My Poetry Teacher

My Poetry Teacher


Ummmm.. I’ll take school facts for $800, Alex. [Reads text on clue] Oh. Oh, man. What is… poetry? I’m sorry Jeff, but the correct answer is all of them. They’re all useless. In my first video, I didn’t have enough time to say this, but I HATE it when people are “cool” with their teachers. I understand that some teachers are more laid-back than others, and sometimes they’ll ask the class; “So, how was everyone’s weekend?” Then if you want to talk about something, or have important news, then you can share it. “My dog died!” Hahaha, yeah, they do that. But there is a line, and you shouldn’t cross it. Don’t talk to your teacher just to talk to them during class. I don’t know how much of a problem this is in other places of the world, but sometimes there would be kids in my class that would say, “Hey, Susan! How was your daughter’s dance recital? Did you remember all of her moves?” “I saw the video you posted on Facebook, It looked like she was having a fun time.” Stop it. Stop it! STOP IT!!! Maybe I wouldn’t have been a good teacher. Before I tell you about my poetry teacher, I need to tell you about the preparatory school I went to, so you can better understand where I’m coming from. So I went to a preparatory school in ninth grade, and- first off, what is a preparatory school? Google says its “A private school that prepares students for college.” Now hearing that definition you might think, wait, don’t all schools prepare students for college? Isn’t that a school’s JOB? And you might think that a preparatory school is more fancy and made out of marble, and all the kids come from rich families… HAHAHA! No! What It means is that the schools get little government funding and parents have to pay for desks and the teacher’s salary. I know different private schools will vary depending on how rich the parents are. I’m sure that school made out of marble exists somewhere? But the preparatory school I went to, was relatively worse than a normal public school. The school I went to didn’t even have DESKS. They had fold up tables and the chairs were fold up too, how did they– Oh…. Well now I know where all the budget went. The main difference between a public school in a prep school, is that a prep school is smaller and there’s a uniform and there’s lockers. So… why did my twin sister and I attend a preparatory school? Because twins have superpowers and we need to go to a special school to enhance our abilities. NAH! I’m just– I’m just kidding. I’m- I’m kidding, that would be cool though! We went because when we were starting our freshman year, our older brother was a senior, and he was already attending this preparatory school, and my mom didn’t want to drive to two high schools to pick us up. We already had a carpool in place; you can’t just mess with the carpool! Me and my sister didn’t know what to expect from a public high school, We’ve never been, we thought we’d get bullied or something. “Boy, I feel like PICKING ON SOMEONE TODAY!” Yeah, sure, we can go to a prep school I mean what’s the worst that can happen? Well the carpool we had, made it so we would arrive at the school super early before everyone else, and we’d be picked up from the school super late. And also because it was a prep school, they gave out a STUPID amount of homework! I remember breaking up the homework into pieces like; “Okay, I can do the geometry while I’m waiting for school to start, the biology homework I can do during geometry class, and I have choir after lunch so I can just do this during lunch! AH! Look at me being responsible! I have a little sister who just finished her freshman year in a public high school, and she thinks it was SOOOO hard. OH, you thought your ninth grade was hard!? Try doing twice the amount of homework and wear the same pants every day! So now the only question remaining is, why did my older brother go to a prep school in the first place? “Bro, why did you go to a prep school in the first place?” “IDK, just decided to. Just felt like I should.” My mom reads my scripts, and she told me that he went to a prep school because one of his friends said that there were cute girls at the school… so he decided to stay there for four years. Okay, now let’s talk about my poetry teacher. I’ll call him… Mister… Poe. Because that’s short for Poe…a.. tree. Poetry wasn’t even an elective class. EVERY freshman was required to take it. And surprisingly, poetry was only the second most useless class you took at the school. The sophomores took a class on Latin. You know, that dead language that no one speaks. So Mr. Poe… I don’t want to judge him TOO hard. I don’t know how he was like outside of school, but just picking up the vibes I got from him as a 14 year old… I think he was depressed. I mean, to be fair, anyone who likes poetry probably has something wrong in their head. But Mr. Poe just seemed SAD. All the time! Every single day he would start the class by saying, “It’s