The Best Cameras We Own: Mamiya RZ67, Leica Minilux, Pentax 67, Leica M10 & More

The Best Cameras We Own: Mamiya RZ67, Leica Minilux, Pentax 67, Leica M10 & More


– Hey, and welcome to Staff Picks where we take the Gear Patrol staffers and we force them to tell you products that they use every day. Today, we’re talking cameras. (slow techno music) Today, we have 21 cameras,
there are 13 film, eight digital, six medium
format, seven 35 millimeter, and the prices vary from $100 to $10,000. If you’re interested
about any specific camera, we’re gonna have them timestamped in the description below so jump ahead. (camera shutter clicks) – My pick is this Fuji X100F. It is, honestly, I’ve got like
a medium format film camera and a couple of little point and shoots, and this is definitely my
favorite out of the bunch, it’s technically my girlfriend’s. Thank you Bess.
(camera shutter clicks) But I use it all the time walking around. Compared to the film cameras
and the medium format and the digital cameras like the 5D IV, it’s just like so much more
versatile and easy to use, and it just makes so much more sense in everyday applications. It’s like an upgraded iPhone, almost. And on top of that, the Fuji colors are really, really, really, really good. And so like.
(metal clinks) (bleeps)
(laughs) It’s a little worn. (laughs) It’s been everywhere with me. I’ve taken this camera everywhere and shot everything with it and it’s great because you can just use
put it in your pocket and whip it out and use it
like you would an iPhone but it just takes incredible photos, and it’s easy to use,
the colors are great. I could spend all day talking about how much I love this camera
but it’s really awesome. (camera shutter clicks) – So the camera that I
brought in this old Canon AE-1 Program film camera. And I had an old Minolta film camera before I got this one. It was kind of like a plastic that I found in a friend’s attic. And it was mostly automatic, and I wanted something a
little bit more control. So I did some research
and picked this thing up on eBay for something like 200 bucks. And I got it before going on
a heli ski trip to Siberia, Which is crazy, but I wanted to be able to take some cool film
shots while I was there, and I went on the trip actually having never developed
a roll from this camera. So, kind of took a risk,
shot a bunch of rolls there, and they all turned out really
really good in my opinion. But yeah, I’ve just been
using this camera ever since. I’ve had it for roughly two years now. (camera shutter clicks) Came with a 50 millimeter
1.8 lens pre-attached to it. I haven’t bought any other lenses ’cause I liked this one so much. Another thing I really
like about this camera is that it does have
automated setting options. If you want, you can change your aperture or your shutter speed, so you can go fully manual if you want to, or if you just wanna mess around with one setting in particular and let the other part go
automatic, you can do that. It’s a super, super easy to use, which is why I like it. (camera shutter clicks) – So, this is my Yashica Mat 124G. They made this camera from the ’70s, ’80s. I bought it on eBay from a guy who actually bought it from B&H photo. It’s still got the price tag on there which I find kind of funny ’cause I bought it for far
less than you paid for it. I originally got this camera, I was a photography minor in college and was taking a film course and wanted to shoot medium format. I was blowing up a lot of large prints and wanted the extra resolution. And it was the most affordable
medium format camera I could get at the time,
so twin lens reflex, which is a little bit funky, it takes a little getting used to. It’s got the waist level finder, so you pop the top up
and hold it waist level and look down into it. The lens, it actually
refracts out of the top lens and then you shoot out of the bottom lens. So it takes a little getting used to that what you’re looking at is actually not exactly lined
up with what’s being shot. It has this also this
cool little magnifier so you can actually
really dial in the focus. You focus just by turning this little knob until you get it just right. The two wheels here change the
shutter speed and aperture. This is the little trigger. It’s really actually
a pretty simple camera but the lens quality is really sharp. You crank once you shoot an exposure. The one downside with this camera is that you need to meter from either a handheld light meter or your phone. It actually took mercury batteries and so they no longer make the battery that you need for this camera, there are a couple guys on Etsy and I’m sure you can dig
through pages of Reddit and find somebody making like
a replica mercury battery but you can get little
adapters that plug in with a modern battery. They work okay. I found that it’s probably
better just to meter off camera. Yeah, I mean, that’s
pretty much the gist of it. It’s fun, I’ve shot everything
from stuff in studio to outdoor like buildings
that type of thing. I shoot a lot of, I
shoot a lot of buildings. It’s not great for like street photography just because it’s cumbersome
to be looking down and the focus isn’t super quick. But it’s fun, I have a fun time with it. I find myself shooting
with it less these days just because I don’t have
access to a darkroom anymore, so developing medium format’s
a little bit expensive, but yeah, it’s a fun camera. (camera shutter clicks) – All right, so as you can see I have a small army of cameras. If you think I have a problem,
you’re probably right. And I also wanna recognize
before I get into this, I look like a (bleeps)
version of George Muncie, and I’ll take that. So I’m gonna start off with the camera I’ve had the most out of all these which is my Sony a7R III. This camera means a lot to me. I used to shoot with an a7R
III at an old job of mine and I absolutely fell in love with it, and my personal camera was a Canon 70D that I got because I watch Casey Neistat. So I shot with that for three
