Drawing pictures with music!

Drawing pictures with music!


*Fast Music Playing* Just incredible If you don’t know who Aleksander Vinter is (Also known as Savant) You should be following him, he’s an amazing music producer He started posting these MIDI drawings that he does This is the most popular one I think so far, it’s gotten 3 Million views in about a week He’s done a monkey, (nope, that’s a rare Pepe, Andrew) A T-Rex A dragon that plays the Super Mario theme. I don’t know how he’s doing this but I’m gonna try and figure it out today. And obviously I’m gonna make a unicorn. I’m gonna make This Unicorn *Music Playing* *Alert Sound* *Music Playing* *Opens box, takes out paper, waggles paper, printer prints* So here’s my thought process. My transparncey is lined up with this edge of the screen. So if anything happens to it, I can always put it back In exactly the same place. I made a MIDI clip and set a tempo And kind of test it out. How long it’s gonna take to play the whole unicorn And this MIDI clip is a fixed size So if I wanna go in and do some edits I can do it, But I can always zoom out And get to the same place To see the whole picture of the unicorn Without notes being in the wrong spots The first thing I’m gonna do is trace the unicorn as accurately as I can. *Music Playing* I have now traced it to the best of my ability It was a difficult balance to strike between getting the image to come across And also getting in enough detail that felt like a good picture So this was just drawing it, not thinking about the music at all. Let’s see how amazing it sounds! *Jumbled up music playing* Nailed it! *exhale* Okay! And now we attempt to make this sound musical. And I can It’s gonna sound better Okay. First thing let’s quantize All the notes to 30 secooooooonds And this just get’s everything on beat. Still looks like a unicorn, Okay. I’mma move this whole thing up Because a lot of the notes were kinda low. I’m just gonna see how many of those low notes we can get rid of And have it still look like a Unicorrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrn (Discordant notes in the background) Just kinda free hand remaking this mane. Come on mane! I’m gonna say that still looks pretty good for a unicorn mane But it isn’t so busy right off the bat Let’s give it another listen… *High Pitched And Low Pitched Unharmonistic Music Playing* Ooh… maybe I made this to tall! That’s a huge range of notes. It’s still really high and really low. Our lowest note is D So I’mma say where in the key of D Minor So if i was using a minor key. So now I’m gonna go in the first bar and delete every note Or move every note so that it fits in D Minor Or a melody that would go over top of D Minor *Note moving noises* *Kind of Jumbled Up Music Playing* What I’m learning Is that it’s pretty difficult To make it sound good Just using what I have drawn So I need to take the idea Of what I have drawn And recreate most of it With the music in mind I get a feel for the shape of the picture I zoom in, I make adjustments to the notes musically I zoom out to see if it still looks unicorn-y Also, look at how our picture changes when I zoom in SMOOSH DAT UNICORN And I got a first bar now that sounds pretty musical *Good Music Playing* Let’s keep going *Cool Harpsichord Sound Playing The Good Part* I’m starting to hear this was kind of a baroque piece So I have slowed down the tempo And changed the instrument to this nice harpsichord * Harpsichord Music Plays And Then Gets To The Bad High Pitched Part* Bad high pitch part appears Look at this awfulness Corrupt file I saved my MIDI Unicorn, no problems there I went to have lunch When I came back to open it up It was corrupt Sad inhale and exhale* This is super annoying! So next video I will give you A glorious MIDI Unicorn And for today You can have this *Horrible Music Playing* And now I will thank you for watching And dejectedly walk away *Sad, Defeated Sounding Piano Music Playing*

How to Import Images into Premiere Pro


mmm that’s real good Hi, this is Janet from Manhattan Edit
Workshop and today I’d like to talk about how to import stills into Premiere
Pro. First I want you to note in our preferences, general preferences there’s
an option called defaults scale to frame size. Note that that is currently turned
off. So I’m going to bring in this file with default scale to frame size turned
off and let’s see what that does. I’m just going to bring in this file here
and drop it on the timeline. You can tell by looking in the preview area that not
the entire image is showing up in the program monitor. If I look here this
tells me the size of this image 1680 wide by 1050 tall. But my timeline is 720 x 480. So what I’m seeing in my program monitor is the center part of the
photograph the outer parts are not visible. You’ll especially notice it if I
shrink this down and click you’ll see the wireframe here is representing the
full size of the original still and what we’re currently seeing through the
program monitor is what we would output. So this is great because it does allow
me to pan around the image while keeping the quality high. Now for comparison
let’s reinforce the image but this time I’m going to change the general setting
to turn on default scale to frame size. So I’m checking that saying okay and I’m
going to re-import it there we go so There we go. We’ll drag our re-imported image and you’ll notice first of all that we do see the entire image if I scale down
this time you can see it’s including all of the image in the wireframe and this
is what we would output. I could make this bigger by expanding the wireframe
but this is not the original image therefore I will be scaling up the
rasterized file and it just may not look good. When I have the default scale to frame size set. Premiere Pro creates a copy of
the still that’s at the same frame size as your sequence. So what I’m currently
working with here is the 720 x 480 and not the original size which was 1680 x
1050. Now if I want to change that I can always right-click on the clip and turn
off scale to frame size. Notice the wireframe changes I’m now looking at the
original so this would be fine to scale up or to do some pan and zoom
adjustments. So if you want your imported stills to match the frame size of your
sequence you should make sure that in the Preferences general settings your
default scale – frame size is checked. Otherwise if you want to be able to pan
around an image and to be able to adjust the scale of the original file you want
to make sure that default scales of frame size is deselected.

