around and be sure to leave some comments or something you know that kind
of thing peace

Long Exposure Photography at Trillium Lake, Oregon

Long Exposure Photography at Trillium Lake, Oregon


Good morning from the Mt Hood National Forest It’s still pretty early, not even 6 in the morning. I came to Trillium Lake today I was hoping to find the road open, but as you can see it is closed So I have to walk the last 2 miles to the lake, which is fine because I get to do some exercise But I’m afraid that I’m gonna miss the light It was beautiful just a few minutes ago, and I’m afraid that when I get there, it’s not gonna be that good But I should still be able to make good images in this place because it is beautiful It is stunning and breathtaking, all of those things It’s been a while since I was here for the last time so I’m really looking forward to this Let’s do it This is a beautiful place, isn’t it? Actually, that’s the problem of this location: the view of the lake and the mountain in the background is so stunning and so beautiful that steals the show. It’s really hard to focus or to look for different compositions here that is not the obvious one that is right in front of you, and there is nothing wrong with taking that, with making that image. I actually made a couple earlier slightly different but the same shot, and I made a couple of long exposures. Most of my images, if not all of them this morning have been long exposures. As you can tell, I love long exposure photography, for me It feels almost like cheating because the images don’t look like photographs They look more like paintings and that’s something that I really, really wanna achieve with my photography There is absolutely nothing wrong with taking a regular shot of this scene, this is a beautiful setting I mean, you can’t really go wrong with it There are some things in this scene that a painter wouldn’t paint For example the contrails from the planes in the sky The clouds are not the most beautiful clouds this morning So those are the things that I’m trying to get rid of with a long exposure, and I think it’s working And I think it’s taking this already beautiful scene to another level and it’s making for almost a perfect painting and I love this place because of this So, I’m not really sure what’s going on here I don’t know if it’s the remote or the camera that is not working properly But I’m not able to take more long exposures. That kind of sucks. So this was the last one from here I was using this as a frame for the mountain and the lake, kind of, and talking about frames I’m gonna go for a walk, there is a beautiful boardwalk along the lake I’m gonna be looking for frames for the mountain. Hopefully some trees and branches, stuff like that. That’s what I’m gonna be doing now

CORINA Camera & Photos

CORINA Camera & Photos


Hello, everyone. My name is Enrique. Thanks for watching. Today we’re presenting you this pretty camera made by Duopta in Prague, former Czechoslovakia. It’s a light camera, not very small. It’s all made by Bakelite Expect for the front metal plates. The camera, being a medium format camera uses 120mm film and you can choose to take 16 exposures with the frame inside, so you can take sixteen 6 x 4.5 photos or you can take the frames out, and there will be 12 exposures you can take 6×6 To check the number, there are two red windows in the back. The upper one is for 6×6 and the one beneath is for the 6×4.5 There is not much to say about this camera The most important thing is that the quality of the image is pretty nice. very very sharp in the middle. a little bit soft in the borders but that’s okay for me. The lens of the camera is an achromat with two different aperture settings We have f11 and f16. In some models, they are accompanied by a symbol In this case, the cloud and the sun The lens, as you can see, when it’s not in use, screws into the body. Like the Fed or the Leica and also acts as the focusing so you have to match the red dot to the distance that you want to focus. The first symbol by the way, quite funny symbols is half man without arms I guess it is made for portraits, the second symbol for group photos and the last one for landscape or something like that Besides the aperture, we have to talk about the shutter speeds There were different models, This one is 30, 60, and 125 of a second. Plus, B mode, very useful. Some other models, they had like 25, 50, 75 of a second, so even slower shutter speeds There are a few funny things about the camera. The first one is the view finder. If you look at the camera from the front, There is nothing wrong, right? It seems perfectly normal and okay, but as soon as you turn the camera around Oh, man, look at the view finder. Seems like a joke, right? But actually, it performs very well, it’s bright and clear. Another interesting thing of this camera is the advance lever or advance knob, i think It’s at the button to pass the film After this CORINA, there were a CORINA 2, which is the next model. But it was totally the same camera, but for a flash connection on the top of the camera to mount the flash This camera came with the cap and also a very sturdy camera case. Leather. It’s made for this camera, so it’s quite difficult to put the camera inside. But even more difficult to take it out. You will always lose the cap on the process. As you can see here. Besides the camera case, the strap seems indestructible. Very very sturdy and nice but as we said before, it’s in the “wrong” side of the camera Because if you want to use the camera with one hand, for example, your right one there is no way you can press the shutter button. Maybe like this, but then I will hang myself in the camera Now let’s load some film and take it our for a walk!

