Confidence & Tapping Into Your Inner Beauty | CARLINE on “I AM” Conversations

Confidence & Tapping Into Your Inner Beauty | CARLINE on “I AM” Conversations


I own a lingerie store downstairs and I’m also a a stylist, a hairdresser upstairs. Uhm I have a business background. I worked 16 years on Wall Street but I have been doing hair and make-up since I was a teenager. So, it was always my passion. Women come here to be fitted, uhm, from the teenager to the 85-year old woman. What sort of differences or similarities really have you noticed with women who come in, even with the age range, Mmm-hmm In terms of how they perceive themselves, body image? Uhm, it’s about the same, negative. It’s sad, very, very sad. We look at ourselves in the mirror, and we don’t like and we don’t like what we see. We have these beautiful magazines that tell us this how we’re supposed to look like, you know. But don’t you see a little bit of a change happening? I mean, when we are coming up, ‘cause we’re in the same age category, we didn’t see a lot of black, brown, dark-skinned sisters you know in the magazines. And now, they’re there. They’re definitely there. They’re there. An aesthetic can’t just be one type. There’s no homogeneity on aesthetic, you know. If beauty is beauty, beauty should be beauty across the board. Across the board. Across ages, you know, races, religions, cultures, you name it. And we should be able to see that in everyone. Yes, but who defines beauty? How do you define that? What beauty means to you and what that means to me will be completely different. You have to find beauty from within. Beauty lives inside not outside. We all have beauty in here, we have to tap into it and bring it out. This is what I do in my business; I make women feel beautiful. The minute they walk in my door, I want them to feel beautiful. I want them to feel more beautiful than the time, the minute they walked in. But they have to tap into that in here. When they’re in the store, we make them feel super confident. I tell them, you leave everything behind the door and when you walk in, you’re going to feel amazing than when you leave. I say, you’re in the wrong bra but you’re in the right place, okay. How did you learn confidence? I, I don’t believe it was learned. I believe I was born with it. I was the first in the family, in a lot, I was a lot of firsts: first to finish college; first to get married; first to have a child; first to you know. So, I was always that go-getter. And I believe in education. I really believe that’s powerful, it’s a powerful way to be confident in life. It’s like, you gotta go after what you want, you got to believe in yourself. And if you need the education, go get it. Don’t let anybody else open doors for you. On Wall Street, women were not as many. I worked on the trading floor and we were maybe 10 women in a huge trading floor of like hundreds of men. Being African-American, and being, you know, having penetrated that industry, was huge. And then it opened up a little bit more to women over the course of you know 16 years that I was there. In this industry however, my clients are 90% Caucasian. And do they, are they surprised to know that you’re actually are the owner? Or, do you not even say anything? I try not to say anything, to be honest with you. But on my website, they do see a picture of me, So they kind of know who I am I. I have seen it many times where it’s like, “Oh, I’m here for a service.” And I’m like, “ok, I’m going to be the one doing your hair.” And you see it, you know. And little do we know, skin is skin, hair is hair. I wish it would work both ways. Because, the way that you’re fluent in all hair types, Mmm-hmm I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been on shoots where they haven’t been conversant in my hair type. And I wish there was the expectation that you know, we need to be versed in all different types of, skin, hair, everything. Very true, yes. When I look around the salon, I, I see all these messages, “La vie est belle, Oui. Uhm, “Life Is Beautiful,” uhm, “Be bold,” “Take Chances,” “Take Risks” Exactly. And, my sense is that you’re not just putting the signs up, you’re actually living that. I am. And you believe it. I do. You know, it’s not a cliché for you at all. It’s not. It’s not. I couldn’t live a different life aside from the one that I’m living right now. I’ve been told many, many times I have that positive energy. And I know there are clients who stick with stylists because of that energy. And I’ve actually had, you know for what we do behind the chair, you’re actually working with a lot of energy from right here. And you can sense it. I give you everything I have behind the chair. Right And if I’m drained after, Right that tells me that was negative energy. Right I can’t. I don’t need it and I won’t have it around me. How uhm are you restored and supported after you’ve been depleted? Because this is no joke.Energy is, is, is a cycle right? Mmm-hmm And it also has to, you give but you also have to take. Yes. And you receive. So where do you get restoration from? Where are you fueled up again? When I’m done and the day’s over, I know, I go home and it’s where I find my peace. I go to bed and I wake up the next day and I never get out of that bed without saying, “I don’t know what’s coming today but help me deal with it.” Mmmm, that’s beautiful. And, you do you have children? I have four. I have a 36-year old, a 24-year old, a 14-year old, and a 16-year old. Wow! Do they think that you’re the 36-year old’s sister? Yes All the time, right? All the time. All the time. And what was it like having kids at such different ages? Well, it, I was a different mother at different ages. ‘Cause I got married very early on and I raised my son in a very different environment than I raised my second child, because they’re about 12 years apart. But now I have a girl, I’m not raising her the way I raised him, right. And there’s no book, right? Nobody says go read this book on how to raise children So my children really never witnessed any animosity among myself or any of my ex-husbands. And so, my third marriage, which I have the two wonderful, crazy boys. Uhm, been married eighteen years. We’re a, a biracial family. So, I’m constantly trying to find a balance between the way how I grew up and the way he grew up, so we can raise the two younger boys. But, we found it. We found it. I have four happy, happy children. When you think about your, your sons, what is it that you want them to learn from you and even from your daughter about how to treat women? I have taught them that, you wouldn’t be here without a woman, number one, okay. And the way I was raised, I was taught to respect my mother till the end. And this is how you will be. And not only will you do that at home, but you will treat every human being the same way. And how do you think the that respect that they learned and have grown up with is going to trickle down? Uhm, I know I had that with my daughter, though. I was like, this is your body, you will respect that body and this is who you are. And, she did it, she really did. And, with the boys, I feel like the peer pressure is so different today. That they will learn things that they want to learn from their peers and you just teach them that there’s consequences to making the wrong decisions. I teach my boys, when a girl says ‘no’ she means ‘no’ okay. You have to understand what that means and you have to respect it. How do you define aging? There’s a great line in a lyric that says, “time waits for no one” and it certainly won’t wait for me. So therefore, I believe that we are forever on-going. And, if we can accept the fact that at every age there’s a new lesson, it’s a chapter in our life, and that the next one can only get better. Yeah, I, I’m aging. I’m going along with that. I’m there. Again, it’s about embracing. Embracing, uhm, enhancing what you have. Uhm, don’t try to become somebody you’re not because then that takes too much energy. You’re a spiritual person, Yes Right, and a person of faith. Someone sees you having these beautiful, you know, sensual pictures. Mmm-hmm. And they say, how can the two things go side by side? How do you explain that? Interesting. Uhm, You have to have, again I think that goes back to being confident. I think uhm, sensuality was created, there’s sensuality in the Bible, okay. We’re all created somehow. So, let’s not admit that we are not a sensual and sexual beings. Because you’re one embodied spirit-person. And you’re given all these antennas to tap into, to make you whole. And that means tapping into all our senses, all our senses, whatever they may be. This is really about embracing who you are at this point, embracing life, embracing yourself. So, when I say “I AM” to you, what is your “I AM”? I am beautiful, I am confident, I am secure I am honest, Uhm, I am over 50. I am Carlene. I am happy Ah, I am uhm, I’m a friend. I’m a sister, I’m a daughter. Uhm, I am me. I wouldn’t change anything about me. Uhm, and I believe I’ve become this ‘I am’ I wasn’t born that way in other areas but I am me and that’s not changing. Thank you. Thank you very much. Yeah.