years and for three years, I saved that to get this guy, and it’s honestly just been incredible. I’ve put this thing through hell and back. I’ve shot 10s of thousands
of images on it, if not more. It’s got 42 megapixels
so I’m able to print a lot of the work that I do and it’s really cool
that I’m able to do that. One of my favorite
features about this camera, just how lightweight the body is. Obviously, it’s a mirrorless camera. So, the problem with that is though is that I usually have
this 24-70 G Master 2.8, which sometimes makes it awkward
because it’s so top heavy but still I find it really light. It’s easy to just pull and shoot. I’ve shot everything from street to sports to landscapes on this thing. I’ve broken the body once and
had to get it fully repaired. I’ve shattered this lens once, I had to get it fully repaired. I just find it really fantastic. The only gripes I have about this camera, the first would be that we
shoot Canon here at Gear Patrol, and I definitely do believe
I’m one of those people, that the color science for
Canon is a little bit better, even when I’m processing my RAW files. I just find that I get a
little bit more out of Canon. But this thing is a workhorse. Honestly, I would recommend it to anybody who’s curious about using
Sony or switching to Sony. It is fantastic and I don’t think you’re ever gonna go wrong with it. And moving on to film cameras. I got into film recently
in the past six months, like a true millennial. My dad and his best friend, they’re big landscape photographers. They shot film so I was
aware of it as I grew up and would mess around with
their cameras sometimes, and then they transitioned into digital and I’m doing the reverse now. So the first actually film camera I’ve ever picked up was this Mamiya 645. I’m not sure why I really
jumped right into medium format. Got a couple people here in the office that shoot medium format and I’d mess around with their cameras and peruse the interwebs
and all the Willem Verbeecks and the Muncies and then, and everybody, so kinda was interested in
having a bigger negative, I wasn’t sure if I could
jump into the 6×6, 6×7. So, this camera, I’ve
actually shot a lot more like my family and more intimate moments. When I first got it,
I thought it was huge, but now I don’t find it too crazy. I’ve an auto winder on it,
which I think is great. It also doubles as like
a really good grip, which I like with this camera. Just when you’re using it
with the traditional shutter, it’s sometimes a little bit awkward so I really like having this even though it just like adds a ton
of unnecessary size. I have the prism finder on it. I like shooting from the eye a lot more than the waist-level viewfinder. It also has like the light meter in it so I don’t need to use
my Sekonic light meter when I’m using this. Yeah, it’s just an all around. It’s really good, really
happy with what it is. I was able to trade a lens for it. So, yeah, it’s fantastic. It’s pretty affordable so you can get one for a couple hundred
bucks, which I really like. And there’s a ton of modularity with any of these Mamiya systems, so yeah I’m really happy with it but I did just get the RZ67
because I’m lost in the sauce, and probably gonna be getting rid of this 645 relatively soon. So I actually, full disclosure, I’ve only shot one roll with this 67 and I’ve only shot one
roll with my Minilux, those are very recent pickups. But I’ve been extremely
happy with the results that I’ve gotten out of those two rolls and plan to shoot both of
them for years to come. So if you’re not familiar with RZ67, this is the Pro II model
which the only difference that is has than the original model is, there’s a little bit
more specific focus wheel that connects to the main one. So this little bit more
or this focus wheel is not as sensitive as this
one which I really like because the main reason
I picked up this camera is for portraiture. I wanna do a lot more street portraiture. I have a studio that
I’ve built in my house. I wanted to do more work on, and actually the only
roll I’ve shot so far and this was my father,
who came up to New York, and I was able to shoot him in the studio. It’s huge, this camera
was originally intended to the studio workhorse
to put it on a tripod. That being said though, I
still do find use with it. I don’t think it’s too crazy, I walked around today
in the streets with it. It’s obviously not ideal,
you’re not gonna travel with it but I still think you get a lot out of it. So I do have a waist
level viewfinder for this, I have the prism finder. Once again, I like
shooting from eye level. I do understand the waist-level, the compositions are gonna be interesting, sometimes with models or people, they’re gonna be a little more comfortable because they can look at you versus you them looking
right into the camera. I have the 110 2.8 on here. I think this one is just incredible. It’s just equivalent to like
50 millimeter focal length. I’ve been super happy with it, you can read or watch a ton of videos where people talk about this camera a lot more eloquently than I do about just how fantastic this lens is, but I’d say like the main point that I can’t stress enough
of why I love these cameras, is the bellows focus system. To be able to get extremely
close to my subject is something that I was
really interested about because I wanted to use this
camera mostly for portraiture, and obviously when the lens is extended, you’re gonna need to factor
that into your light readings and add a little bit more light, but it’s just a fantastic
camera that you’re able to truly leverage in a fantastic way. I’m extremely happy that
I picked this lens up as a tax return splurge, just really, really happy with it, and yeah, the modularity,
again, is fantastic. I have an autowinder for it if I’m ever trying to crank
out shoots in the future. You can get different backs
you can do the 67 back, you can get a 645 or 66 back. So obviously, 67’s gonna be 10 exposures, 66 is gonna be 12, 645, I think,