the best day ever,” which, if you think about it, saying that every day only means that the days are going to get better and better which is.. sort of poetic… but I think Mr. Poe is lying to himself. Also, Mr. Poe really liked anacondas… I mean snakes… he really liked snakes. Sometimes would go off on tangents talking about snakes. “Royal Pythons, also called American Ball Pythons, got their name because they turn into a ball when they get nervous. Also, did you know that snakes have have two– …nevermind.” Sometimes in class we would be analyzing poetry, and Mr. Poe told us that every single word in a poem was important. “The poet didn’t have to use the word ‘The’… but they DID… What did they mean?” Sometimes we would spend days analysing a single poem, taking notes and talking about what we thought the poet meant. One time, a poem we were reading had someone talking, so there were quotation marks at the start of the sentence, but there weren’t quotation marks at the end. The poet forgot to put end quotes. I remember noticing it in thinking: “AHA! A clue! Mr. Poe, I just made a breaking discovery! There’s no end quotes here, meaning that the whole rest of this poem is told by this character!” And Mr. Poe said: “Oh no, that’s just a typo.” Well, frickin’, why am i perfectly nitpicking this piece, when the poet purposely put poor punctuation in his poems! PTERODACTYL!! This is going to sound off-topic, but do you guys know what lateral thinking puzzles are? Lateral thinking puzzles are sort of like riddles, but more stupid. You’re given a strange situation with little information, and you have to ask the person who told you the puzzle, yes or no questions to get the answer. My favorite lateral thinking puzzle is this, because it’s so stupid. “A man goes into a restaurant, orders albatross, eats one bite, and then jumps off a bridge. Why?” Now normally, if we were playing legitly, you would ask me yes-or-no questions like “Was the man in a relationship?” And I would answer them, saying “Well, not anymore.” The explanation is this, I’m not going to read it out because it’s super long and complicated but, you can read it if you want. Well Mr. Poe, also liked to tell these lateral thinking puzzles, but his solutions were more… dumber. One of the puzzles he told the class was, “You’re trapped in a restaurant, how do you get out?” Now, I can think of like five solutions right off the top of my head. Go through the door, through a window, use a crowbar if it’s locked, there’s probably a sharp knife to cut through a wall, or you can dig a hole under everything with a spoon, but it was actually none of those answers. So how do you get out of a restaurant you’re trapped in? You get an.. education. Okay let me explain, you’re trapped in a restaurant because you’re a waiter. That’s your job, and to get out of the restaurant, you need to get a good education so you can get a better job, kind of like how I was able to quit my job in the food industry, by getting.. an education. *whisper* “It’s funny because he dropped out of college.” So the class got the answer to that riddle, but Mr. Poe told us another riddle and we never figured that one out. and that riddle is; “Anyone can dig a ditch, but it takes a real man to… blank.” Given that the answer to the first riddle was education, the answer to this could be anything. I really wanted to know the answer to this riddle, so I Googled it, hoping that Mr. Poe just stole it from the internet, and and I found this song; “Anyone can dig a hole, (close enough to a ditch) but it takes a real man to call it home.” Which sounds poetic enough. Let’s see if the song gives us any more clues. (Loud screaming rock music) Mr Poe, I didn’t know you were into this sort of stuff. So I wish I could give you the answer, but I don’t have one. Feel free to guess what you think the answer is, and give your reasoning in the comments. That’ll be fun to read. But I will say the answer that I did come up with that I think makes the most sense. “Anyone can dig a ditch, but it takes a real man to… hide the body.” Poetry was dumb, but at least I learned something, how to write haikus. Honestly I’m glad I took a poetry class. At least it’s not French. Mr. Poe, teacher, if you’re somehow watching this, thanks for teaching me stuff. I need to give a big thanks to my friend CypherDen, who helped color some of the pictures. She’s a pretty cool dude, you should check her out. I never figured out the solution to that riddle, I guess I’m not a real man. Mr. Poe, if you’re watching I’m sorry I called you depressed. You just always sounded tired and annoyed. Well, okay, I probably sounded exactly the same when I was in your class. But honestly, Mr. Poe it was a great class, okay? It was WAY better than French. Thanks for watching, everyone. I’m excited for VidCon and I hope to see you there, and wear your seat belt. That rhymes, sorta, and it’s ironic because this is about poetry. Whatever.