Drawing Pictures

Drawing Pictures


♫ Yes yes yes yes yes yes yes! ♫ (clattering) Hi Tom! What are you doing? I was gonna draw a picture, but… I don’t know what to draw a picture of. – Hmm. Maybe we can help. Can you think of something Tom should draw a picture of? Let’s just think of the first thing that pops into our head. Ready? Ummmm A truck! How ’bout a truck, Tom? A big blue truck. Why don’t you draw a big- a picture of a truck? – Hmm. I don’t know. – Okay, okay, okay. We’ll try again. Ready? Ummmm Oranges! You should 𝘥𝘦𝘧𝘪𝘯𝘪𝘵𝘦𝘭𝘺 draw a picture of oranges. Ah! – Umm, maybe. – Okay, okay! No oranges. Um… I wanna get- I really wanna get this right. Okay. Um, here we go. Ummmm An angel! Oh yes Tom, this will make a lovely picture! – I finished my drawing. – Is it a truck? – Mm-mm. – Oh, then it must be the angel. Pretty angel. – Mm-mm. – Oranges? – Mm-mm. – Then what is it? – It’s a picture of us. See, um, that’s me right there, and that’s you. Do ya like it? – Do I 𝘭𝘪𝘬𝘦 it?
(building suspense music) – Do you?
(building suspense music) – Do I 𝘭𝘪𝘬𝘦 it?!
(building suspense music) – Ehh?
(building suspense music) – I love it!
(building suspense music) – Ehh?
(building suspense music) (maniacally) I love it!
(building suspense music) – Huh?
(building suspense music) (building suspense music) (music stops)
– I love it. – Oh. Thanks. Thank you.

The Image Toolset – Part 11 – 3D Selective – Using Primitives with 3D AOVs  – Flame 2020.2

The Image Toolset – Part 11 – 3D Selective – Using Primitives with 3D AOVs – Flame 2020.2


Hi everyone, Grant for the Flame Learning Channel. In parts 5,6 and 8 of the Image Toolset series… We looked at the 3D AOV capability… Where you could produce a selective matte for your image… Based on supplied 3D information. So you could create isolation mattes… based on the z-depth of the image… the normals of a 3D object… as well as the movement of an image based on motion vectors. In the Flame 2020.2 update… You’ll learn about a new tool to refine your 3D AOVs… Known as “Primitives”. This allows you to constrain the effect of a 3D AOV… By placing virtual 3D objects in 3D space. I’d also like to add… That if you are new to 3D Selectives… I suggest watching part 5, 6 and 8 of the Image Toolset series… To explain the basics and fundamentals of 3D AOVs. Now if you’d like to follow along with this video… Click the link in the description below… Or type the link displayed to download the media. Please note that for colour management reasons… the QuickTime clip is Rec709… And the EXR sequence is Scene-Linear Rec709sRGB. Now start off by opening the QuickTime file as a sequence… Select it… And switch to the Effects Environment. I am currently using a 3-up layout… With the Manager on the left… Result view in the middle… And a Selective Matte view on the right. You can set this up manually each time… Or save it as a custom layout for easy access. Now to illustrate Primitives with 3D AOVs… You will need a Z-depth pass… In order to generate the selective. The EXR example does have an embedded Z-depth… As it is rendered CG. However, live action footage… Like this shot… Do not normally have the supplied depth information. So to make this work… You will use Machine Learning to generate the depth data. Select the Selective in the Manager… And switch to the 3D AOV menu. Change the Type to Primitive… And click CREATE MAP. A z-depth map will be generated… And it appears in the Manager. If you select it and press F8 for the Image Object view… You will see the generated depth pass. If you wish to know more about machine learning… And how it works in Flame… Please watch the Machine Learning series… on the Flame Learning Channel. So this depth pass can be used to create isolation mattes… As seen in previous 3D AOV videos. The difference with the Primitives option… Is that these isolations are contained within virtual 3D objects. Select the Selective in the Manager… And turn on the 3D AOV. Hover over the right viewport… And toggle to the Selective Input. When the viewport is active… You will see a spherical 3D widget… Which is limiting the isolation matte. To see effect in the Result viewport… Go ahead and perform a quick grade. This can be any SelectiveFX… And not just the MasterGrade. Now using this widget… You can move the virtual sphere in 3D… Based on the generated depth pass. For example… You can grab the centre of the widget… and move it around horizontally and vertically. If you want to use proper axis handles… switch the Tools from SELECT to TRANSLATE. It’s not mandatory… But it can help constrain the movements. If you want to move the widget in Z-space… Hold SHIFT and drag the widget to different areas of the image. Using the Z-depth pass… You can snap the widget to different depths within your shot. For example, place the widget on the buildings… Just behind the ruins. If you prefer a more controlled way of moving the primitive… You can adjust the position sliders in the menu. So what’s the advantage of using a virtual primitive with a 3D AOV? Well, if you temporarily switch to the RANGE type… You will see that Z-depth… Isolates all the objects that are included at certain points of depth. In other words, all the objects at that point in distance… Are included in the isolation matte. So not only do you have the buildings… But you also have the trees and other objects. Switching back to the PRIMITIVE type… You’re able to really focus what you want to isolate out of the depth data. In some cases, this is more efficient than using a Gmask with the Selective. Now you can adjust the radius and ratio of the widget using the sliders… Or you can switch the Tools to SCALE… And adjust the widget interactively in the viewport. The centre point of the axis adjusts the radius… While the end points control the Y and Z ratios. The final controls you have for refining the 3d Primitive… Is the falloff slider to soften the edges of the primitive… And the gain slider to change the intensity of the 3D AOV. Similarly to all other 3D AOVs… These values can all be animated… And this is fed into the Selective pipeline… where you can shrink, dilate and blur the outcome… As well as blend this with the Keyers and masks in the current selective. Now if you didn’t want the roundness of a sphere constraining your isolation… You can switch the Shape Type to Cube… Which gives you straighter lines. Let’s use this cube to brighten up the darker areas of the ruins. Ensure you are using the SELECT or TRANSLATE tool… Hold SHIFT… And snap the cube to the foreground region. Switch to SCALE… And you can reshape the cube… to only cover the floor region of the ruins. If you start pushing the gamma and the gain of the MasterGrade… You can bring detail back into that part of the image. If you choose to, you can also adjust the colour… to make it slightly warmer. So there are plenty of uses for Selectives. And using Primitives with the 3D AOVS… give you that extra level of control. The next example I’d like to cover is CG based. The big difference this time… Is that you have a Z-depth pass as before… But you also have a 3D camera from the 3D application. This can offer a bit more functionality… compared to the first example. So switch to Batch… And import the EXR sequence… Which must be tagged as Scene Linear Rec709/sRGB. Set the Batch duration to 24. Now this is a multi-channel clip… And if you toggle F4 to look at the channels… You have a beauty pass… The alpha pass… And a Z-depth pass. This was rendered using Arnold and Maya… And the Z-depth is using absolute values… As opposed to normalised values. This is something you’ll need to define for the selective. Go back to Batch… And add an image node from the Batch node bin. Connect the Beauty pass as the Red front input. To use the accompanying Z-depth pass… Select the Image node… And add a new media input. Connect the Z-Depth pass into the front input… And you’re ready to go. As a reminder, you could do this in an Action node… But the image node automatically sets up the selective for you. Double-click on the Image node for its