is either 15 or 16 on this. I just love that modularity, the fact that you’re able to
do a bunch with this camera. Yeah, it’s just great. And lastly, I’ll move
on to my Leica Minilux. Most ridiculous and unnecessary
purchase I’ve ever made. I was looking for a point and shoot. I kind of saw the interest
or I saw the interest. I kind of developed an interest in wanting to shoot 35 millimeter
just because the 645 is a little too big for
the streets in my opinion, and I shoot a ton of street
photography with my a7R III. So I did a little bit of research and stumbled upon the Minilux kinda as a comparable option to Contax T2. I know there’s a plethora of options that are way more affordable that I probably would
recommend over this Minilux that do some of the same things
better and for a lot cheaper but there’s just
something about picking up a Leica, the namesake,
just like, I don’t know, it’s just ridiculous but. – [Man] Oh, you should get T3. – Yeah, so I’ve actually only
put one roll through this. I had put a roll in prior
but it turned out weird. I actually believe that
now, it was a film issue and not to do with the camera. So, one of the main, I guess,
negatives of this camera deals with uncertainty, and that is… So when you turn the camera on, you can see the lens comes out. And there’s a notorious
issue called the E02 error, and what that is is there
is a cord that connects to the lens that connects
in the body of the camera and whenever you turn it on and off, that cord is actually
a little bit too small. And the more and more
pressure you put on it, apparently, it will disconnect. And there is one person in the world that can fix that and that’s
the guy living in Ukraine. I knew that going in, but I didn’t realize how sketchy it could be. I haven’t had any problems
and I’ve actually read that one of the reasons
why that issue can occur is that the battery reading on the Minilux might be a little bit off. And so when it might say half full, it might actually be a
quarter full or less, which then puts more strain on when it’s opening and closing which might affect that cord. So just to be safe, I
changed this battery out whenever I see it go
into the middle section. It’s got a 40 millimeter 2.4. Actually, my favorite focal
length is 40 millimeters when I’m shooting in
the streets and stuff. I really like it. I found this lens to be
absolutely fantastic. I’m super happy with the images. I shoot almost exclusively on portrait for my color Portra 400 is
probably my most used film stock, and very, very happy with this camera and the results that have come out of it. I don’t know if it’s the best
point and shoot to pick up. One of the biggest reasons
being, it’s like a fucking brick, like it literally is a little bit too big. If you compared it to like Hunter’s GR1 or even Eric’s Olympus,
it’s considerably larger. It doesn’t fit comfortably into a pocket. In the winter it does
fit into my coat pocket which is why I don’t think I minded it, but I would not wanna be using this all the time in the streets. I don’t think it’s as
inconspicuous as another one. But that being said, it is
still a fantastic camera. And, yeah, I enjoy shooting with it. Yep, that’s my strange addiction and I hope you guys enjoyed it. (camera shutter clicks)
(upbeat music) – So these are my two cameras, I figured, I’ll go in chronological order here. So, this is the Olympus
OM-D E-M10 Mark II, bit of a mouthful. This is the first serious
camera that I ever got, like three-ish years
ago something like that. I spent some time messing
around with a friend’s DSLR and I decided I wanted
to get a camera my own. So I spent a lot of time
figuring out exactly what I wanted and I ended up with this Micro Four Thirds camera ’cause I decided the old adage, the best camera’s the
one you have with you. I wanted to get something
that was small enough that it wasn’t gonna be
arduous to carry around, and I figured I probably
wasn’t gonna be printing poster size prints and so far, the Micro Four Thirds has treated me well. I’ve got the little kit lens on here, I’ve also got a 15 millimeter equivalent. Is that would it would be? Yeah, it’s 25 millimeter in the weird way, the crop ratios work,
and I’ve got a zoom lens. It is a great little camera,
it’s very customizable. It’s got like three little
function buttons on here that you can program to be
basically anything you want. I find it to be lovely. It’s very easy to carry around. I’ve got a tiny little
Amazon Basics tripod that can hold it up perfectly well. Yeah, it suited me great. I use it to do a lot
of long exposure stuff. It’s my general, is the thing that I’ve been really into recently. Yeah, and the lenses are so tiny. It’s really fantastic, very easy to fit in a bag and a backpack. There is a pancake lens for
this that I haven’t got yet but I think I’m gonna buy it
because once you have that, you can actually fit this in a coat pocket which would be awesome. Which sort of brings me to,
this is my most recent camera that I bought fairly recently. So I’ve never shot film before. I actually caught somebody talking about the Olympus XA2 on Twitter. Somebody posted a picture of it and I just thought it looked amazing. And so I started looking into what it was, the film cameras in general, and it was really appealing to me and where I’m at as a film photographer which is that I don’t
really know anything. And so this camera makes it super easy. You just put the film in
there, it’s a point and shoot. It’s got zone focusing which takes a little
bit of getting used to, But it was, it’s a very simple package, except for the zone focusing
which is a little unintuitive, but that made it a great place for me to like start
practicing and messing around and broadening my horizons when
it comes to my photography. Like I said, I shoot a lot of