School of Culinary Arts

School of Culinary Arts


File Name : School_of_Culinary_Arts
Length : 0:02:53 Speakers : Gail Simmons, Richard Simpson,
Daniel Boulud, Sabrina Sexton, Andrew Gold, Linda Simon, Cindi Avila, Miguel Trinidad,
Kelly Senyei, Michael Anthony, Marc Murphy Special Comment: [0:00:00]
[Audio Starts] Gail Simmons: I think going to a culinary
school and working in kitchens, learning what it means to really be a chef and to be a cook
is invaluable experience. – I can’t stress that enough. ICE has an award-winning culinary
training program, which is only six to 12 months. It has launched more than 10,000 careers
just like mine. James Briscione: Now I think that plate looks
really great, very nice. Richard Simpson: The Culinary Arts program
is the foundation of everything that we built here at ICE.
The curriculum’s 13 courses include fundamental skills, introduction to meat, fish and poultry,
soups and sauces, dry-heat cooking, moist-heat cooking, breakfast, brunch and lunch, international
cuisines of France, Italy and Asia, pastry and baking, modern culinary masters and hors
d’oeuvres, charcouterie and buffets. Daniel Boulud: What I like about ICE cooking
school is the boutique size of the school which I think is very important because the
classes are never too big. The teachers, of course, have very high knowledge and we have
had wonderful results with the selection of the student. I think it’s a big plus for ICE
— the location. I mean they’re in the heart of New York City.
Sabrina Sexton: Here at ICE, I love that we offer small, attentive, hands-on classes,
never more than 16 students and I’m able to give each students lots of individual attention.
Andrew Gold: The student experience extends outside the kitchens through guest lectures,
networking opportunities and volunteer opportunities by the hundreds.
Linda Simon: The externship is an opportunity for ICE students to get practical experience
in the industry as part of the training program. When they complete their training in school,
they then go and work and it really gives students a leg up and an opportunity to get
hired out of the externship. Cindi Avila: One of the great things about
ICE is it prepares you for so many different careers: from working in a restaurant, to
being a caterer, to working in food media, to owning your own restaurant or even research
and development. The possibilities are endless. Miguel Trinidad: The key points about the
program were not only the instructors but the freshness of produce and ingredients,
the quality of the meats, technique, equipment. It was a well-rounded program. We were in
a space where you had everything that you needed in order to accomplish your goal. I
chose ICE because it was already established, and I wanted to be part of it.
Kelly Senyei: ICE is the best place to take your passion for food and cooking and turn
it into a career. Graduating from ICE has really given me credibility as a food journalist.
Michael Anthony: ICE students are such good employees because they come into a restaurant
prepared. We have a number of our key staff members who have graduated from the school.
So we see a great continuity over the years, that in my opinion is only getting better
and better. Marc Murphy: I own four restaurants and a
catering company. ICE really helped me realize my dreams.
Gail Simmons: Come to ICE and find your culinary voice just like I did. [0:02:53]
[Audio Ends]

Creative thinking – how to get out of the box and generate ideas: Giovanni Corazza at TEDxRoma

Creative thinking – how to get out of the box and generate ideas: Giovanni Corazza at TEDxRoma