The Image Toolset – Part 8 – 3D Selective – Adding Motion Blur – Flame 2020.1

The Image Toolset – Part 8 – 3D Selective – Adding Motion Blur – Flame 2020.1


Hi everyone, Grant for the Flame Learning Channel. In parts 5 and 6 of the Image Toolset series… We looked at the 3D AOV capability… Where you could produce a selective matte for your image… Based on supplied 3D information. So you could create isolation mattes… based on the z-depth of the image… Or the normals of a 3D object. With the Flame 2020.1 update… We have now the ability… To use motion vector data… To generate an isolated selection. So you can identify an object’s movement and direction… And use that as the basis for a 3D Selective. You can feed the isolation matte into any SelectiveFX shader… And be as creative as you like. However the use case, you’re about to perform… will show you a creative yet practical use for the Motion 3D AOV. Simply put, you’ll add more motion blur into a shot… Using the 3D Selective workflow. Now if you are new to 3D Selectives… I suggest watching parts 5 and 6 of the Image Toolset series… To explain the basics and fundamentals of 3D AOVs. For everyone else… if you’d like to follow along with this video… Click the link in the description below… Or type the link displayed to download the media. Now import the downloaded media… And either open it as a sequence… Or edit it into an existing sequence. Looking at this clip in the player… You will see a shot of a guy taking his bike down a ramp. Now there is a little bit of motion blur… But the shutter may have been set high… So the subject is still quite sharp. Adding a bit more motion blur… will enhance the movement further. As a side note, if this was a CGI image… You could be supplied with a Motion Vectors data pass. You could use that with the 3d Selective. However since this is a live action shot… At some point, you’ll have to generate the Motion Vectors pass in Flame. So you’ll use the Image TimelineFX for this example… Since there are no other external inputs. If you were provided with a separate motion vectors pass… I would suggest using either the Image or Action node in Batch or BatchFX. Switch to the Effects Environment… And if you don’t have this layout already… press ALT+2 for the 2-up view. Manager on the left with 8… And result view on the right with F4. Now expand the selective in the Manager. By default, the Selective is using the MasterGrade SelectiveFX shader. This is fine for grading. But to add motion blur… Delete the MasterGrade… And add a SelectiveFX through the context menu. At the bottom of the list… Choose the Motion Blur SelectiveFX. Now this shader’s controls… Won’t do anything without a motion vectors data pass. So if you were supplied with one… You could add it as a Motion Vectors map via the media list. But remember I said earlier… That you would need to do that in Batch or BatchFX… With an Image or Action node. In this case, there is no Motion Vectors Map… So you need to generate it… And this can be done quickly in the timeline… Using the Image TimelineFx. Go to the Selective Controls… And switch to the 3D AOV menu. Change the Type to Motion. Now click CREATE MAP. The Motion Vectors are generated for the shot… And you can verify this in the manager. To view the Motion Vectors… You can select it in the manager… And over the result view… Press F8 for the Object View. Scrubbing the sequence… You can see the motion vectors update per frame. With the Motion Vector Analysis… You can cache on scrubbing… Or click the Cache Range button. You would use these to improve performance if required… And I cover these features in great detail… In the Motion Warp tracking videos for Flame. Select the Selective for its menus… And press F4 to return to the result view. Now go to Frame 25… And turn up the Motion Blur Exposure to 10. So the cyclist has plenty of motion blur… But if you look at the background… The motion blur is affecting other moving people and objects in the shot. You could use Keyers and masks in the Selective… To isolate the Cyclist. But since the data has already generated for motion… You can use that as the 3D selective. So enable ACTIVE to turn on the 3D Selective. Now just looking at the result view… You can’t really tell what the Motion 3D selective is actually affecting. So let’s use another view to see the selective… As well as monitor the result. Press ALT+3 to switch to a 3-up view. Now set the manager to one view with 8… The result view to the middle viewport with F4. For the final viewport… Hover over the third view… And press F9 to switch to the Selective View. Currently you should see the Selective matte output. This is the matte that is being generated by the Motion Vectors. Admittedly, this doesn’t help in this context… When trying to target specific objects for the SelectiveFX shaders. Instead, press F9 over the Selective View again… And this will toggle to the Selective Input. You can now see the image with an overlay… Of where the Motion Blur will be applied. Currently, it’s affecting the people in the background… And not our cyclist. So this is where the 3D AOV Motion controls will be invaluable. In the interface, you will see a widget… Which allows you to define the direction… As well as the speed of the object. So as you move the ball around… The overlay updates… Showing you the direction being chosen for the 3D selective. In the case of the bike… It’s travelling to the bottom left of the frame. So position the widget to point in that direction. Now the overlay is affecting most of the frame… Because you need to define how fast the object needs to be moving… In order to be considered by the Selective. This is known as the Motion Minimum… Which is quite low at this point. You can increase this slider… Or you can pull the widget more away from the centre… And that will perform the same operation. Around 0.18 will be fine. Looking at the overlay in the Selective View… Only objects travelling in this direction… Above a certain speed… Are considered in the Selective. So using the widget… You can really mould where the Selective will be applied… Based on Motion. Looking at the bike in the Result view… You can see the Motion Blur being applied in the desired area. Now you can also set a maximum speed cut off… As well as increase the gain and fall off of the selective. But another useful slider is the Angular Threshold. So you’ve defined a direction for the bike… However, when you scrub to the beginning or end of the clip… The bike moves horizontally and not towards the bottom. So these frames are not considered in the Selective as much. So using the Angular Threshold… You can expand the angle of direction considered for the selective. So now the bike should be covered for whole shot. As a tip, the 3D AOV values can be animated. So if something changes direction quite drastically… You can animate the Selective to match. In addition, you can still use Keyers, masks… And all the tracking tools to segment a subject with motion… To isolate it further in the shot. This is something you can try on your own another time. You can now switch back to a 2-up view with ALT+2… And you can scrub through the result view. If the edges seem a little harsh on the motion blur… You can use shrink, dilate and blur the result of the selective… And this should fix most of these issues. However it is worth mentioning… that Motion Vector analysis in general… Works pretty well with motion heading in a straight direction. You may encounter artefacts with spinning motion such as wheels… As well as when two objects cross over each other from opposing directions. This is simply the nature of current technology. So in summary… The Motion 3D Selective allows you to isolate a portion of your image… Using the speed and movement of objects in your shot. This is all determined using Motion Vectors… Which can be supplied by CGI… Or generated through a Motion Vector Analysis. And like all the other Selective tools within the Flame products… You can apply any SelectiveFX shaders to these isolation mattes… And this can certainly give a new added dimension… in any grading, VFX and look development work. Don’t forget to check out the other features, workflows… And enhancements to the Flame 2020.1 update. Comments, feedback and suggestions are always welcome and appreciated. Please subscribe to the Flame Learning Channel for future videos… And thanks for watching.