long exposures with this one. That’s not something you can really use this point and shoot for so it’s made me broaden my horizons. I just love how small it is. The fact that there is the dust cover makes it so easy to
just throw it in pocket, pants pocket, coat pocket,
fits into my back pocket. I also really love how
it’s taken me a little bit to figure out but you can
operate it pretty effectively one handed and just like
slide the dust cover open, and then hold it one handed like this, and the zone focus is on the right side so as long as you remember,
up to make the focal lens, to make the focal length more distant, down to make it closer, so it makes it very easy
to pull it out of my pocket and snap off a picture really quick. It’s got a very quiet shutter
so it’s also like very subtle. I’ve only shot a few rolls with it. So far, all black and white. I’ve got a roll of color Kodak in here but it has been an absolute blast. I found it on eBay,
you can find a used one for around 60 bucks. It’s been a great little toy
and I have been loving it. – This is the Canon EOS Rebel T5i and I’ve had it for probably
like three or four years now. And I can tell you two major things that I love about this camera. Number one is you basically
don’t even really have to be able to read to use it. I am definitely very much in the amateur photography category. And you basically got all
these great little icons on the dial and you can pretty much select between motion, portrait,
nature, all kinds of stuff, and get exactly the
kind of shots you want. I’m definitely what I would
call a volume shooter, so I just take as many pictures as I can. And usually, one out
of 100 is pretty good. The second thing that I
love about this camera is that it just looks really sharp, and I feel like when I
show up with this thing, it’s like, just impressive enough that it can open some doors if I wanna get access to take some photos. So I find that to be really handy. It’s pretty light. 18 megapixels. I am not an expert on
technical specs at all, but it’s a great camera,
takes a lot of cool, I’ve taken a lot of cool
pics of it and I love it. (camera shutter clicks) – Okay yeah so my camera is Leica M10 with a 35 F2 Summicron. Had it for about a year, it’s– – [Man] You don’t have to
start, you don’t have to start. – I’m gonna just dive
in, don’t worry about it. I’m getting there. And so it’s a rangefinder camera. It’s a full frame digital camera. I always get this wrong. 24 megapixels 24, let’s say 24. If it’s wrong, just roast me
in the comments or something. It’s manual focus, but otherwise has all the general accoutrements
of modern digital camera. I say that remembering
that it doesn’t have video. It doesn’t have a lot of things actually. But it’s a great way to
slow down your photography and really experience the lens design that Leica’s famous for. This 35 F2 is unreal and tiny compared to basically everything else. And otherwise, the rangefinder
focusing mechanism, the rangefinder focusing mechanism takes a little bit to get used to. It’s weird to look through an
apertuire that isn’t the lens. A lot of times I’ve left the
lens cap on and shot with it, just doesn’t work nearly
as well as you’d expect. But it takes some getting used to, but eventually you find the groove and the satisfaction of
hitting focus on that is really awesome and to see people who have used it for a long time and gotten really good at it makes me feel like a total idiot, which modern digital cameras
do everything they can to not make you feel like a total idiot. So it’s fun sometimes, we call that on it. That’s kind of in comparison
to what we do use at the office which is all Canon gear so
we use generally 5D Mark IVs, couple 1DXs, well, 1DX. And almost all the time, the
100 millimeter macro lens, which has just been
the absolute workhorse. We got our first one five years ago and we’ve got four of them since. Reason for everything
for video and for photo and just about every product shot you see on the site was taking with one. So this is kind of the dual setups that I, as photo editor,
deal with every day. And so they complement each other nicely. You’ve got the simple deliberate vacation from something that does everything and maybe doesn’t excite. (camera shutter clicks) – So I guess we’ll start
with the smallest one. This is my Ricoh GR1s. it is a Japanese camera from late ’90s. Arguably, the smallest point and shoot 35 millimeter camera there is, like look at that, look
at the size of this, and look at the size my wallet. It’s like just barely bigger
and this thing can hold a roll film which is insane. It has a 28 millimeter lens
F2.8, stops down to F22, has aperture priority. You can do exposure comp on the top dial, so plus two, plus one,
minus one, minus two, has a built in flash, which
for this size is incredible. And honestly, I’m afraid it’s gonna break every single time I turn it on, so we’ll see, we’ll see
how long I hold on to this but I specifically bought it
for a bike ride to Vermont. I just needed something with a fast lens, good autofocus, and something small that I could have like
right next to my handlebars and this is why I bought it. And then one thing I’ve done
so far is the light seals were 25 years old so I
bought this 3D laser cut piece of rubber off eBay and
put a new light seal on it for five bucks. (camera whirring) Okay, next camera. This is my Voigtlander R2M, which is a Leica M mount rangefinder made by a Japanese company
called, what’s it, Cosina? Cosina bought the rights to Voigtlander in the early 2000s, I
believe, and came out with the best series. So this is the R2M which
is second generation of the Bessa with a mechanical shutter. So if the battery’s dying
at this, I can still shoot, all it does is meter. So, it’s really nice
because it’ll never break or if it does, it’s mechanical. So it’ll be able to be
repaired and what do we have? I have a Voigtlander Nokton
Classic 41.4 in the front and this is the multi-coated
version, so it’s pretty good. It’s a $300 lens but it has
this focus knob right here, so it’s really easy to focus