controls… And like you did previously… Switch to a 3-up view with ALT+3. You have the Manager, Result view and the Selective Matte view. Now the supplied Z-depth pass… Or any other data pass for that matter… Is based on the 3D camera… That was used in Maya… or whatever 3D application you are using. Since this camera was exported… And made available for Flame as an FBX file… It is recommended that you import… and apply the same camera data to the shot… Before using any data passes… like the Z-depth for instance. This will ensure that any data passes will be mapped to the matching camera data… And things should hopefully align up much easier. So first off… To import the 3D camera for this render… Call up the context menu in the manager… And choose the IMPORT option. Navigate to the EXR sequence… And here you will find the FBX file containing the 3D camera. Now very importantly, Flame uses pixels as its units of measurement. Whereas 3D applications, like Maya… can have different units of measurement such as centimetres, meters, etc. So it’s crucial that you get the conversions correct… Otherwise the camera will be off. In this case, set the SCENE UNIT TO PIXELS to a value of 1. Choose the FBX file and load it into the scene. The next step… is to assign the camera data to the surface object containing the CG render. This ensures that the camera data will be taken into account… When applying Selectives, nodes and data pass maps to this surface object. To do this, hover over the result view… And switch to the schematic view. If you pan the view, you can locate the 3D camera. Now connect the surface to the 3D camera node. So the camera data is now being fed into the surface object… And any nodes you use with the surface object… Will consider the 3D camera data. Switch back to the Result view. So the next step… Is to assign the Z-depth pass to the Surface object. Switch to the node bin… And ensure the Z-depth pass is selected in the media list. Next, using the context menu over the surface in the manager… Add the Z-depth map to the image. Now remember that I said that this Z-depth pass uses absolute values. So call up the Z-depth controls… And switch the input type from NORMALISED to ABSOLUTE. So by interpreting the Z-depth data… As well as using the assigned camera information… This should ensure the depth values are mapped correctly within the 3D scene. If you select the Selective in the Manager… And go to the 3D AOVs… You can choose PRIMITIVES… And activate the tool. To see the widget… Switch to the Selective Input view with F9. If the widget is off-screen… You can adjust it with the sliders. Once you see the centre of the widget… You can interactively adjust within the scene. So hold SHIFT… Snap the widget to one of the spheres… And then scale the radius to match. With that done, perform a quick grade through the selective. Now since you have associated the CG render with its original 3D camera… As well as applied the primitive with the 3D AOV… The primitive widget is actually part of the 3D scene. If you scrub the time-bar… You will see the widget move… Because it is considered as part of this 3D scene. So you can place the primitive anywhere within the scene… And it should react as if it was there in the first place. This occurs when the POSITION setting is set to WORLD. The other option you have… Is even when you have all this camera data…. You can still lock the primitive relative to the camera… Instead moving with other objects in the 3d scene. So change the Position setting from WORLD to CAMERA. Looking at the sliders… You can now position the widget relative to the camera. You can also interactively place the widget with SHIFT and drag. When you scrub the time-bar… The widget remains locked with the camera… And doesn’t appear to move with the rest of the 3d scene. The final use case of working with Primitives and 3D AOVs… Is when you want to use them with a traditional Action Composite. I’ll go back to Batch… And go into this Action node with a 2-up view… to illustrate the workflow. Here we have a typical composite… that consists of 2D images and a 3D object within the 3D scene. Now after building this composite… You would like pick certain objects in 3D space to apply an effect. This can be done with a Selective… using 3D AOVs and Primitives. But the big difference compared to the previous two examples… Is that this is a live composite. If I switch to the Perspective with SPACE+F4… And you hold ALT to orbit the scene… You can see the full 3D environment. Switch back to the result view with F4. Now the 3D AOV requires depth information to function correctly. This is not problem… Since the Action 3d Compositor is automatically generating the z-depth pass. To see this, go to the Output menu… And if you scroll the Output Selections list… You can locate the Z-depth pass. We’re only using it internally in Action… So you don’t need to enable it as a render pass. Scroll back up the list… And view the composite output. Now in order to apply a selective to the output of Action… You will need to add it to the default camera. Call up the context menu over the “default” camera… And choose ADD SELECTIVE. In the browser, I’ll go with the Glow SelectiveFX to demonstrate the example. So the Glow SelectiveFX is affecting the entire composite result. Double-clicking on the Selective in the Manager… You can tweak various aspects of the SelectiveFX. To use the Selective with a 3D AOV and primitives… Go to the 3D AOV menu… Choose the Primitive Type… And click Active. Using the 3-up view… You can monitor the result view… As well as look at the Selective Input View with the primitive widget. Hold SHIFT and you can snap the widget… to any object at different distances within the Action 3D Environment. So all the controls work like the previous examples. You can expand the radius of the widget… And set it anywhere within the z-space of the scene… to apply the SelectiveFX. With the position set to WORLD… When you scrub the time-bar… The primitive widget acts like any other object in 3D space… And moves as part of the scene. To make it lock to the camera’s movement… switch the Position to Camera… and it will remain in the same position relative to the camera. You can still snap to the depth of an object… And place the widget anywhere in the 3D scene. But when scrubbing the time-bar… The widget remains in its current position… Aligned with the Action 3D camera. So hopefully this gives you a wide range of uses… with 3D AOVs and primitive objects. In summary, the point of using the Primitive objects with the 3D AOVs… Is to generate an isolation selective based on Z-depth data… And then limit that further… By virtual 3D objects sitting within the depth of the 3D scene. This would not be possible… If you just did a standard depth selection… In combination with a key or mask. So hopefully this can expand on more creative 3D potentials… when using Selectives… and you can apply any SelectiveFX shaders… to meet your VFX… and look development needs. Don’t forget to check out the other features, workflows… And enhancements to the Flame 2020.2 update. Comments, feedback and suggestions… are always welcome and appreciated. Please subscribe to the Flame Learning Channel… And click the bell to be notified for future videos. Thanks for watching… and hope to see you soon.

Michio Kaku on Reading Minds, Recording Dreams, and Brain Imaging

Michio Kaku on Reading Minds, Recording Dreams, and Brain Imaging


When I was a child I was fascinated by telepathy
in science fiction. In fact, I tried really hard to read other peoples’ minds, to project
my thoughts into other peoples’ heads. And I came to the conclusion that maybe telepaths
do walk the surface of the earth but I wasn’t one of them. Now I’m a physicist and I realize
that with all the electromagnetic probes that we have of the human brain we can actually
see thoughts ricocheting across the brain itself. We can see the thinking living brain
as it thinks and we can create computer simulations of this to understand what people are thinking.