How to reshape images without distorting in Photoshop content aware scale

How to reshape images without distorting in Photoshop content aware scale


I my friends and welcome to my most favorite Photoshop feature of all time. We want to make this bigger without it. Look at it magically grows bigger. So we’re going to resize things without distorting them. And if things distort OK like I man here and I’ll show you how to protect the mean so handsome so if a dude doesn’t get stretched we’re going to get to some more advanced uses as well. Well we just want more surf because we need to end some ticks store stretch for a banner ad maybe a double page spread it’s all using the cool content with scale. Let’s get going in Photoshop right. So we go exercise files from a new folder. This one is over five. Cropping a lining distorting. If you can open up all of the content a with scale 1 to 7 is quite a quite little tips and tricks we can learn with content with scale. First tip is I can’t see one case’s little double Chevron here. You can click on this and it shows you everything that’s open. It can do to square one and let’s say that you’ve got this image but we just need it to be square for some unknown reason. Instagram we use need to be taller because there needs to be text in here you need a structure this way because it needs to be kind of the right size for maybe a double page spread for a magazine. So first thing we need to do is we need to unlock the background. So double click background give it a name. Don’t tell anybody that I do but you should. Next thing I want to do is like generate some space up here you could use image canvas size OK and they just you can type in a size that square. I just like to grab the crop to grab it hold it and drag it to the size I want to be out there. HAVERTON now the magic talk. OK so what’s under it. It’s this one hit content a with scale. So I’d like transform right transoms is going to do this. That’s not what you want. You want this magic wand here counting to go get ready. City holy man just invented more background quha. And when you’re finished and that is the magic tool that’s been there for a long time and if you’re like a lot of advanced uses like you know to be shocking or on your face I love it. And I kind of picked an easy one. But in all honesty it kind of works like that without any help. Only about 30 percent of the time but 30 percent of the time. Good rather than a clone tool stamp madness we all have to do it right. To try and fix it all up but don’t worry the other 70 percent there are tricks to kind of make it work for that as well. Let’s look at it counting the way scaled to this one. Just the same just a little wine for you to practice with. Let’s do it together. First thing let’s rename the background land. Just double click in the background. My Cocteau clicking once I’m holding down the old key and dragging the corners and it goes from all sides just to give myself like how far can this go well here. OK now I’m going to use my. It contained a scale. Now you see I’ve got a shortcut here. That’s not the by default. I added it to keyboard shortcuts and I made my own one because I use it so much and so much I give it like the world’s most sure. I know it. Anyway I shall cut my hair. Leave me learn what I want to do now is it to see how far this goes. Look at this is particularly good as well. It works really well in these small unique high contrast images amongst kind of more generic stuff where I find something like this really useful is if you’ve done like I do a lot of advertising Benas I’ve got a course on HMO banner ad making. OK. And this is perfect for it because you get these kind of weird leaderboards Kalitta boards are a pain right because they are that shape but look all we can do with Konting the scale or the skyscrapers or the long and thin goes along here. OK. Maybe not resizing like that maybe just invent more background this way. Quha let’s look at another use case and this one here. Cool image. I just need I need space over here to add text and if my parents name my grandma a crop to want to put some space in over here please. But if I tried to fill it with a color is this kind of like subtle gradient in the background. I’ll show you a little trick. So if I wanted to fill it I can make a new layer put it underneath and grab my Java tool. I can click on this color. Then I want to fill this layer with it a cool little trick is holding down the option key on the mic. OK on a PC and just hitting your backspace or delete key the one just next to the plus can it fills with the foreground color. Any trick you can see there it’s kind of blended in a couple of parts but not over there. Ah but what if we could use owl dance crazy show up with still using it it contained to wit scale. And watch this and check and say I want it over here is going to Keepon like using this poor image till I get this giant area for my come by my orange flyer or double page spread and I’ve got this kind of cool thing spanning across go up. I’m going to say Kohath losen this of course. I love showing people continuous scale but let’s say you’ve used it before and you run into trouble it’s like it contained a wisco. And let’s look at this handsome man member named the background’s going to stand out. My background a bit. And now I want to resize it. We’re going to run into a couple of problems or one big problem. Watch this. And they Mangere austerity some pretty good job of everything else. Right. So how do we fix Trichy man. Basically we just need to protect him so we can select. I’m going to like the cool thing about it is protecting a person with a selection can be as blunt and as quick as using the rectangle Machi tool and say that but there I want you to be protected. So once you’ve got a selection this little tip is a little hard to remember. He might want to write this one down. So get to select you save the selection. I’m going to call this one man pick OK. De-selected don’t need it anymore. So you say you selection that’s the important bit. Now let me go to it. Continue to a scale. There’s this option this is protect man and I’m just looking at my selection. Now when I drag it out it protects them in return. Quha. Now let’s look at one that kind of almost works. I feel like I need to show you this because if I end the day you’ll be like hey it’s not working on my one so you can go through that same process super quick and just making it big and you use my Konting to wisco So we’re going to run into problems with the bottle here. Q So it just starts getting a bit too tall you might actually find that that’s fine. Who knows how big the bottle is anyway but you know so let’s say we want to protect that. So what we need to do is do a selection. You can use that quick selection or the magic wand 2 or the last two any two you like. I’m just using the rectangle Machi to member save the selection. Give it a name. De-select. And it’s going to work to a degree where this is all but so it works works works. Looks a lot better than it did before. But eventually it just go. It gives up and goes I can’t keep doing it. Conky protecting that area is better than a walls. There are times where it just won’t work. I felt like I need to keep that in the class because sometimes it doesn’t work. What you might do in that case is we looked at content with fill in the last video some is going to kind of sit a limb here and use my cantin to see a scale which we’ve already done because the side to side with the right is this height that didn’t. So instead of kind of dragging this up to the top I’m going to grab my rectangle my Kito grab all of this and I’m going to say please go to it fill and use content where Phil and I got to look at the document and try and fill this background and de-select and it’s done a pretty good job. So kind of a combo deal. The stuff we learned in the intro scores canina with Phil Plus some of the newer stuff with content. A scale now we kind of worked around this one to make it work. They are just images that are too busy too noisy there’s no small part of a more generic background and there are just lots of high contrast areas so let’s have a look at this one and I’ll show you. Sometimes there’s no fixing it. Isko is code like it’s pretty amazing what it’s done like it’s got some interesting things. Case so the most generic stuff I’ve found was in this coffee cup this coffee in the middle here the plate is try to duplicate then it’s done an OK job but I wouldn’t know where to start with this image. And I guess I want you to know that if you need to explain this one it’s tough it’s really cropped in what I probably do is I’d mask out all of these guys separately find a new wood background to stick it on. That was bigger than what I had. Then I can separate them all out manually. It would take a lot longer but I can’t think of a bit away for that one. Let’s go to the chevrons and find the last one. The A little tip I want to give you is sometimes say this when he I need some I need more Wavves because I need to put the text for the better way that I’m doing. So again the name that layer grabbed my crop touring and make some space up here. And if I just use the whole thing which we’ve been doing up until now. Fine but it’s not what I want. It’s given me more sand and more waves. What I want to do is just use my rectangle Machi to drag a box around the stuff you want and then transform just that part. Most people try and do the whole image. We can just do a pop maybe sky because you need a bigger sky for logos and stuff to go into. So just make a selection. I’m going to go to continue to wisco and check out these people down here and that’s the cool thing about it is that the people will stay the same way the waves get bigger and believable the waves. Gil Tola the people stay fine Wisma you can tell I love content a scale enough that I gave the world’s worst shortcut by my friends that get into the next video.