Translator: Michele Gianella
Reviewer: Elisabeth Buffard Sometimes, easy means difficult. Have you ever been assigned an easy task, which for you is actually
very difficult to perform, and maybe for nobody else? That is when you experience frustration. I have experienced that
when I started taking singing lessons, and my teacher told me
to breathe with my diaphragm. That’s easy, it’s our natural breath,
but actually very difficult to do, and it’s a secret of the great singers. It’s similar to what happens when a boss comes into a meeting
and tells you to think out of the box. Come on, give me your creative ideas. Think out of the box. I want to hear that. I need innovation. Easy, simple, but actually
very hard to do. You need to practice. You need to know how to get
out of the box, where to go, and how to come back inside the box,
because that’s where we live. We actually live inside our boxes. I want to ask these questions. I asked those questions to myself. This presentation is a little journey
through my answers. I hope that some of these
will resonate with yours. The first thing is to ask, why. Why should you really go out of the box? Because inside the box, we feel safe. We agree with everybody else. And when we go out,
we risk our reputation. We worked so hard
for a lifetime to build it up, why should we risk it? Is this something which is a luxury,
that only a few people can do, or is it really a necessity? Why? Think of our lives today. We are really a part of a network. We are nodes in a network. We share information in a real time, and we, in the end,
all possess the same information. That’s the end of it,
and that is a scary thought. If we all possess the same information, what makes a difference between ourselves? Where does our dignity
as human beings lie? It really depends on what we generate
with that common shared information. To think creatively, to go out
of the box, is not a luxury. It’s a necessity for us,
and for our dignity as human beings. Which box are we talking about? We must have a clear definition, so that we are really talking
about something specific. It’s not our mind;
we cannot think out of our minds. It’s a boundary within our minds. The boundary between what we know, and what we haven’t still,
or yet, thought about. What is our mind? What is our knowledge structure? It’s an emergent phenomenon
out of the complex mechanism, which is the brain. We start with initial conditions,
our genetic heritage. We have boundary conditions,
the environment. We have indirect experience, years and years spent
in school and University to learn what other people have thought, what other people have discovered, what other people have created. Then, we have our own direct experience, our successes, our failures
that really make what we are. All of this builds the anthill
within which we live, and we live very well in that. Whatever we think inside that anthill,
that box, we feel safe. Whatever is outside, it’s invisible to us. We don’t know what it’s outside. That is why it’s so risky,
because nobody else knows. We are faced with something
which is necessary to our dignity, but actually it’s very difficult to do. How do we go out of the box?
How do we do that? What are the mechanisms? Do we need to wait for an apple
to fall on our heads, or are there some specific techniques? Reality is out there
for us to perceive it. It’s beautiful. You see these flowers. We have a lot of ideas,
which is our convergent information, the dominant ideas. Whenever we need to think
about an area, a focused area, we have ideas on how things should be. We have requirements,
we have specifications. We know how things are, because that’s the way
they always have been. But if we want to go out of the box, we need to add something more,
a little spice, something which goes beyond
the convergent information. Something wrong, something absurd, something which apparently
is not relevant, something which takes us far. This is what we call
divergent information. We need a little bit
of that divergent information to cross the borders within our minds, from what we know
to what we haven’t yet thought about. This is the essential mechanism
that is necessary, and it takes us to a place
where we don’t really know where to go. We are suspended. It’s like the middle game in chess. Where do you go
once you’re out of the box? You have no preset direction. It’s really a potential situation that brings us to a feeling
that we should immediately go back. This does not make any sense. Let’s go back to safe place.
Let’s go back inside the box. That’s a temptation
that we need to resist. We need to value long thinking. Normally,
we talk about brilliant thinking, fast thinking, deep thinking, but here we’re talking
about something different, long thinking. What does that mean? It’s some thought that takes us far. It’s as if you were reading poetry
or listening to music. You don’t judge the single notes. You don’t judge the single words. It’s the ensemble that gives you
a feeling, and takes you far. We must do the same thing
with our concepts. We need to go far. We can use association of ideas, combination of ideas,