like infinity, close up, get really precise with it. And it’s really tiny,
it’s a 40 millimeter 1.4 and it’s barely, it’s same
size the camera almost. So it’s really compact. Yeah, and then I have this
grip for it because without it, my fingers like slip off really easily. And it just looks cool. And yeah, what have we got? I actually have the wrong
frame lines for this lens but I just guesstimate on top. There are frame lines that you can adjust, so 75 millimeter, 35-90
millimeter and then 50. But since I have a 40,
I keep it on 35 and 90, so kind of guesstimate. And yeah, what’s nice about this is the shutter speed goes up to 1/2000th, whereas the Leica M6 or M7 only goes to 1/1000th, I believe. So you get a little bit more
shutter speed out of this one. Yeah, it’s a good camera, I like it but no Leica so, still, I’m still wanting an M6
but for now, it’ll do. And then this, (laughs) this behemoth is my Pentax 67. I got it from a friend who, to this day, still regret selling
it to me for so cheap, seeing as these things
are getting close to 1000, maybe more for a good 67, especially the mirror lock-up
version, which this is, it’s right here, this is
the mirror lock-up button. It’s good for long exposures. So what is mirror lock-up? When you’re shooting, normally,
the mirror has to go down and then back up and that
can shake the camera. So with mirror lock-up, you set your focus, you press the button, the mirror flips up, I
believe, it flips up, so then when you take the photo, there’s no travel which just
takes the photo and that’s it. So there’s a lot less shake. I think, I’m explaining that correctly. Yep, so this is 67, it has a custom grip. I’ve no idea where it came from, but without it, this thing’s
awfully hard to hold. It’s just like, big heavy
camera with barely any grip, but with this, one hand it. It has a muted prism, which is actually not
functioning right now, I need to get it repaired. These things are notorious for breaking. There’s like a chain inside
that can easily fall off. You gotta take the metered prism off after you take off the lens. Yeah, what lens? We got a 105 2.4 on here which is arguably the best Pentax portrait lens there is. It’s a really shallow depth of field, really sharp, really easy to focus because of the split prism inside so you can be really precise shoot, shoot wide open and be tack sharp. That’s about it. This thing, this is my favorite camera that has the most badass
shutter sound there is. Let’s see, I’m out of film,
so maybe I’ll load it. So, unlike many medium format
cameras, this is an SLR, so you load it just like your normal SLR. So I think, I’ll put, got
Portra 880 here and Portra 160. Gonna load Portra 160 in it. Shooting medium format
film is quite wasteful because you got to take off all this stuff before you can actually load it. Just a moment.
(camera shutter clicks) Okay, so you shoot medium format film, you have spools rather than canisters. So when you load this,
you have to take spool from the roll you just shot, transfer it over to the
other side of the camera. Get it in there. And then take a new one, put it on the other side of the camera. Get it in there. And then peel it, put it into the spool. Press down on it just a
little bit to get it winding. And then once it’s in this spool, you line up the arrows with the section that says 120, close it back, and then
wind until it’s tight. (camera whirring) Yeah, now it said zero
so it’s ready to shoot. And what’s nice about this
camera is it has a shutter lock. It’s like a safety on a rifle. So disengaged, I can’t shoot, which is good because if
you accidentally shoot this, you only have 10 shots per roll since there’s 6×7 negatives. So if you accidentally fire,
then you’re down one shot and then you’ll only have nine left. So it’s a good feature. And yeah, I’ll tell you,
I’ll show you how it sounds. So I’m gonna waste a waste of frame here, but I think it’s worth it, just– – [Man] Don’t talk. – Oh, okay, here’s the shutter. (camera shutter clicks) Really crispy, really heavy. Probably the worst camera
for street photography because sounds like
you’re firing off a weapon and people will see what
you’re doing. (laughs) But yeah, it’s great camera. The negatives are huge. I can show you the effective… So that’s the size of the mirror which is pretty massive
if you compare this to a crop sensor camera like a Canon T3 or something, you know? Yeah, this is old school medium format and it’s the best, the
best format there is. (camera shutter clicks) – So this is a Kiev 88. For anybody who’s never seen
one or heard of one before, it’s basically medium
format Hasselblad rip-off. I think they’re mainly made
in the ’80s, ’70s, ’80s. They’re pretty much the exact
same design as a Hasselblad, but cheaper and not quite as nice, which is actually kind of why I like it. It’s it’s heavy duty, it’s kind of funky, it’s got its own character. Some of the settings don’t quite work, but it definitely produces images that are unique and interesting. Some of the things I like about it is it’s completely analog. There’s no light meter in here. There’s no digital settings of any kind. It’s a film camera obviously. You’ve got the film backs, I have two. I usually keep them loaded and I have two roll of
film, one in each back and I can switch up quickly. But everything in here is
meant to be taken apart, meant to be fixed. You can find the parts for it. And it’s got a great sensibility to it. Let me give you a shutter
here, let’s see if, yeah. So this thing just sounds, sounds analog. (camera shutter clicks) It’s great, I love that. The other thing I really
enjoy about the camera is that I shoot this from the hip, you can actually get a viewfinder, where you can hold it up to your face, but I like shooting on
the streets in New York. I got this camera, I don’t
know, probably seven years ago, right before I moved to the city. And the way I typically use