How to animate photos or pictures in Free Davinci editing software

How to animate photos or pictures in Free Davinci editing software


If you’re watching this it’s because you’re awesome and you’re about to learn something that makes you even more awesome Okay, we’re gonna learn how to do some awesome stuff right here in da Vinci, this is my DaVinci screen I’m already in the middle of doing an Editing this is a real video. I’m actually editing not a sample video and I’m editing it for SaneAuto page. You’re watching this on our Sane Enterprises page So if you want to see this finished video after I’m completely done with it It will be on the SaneAuto page and it’s called world of wheels car show 2019 Corvette alley First you’re gonna see This right here is an actual video. So it’s going to have motion in it already It’s can pan from left to right across the car this video This is actual video right here, and it’s got motion Panning across the car, but this is a photo and it’s going to have motion in it, too Now when you’re actually in the editor, it looks a little choppy But as you could see from my other video that we showed at the beginning of this video. They’re really smooth When they’re after you render it and put it on YouTube. It’s nice and smooth. So This is actual video clip I was actually using the bit not that is a photo that I put motion into and I’m going to show you how to do that That’s a photo I made it zoom This one I did the pan And that one I made it zoom into the shifter handle which is not the center of the photo So that takes a little extra work same thing here You’re going to a different point other than the center of the photo. Now. How did I do that? Well, you got to go to file go to file left click on that and then come down and hit import file Go over to the right import media Click on that and it pulls up your photos Now if your photos aren’t over here right now Then you may have to click on a few things over here in your left window to get up the exact file that you want to find the photos and Then go down to the photo that you want to put on your video next right? Here is the one that I’m after So I left clicked on it and puts a checkmark in it go down to open And that imports it into DaVinci and puts it over here And I’ve got to put my cursor on it Hold the left click down and drag It to the right And put it right here Where I can get to it with this cursor right here now you left-click on that and drag it around wherever you want But for our purposes right now in order to do what we want to do It’s got to go at the very front of this picture Or the very far left of the picture Just touching it Now you want to go up here If you don’t already have your inspector open go up to the upper right-hand corner and left click on inspector And Open that up this is nothing to inspect if It says nothing to inspect. That means you haven’t clicked on the photo got to left click on the photo and You see how it gets a red mark around it Now there’s something you got to watch out for here too. Sometimes this will be up and there’s no red mark around this photo because the red mark will still be on the last photo that you were working on if If that happens and you put this over here and you start working on this photo or thinking you’re working on this photo Clicking on things in here what you’ll actually be doing is mucking up your last photo because it’s got the red mark around it You’ve got to make sure that you click on the photo You actually want to work on and get it highlighted in red so that you know, you are working on that photo that’s something that was left out of the other videos that I watched when I was learning and Yeah, I messed up a few Photos and took me a while to figure out what I was doing wrong Hope hopefully now that I’ve showed that to you you won’t have that problem. So the first thing you want to do is Get rid of these black marks right here because that really ruins the effect Those if you leave those black marks they will show up in your finished video and it’ll make it obvious that this is a photo and It just ruins the effect So the first thing you want to do is zoom in now you get your cursor over here where it says zoom and then you left click and hold and push to the right see how when you push to the right it zooms in and Push to the left it zooms out The right it zooms in .You want to zoom in enough To where those black lines are gone, and if you’re going to pan left or right Or up or down something like that you’re going to want to zoom in some more if you’re going to pan down to a Pinpoint like I did with the engine on here, then just leave it right there. We’re gonna pan From left to right so I’m gonna need to zoom in quite a bit more Right about there then I want to go down here to position X and pull this thing Over to the left as far as I can see a black mark starting to show up. So I’ve got to Pull it back to the right a little bit don’t want to start with any kind of Black marks there that ruins that effect. It doesn’t look good. Then I’ll let go of that and I hit You got to hit these buttons over here to anchor it So now that I’ve hit those buttons and they turned red do you see how they turned red That has anchored it at the beginning of this video right here Close that Now I can grab this and pull it over here Not all the way to the end of the video The picture because if you pull it all the way to the end of the picture you see what happens It goes black and you can’t see what you’re doing So almost to the end get it almost to the end right there, and it doesn’t have to be perfect. Just Kind of in this spot that’s almost to the end where you can still see what you’re doing and drop it there Then you go back up here you notice these little things aren’t red anymore Go back up here and don’t mess with the zoom if you’re trying to get this pan affect you you hit that x position and Drag that to the right but went too far pull it back to the left again till it’s panned as far as you can go without having a Dark line here. We don’t want any dark line there Now, imma let go of that Because I was holding a little F down to move it around and then I’m gonna click this over here to anchor it That didn’t work, let’s pull that again Okay, no black line, okay, it’s turned red all on its own so don’t click it again All right, now you’ve got to go over here without clicking anything don’t don’t breathe on anything as you mess it up and click the left click on the play and let it play past the end of the Picture just like that and hit stop Grab your cursor and bring it over here to the beginning of the video and check your work. See if everything worked out. All right Okay, it’s on the beginning of the photo. It’s still zoomed in like what we wanted. There’s no black marks here or here you know, You dont pay any attention to these that’s not going to be in the video and Then you click play and watch it Just pan across So now it looks like you took a little bit of a video clip starting from the front of the car and you just panned your video across