So at the present time telepathy exists. For example, look at my colleague Stephen Hawking.
He’s lost control of his fingers now so he cannot communicate even with a laptop computer.
But look at his right frame of his glasses. There’s an EEG sensor that picks up radio
waves from his brain, decodes that and he’s allowed to manipulate to some degree a laptop
computer. You can do better by putting a chip directly on top of the brain. People who are
totally paralyzed, who are vegetables and they’re trapped in this shell of a lifeless
body — these people can now play videogames. They can read email, write email, do crossword
puzzles. They can operate their wheelchair. They can control household appliances. They
can control mechanical arms. Next they will control mechanical legs and exoskeletons.
In fact, one of the people that pioneers this technology for the next World Soccer Cup wants
to have a paralyzed person put on an exoskeleton and initiate the soccer games. That’s a goal
for one of the scientists that I’ve interviewed for my book. And so we’re way past simply understanding
the way in which the brain radiates radio. We’re at the point now where we can actually
interface the human brain with a computer and eventually with an exoskeleton by which
they can become Iron Man. And so Iron Man is not simply a question of science fiction.
It’s something that we can actually visualize in the laboratory. In addition to putting a chip on top of the
brain you can actually put sensors directly into the brain itself that are like hair-like
thin fibers. There’s a certain class of people with depression that have been resistant to
drugs, pharmacology, psychiatry, counseling. They are chronically depressed. It turns out
that when you put a brain scan — put them in a brain scan you find out that yes indeed
there’s a certain part of the brain that seems to be associated with this depression. By
putting in probes you can dampen the electrical activity of this and all of a sudden they’re
cured. On one hand you see somebody who’s chronically depressed, wants to commit suicide,
has been plagued by this. And afterwards they’re just cured. It’s remarkable. But this is just
another of the ways that we can access the human mind. Another way is through probes
in an operation on epileptics. Epileptics have many seizures — many of them are life
threatening. It’s possible to remove part of the cranium. These people are fully awake
during this process because the skull has no sense organs to sense pain. You put a bunch of electrodes directly on
the brain itself. These people can type. These people can type very quickly simply by thinking
about it. They think about a certain letter, a computer recognizes the pattern and a computer
will type in this way. Yet another way of probing into the brain itself is with an MRI
scan. We can take the living brain, put it in an MRI and get 30,000 dots like a Christmas
tree set of lights that code the amount of electrical activity. You take these 30,000
dots, put it into a computer program that can then decipher it and bingo, what you get
is a picture of what they are thinking. We can now visualize what somebody is thinking
about. In fact it’s on the web. There’s a picture of Steve Martin, for example, in one
of his movies and then right next to it is a picture as viewed through the human mind.
This is amazing. You can clearly recognize the eyes, the ears.
You cannot recognize the fact that it’s Steve Martin. However, you can also do giraffes.
You can put elephants and clearly you’re looking at an animal and not a human. And now get
this. We can actually begin the process of photographing dreams. This was considered
pure science fiction. Look at the movie with Leonardo DiCaprio called Inception. It turns
out that the first steps in this direction have been taken already in Kyoto and at Berkley.
What you do is you put the patient in an MRI scanner and he falls asleep. The brain is
then scanned creating 30,000 dots. A computer analyzes the 30,000 dots of a sleeping brain
and reconstructs the image of what he’s dreaming about. Now I’ve seen these pictures. They’re pretty
crude. You see a picture of a human and obviously he’s thinking about and dreaming about a human.
But one day we may be able to refine this technique so that when you wake up in the
morning and you hit the play button of a computer, you see the dream that you had last night.

Nikon D5600 “User Guide”: How To Setup Your New DSLR

Nikon D5600 “User Guide”: How To Setup Your New DSLR


Right before you jump into this video, if
you want to get my free 11 days to better photography mini video course, head on over
to froknowsphoto.com/11 days to get started right now. Jared Polin, froknowsphoto.com
and this is your user’s guide for the Nikon D5600. Now, I hope that you use this instead
of reading the manual, but I do suggest that you do read the manual because there are some
good nuggets of information in there. Now speaking of nuggets, some of this stuff
may seem super simple to you, but as we progress it may get a little more advanced, but it’s
going to help you set up the camera and use it, so you can start getting great pictures
and video of whatever it is you want to shoot. So, the first thing I want to show you how
to do is put the lens on. Now, to start I’m going to take the lens off,
because it’s off when you get it. You see this white dot right there. You line that
white dot up with this white dot right here. Go ahead and do this. Boom! It goes in. Turn
it towards you. If you’re holding it like me, you’ll hear a click and you’re all set.
How do you take it off? You’ve got this release button right here. You press it. You turn
the lens the other way and you take it off. Now, be careful when you take the lens off
you don’t ever want to touch anything inside this camera, you don’t want to touch the mirror
or the sensor underneath, so just know to get the lens back on, line it up, turn it
towards you, and it locks right in. So, before we turn it on, I want to show you where the
battery goes. Right here on the bottom there’s a little door. The battery pops out just like
this. There’s only one way that it can go in. Move
this yellow tab out of the way. Press it in. Boom! Close it recommendation. Try to have
two batteries always fully charged, especially if you go away, if one goes bad or you run
out of power you don’t want to not be able to shoot. Now, when you turn the camera to
the side, you have one SD card slot. Right here we have a Lexar 128GB SD card. You can
go ahead. You pop it in here. It goes in one way. Press it. Shut the door. Close it. You’re
ready to go. Now, to turn the camera on and off, move the
switch right there. It goes on. Turn it off. It goes that way also. So, how do you take
a picture in focus? Well, you have a shutter button right here. You can go ahead and press
that all the way down to take a picture or hold it halfway down to get your focus for
whatever you’re trying to focus on. Now, moving around these buttons you have
a plus, minus, for exposure compensation, but also for changing your aperture. I will
show you that when we turn the camera on. This red one is for shooting video, to get
into the live view mode to shoot either photos or video you would pull back on this spring
loaded button right here. You’ve got this dial right here, which helps you change your
shutter speed. Now this is your mode dial. Now you’re going
to notice something a little different than some other cameras you may have seen in the
past, because you have your auto right here. Then you have the no flash one, which means
if you don’t want the flash popping up in any situation you’re in, go ahead and do that,
it will be completely in auto still, but the flash won’t pop up. You’ve got your effects
mode. You have manual, aperture priority, shutter priority, program mode, and now you
have a scene mode. Now if you’ve seen other cameras mode dials,
you’ll see a running man person on there. You’ll see a portrait. You’ll see a kid. You’ll
see a landscape. They’ve got rid of that on the wheel. So, how do you access it? Well,
I am going to turn the camera on. I’m going to show you real quick because it’s in the
scene mode and I go ahead and I look at the back of the camera on the screen, you see
this lady with a hat on. I go ahead and hit that in the top left and I can either use
this dial to move through or I could touch the one I want or use the touch screen to
go ahead and change it. So, I’ll show you more of that as we get into
the camera, but I just wanted to show you how you get your scene modes. Now, moving
to the top of the camera, you’ve got your left microphone, your right microphone, as
well as your hot shoe. This is where you would put a flash or an external microphone if you
were going to connect the microphone right to here. This is your flash. Now, when you press this and it’s too dark
to take a picture, you press the button halfway down and it’s supposed to pop up. I just realized
why it’s not popping up, but let me show you that right now. If you have the 18-55 kit
lens, it has a lock on it with this button right here for when you put it back into your
bag. To unlock it, press the button. Turn the lens that way. You hear a click. It’s
now unlocked, so that when I go ahead and press the button, the flash is popping up
just like that. Now, I want to show you how it won’t pop up
if I put it into the ‘don’t flash pop up’ part. Boom! Not popping up anymore. All right.