extraction of principles, and application of those principles to areas where they were
never applied before. We need to be open-minded.
We need to be fluent. Look for alternatives,
and not for the correct answer. Because when you think creatively,
there’s no single correct answer. There are many possible alternatives. Suppose now that we are lucky. We land upon a new idea in our travel, in the exploration out of the box. What is the value of that? How do we assess the value of a new idea? It’s very difficult if it’s really new,
because you’ve never seen that before. Nobody else has seen that before. It’s as if we landed on a new planet,
totally undiscovered territory. It’s difficult to understand
the value of something new. First of all, because we don’t feel
entitled to be inventors. Who am I to be the generator
of that new idea? Probably this has been
thought about before. If this is correct, somebody else
would have done it before me. These are all natural mechanisms
with which we kill our own ideas. We have to resist that. We have to look for the match
between the new idea and our initial drive, our initial focus, or evaluate the idea per se,
for its own value and maybe see that that’s something
that solves another problem, which it was not yours. Serendipity happens all the time. We just need to have the eyes to see that, to notice the difference. Ok, but we are social animals. We live in an environment, so to think out of the box,
bring in new ideas, is going to challenge that environment. When is it a good idea
to challenge everybody around you in your working environment? You have a boss. You don’t really want to upset him or her. When is it a good idea
to think out of the box? First of all, if the environment
punishes mistakes, you will never be really tempted
to go out of the box. You will remain safely
in a known environment. If you want to stimulate
an environment which is creative, you need to allow the existence
of divergent information. You need to allow
irrelevant information to come in. You have to mix and match
different disciplines. You have to use metaphors
in the organization. Only in that case,
you will allow the environment to be really prone
to the generation of new ideas. I want to end my talk
with a little experiment. We wanted to do this
interactively with you, but the time is scarce. I have indeed prepared a little thing, but if you believe me, and to be honest, this has been generated
in the space of few minutes. The generation of ideas,
this travel outside of the box, is something which happens very fast. Where should we experiment? Let’s say that we want to generate
new ideas about TEDx Conferences. We are here, so that’s a focused area
which is very clear to all of us. Let’s start from the convergent
information about TEDx Conferences. What is needed to make
an excellent, good TEDx conference? You need the brilliant speakers
that will come up. You need an excellent theme. You need fast
speaker to speaker transitions. You need grand settings. The list can go on, and all I’m saying
is things that you already know. This is all convergent information, safe. I’m not generating anything new.
I’m inside the box. Now I want to go out, so I apply a divergent modifier to any of these convergent elements. Start from the last one for example,
the grand setting. A divergent modifier,
for example, is to exaggerate. Bring it to the limit. Instead of thinking
of a TEDx conferences in a theater, think of a TEDx Conference in a stadium. Does this make any sense, in a stadium? Very difficult to organize,
even more difficult than in a theater, and how do you fill the place? How do you fill the stadium? It’s too difficult.
It doesn’t make any sense. I’m tempted to reject that idea. But then I move, and I say, ok, maybe the stadium
is already filled with people. From that, you can get the idea of having a TEDx Conference
at half-time of football matches, a network of speeches which happens
at half-time of football matches. Good idea, bad idea?
I leave it for you to assess. Take another element:
good speakers, brilliant speakers. That’s the most fundamental element
of a TEDx Conference. Let’s take that away. We eliminate the good, brilliant speakers. Does this make any sense?
No, we’re out of the box. Does this lead to anything useful? I could say that,
OK, I don’t need the speakers, but I need the speeches,
the talks, the scripts. From this comes the idea of one speaker delivering
the speech of somebody else. We exchange speakers. So it’s a cooperative TEDx Conference. Maybe we have duets on stage,
instead of a single element, or we have people that speak about, somebody has this topic. In that way we have
one advantage at least. We take away the element of the ego. There’s no ego anymore, if you’re speaking
with somebody else’s script. These are just examples, just examples, to show you that it’s possible
and not too hard, actually, to think out of the box. I hope this journey, in a way,
was interesting for you, and now you want to do more of that. Thank you very much for your attention. (Applause)