the front of the from the front to the back of the car and at this point you can grab your picture and bring it over here and connect it, because it’s done and Then you go up here to file and you grab another one Hit file go to import file Import media click on that and there’s the 2266 I got last time Now I’m going to grab this one. That’s 2267. It’s got the other side of the car same car Open and it puts it right there in DaVinci so that you can start working with it So you grab it bring it down here to your timeline? And Don’t connect it yet. Leave it out here all on its own so you can work on it and once again Notice how the last photo is still highlighted If you start messing with this right now, you’ll mess up the last photo that you did So you want to click on this new photo and get that red highlighter around that so that you don’t mess up the other photo now Bring this cursor to the beginning of the photo Go up here and zoom in like we did last time get zoomed in good then grab the position and Pull it to the right. So it looked like you took a video camera and pointed it at the front Sometimes it jerks around you just got to work with it left and right until you get it Where you want the photo to be? I don’t know if you can see this on the camera or not But this black is much blacker than this black. This black is kind of a semi flat black and this is a gloss black right here, and there is a a line right here, very dark black and fuzzy Almost flat black you don’t want any of this gloss black here any of this black right here will show up on your video Make sure that it’s at least has photo covering that and we’re going to leave it right there We want this to be anchored right here in order to do that. You’ve got to go over here and click this button and Because we messed with the position click that little button to now see they’re both red Now we grab this cursor drag it over to the right hand side of the photo not all the way to the end Remember so you go all the way to the end it goes black and you can’t see what you’re doing. So almost to the end And go back up here to position and see they have turned White or green or whatever color they are I’m a little bit colorblind. So forgive me. I don’t know what color those are. So we’re going to move the position We’re gonna make it look like we panned across the car with a video camera No left-click on that. Hold it down and push to the left Push to the left, but I’m getting glossy black right there don’t want that gotta back it up back it up. Okay Right there. That’s as far as I can pan to the right without ruin ruining the effect and Then we’ll let go now look those turned red by themselves this time. I didn’t have to click them They turned red all by themselves, which means it’s anchored sort of Remember what I told you about hitting play? if you don’t hit that play and let it play off the end of the photo for some reason it just doesn’t actually anchor So grab this drag it back over here to the front of the photo hit play again to check your work Like I said it it’s a little choppy, but before it’s rendered that’s fine if it’s choppy before it’s rendered it’s fine It will be smooth After it’s rendered You can put it on your YouTube your blog or whatever you want to do Publish it on Facebook. Whatever you want to do with it. It’ll be nice and smooth after you render it You have to watch another video if you want to see how to render things if you don’t know how to render things That’s a separate video. Okay, we’re gonna grab this photo left click and drag it over to the left And and let it connect now when I get really close here It kind of jumps over there and connects itself and I’ll let go that’s why I move real slow cuz if you move too fast It could go over top and kind of that’s a whole separate thing We’re not getting into that on today’s video. Now. I want to do show you something else you can do with this Besides panning left and panning right? So we’re gonna get another V another photo We’re gonna go to M file and then import file import media we want to do this 2272 right here. It’s already kind of close to the velocity stacks on the engine See I’ve got a check mark there where I clicked on it. I’m gonna hit open that pulls it into the DaVinci so we can Grab it with a left click and drag it over here Right there my cursor is already right at the front of the photo But this red is still around the last one that I did. We don’t want that We want to left-click on this to make sure the red highlights that photo then we’re gonna go and get rid of these black lines These gloss black lines on either side of the photo by zooming in At least enough to get rid of the gloss black lines we’re gonna anchor it right there by clicking that little button we can grab this cursor and go almost to the end of the photo and Then we’re gonna do something neat we’re gonna zoom way in here Whoa, not that way in remember I tell you is it jumps sometimes Let’s get it Okay, now if we just zoom in it’s going to be on these velocity stacks, these four velocity stacks closest to you and the other four velocity stacks are kind of out of frame and This chrome linkage is kind of drawing your eye to it. I want the eye to be drawn to these velocity stacks So I’m going to go to the Y position over here And I’m going to move that to the left so that it pulls the photo up a bit And see how that brings the top of the velocity stacks into the frame and The linkage is out of the frame now That’s not the center of the picture. But that is the part of the picture. I wanted it to zoom into Now you can use these positions right here and move them around to get it To whatever part of the photo you want it to be so that you can zoom into a specific position in the photo instead of it just automatically zooming to the center of the photo and that’s how I did the thing with the shifter handle in the other photo that you saw where it was a photo of the Interior and it zoomed down into the shifter handle that shifter handle was not quite in the center of the photo but I was able to use this technique to zoom in to what I wanted to zoom into and To complete this effect you can see this is red already, so don’t click on it If it’s red already Just click on the play and let play to the end of the photo and it’s off into the black If there’s something else you want to learn on da Vinci right here on saint enterprises Then put a comment below if we don’t have a video on it Then check with Camaro Time Pete at Camaro Time. He has several videos how-to videos on DaVinci editing software Hi, we’re so glad you’re here at Sane Enterprises This is Carol Sane and this is Victor Sane isn’t he adorable? We’re here to help you and the rest of the sane community grow And we’re gonna have fun helping you celebrate your victories with the whole community. I Guess by now. You’ve noticed we’re not just another average self-improvement channel We’re a community and how do they do in this community? That’s easy There’s this red button right there. Oh and I gotta hit the bell. Don’t forget