I am going to turn the camera off for the time being and let me show you the side of
the camera right here. Right here we’ve got another manual way for you to pop up the flash.
We have a function button, which you can set yourself. We have the release button like
I showed you how to take the lens on and off. We also have another dedicated button. This
means how many frames a second you can shoot. It will allow you to make that change in the
menu system by pressing that, as well as accessing the timer function if you want to do timed
photos, say, two seconds or five seconds, it can do that. Right here you’ve got your
name plate to let everybody know that it’s the D5600. Right here on the side you can
see if you move this piece of rubber, open up the door, you have a remote slot, you have
a microphone slot and you have a USB plug that you can plug in right here. Moving around to the top right here, this
is where you can put your strap that comes in the box. This right here is a speaker to
play back the audio for when you’ve recorded audio and you want to hear it. It’s not the
greatest thing in the world because look how small it is. Now let me show you what you
look through in order to take the picture. This is your view finder right here. Right next to the viewfinder, you will find
a diopter. If you wear glasses or you don’t want to wear glasses and dial that in, you
can go ahead and use the diopter to do that. You’ve got the info button right here, as
well as another button that helps you to do focusing or auto exposure lock. You’ve got
your play button for playing back your images. You have another info button, but this one
is I. It does something different. I’ll show you that later as well. You’re up, up, down, down, left right, left
right, B A B A button right here for anybody who knows what that is. Leave a comment down
below. But that’s how you go ahead and move around the menu system with an OK button.
You’ve got your zoom buttons. That shows you exactly what that is and then you have a trash
can. Now this is your screen right here, your LCD
screen, because you have a Nikon D5600 it will come to you closed. Boom! You can close
it when you put it in your bag, so it protects the screen in case anything bumps into it.
You have a protector built in by this. Now, to open it you just pull it out. You can rotate
it back like this and then, boom, close it and it can be exposed right here and this
is the LCD screen that you would use. Now also people always ask, well, how – what
if I don’t want the LCD screen on when I’m shooting pictures using the viewfinder? Simple.
We have a proximity sensor built into this camera and when I say ‘we’ I mean Nikon,
not actually me, because I didn’t build it, but you’ve got the proximity sensor there,
so that if your eye comes up to this, it will turn off the screen so that it makes it easier
to shoot. Now moving to the bottom of the camera, we
have right here is your tripod socket. If you want to go ahead and put it on a tripod
that’s where you would do it. Or if you want to put it onto a monopod, you would put it
there as well. So, that’s pretty much everything on the outside of the camera. I’m going to
take a quick second to go ahead and get ready to show you how the menu system works. Before we jump into the next section, I have
a question for you. How do you organize and protect your camera gear? Well, if you don’t
have an answer for that, I have an answer for you. It’s called mygearvault. It is the
best way to input, organize, and protect your camera gear. It’s a free app that you can
check out right now at mygearvault.com. Download it in the Apple App Store and it’s coming
soon for Android. So, go ahead and check that out. Now let’s get back to the user guide. So now I want to show you how to set up your
camera by using the menu system. I’m going to walk you through step by step and show
you how I personally would set it up myself. But before I do that, I want to let you know
we’re using what’s called an Atomos to record the back of the camera, so that you can see
all of the menu systems as if you were going through the camera with me right now. So, the first thing that I want to do is remind
you that if you’re in the auto mode, you may not have access to all of the menu systems
to make a change. Let me show you what I mean by that right now. I’m in auto mode. Do you
see these grayed out areas on the back of the camera? Those are functions that you cannot
control because you’re in auto mode. So, if I go ahead and get out of there and
I move from Scene Mode back into say Program Mode, it’s no longer in Auto Mode, but I want
to let you in on a little secret that Program Mode is basically full auto. It’s just going
to give you full control of your camera. So, now I’m going to hit the menu button again.
It’s going to take us into the menu settings and the first thing we see here is playback
menu. Delete, that’s one way you could delete the pictures, but I’m not a fan of deleting
any pictures on the camera. Playback folder, play all is perfectly fine.
Playback display options, let’s see what that is. Oh, do you guys see the question mark
in the bottom of the screen? Well, you also have a question mark on the back of your camera.
If you see the question mark on the bottom of the screen and you hit the question mark
on the back of the camera, it goes ahead and brings up the actual user’s guide inside of
the camera, so you can read what it means. No image, none, highlight, RGB histogram,
it explains everything for you. So, what do I turn on? I go ahead and I use the arrow
to hit right to turn on none. Let’s turn on highlights. Highlights are the blinky things
that you’ll see in the back. Just play around with this one. Shooting data and overview
is what I like to do. Also you go ahead and hit the OK button right here and that goes
ahead and it should have saved everything. Let’s go back and it did. So, I hit the OK
button again. Image review, I like to turn image review
off. Personally that means when you take a picture, the picture doesn’t pop up on the
back of the screen, I recommend doing this because you don’t want to get in the habit
of taking a picture, looking at the screen, taking a picture, looking at the screen, because
you end up missing the pictures that you should have been shooting because you’re looking
at the screen. So, don’t do that. Keep on moving. Auto-rotate image, what does
this say right here? Record camera orientation when taking photographs. Images taken when
off is selected will not be rotated for display during playback. Now, this is something that
I personally leave off, because I want to be able to turn the camera myself like this
to see the full image covering the entire screen, but vertically if I shoot vertical
images, now when we move rotate tall, let’s see what this says. If on is selected, images taken with on selected
for auto image rotation in the PLAYBACK MENU will be rotated for display during playback.
Images are not rotated for display in the monitor immediately after shooting. So, I’m
going to leave this on. Moving through slide show, I don’t even touch rating. I don’t touch
and select to send to smart devices, I don’t touch that either. Moving on to the SHOOTING MENU, you could
reset everything. You could change storage folder. This is stuff that I’d leave basically
with whatever the camera had set. File naming DSC is a file naming structure that the camera
has it set to. You could change it to your initials. It could be J something 2. It could
be J22, whatever you want it to be, you can change those three digits right there. Image quality, this is important. So, on image
quality it comes to you set in Jpeg normal. I’m a big fan of shooting RAW as my shirts
say I shoot RAW by the way if you want to get I shoot RAW shirt, go to store.froknowsphoto.com.