PHILOSOPHY – Hegel

PHILOSOPHY – Hegel


Georg Friedrich Hegel was born in Stuttgart in 1770. Intellectually he was adventurous, but in externals, respectable, conventional, and proud of it. He ascended the academic tree and reached the top most branch, head of the University of Berlin, when he was sixty years old; he died the following year. Hegel wrote some very long and very famous books, among them, “The Phenomenology of Spirit”, “The Science of Logic”, and “Elements of the Philosophy of Right”; but, we’ll be frank: he wrote horribly; his work is confusing and complicated when it should be clear and direct. He tapped into a weakness of human nature: to be trustful of grave-sounding, incomprehensible prose. This has made philosophy much weaker in the world than it should be, and it’s made it much harder for us to hear the valuable things that Hegel has to say to us, amongst which a small number of lessons stand out. Firstly, important part of ourselves can be found in history. In Hegel’s day, a standard European Way of looking at the past was to consider it as primitive, and to feel proud of how much progress has been made to get us to the modern age. But in his book, “The Phenomenology of Spirit”, published in 1807, Hegel argued that every era can be looked at as a repository of a particular kind of wisdom. This means we need to go back in time to rescue things which have gone missing. So, for example, we might need to mine history of ancient Greece to fully grasp the idea of what community can be, something which has been lost in the modern age. Or, the Middle Ages can teach us, as no other era can, about the role of honor, even if this period featured appalling attitudes to children or the rights of women. “Progress is never linear”, Hegel tells us; “there is wisdom at every stage”, “which”, says Hegel “points us to the task of the historian.” “To be a historian is to be someone who should rescue, from the past, those ideas that’re most needed” “to compensate for the blind spots of the present.” Secondly, learn from ideas you dislike. Hegel was a great believer in learning from one’s intellectual enemies, from points of view we disagree with, or that feel alien. That’s because he held, “the bits of the truth are always getting scattered even in unappealing, or peculiar places,” “and we should dig them out by asking always, ‘what sliver of sense and reason might be contained in otherwise frightening or foreign phenomena?'”. Nationalism, for instance, has had many terrible manifestations even in Hegel’s day, but Hegel’s move was to ask what underlying good idea or important need might be hiding within the bloody history of nationalism. He proposed that it’s the need for people to feel proud of where they come from, to identify with something beyond merely their own achievements, and to anchor their identities beyond the ego. Hegel is a hero of the thought that really important ideas may be in the hands of people you regard, at first glance, as beneath contempt. Thirdly, Progress is Messy Hegel believed the world makes progress, but only by lurching from one extreme to another. As it seeks to overcompensate for a previous mistake. He proposed that it generally take three moves. Before the right balance on any issue can be found. A process that he named the DIALEKTIK. He was often thinking of the complex twist and turns that brought about the modern state. We can also think the slow path towards sensible attitudes to sex in our own time. The Victorians impose too much repression, yet the 1960s may have turn out to be too liberal. It might only be by 2020s that we`ll find the right balance between extremes. All this can seem the most appalling waste of time, but Hegel insists that the painful stepping from era to era is inevitable. Something we must expect and reconcile ourselves to when planning our lives or contemplating history books. And sometimes in this process of moving from era to era we`ll find a new solution, that manages to synthesize the good qualities of the previous solutions, to make something really new, and different and better. Four, Art has a purpose. Hegel vigorously rejected the idea of art for art sake. Painting, Music, Architecture, Literature and Design: all have a major job to do. We need them so that important insights can become powerful and helpful in our lives. Art is in Hegel`s formulation: “the sensuous presentation of ideas”. Just knowing ideas often leaves us cold. for example in theory we believe the conflict in Syria is an important one. In practice however we just switch off. In principle we know we should be more forgiving to our partners, but this abstract conviction gets forgotten at the least provocation. The point of art Hegel realized, is not so much to come up with startling new strange ideas but to take the good, helpful, important thoughts we already think we know, and make them stick more imaginatively in our minds. Five. We need new institutions. Hegel took a very positive view of institutions and of the power then can wield. This is a point Hegel made again and again in different ways. For ideas to be active and effective in the world, a lot more is needed then the ideas are simply correct; to make major truths powerful in society they need employees and building and budgets and legal advices; institutions allow for the scale of time and power the big projects need to become effective in the world. So, as new needs of a society get recognized, they should ideally lead not just to new books but to the formation of new institutions. Nowadays we might say we need major new institutions to focus on relationships, consumer education, career choice, mood management and how to bring up less damaged children. Hegel help us to see valuable insights what we might initially resist them, in art in institutions in the ideas of our enemies and in the strange mistakes of the past. His insight is the growth requires that clash of divergent ideas and therefore that will be painful and slow. But at least once we know this we don`t have to compound our troubles by thinking them abnormal. Hegel gives us a more accurate and hence more manageable view of ourselves, our difficulties and where we are in history.