Motion Magic in Under 5 Minutes: Create 3D Scenes from 2D Images

Motion Magic in Under 5 Minutes: Create 3D Scenes from 2D Images


Welcome back! In this episode of Motion Magic we’re going
to look at forced projection onto photograph. Shoutout to Simon for the inspiration for
this episode. I’m going to take this photograph here and
drop it in a project. Hold down shift and option and scale it up
so it fills the frame. And then I’m going to add a Camera and Switch
to 3D. If I orbit the camera, we can see we have
a simple flat photograph in 3D space. I’m going to make two clones of this by pressing
the K key. Select it and press K. Then I’m going to right click and select the
Crop tool for this first clone layer. Hold down space bar+command and zoom out a
little bit. And I’m going to crop this one down to just this
section of the boardwalk right there. Then I’ll select the upper clone layer and
crop it up to everything but the boardwalk. So if I now turn off the bottom layer, which
is just a reference, we now have two sections: there’s the bottom and there’s the top. If I orbit the camera, nothing is changed. I’ll double click to reset the camera. Now I’m going to select the bottom with the
boardwalk, right click and select the Anchor Point tool and move the Anchor Point down
to the bottom of my frame, right about there. Press “Q” for the Adjust 3D Transform tool,
hold the shift key down, and drag down on this X axis rotation handle to rotate this
down exactly 90 degrees. If I now deselect it and orbit the camera,
we can see it’s laying flat like a floor. I’ll double click to reset the camera. Now I’ll select the same lower layer, shift
Z to fit everything to the window, then drag up to scale it all the way up to touch back
to the original top of the photograph. If I now orbit the camera, we can see we have
two separate layers. I’ll deselect everything, so that we can orbit
around the center point and you can see we now have two separate layers, one is a floor
stretched out. I’ll double click to reset the camera. Now what I’ll do is right click and choose
the Distort tool. What I want to do is map this back to the
original dimensions. Hold the shift key down so I’m only dragging
directly left and move that over and also move the right one over. I’m adding the shift key after I start to
drag. Then I’ll hold down command+space bar and
drag to move out a little bit and move these over as well, again using the shift key. Now you could be more exact in the inspector
but I’m doing this in under 5 minutes. Shift Z to fit it to the window, deselect
everything. If I turn those off, there is our original,
and here’s our new one so we have our original photograph back but if I orbit the camera,
we actually have them separated in space and we have a floor. Finally, I’m going to take this top one, right
click, choose the Anchor point tool, set the Anchor Point at it’s base, press Q for the
Adjust 3D Transform tool and now I want to move it back in space, so I’m going to go
to the right view using the compass, deselect everything and press F to frame the entire
scene, select this top layer, and move it back to the very back of our floor. Then I’ll press F to frame it, zoom out a
little bit, and move it down, and position it right at the base of our floor. Then I’ll go back to our active camera and
then in the inspector, for the scale, I’ll scale this up and it will scale from it’s
anchor point back to match again. And once again we have our original image,
however, if I now orbit the camera, we basically have a box, a little scene here. I’ll double click to reset that. So, if I dolly the camera, we can create a
little camera move and it actually looks like we’re in a 3D scene here. I’ll double click to reset that. So with the camera selected, from the behaviors
short cut menu, I’ll select Basic Motion: Move. Move forward about three seconds. O for an out point and I’ll move down a little
bit and I’ll move in. I’ll also turn off my 3D grid. And very quickly I’ve created a force projection
look on a simple photograph. In our new Warp Speed Motion 3D tutorial,
we take this a step further, by adding 3D text to the scene, incorporating shadows with
a directional light, and then creating a camera move that moves through the text. Click the Subscribe button below. If you have an idea, comment, or suggestion,
leave those below as well. Go to RippleTraining.com for fast professional
training on Final Cut Pro, Motion, and DaVinci Resolve from industry professionals.