You can pick one up right now. My recommendation is if you are just starting out, I would shoot
RAW plus Jpeg, fine. Now, it’s going to use more space on your
memory cards because you’re shooting a RAW file and a full res JPEG, but you will thank
me in the future when you understand the importance of shooting RAW. What I want to quickly say
is that the RAW file gives you all of the data, all of the RAW data that the camera
captured. A JPEG goes ahead and throws away a lot of
that data that you don’t need that it thinks you don’t need, but maybe in the future you
do, but a word of warning is that RAW files are larger. They take up more space and you’ll
have to tweak and edit each and every one of them, but you may not be ready for that
now, but you want to have that. You want to take those photos, so that when you are ready
to go ahead and edit them in the future, you still have them. So, I put it on RAW plus
JPEG, fine. Image size, I put that on large. There’s no
reason to shoot medium or small. I don’t care about shooting small. I don’t care how much
space it takes up. The reason I say this is you can always go down in quality, you can
never go back up if you don’t have it, so I leave that on large for your JPEG. NEF RAW recording, I put that on 14-bit instead
of 12. Again, the best quality is what I want. I don’t want a dumbed down file. Moving through,
ISO sensitivity settings. We can show you this on the back of the camera. There’s a
Info button that allows you to make changes there. It’s much easier. We’ll show you
that later. White Balance, I personally leave on auto. Set your picture controls. You can
see the different ones from standard to neutral to vivid to monochrome to portrait to landscape
to flat. I generally leave it on standard. Now keep
in mind that your RAW files will not retain the picture style controls, but your JPEGs
will. Also if you’re shooting video and, say, you shoot it in monochrome, yep, your video
is going to have no color. It’s going to be monochrome only. So when you’re shooting video,
make sure you set your picture style before you do that. So, moving back through the menu here, Manage
Picture Control style, save and load, that means you could save them for later to come
back to color space sRGB. Activity D-Lighting, I personally turn this off. I don’t want that.
Let’s see. High dynamic range is currently off for whatever reason. Release mode, what
does that mean? Let’s go inside and see. Ah, that’s what it means. Do you want to shoot one frame every time
you press the button or do you want to shoot continuous frames and continuous low, meaning
when you hold your finger down on the shutter button, it’s going to shoot photos in rapid
succession or in continuous high? Now, I like to shoot in continuous high especially if
I’m shooting action, I want to get as many frames a second as possible for that short
burst that I’m going to shoot. You’ve got quiet shutter release mode. If
I had to guess, it’s probably not that much quieter than regular mode. And then you have
self-timer mode, which you could set as well. I’m going to show you another button that
you could do that with. Actually I’ll show you right now. I go ahead and hit this button
and it brings up the back of the camera. Now you’d be able to touch the back of the
camera to make these changes because I’m plugged into this Atomos right here. I can’t touch
it, so I’ll just use the arrows. You see if you hit this button, you can get a quick menu
to single frame to continuous low, continuous high, to quiet mode, as well as the – what
do they call this? They call this the self-timer. So getting back into the menu section, let’s
get back into the menu section right here. You’ve got long exposure noise reduction.
I personally leave it off. High ISO noise reduction, I also turn that off. For those
of you who shoot JPEGs, if you shoot at higher ISOs and you leave that on, you would see
more of a mushy muddled image. If you leave it off, you may see a little
more grain, but it’s at least going to be a sharper image, so that’s my recommendation
for you right there. Vignette control, I leave it exactly where it’s at. Auto distortion
control off. Optical VR, so being that this lens right here does not have a button anymore
for turning on VR and turning it off, if you want to turn it off, you have to come into
the camera and go ahead and hit off. You might as well just leave it on. Now if
you’re on a tripod that’s where you would want to turn it off. For the other times,
just go ahead and leave it on. Internal timer shooting, wow, this camera has that. That’s
a pretty good thing. You could play around with this for time lapse, for setting the
camera to take pictures every second, every 10 minutes, every 20 minutes. Play around with that. That’s a fun little
setting in there. And then your movie settings, you’ve got your frame size rate. Let’s go
in there, 1920/1080, which is full HD at 60 frames a second. Now remember if you shoot
at 60 frames a second, you’re chewing up more data as opposed to if you shot at, say, 24
frames a second. Now 24 frames a second is more cinematic what you’re used to seeing
when you are watching movies and 60 frames a second is more what you would see with video
games. It’s kind of awkward when you’re shooting
your video, so I recommend doing 24 frames a second if you’re going to go ahead and do
that. You’ve got these other lower end ones. I really wouldn’t go less than 1080. I wouldn’t
get into 720 at this point and so those are the options that you have. I’m going to go
ahead and set it to 24 frames a second right there. Movie quality, I don’t want it on normal.
I want it on high. Remember what I said, you can always go down
in quality, you can’t get higher in quality once you’re lower. Microphone, you could leave
that on auto for the most part except if you’re plugging in an external microphone, I recommend
that you study up on how to set your audio levels for that. I leave wind noise reduction
off and manual movie settings, I’m actually going to put that on. Let’s read what that
says. Manual movie settings: Choosing ‘On’ allows
the shutter speed and ISO sensitivity for movies to be selected manually. Yep, this
means if you’re shooting manual video, you can change your shutter speed when you’re
recording that’s something I recommend you do, so let’s get out of there. I go ahead
and turn that off. So, moving back over to here, we are now into your CUSTOM SETTING
MENU. I know this takes a little bit of time, but
watch this video once and also refer back to it if you ever need to find a section where
you want to know what something means. You always have me to come back to at froknowsphoto,
so go ahead, hit the Subscribe button while you’re at it. Let’s get into auto focus. Auto focus, so you’ve got AF-C priority selection.
What does this mean? It means if you’re not in focus, it won’t take a picture. You could
set it to release, which would mean. Let’s see what it means. Let’s go ahead and hit
the button. Release means the shutter can be released even when the camera is not in
focus, say, sometimes the camera is wrong and you’re actually in focus, but it doesn’t
think you are, look, this is a crapshoot. You pick whichever one you want. For now we’ll
put it on focus. Number of focus points you have to choose
between 39 and 11. I leave it on 39, because I like to select a bunch of different ones
of those. We’ve got the built in AF-assist illuminator thingymabobber. This lights up
when you press the shutter button halfway down to help light up your subject. It’s actually
kind of annoying. I don’t recommend doing it because then people know you’re taking
their picture, especially if you’re trying to get candid moments, it can become annoying. So I personally turn this one off. Rangefinder
off. Manual focus ring in AF mode on. Let’s see EV steps one-third, I like third stops.
ISO display, what is this talking about? On and off. Let’s read about it right here. Choose
whether ISO sensitivity is shown in the viewfinder frame-count display. That’s up to you. Not
a big deal. I leave that off. Shutter release button, yep, skip past that. Auto off timers,
you can go ahead. I have it set, so it doesn’t go off, but you can set it to short, normal,
long, I have it custom right now, but you go ahead and set that up for yourself. Self-timers, you can say self-timer delay
10 seconds. You could also do 2 seconds, 5 seconds, 10 seconds, 20 seconds, it’s going
to beep and when it gets to the end, it’s going to go beep, beep, beep, click and take
the picture. Number of shots, now this is pretty cool. This means in self-timer if you
go ahead and say set it to 10 seconds and hit this over here and you could set between
one and nine frames. So, when you go ahead and hit self-timer and
you set this eight to nine or let’s say eight because that’s what I just hit it, it would
take eight pictures in a row and I don’t know if it’s going to take it every 10 seconds
or if it just takes eight after every set, I don’t know I have to try that out. You guys
test it out, but just know that this functions there and it’s pretty cool to have. Let’s see exposure delay mode, I don’t even
know what the heck that is. It’s funny. I don’t know what all the stuff means either,
because most of the time you don’t need it. Delay shutter release until about one second
after the mirror is raised. Exposure delay mode that’s interesting. That’s for if you’re
shooting super slow shutter speeds. They don’t have this. It’s funny. They don’t have a lot
of this in Pro cameras, but they have it down here. So, what this means is it would delay the
picture being taken. So, if you don’t want any shaking, because you’re shooting at a
super slow shutter speed, you would hit it, it would wait and then it would shoot the
picture. File number sequence, turn this on. You don’t want this off. You want this on,
so that when you take a picture and you take another picture and then you turn the camera
off and you turn it back on, it doesn’t give it the same file name. It will go to 1999
before it resets to zero. Viewfinder grid display, I leave that off.