ART/ARCHITECTURE – Edward Hopper

ART/ARCHITECTURE – Edward Hopper


Edward Hopper is a painter of gloomy paintings that don’t make us feel gloomy. Instead, they help us to recognize the loneliness that so often lies, at the heart of sadness. In his Automat women sits alone drinking a cup of coffee It’s dark outside, and judging by her hat and coat, it’s cold. The room is large, empty and brightly lit, the decor is functional, and she seems slightly self-conscious, and little a afraid. Perhaps, she’s not used to sitting alone in a public space something seems to have gone wrong, and the viewer is invited to invent stories for her of betrayal, or loss She maybe trying not let her handshake, as she takes the coffee cup to her lips, It might be eleven at night, on a dark February night, in North America Automat is a picture of sadness, and yet it is not a sad picture. There can be something enticing, even charming, about anonymous diners. The lack of domesticity, offers a relief, from what can be, the fullest comforts of home. It may be easier to give a way sadness here, than in a cozy living room with wallpapers, and framed photos. Home often appears to have betrayed Hoppers characters. Something has happened there, that forces them out in to the night, and on to the road. The 24 hour diner, the train station waiting room, and the motel, are all sanctuaries for those, who for sound reasons, have failed to find their place, in a normal world of relationships, or community. Hopper’s ability to portray solitude, came from his own familiarity with it. He was born in 1882, in a ship builders town, Upper Nyack, New York. He lived a nice, middle class childhood, as a son of a merchant. And, yet inside, Hopper often felt awkward, indeed a bit like an outsider. In one early portrait, we see him gazing, almost distrustfully, at the viewer. Hopper longed to be an artist, and yet his parents insisted, he trained an commercial art, to keep afloat financially. He hated it, and to escape, he took several trips to Paris, under the pretense of studying french art. But in truth, he didn’t feel a connection to the salons, he absorbs some of the impressionist, but forgot Picasso’s name. He preferred to be outdoors, watching children playing in the Luxembourg gardens, listening to concerts and –. or travelling up and down the Seine, by boat In 1913, when Hopper was 31, he settled in Greenwich Village, in New York, where he would stay for the rest of his life. This is where he discovered how crowded, and yet isolated, life could be in the city. The population of American cities was skyrocketing, and yet, they were inhabited by passing strangers, who were increasingly alienated from one another. Hopper would ride the L-train, and look down at, in his own words, dark glimpses of office interiors, that were so fleeting as to leave fresh and vivid impressions on my mind. In each room, a separate drama was unfolding, an unnoticed oblivious island, in the sea of people. Although Hopper painted a New York for over a decade, his paintings failed to sell, and he often struggled to find inspiration. Then in his early-forties, he met a beautiful social painter, named Josephine. Edward and Josephine took excursions to paint by the sea, they went to the movies, they went to the theatre, and eventually, they got married. Hopper was no longer, so alone. But, of course, as most of us discover in our relationships, Hopper’s marriage didn’t permanently end his feelings of isolation, and woe. He still felt lonely at times. He and his wife, couldn’t quite figure out their sex life, and she often seemed to prefer, the company of her cat. Hopper discovered that even, when somebody loves us very much, There is always some essential part of us, that remains alone. It is, this recognition that makes his paintings so compelling, and indeed, by addressing loneliness, the art can at it’s most therapeutic. Consoling us, and reassuring us that –, and sorrow are normal, and that we are neither strange nor shamefull, for experiencing them. Sad and lonely art, allows us as viewers, to witness an echo, of our own grieves and disappointments. And therefor, to feel less personally persecuted, and pursued by them. Hopper’s art helps us to notice, the landscapes of loneliness in our own lives. A side effect, of coming into contact with any great artist, is that we come more aware of the things that the painter would had been receptive to. Nowadays we’ve come to accustomed to what one might call a “hopperesque”, a quality found, not only in the North American places that Hopper visited, but anywhere in the developed world, where there are motels, and service stations, roadside diners, and airports, bus stations, and all night supermarkets. For example, service stations readily evoke Hopper’s famous “Gas”, painted thirteen years after “Automat”. In this painting, we see a petrol station on it’s own, in the impending darkness. The isolation is made poignant and enticing. The darkness that spreads like fog from the right of the canvas, contrast with the security of the station. Against the backdrop of Night in the Wild Woods, and the last outpost of humanity, a sense of kinship seems easier to develop, than in daylight in the city. Hopper loved the introspective mood that travelling often puts us in to. He liked painting the atmosphere inside half empty train carriages, making their way across the landscape. But we can stand outside our normal selves, and look over our lives in a way that we don’t, in more settled circumstances. We have all known the atmosphere inside Hopper’s car C No. 293 that perhaps we have not recognized it as well, as when Hopper has held the mirror up to it. After Hopper’s marriage, his professional life suddenly improved as well. He felt more creative, it was the era of the great depression, and yet his paintings began to sell. Critics rated, museums bought his work, and he received awards. Yet despite his succes, he remained deeply introverted, and instead of escaping his solitude, he embraced it. For decades, he turned down the awards, rejected the speaking opportunities, and lived simply, out of the public eye. He died in 1967, and yet his art remains, and retains the ability to help us to see, the loneliness in our own lives, from a wiser, and more mature perspective. Oscar Wilde, once remarked that there had been no fog in London, until Whistler painted it. There was of course lots of fog, it was just that it was harder to notice it’s qualities, without the example of Whistler, did direct our gaze. What was said of Whistler, we may well say of Hopper. That there were far fewer strangely haunting, and consolingly beautiful service stations, and train carriages, motels and dinets, before Hopper began to paint.

Blue Friday Starts November 12th at PRO EDU | Black Friday Photography Sale 2019

Blue Friday Starts November 12th at PRO EDU | Black Friday Photography Sale 2019


(upbeat music) – Baba Kabokeh! Genie here, I’ve been getting all
these requests for AMA and I thought it would be kind of fun. (upbeat music) First question, from Jess. Why aren’t you in a lamp? Well Jess, there’s bottle genies, there’s lamp genies, there’s a box genie and they’re Diaper Genies. Clearly, I’m a box genie, which I think is a pretty cool thing. (upbeat music) Why are you blue? It’s a quality control issue. I would never trust a genie, who isn’t classic genie blue. Are you blue everywhere? – [Lady] What? Okay, next question! (upbeat music) Daenerys, when can I win
my 15 K shopping spree? Well Daenerys, we are
so close on this one. I can feel my powers growing. (whooshing) (upbeat music)

Visual Arts at Central Piedmont

Visual Arts at Central Piedmont


I love the job because it is an
opportunity for me to provide a service to serve the students and in a larger
sense to serve the community and to do something every day that that tries
to make the word a little bit of a better place. Hello I’m James
Pence, instructor of photography and art history at Central Piedmont Community
College. I’ve been a member of the visual art department here for the last 16
years. At CPCC, we offer an associate of Fine Arts degree and in our visual art
department we offer courses on drawing, design, painting, printmaking, photography, ceramics, sculpture and jewelry. Hi, I’m KC Roberge. I have been at CPCC for
two years and I am in the fine arts continuing education program. I chose
CPCC because it was affordable and it offered all the foundation art classes
that I was lacking from high school. All of the art programs here at CPCC are
fantastic. Every single room is stocked with all of the things you could need
and all the students are also very passionate about what they’re doing so
it’s a really fun and inviting environment to work in.
My ultimate goal here at CPCC was to really develop my own style of art. I had
been drawing and making art since I was a child but I never really had the
chance to discover my style of art and what was going to set me apart from all
the other artists. So here at CPCC, all the teachers have been very encouraging
about pushing you to really figure out what you want to do.
If I have one reason to recommend the visual arts at CPCC to a student, it
would be the quality of our instructors. They are highly dedicated they are
highly motivated they are exquisitely trained and educated and devote their
life and their time to the achievements of students. If someone asked me if they
should come to CPCC I would tell them definitely yes! There are so many classes
here that you can take in classes that you really want to take that are going
to help push you forward in your professional career