The Image Toolset – Part 6 – 3D Selective – Normals – Flame 2020

The Image Toolset – Part 6 – 3D Selective – Normals – Flame 2020


Hi everyone, Grant for the Flame Learning Channel. In the previous video, we started looking at the new 3D Selective capability… In the Flame 2020 products. So when it comes to producing selective mattes for your images… You can use a key or a mask… But you can also use 3D data like a Z-depth pass… To create a selection based on depth. In part 6 of the Image Toolset series… You’ll carry on with 3D Selectives. But this time, you’ll use a normals pass to create the isolation Selectives… And these isolations are based on the X, Y and Z coordinates… of the surface’s normals in 3D space. And finally, to conclude this video… We’ll go over how to perform 3D relighting… Using a combination of the Z-depth map, normals map… And the Action 3D lights. If you would like to follow along… Please click the link in the description below… to download the zip file. Alternatively if you’re watching the video podcast… Than please type the displayed link in your web browser. Starting off in the MediaHub… Import the media into a library as a multi-channel clip… that is using a Scene-Linear REC 709 colour space. Next, load the accompanying Batch Setup to get to this starting point. If you select this source clip and toggle F4… You’ll see that it has a beauty pass, Z-depth pass and a normals pass. You’ll use the Z-depth later for relighting… But for now, you’ll concentrate on the beauty and normals pass. Go back to Batch… And drag out an Action node from the Batch node bin. Use the beauty pass to set the Action’s Resolution and colour space. Next, select the Action node… And create two new media inputs with CONTROL+N. Connect the beauty into media 1… And the Normals pass into media 2. Double-click the Action node for its controls… And press F4 for the result view. Similar to the previous video… You’ll use the normals pass as a data map… Rather than a surface object. So pick up the axis of the surface object… And delete it through the contextual menu. Now we’ll look at the structure of the composite with Manager… So switch to a 2-up view with ALT+2… And place the result view on the right… And the Manager on the left… using the 8 keyboard shortcut or Viewing pull-down menu. Now a map object can be applied to a surface… with or without a Selective on the surface. So go to the Action Media menu… And choose the normals map entry. Call up the contextual menu over the surface… And apply a normals map. If you expand the material of the surface object… You can see the associated normals map. Now as a side node… Similar to the Z-depth map… If you go to the Normals Map controls… It is set to MEDIA INPUT. The current setting expects an external input. The other option is FACE ANALYSIS. This uses machine learning to generate a normals map for a human face… If you don’t have one. As the name implies… This normals generation will only work for a human face… And this is covered in great detail in the Machine Learning Series. Returning back to the current example. Next, call up the contextual menu over the surface again… And apply the Selective with the MasterGrade. Go to the Selective Controls… And start applying a look to the image. Without applying any isolations… The selective affects the whole image. Switch to the 3D AOV controls… And change the type to Normals. The other three AOV types only work with a Z-depth map. Click ACTIVE to use the Normals as the Selective Matte. The image is immediately affected. If you hover over the result view… And press F8 for the Selective Matte Object Viewer… You can see how the Normals map… has been converted into an isolation matte… which limits the results of any SelectiveFX shaders… like the MasterGrade for instance. As a reminder, white are the areas that are most affected… And black are the areas least affected by any SelectiveFX shaders. Now in the Normals controls… You have a few controls for direction, incidence, gain and threshold. The widget to the right of the sliders… gives you a more intuitive way… Of defining which values in the normals… will be used for image segmentation. You have top, bottom, left and right. So if you drag the widget upwards… The top facing normals will be more affected then the bottom facing normals. You can play with the widget… And choose directions from which to derive an isolation matte. Now the threshold allows you to constrain how much of the normals… are considered for the selective. This will also update on the widget. You can choose a specific direction… And then limit the matte to a very precise selection… Based on the normals direction. If you return to the Result View with F4… You can see how this selective… is now affecting the image. You can adjust the Normals controls while looking at any view… And you can combine this normals map with the keyer and masking tools… To further isolate the selective. As mentioned in the previous video… You can also use the Selective shrink, dilate and blur controls… To blending the selective within the image. So there are multiple applications of these tools… Such as grading, beauty work, VFX and final look development. Now before I conclude this video… It’s also important to know… That the 3D data passes can also be used for 3D re-lighting in Action. So they are not just for Selectives… Which are applied directly to a surface object… Or on the rendered result of a composite. Instead, you can use this data within a 3D environment… And this will give you even finer control… To concentrate lighting… Or even vfx effects tools using the Lightbox shaders. To illustrate