How to Use a Fuji Instax Mini 9 Instant Film Camera

How to Use a Fuji Instax Mini 9 Instant Film Camera


The Fuji Instax Mini 9 instant film camera takes 2 AA batteries, which come with the camera and are loaded into the handle. Simply slide the battery door out of the way and install the batteries as indicated. The Mini 9 uses Instax Mini film which is about the size of a credit card. The standard film with a white border comes in this kind of packaging. There are also other kinds of Mini Instax film you can use in this camera that have different colored borders as well as a black and white film. You can find links to these in the description below. To load the film, first remove the silver packaging by tearing at the top notch in the upper right. Make sure to hold the film cartridge by the sides and to not push on the film through the two holes. Open up the back of the camera by pulling down slightly on the latch on the top. Insert the film cartridge by aligning it with the yellow marking on the top right, then firmly close the back of the camera until you hear the latch click. You can always tell if there is a film pack inside the camera by looking for the yellow mark through the film indicator window. Push down firmly on the cameras “On” switch, in the lower right front of the camera. This will pop out the lens and start to charge the flash as indicated by the flash charging light blinking next to the viewfinder. Once the flash indicator light stops blinking and one of the brightness LED indicators is lit, the flash is fully charged. Keep in mind that the flash always goes off for every picture and the camera will not allow you to take a photo until the flash is fully charged. Pressing the shutter button will eject the black film cover from the camera and the picture counter will go from saying “S” to saying “10”, indicating how many photos you have left in this pack. Carefully remove the black film cover and you are now ready to start taking photos. Make sure not to open the back of the camera when you still have film loaded as this will expose the remaining film to light and ruin all of those shots. In order to prevent an accidental opening, you can actually put a piece of tape across the latch. To take a photo, first point your camera in the general direction of your subject and look at the brightness LED indicator. Make sure you are not blocking the light meter, the flash, the lens, or the viewfinder with your fingers. These LEDs will light up to indicate which brightness setting the light meter thinks you should set the camera to. Make sure to turn the brightness adjustment dial to the recommended brightness setting. Turning this wheel actually changes the size of the aperture, or iris, in the lens, letting in more or less light. Once you have chosen the appropriate brightness setting, look through the camera’s viewfinder to frame up your photo. Keep in mind the framing you see through the viewfinder is actually slightly different from what the camera lens actually sees, especially the closer your subject is to the camera. The lens will capture a slightly wider view than what you see in the viewfinder, with a little more space showing up on the top of the photograph than the bottom. Here you can see the view through the viewfinder versus the actual print that comes out. Keep in mind the Instax Mini 9 has a fixed focus distance of about 2 feet to infinity. Anything closer than 2 feet will be out of focus without the use of the close-up lens attachment, which I’ll talk about in a bit. Now that you have your brightness settings set and you framed up your photo in the viewfinder, you can hit the shutter button to take your photo. The camera pushes out the film through rollers, spreading the developing chemical evenly across the entire photo. You want to make sure to let the print come out of the camera on its own and only then pull it out. Make sure not to shake the print as this can cause the developing chemicals to become unevenly distributed. Your photo will be fully developed in about 2 to 4 minutes. On the brightness adjustment dial there is a setting called “Hi-Key”. This setting gives you the largest aperture or iris the camera has and will cause your photos to be brighter than normal. So if you’d like your photo to come out really bright or you are in a very low light situation, you can use this setting to get the photos you want. An important thing to remember is that every time you turn the camera off by pushing in the lens, the brightness adjustment dial will reset. When you turn the camera on again, it will always be at the default brightness setting of “indoors”. If you are in a bright light situation and forget to set the brightness adjustment dial correctly, this can cause your photos to come out way too bright. If you’re interested in taking selfies, or just photos from a closer range, then you can snap on the close-up lens attachment, which comes with the camera. This allows you to take photos at a closer focusing distance of about 1 to 1.5 feet from the camera lens. If you’re taking a selfie, you can use the selfie mirror on the front of the lens to frame the photo. If you’re shooting through the viewfinder at a close distance of about 1 foot, make sure to compensate your framing by moving the camera slightly up and to the right, as you can see here. Once you have shot through all of the photos in the film pack, the film counter will read 0. You can remove the used film pack by opening up the back of the camera and inserting two fingers into these holes here and pulling the pack out. You can store your Instax Mini photos in custom photo albums made by Fuji specifically for this film. They’ll come in multiple colors and they’re a great way to ensure the longevity of your photos. You can get your own through the links in the description. Keep in mind that the camera has an auto shutoff feature of 5 minutes to save battery. Once your battery does get low, the camera will let you know by lighting up the flash charge indicator a solid red. If you see all of the brightness LEDs light up at the same time, this can also indicate a low battery or something more seriously wrong with your camera. If this happens, leave the camera in the “On” position, while you replace the batteries. If this does not make the brightness LEDs work normally, you will need to contact Fuji for a repair or replacement of your camera. The Mini 9 does not have a tripod screw mount on the bottom. But the bottom is flat enough for the camera to stand on its own. You can still place the camera on a flat surface, like a table or counter, to help you stabilize it. When holding the camera for long periods, I found that using the handle isn’t very comfortable, and it’s far more comfortable to just grab the camera like this. Also, don’t forget to use the included wrist strap to prevent dropping the camera and damaging it. You want to make sure not to cut the print with scissors as this may cause the developing chemicals to leak out. Also, when traveling, avoid having any unexposed film, including the film in your camera, from going through the x-ray machine, as this will ghost the film. As of the making of this video, the TSA still allows hand inspection of photographic film upon request. Also, make sure to keep Instax film away from mothballs, as they contain a chemical that can damage both exposed and unexposed instant film. You also want to keep your film and prints away from extreme heat and cold. It’s generally a bad idea to leave unexposed film in a (hot) car as it will ruin it. If you’re going to put your camera and film or prints into long-term storage, make sure to keep them in room temperature and at low humidity. Make sure to remove the batteries as well as attach the close-up lens, so it doesn’t get lost. As far as specifications the Fuji Instax Mini 9 has a lens focal length of 60mm, which is roughly equivalent to 34mm on a full-frame camera. The shutter always fires at 1/60th of a second, and the flash has a maximum effective distance of about 9 feet. The Instax film itself has an ISO of 800. I hope this video has helped you if you feel I deserve it, please leave a “Like”, and if you’re interested in film cameras or film photography, go ahead and subscribe for more videos! If you have any questions or comments, please leave them down below. Thanks for watching!