Blue Friday PRO EDU Is November 12th | Black Friday Photography Education Sale 2019

Blue Friday PRO EDU Is November 12th | Black Friday Photography Education Sale 2019


(upbeat instrumental music) – Here’s Genie. – [Announcer] Unbelievable. (laughing) – You know, I’ve been thinking.
Kind of stuck in this box and I’d love it if you
could help me get out. Life’s not bad in here. I’ve got central air, I’ve got WiFi, but I don’t have arms. (awww) So if I grant all your
wishes, maybe you’ll help me out of the box? What do you think? (cheering) And how do you help me? Tell all your friends about The Genie, because the more people that know about me the more powerful I become. (oohs) So what do you think? Help me out of this box? (clapping and cheering) Yeah? Baba Kabokeh. Well that’s embarrassing. I can part the Red Sea but I can’t close these tiny little doors. (mystical instrumental music)

Arts, Media, and Communication

Arts, Media, and Communication


>>>My name is Zak Cowan. I’m the editor in
chief for the Renegade Rip for the Journalism Program at Bakersfield College.>>>My favorite parts is putting the paper
together. The writing is awesome, talking to people, meeting people is cool, but actually
putting it together, designing the pages is the best. That’s for sure.>>>I chose journalism because I get such a
rush after an interview where the conversation I just had is getting turned into an article
that thousands of people are going to read.>>>The best thing about an interview is finding
out what’s unique about them. Some of the best stuff that I’ve done here is interviewing
people that have made such an impact from BC, like Norman Levan and the starting quarterback,
people like that.>>>Outside from the interview process itself,
I think my favorite is being a part of a newsroom. I’ve never been into sports or anything like
that, but its like being on a team.>>>It’s all hands-on. We write the stories,
we take the photos, we interview we do everything. My belief, which have rubbed off from my professor,
is you’re not going to learn that much reading about journalism. You’re going to learn more
practicing journalism.>>>The Journalism Program at BC is definitely
where you’re going to get the best experience for whatever you want to do in journalism.>>>When I first got here, I could barely write
an article, barely put it together. Now I can put together an article in an hour.>>>My name is Kristopher Stallworth, and I
teach the photography classes here in the digital arts program at Bakersfield College. There are two pathways you can take in Digital
Arts Program. We have both graphic design and photography. The Graphic Design Program
will give you a great foundation in graphic design. You would learn how to use Illustrator
and prepare you to move on into an entry level job or into a four year school.
pause The greatest benefit of BC is the cost. It’s
a relatively inexpensive program. Through a variety of grants we have been able to purchase
cutting edge technology. We have the up to date software. So we really prepare you well
for your next step.>>>The reason I chose BC and their Photography
Program was so that I can venture into the fashion industry and make a career. They offer
the most current programs which other institutions offer, but with a higher price.>>>We still have the equipment here on campus
to be able to process film, develop it. We have a whole dark room here on campus, which
many campuses do not have that.>>>I’ve also got to learn how to process and
develop my own film, which I really enjoy. Without this class being available, I don’t
think I would have ever got to learn that.>>>I think the dark room is really fun and
cool because you get to do everything yourself.>>>I think the dark room is one of my favorites
because not only taking the picture, you do the process to where you are doing your roll,
and then you go into the dark room and when you are just starting with a blank piece of
paper and then all of a sudden your picture starts to appear. The first time you do that,
there’s an excitement.>>>The instructors are very accommodating.
Because every student’s different, they seek the time to work one-on-one, and I find that
to be very helpful.>>>The instructors are very helpful. They’re
there for you whenever you need them. The technology they have here helps us learn
new things and keeps us updated with the world.>>>The degree I’m getting in digital arts
at BC is probably going to help me get a pretty good job in graphic design hopefully.>>>The things that I’ve learned here at Bakersfield
College will take me into the future.>>>The classes here at BC are helping me achieve
my goals and become a better photographer.