Date time stamp that is absolutely off. Remember in the ‘80’s when you would go to the
One Hour Photo Mark and you get your pictures back with that burnt in thing in the bottom
right-hand corner with the date and time and when you would enlarge it, you would enlarge
the date and time, yeah, don’t put that on in your photos. Nobody likes that.
Unless you’re one of those people who likes that, then turn it on. More power to you.
Reverse, nope, don’t do that. Flash control, TTL is fine. Auto bracketing set, I leave
that. Assign function budget right now is set to ISO. So the function button, which
is right here on the side that means it’s set to ISO. So if I hit that, it would then
go into ISO. Assign AE lock, leave that. Assign touch function,
I leave it where it’s at. Reverse dials, I don’t do that either. So, that’s your CUSTOM
SETTING MENU. Moving down we’ve got your SET UP MENU. Man, there’s a lot of menus in here
when you’re out of auto. Format, this is what you do every time you put a new card into
the camera. You format it so that the card and the camera are talking the same language,
so that you have less issues when you’re shooting photos. Now, remember before you reformat a card,
make sure you’ve offloaded the data that’s on it because once you reformat it, it’s much
harder to get it back and recover it. I’m not going to reformat it right now because
I have some images on the card. Image comment, you would set this to leave. Remember how
I said you don’t want to put that time stamp in the bottom corner. Well, with image comment, you can digitally
put it into your, what’s called, metadata. It’s going to store it inside the file, so
you can put an image comment and copyright information. This is where you would set the
time. I would take the time to do image comment and copyright information. You guys should
do that, turn that on. Language, you can change it to a bunch of
different languages. In this case, English, because that’s all I can read. Beep options,
on, I like having my beep options on. This means when you’re in single focus mode, it
will beep when you’re in focus. So here you’ve got your choice between high. That sounds
like that. And low, low, high, low, high, low, high, whatever you want to pick, pick
it. So, for now I’ll leave it on high pitch. Let’s
keep on moving. Touch controls, what are touch controls? That just means I should be able
to just touch the screen? Yes. I’m leaving that on. I want that enabled. Monitor brightness,
I generally leave it on zero, because we were filming it earlier. It’s still set to minus
three, so I like to leave it set to zero. Let’s see. Info display format, yes, you could
change this. I like the more traditional style, which is this more so than the nontraditional. Let’s take a look. That’s the nontraditional.
I don’t like the way that looks. That’s awfully confusing to me. So when I go in here and
I go to info display for P/S/A/M, I’m going to go to this one with the old [Indiscernible]
[00:24:14] go a look. Let me show, yes, that’s much better. Oh, and you see everything blinking
right now. The reason it’s blinking even though I have a lens attached to it, remember I said
that if it’s locked, you can’t shoot pictures. Well, it’s locked. So, let’s unlock it right
now to show you. Yep, see that. All those numbers start to show up. So let’s get back
into the menu system once again. Info display, I leave that on. Info display auto off on
as well. Clean image sensor that’s where the camera would clean the image sensor. It doesn’t
hurt to do that every once in a while. It’s going to clean the dust off. And I will remind you that if you see what
looks like a black spot on your images that may be because you have dust on your sensor.
Don’t go in there and try to clean the sensor yourself. Use this clean image sensor mode
in the camera first and then if you notice that you’re looking through the viewfinder
and it looks like you have specs in your images, those won’t turn out in your photos because
the mirror is what’s dirty. I wouldn’t even worry about cleaning that either because you
don’t want to mess anything up. You can lock the mirror up if you want to
go ahead and clean something. Image dust off, I’ve never even touched that. Flicker reduction
is on auto. That’s cool for if you’re shooting inside a gym. It may know and it won’t shoot
while the lights are flickering. Slot empty release lock, I highly recommend that you
leave this on lock. If it’s on unlock and you start taking pictures
without a memory card and then you go, well, why didn’t I get any pictures? But you don’t
have a memory card. I made that mistake back when I was shooting film. I was at the school
event and I took like 30 pictures and I looked at my camera and realized that I didn’t have
any film in it, so you don’t want to have that issue right here. Moving on HDMI, yep, location data, remote
control, if you connect it, airplane mode in case you’re on an airplane, you want to
turn off the Wi-Fi. You could do that, but nobody is going to turn it off on an airplane.
Connect to smart devices. This is where you would go ahead and connect to snap bridge.
I’m not going to show you how to do that now. You can – that’s really easy to go ahead
and do. It can walk you through that by itself. Wi-Fi, all right, so that’s all of that. Conformity
marketing, what is conformity? I don’t even know what the heck that means. Oh, it’s an
FCC thing. That’s on the bottom of the camera and, yeah, I don’t even know what the heck
that means. And then firmware, this tells you what firmware you are currently on. And
if there’s ever a firmware update, you can update it and I’ll make a video to show you
how to do that. Then you’ve got your RETOUCH MENU. If you
want to edit your RAW files or any files inside the camera, you could do that. I don’t do
anything inside the camera. I save that for later and then you’ve got your recent settings.
Any of the settings that you recently went through and changed you would see them right
here in the recent setting menu, so that is running you through how to set up the menu
system. I know it’s a little long, but this should
help you out right out of the gate and remember just because I said it one way, it doesn’t
mean that you should set it the exact same way. This is just a guide. Try it for yourself.
See what works for you and then leave a comment down below with what settings you use that
I don’t personally use and we’ll be right back with another section. So, now I want to walk you through everything
you will see on your touch screen on the back of the camera. Now you can make a lot of changes
from this touchscreen where back in the day everything had to be done in the menu system,
but now that you can touch the screen, you pretty much have a dedicated button for everything.
So, you see how it says lens retracted and I can’t make any changes. Again I’m going to unlock this. I hate the
fact that they have this on this lens, but you unlock it and you have to lock it when
you put it away and it won’t let you shoot until you unlock it. So, you see how it says
one to thousandth of a second, yep, that’s exactly how you say it. If you rotate this
back dial right here that’s how you change your shutter speed. Now, how do you change
your aperture? A lot of people ask this question on this
camera because it doesn’t have a dial to make any changes on the front. So, you hit the
plus, minus, right here and you turn that scene dial that you were using for the shutter
and this time it overrides that and it will change your aperture. You can see that it’s
changing right here on the back of your camera. So, on the screen right now, you can see the
meter. That’s where the arrow is all the way to the left because it’s telling you that
it’s under-exposed. That’s what you could line up right in the middle if you go ahead
and line it up properly, which I probably [Indiscernible] [00:28:28] that’s telling
me that’s a proper exposure right there. Also like I said at the beginning of this
video, if you want to become a better photographer in only 11 days go to froknowsphoto.com/11
days. I have a video specifically on how to set up the meter for free right there. So,
what do we do if we want to change the ISO? See this info button on the side. We can go
ahead and hit that right now. This basically is like a dedicated button for everything,
now because I can’t access the touch screen right now, which you can, you can just touch
everything. I’m going to go in here and show you can change
the RAW to whatever you want it to change to. I leave it in RAW + fine as you can see.