it is put around the neck and I shoot it from the hip here. The nice thing about that
is people aren’t confronted by the camera when you’re
holding it up to your face. People see it they
respond, they move away, or they react to the camera. When you’re shooting from your hip, most people don’t even see it,
so you can hold it down here. You’ve got a view finding
panel in the top of the camera and then you get a little magnifying glass so you can get your focus just right. And I can get a lot of great
shots, right from the hip. Nobody notice that I’m shooting them. It is a little difficult to use. You have to dial all the
settings in and get it right. Like I said, there’s no light meter so I use my phone for that, hit or miss depending on the day. I shoot Ilford 400 black and white film. I like Ilford, tends to
work well with this camera, and 400 seems to be about
right for all the settings. I shoot on a fixed length
80 millimeter lens. that’s just what with the camera. It’s actually a gift to
me from my brother-in-law who found it in a storage locker in Boston and didn’t know what to do with it. He knew I was into photography, he knew I was into cameras and said, “Would you like to give it a go?” And I probably put a couple hundred rolls of film through it since
I’ve been in New York. And some of the photos are good
and most of them are trash, but that’s what you get. Yeah, that’s the story,
the Kiev 88, what else? (camera shutter clicks) – Yeah, so this is my Nikon EM. Nikon EM was just basically,
it stands for economy model from the late ’70s, early ’80s. There’s not a ton to it,
but story behind it is it was actually my dad’s. He had bought it for a photo
journalism class in college and it just sat around
and in seventh grade, I had the opportunity
to take a film course just as a general elective in class and he unearthed it, bequeathed it to me and it’s been mine ever since and I’ve been shooting with it. It’s got just a basic 50 millimeter on it. And it has these light leaks so the seals on both sides of the case are not very well sealed, which means I get a lot of
light leaks but over the years, working with this camera for so long, it’s really allowed me to fine tune that and really get a lot of, take advantage of a lot of
different lighting situations. So I have that 50 millimeter on there. I’ve also bought a 36-72
millimeter zoom lens, another Nikon E series, very basic lens but it
gives me the ability to shoot a lot of different styles with that zoom lens feature,
so I can go macro with it, I can go wide angle, I can
go telephoto if I need to, and that’s really good to
have when I’m traveling, just shooting whatever so
yeah, I’ve shot on this, and it’s my trusty go-to camera when I really want something I know what I’m gonna be able to do with it and I’ll take this guy out and tend to shoot a lot of
black and white with it. Ilford is one of my go-tos with that just because those light
leaks tend to really work well with all that so. (camera shutter clicks) – So this is a Canon 6D. I think it’s the original version. And I actually originally
got it when I was dabbling in real estate photography. I started doing that and that
was the camera they gave me and I ended up liking, using it so much that I bought it from the company just so I can use it personally. So my wife and I were sharing it. We were shooting a lot
of portraits and photos and she was using it for
shooting some weddings. And really I just use it for
shooting anything that I want which a lot of times is landscape, a lot of the time is portraits, all the time is just
stuff I see on the street. We have a 24-70 millimeter
lens on there which I love. It’s got enough of a zoom to where you can zoom in
enough if you need to. The photo quality is great. Images always come out really crisp, and another feature that
I really love about it is the Wi Fi capability. I’m always on the go and it’s nice to just be able to download the photos that I take right on my
phone and look at them there. (camera shutter clicks) – This is my Canon 70D. I got it for watch reviews mostly but I have learned to love
it for many other reasons. I use this pancake lens
on, it is a 24 millimeter. I know it’s not, I know the Canon 70D isn’t a cool watch, it’s a (bleeps). I know that Canon 70D isn’t a cool camera like these vintage film
cameras and whatnot but it’s a very solid DSLR. I like this little flip
thing that it’s got, that works well, it’s good for video, although I don’t use it for that too much. I love the pancake lens
24 millimeter right here. I take it to traveling everywhere. It’s a cropped sensor but I
think that just forces you to adapt in some ways and it’s made me a better photographer for
having to use lower ISO than maybe a higher end camera would and for adapting to
those minor limitations. Otherwise, it’s fantastic. (camera shutter clicks) – These are my three favorite cameras. These are the cameras that I use most. I’d say the one that I
use the absolute most is definitely the Fuji X-T3. I do video and I do photo
and I mostly take photos of my family and friends. This easily has the most
photos that I’ve ever taken. Also does great video, 4K,
60, great 1080, slo-mo, 120. I have a 16-55 F2.8 lens on here that’s roughly I had the 5D III, the Canon 5D III for a while
and it had a 24-70 F2.8 but this is my most, this
is the lens I use most, this is what I walk around with. I also have a 35 F2 that’s
really tiny that I take if I’m just like going out
to a dinner or something and I’m trying to keep it low profile, this thing is pretty massive,
easily bigger than the camera, and the 35 is only like, it’s
a tiny little baby thing. But this is an APS-C sensor, so a little smaller than a full frame. Which is why I love the
Yashica T3, this is digital. This guy is film, so it
takes 35 millimeter film and I mostly shoot Portra 400 Kodak. This, the T3 specifically
has some really cool features and why I love it. It’s got a Zeiss 35 millimeter F2.8 lens which really renders some