It also tells you how many – how much storage it will take. It would take 54 megabytes per
picture that you take, but because I have 128 gigabyte card in there, it would give
me 2300 pictures. So, moving down basically we went into the
menu system. We already showed you that bracketing. I leave that off. Auto white balance, changing
the ISO, you’re going to change the ISO quite often at the back of your camera. So, here
the lower the number – by the way in 11 days I have a video on this as well, but the
lower the number the more light you need, so a bright day you’re going to go ahead and
use that. You could also see that on the back of the
camera it shows you a picture of a situation that you might want to shoot there. Now, if
you’re shooting action sports, maybe start around 400 if you’re outside and then as it
gets darker, you start to use a higher ISO. In this case, this one tops out at 25,600.
So, at those higher ISOs, you may see what’s called noise and grain, so the best way to
have less noise and less grain is to shoot at lower ISOs where possible, but do not be
afraid to shoot at higher ones from time to time. So, moving on back here this you can get your
picture style and this one is how you can set your focusing modes. So, right now it’s
set to AF-A. I do not like auto-servo AF. That means the camera is going to decide should
it do single or continuous, it could get it wrong, so that’s why I’m either in AF-S. What
that means is if you hold the shutter button halfway down, you’ll hear that beep when you’re
in focus that means you can lock your composition and move the camera and the focus will stay
locked. And if you want to refocus, you press the
button again. You use that for subjects that aren’t moving. Now, if the subject is moving
you use AF-C, which is continuous. That’s for your sports or shooting cars or somebody
running or the kids in the backyard. That’s where you would use that and then manual focus
and if you want to go ahead and override everything else and do that yourself. So, most of the time you’re going to be living
in AF-S and AF-C. AF area mode, so let’s go through what those are. You’ve got single
AF. You’ve got 9 point, 21 point, and 39 point, as well as 3D. 3D tracking is really good
if you’re shooting a subject that’s moving superfast like a jet. I’ve shot fighter jets
before and if you want the focus to continually track it 3D wise, this is what you’re going
to use and I don’t use it all the time especially for sports where people running at me because
if somebody kicks a ball, it may focus on their foot or it may focus on the ball when
it should have been focusing on their face. Nine points means you could select nine different
points. This one means you could use the 21 points and this one would use all 39 points
to get the autofocus data. This is for you to choose. Try them out. Most of the time
I’m probably in 9 or 21. Moving on, we’ve got metering mode. I leave this in this one.
This is called matrix metering. This one is called center-weighted. And if you’re ever
shooting a subject at, say, back against a strong back light, you could get into spot
metering, meaning it will only give you the meter reading for what’s inside that spot. So I generally leave it on matrix metering.
Flash, you can’t touch. You can’t touch that. I don’t have those [Indiscernible] [00:32:20]
anymore. But anyway that is the back of the camera right there. So, next let’s go to the
playback menu, so you can see the pictures that you’ve taken. Right here you’ve got that
sideways triangle. I think you should know what a play button is by now, but if you don’t,
this is it. I go ahead and hit play and I can cycle through
the images by hitting left or I could hit right and check this out. If I hit up, it
changes what you see, now because we set that in the playback menu, I can see the settings
that I use the histogram. The histogram is that thing to the right of the screen. As
I keep hitting up, I can see more data. That’s where I would see the image comment and all
of that information if I had that set. So you can see all of that stuff. Don’t forget
cycle through and if I had video in here, which I think I do, I could play that back
as well, but I’m not going to do that right here. So let’s get out of that and hit play
once again. Oh, let me hit play again because I want to show you something. Say I want to
delete this. I could hit the trash can and I could hit the trash can again to delete
it, but my recommendation is don’t ever delete anything inside the camera because you may
delete something that you didn’t want to delete. The cards are cheap. Fill them up. Don’t worry
about deleting stuff on the camera itself. So, now I want to show you how to get into
live view to take photos, as well as shoot video. What you need to do is pull back on
the live view toggle. It flips the mirror up, which then allows you to see everything
on the LCD, the back of the cameras. So, right here you can see everything that I’m seeing. Now this is if you want to take stills, if
you want to take video, you can go ahead and hit the record button right here and I’ll
show you that in just a second. On the bottom of the screen, you can see that my shutter
speed is changing, because we allowed that in the menu system that I could change it
manually. You could also see how many photos are left, the ISO. On the right-hand side,
you can see that I’m in AF-S, which is single focus. So, in this case you can hear the beep. Press
the button, shutter button halfway down, and the green box shows up, because it’s in focus.
Now that means it’s locked in. But what if you want to track a subject for video or for
photos, go ahead and hit this ‘I’ button again. Right now it’s on AF single. Let’s
put it on AF-F, which is full time servo AF and hit the ‘I’ again and watch this. It’s going to focus in on the time and then
I’m going to pull it back like this and watch it’s going to focus in on my hand. Now this
is not the greatest autofocus in the history of autofocus. It’s not like an old camcorder.
Now, it’s good. It’s not the best, but it’s going to do the job if that’s what you want
to do. My recommendation is not to use live view to shoot still images. I’m a big proponent
of holding the camera like this and shooting through the viewfinder just like this. That
is more stable than holding the camera just like this. So, now how do we hit record for video? We
hit this red button and boom. It starts recording. You can see what it’s recording right now.
We can zoom in on the Wheel Of Fro right there, boom. It found the focus in this low light.
Like this you can also see my levels are on auto, how much battery time is there and in
the top left-hand corner you can see that I have 20 minutes of record time. So, you will get 20 minutes in the highest
mode that I was set at right now to record video. To stop it, you go ahead and hit the
record button again and that stops recording your video and that’s what you use live view
for. In order to turn live view off once again you pull back on the LV right here and that
will turn off live view. So, there you have it. That’s your free user’s
guide for this Nikon D5600. I know it’s a long video. I know it’s a lot of information.
But if you get everything set right at the beginning, it’s going to make shooting photos
a heck of a lot easier as you progress with your camera. So, any questions that you have,
you could always leave comments down below and I will do my best to answer them and don’t
forget to subscribe right here on YouTube, so you can be notified when all of my videos
go live. So, that is where I’m going to leave it. Thank
you very much for watching, Jared Poland froknowsphoto.com. See you. Hey, look, it’s my logo on the top
left-hand corner. Go ahead and click on it, so you can subscribe to my YouTube channel
and never miss another video again. Over here on the top right-hand corner, you have the
mygearvault logo. Go ahead and download mygearvault, the best way to input, organize, and protect
your gear and on the bottom right a video.