beautiful depth of field. If fully automatic so you can’t control like aperture priority,
you can’t select F2.8 but I think it basically
chooses F2.8 for you in any given light, unless
you’re fully blown out in the middle of day. And with Portra 400, I mean
that the photos that I take are, I’d say better than these. I love it, it’s super small packable, it’s really ergonomic, and it has a really
great retro vibe to it. It’s kind of chunky, definitely not sleek, definitely not modern-looking like people, I get questions about
it basically everywhere. It’s got a cute little feature
where if you open it up, it’s got a little Pacman, that’s it. And some annoying bits is that you, every time
you take a picture, if you don’t want the flash on, you have to do that every single picture, it doesn’t just stay off, and this, you have to close entirely, sometimes like it’ll open up and you’ll accidentally take a photo. It doesn’t happen often. And it requires a really steady hand. I like it for street photography ’cause it also has this cool
little periscope, N.A. scope. Don’t know what the N.A. stands for, but you can look down and take photos. It’s still not that inconspicuous like people can tell you’re
taking a photo of them. But it’s a cool feature
and I use it really often, especially because like
I have two little kids, two girls that run around,
and they’re like waist level, and that’s that’s how I
usually take photos of them, it’s inverted so keep that in mind. And then this I got ’cause I always wanted a twin reflex camera. I just, I love the way it looks, and I love medium format, I never had a medium format camera. This is a 6×6 camera. It is beefy, this thing is heavy, it’s way bigger than
Rolleiflex, or even, I think, AJ has the Yashica somewhere, it’s huge. I like this one specifically, it’s less expensive, a, and awesome. I like this one because it’s
an actual interchangeable lens like even the Rollei isn’t
an interchangeable lens, which makes it probably a little beefier, but I have the 80 F2.8 on here, and I got it for really
cheap and it’s acts up, it’s an old camera, it’s
a really old camera, so like, while they’re great, you have to remember just like an old car, there’s gonna be problems, and I have to, I’ll take a photo right now. And you’ll see that like at… There, you’ll see that at… The shutter takes a second, like it doesn’t just shoot, so you know. And this doesn’t have a light meter. So, I gotta do it with
my phone, hold please. I use myLightMeter PRO and
I do something of the… So I select my aperture at F2.8, I’ve got ISO 400 in here, and I think I can get away
with a 30 shutter speed. F2.8, also, I love, so this
is actually really good still in daylight. You can flip it up for a little
while which is fantastic. Honestly, it’s really great. The image that you see straight
out of here is really nice. And you’re gonna see a
beautiful photo of Brendan. Actually, I’ll leave on the table because I don’t have the steadiest hand. Yeah. That’s the other thing, it’s not fast. (camera shutter clicks) So you hear it like click and
then the shutter goes off, so it’s like, it’s quirky,
it’s definitely quirky. I mean, it’s a 70, 80-year-old camera, much older than I am, a
little bit older than I am. It takes 120 film, it takes
about 12 photos per roll. So developing film is pretty pricey. One thing I forgot to say
about the Yashica T3 is that, the reason I went with this,
like there’s a lot of amazing, I feel like the point and shoot revolution is happening right now,
there’s the Contax T2, and Brendan has the Leica Minilux. I went with this guy ’cause
it’s on it’s on the cheaper end but it still has an
F2.8, and it’s autofocus. So I love this camera, it’s very large, takes really good pictures. I wanted something that
could fit in my pocket, and I wanted something
full frame again, an F2.8 and this is all, this is probably
the camera I use the most. I love the photos that comes out of it. The colors on portrait are amazing even in black and white, they’re great. So this is probably my go-to and this is usually if I’m traveling, this is usually in my pocket. But that kind of runs the gamut of the, that kind of runs the gamut of all the different cameras I use. I have my digital one for,
it’s really my workhorse, if I need a backup camera for video or just a lot of stills for a
weekend trip with the family. This is always with me,
it’s always in my pocket, and this I like to make
an effort to once a month, take it out and really compose, really think about taking a photo. I mean, it’s, I think, it’s
like five bucks a roll. By the time you get it developed, it’s like a buck or two bucks a photo so you really think about the
photos that you’re taking. So this is more like a beautiful exercise. This is a really good go-to
and this is just my workhorse, and those are my cameras, I hope you liked our camera staff picks. Let us know in the comments
which one you may like best and if you liked this video,
check out our other videos. Like and subscribe.

FERRARI – Filming a race with 50-year-old cameras

FERRARI – Filming a race with 50-year-old cameras


The automobile is an art form expressed
in steel, gasoline, and tire smoke! Every automobile bears the mark of its creator–
like the signature of a sculptor on their work. In Maranello, every Ferrari is
shaped not from stone but formed from fine materials by skilled Italian
craftsmen. But a Ferrari is more than just a sculpture, and no one’s ever taken
the Statue of David around a racetrack. For Ferrari, a machine bearing the
Prancing Horse symbolizes that it is unique in its performance, innovations,
technology, driving pleasure, and design. Machines with Ferrari’s emblem span
decades of performance with thousands of victories at the hands of some of the
world’s greatest racing drivers. The best of a good bunch was Nuvolari, who finished first completing the course at an average speed of over 57 miles per hour. Niki Lauda’s Ferrari is in the pole position.
Lauda still holds the lead in the World Champion table, only ten points separate the top four
drivers Lauda, Regazzoni, Fittipaldi, Schecter
in that order. Experts had forecast the Ferraris were unbeatable. Michael Schumacher’s done it today – and he wins – and he’s a 5 times world Formula 1 champion. Today at Ferrari’s own Mugello circuit,
racing drivers have gathered to try their hand at the art of sports car
competition. Mugello is a 3.3 mile racing circuit whose twisting curves are
carved into the hilly Tuscan countryside of northern Italy. The “Scuderia Ferrari”
meaning “Ferrari stable” is home to those few daring enough to rise to the
challenge. Although they are a rare treat to see on the road, a herd of prancing
horses have come from all corners of the globe to compete here in the world
championship of Ferrari Challenge. The cars here are the top crop on the sports car
world and have been specially modified to be at home on the circuit. The brawny
conformation of these beasts is a testament to their performance. Built to
exacting specifications, the focus of Ferrari Challenge is, as the name implies,
a challenge to the drivers. Only one driver brave, skilled, and bold enough
will leave the circuit today a world champion– adding their name to the
history books alongside Ferrari’s greatest. Nostalgia hangs in the air here
as thousands gather to witness both today’s perspective champions and the
relics of Champions past. Although the days of their competition on the world
stage are over, these masterpieces of sports car engineering live on. The
evolution of their flowing yet purposeful contours echo the march of
progress–the advancement of speed. Spectators marvel at the sleek bodied
racers while wondering who might emerge victorious from today’s gathering. The
bodywork of these champions is an art form of its own–the art of winning. But
not all former champions lie dormant many still take to the track at the
hands of those looking to extend or relive a legacy of these machines.
Whatever their motives, the result is a spectacle to behold and an assault to
the senses. Back in the paddock, today’s competitors
prepare for their chance at a piece of victory. To perform at the cars greatest
potential every bolt must be in its place, every adjustment made, every
component running like clockwork. With every car prepared to the best of the
abilities of its crew, the drivers move out. At the wave of the green flag, the race
begins. And they’re off! Out of the gate the race
is neck and neck, but soon one skilled driver will set the pace the others must
match –lest they be left in the dust. The glow of brake rotors burns bright as
man and machine are pushed to their limits. It’s risk versus reward for every
contender on the track. Every chance taken increases the odds of disaster. An
accident! The championship hopes are dashed for some, but the race goes on! The yellow flag cautions the drivers of
the incident and provides a short break in the action. This brief reprieve gives
drivers a chance to settle their nerves and strategize for the final bout of
the race. It’s not long before they’re chomping up a bit again!
In the heat of battle the drivers laser focus is his best tool for success. Every
racer tiptoes the line between glory and failure, daring one another to push too
far! Lap after lap, they vie for the coveted top spot as the finish grows ever nearer. As they round the last corner, a leader
has pulled ahead! The checkered flag waves and–by god–he’s done it! For some, the
sheer thrill of the chase is enough to satisfy those primal desires for
competition, but others have developed an appetite for winning, and nothing is more
satisfying than the top of the podium. The top finishers are recognized for
their performance but one man stands above the rest. A feeling of
accomplishment overcomes him, but undoubtedly he will feel the need to
defend his crown as soon as the next green flag waves. An insatiable hunger to
compete! Long after the checkers have waved and the champagne has sprayed, this
14 turn ribbon of asphalt catalogues another year of heritage and sport. In
the end every competitor would agree motor racing with Italy’s finest is more
than a sport, it’s an experience. One that beacons to every passerby to stop and
appreciate such beauty as if at a gallery. One whose history runs deep,
without borders or bounds. A name that will be spoken in every household for
years to come, Ferrari. Through the annals of racing history,
a legacy maintained. Enzo Ferrari once said, “ask a child to
draw a car and he will undoubtedly make it red”

Windowless homes ~ Bronica SQ-Ai and Rollei Retro 400s

Windowless homes ~ Bronica SQ-Ai and Rollei Retro 400s


Good morning, everyone from the streets, in town I’m trying to photograph a thing that it’s always been there, but I only paid full attention to it lately and it’s that here, in this town, as you can see most of the buildings and houses have no windows on the sides, they have windows in the front facing the street or the road, or in the back facing the backyard, but most of them don’t have any windows on the sides and the reason is, I believe, that by law you can’t open a window within 10 feet of someone else’s property most pieces of land here are very narrow, what most people end up doing is to max out on the width otherwise if you have to leave 10 feet on each side of your property, you’ll end up having a very narrow house so what they do is they max out on the width and they install those little holes with glass bricks, I guess they are they don’t let you see through but they let some light through, so that’s allowed by the law that makes for very interesting architecture, it’s kind of ugly, but I think it’s a very interesting thing to document and photograph, I’ve been taking a few photos in the last couple of weeks with my digital cameras but today I’m out here with my Bronica because I wanted some of those images on film for this project so I loaded some Retro 400s this
morning and I’m out here it’s starting to rain quite a bit, so I’m going to need to get my umbrella out I’m gonna show you some footage of the Bronica in action and the images that I make with it and afterwards, I’m gonna show you the images that I’ve made with my digital cameras as well for this project I hope you enjoy this video, thank you so much for watching and see you in the next one!