this… Go back to Batch and look the second flow graph. In the interest of time… You are using the same media… And I have already set up an exposure node to remap the Z-depth. These have all been fed into an Action node… And if you go into its controls with the 2-up view… I have already deleted the Z-depth… and normal map surface objects from the composite… but they are all loaded in the Action Media List. You can build this manually if you want… And I talk more about setting up the Z-depth in the previous video. Now go ahead and assign the Z-depth map and normals map to the surface object. Ensure you select each entry in the media list… And apply the appropriate map to the surface object. You can expand the surface material in the manager… to confirm the association. Once this done… The last step in setting this up… Is to go to the Z-depth controls… And enable Displace Vertices. If you don’t do this… The lighting will not behave correctly … with the Z-depth map in 3D space. Next switch to the Action Node bin… And drag a light into the 3D composite. This totally relights the scene and you may find… that you have to move the light with greater values… to have an effect. The position values of the light are now more aligned to the 3D app… As opposed to Flame. This is great for moody lighting… But if you want to add more light into the existing scene… Instead of relighting from scratch… Change the light type to AMBIENT… And set the shade to 0&. So this restores the media to its original lighting. Adding a second light into the composite… Will allow you to add more light where you like. For example… Set the light intensity to 1000%… And change the colour using the colour pot. Next, set the spread to 20 degrees. So the light is illuminating the floor and under the car… As if the light was actually there. Now if you can rotate the light downward… And then move the light up… You can see that the Z-depth and normals information… Is being applied to light… Allow you to project the light into the scene accurately. You can also switch to the light profile… And adjust the fall off. So you have a lot of control being able to focus the lighting… And project it anywhere using 3D space. This type of result is not achievable… with a 3D selective on a surface object. However you can use the Selectives and 3D relighting at the same time… But I’ll leave you to experiment on your own. Lastly, just because you can… You’re not limited to a single light. Select the light… And duplicate it with CONTROL+D. Go to the light controls… And push the light to the other side of the car. Change the colour back to white with the colour pot. So the lighting will blend using 3d lighting… But as a final tip… You can also project effects through the lights… Using Lightbox Shaders. Call up the contextual menu over the light… And add a Lightbox. Now you can project a whole range of shaders through a light… But a new Lightbox I want to show you… Is called “LINEAR GRADE”. This shader gives you the Linear Grading capabilities matching the MasterGrade… But projected through a 3D light. This is something to bear in mind… If you’re relighting scene-linear material within a 3D composite. So here is our completely relit example… And this finishes the look of the shot. Now in all the cases you have seen with 3D Selectives… You have used CGI material… With data passes that have already that been provided. But with live action footage… These data passes normally don’t exist. So as an extension to the 3D selective toolset… Machine Learning has been incorporated into Flame… To help generate some of this 3D data… Which you can use in your grading, VFX and look development work. So please check out the Machine Learning Series on the Flame Learning Channel… To learn more about this amazing technology. Don’t forget to check out the other features, workflows… And enhancements to Flame 2020. Comments, feedback and suggestions are always welcome and appreciated. Please subscribe to the Flame Learning Channel for future videos… And thanks for watching.

Beginning Graphic Design: Images

Beginning Graphic Design: Images


Images. No matter what the subject, we’re naturally
drawn to them. From beautiful, high-definition photos…
to carefully crafted illustrations—even simple examples, like logos and icons. Images are more than just decoration. In design, they’re the hook that draws the
viewer in. Compelling visuals can help you connect with
the audience—and make a strong impression—before they’ve even read a single word. You don’t have to be an artist to use images
in your work. All it takes is a little creativity and a
willingness to think outside the box. With the right resources, you can learn to
set your designs apart. First: Finding high-quality images for any
type of project. Maybe you’re handy with a camera or have some
graphic design experience—that’s great! If not… don’t panic. There are countless sources online that offer
images for exactly this purpose. The truth is, most people (including professionals)
rely on free or low-cost images called stock. Stock is perfect when you need something specific—for
example, a photo of a tiny dog in a teacup—and you don’t have the time or resources to make
it yourself. Most stock image sites let you browse or search
their offerings. Look for results that are relevant to your
project, but also unique in some way. As viewers, people are naturally drawn to
images that feel authentic; for example, distinct but believable photos… and graphics that
tell a story. The best images are somewhat open-ended—they
set the tone for your project but leave room for interpretation. Some stock images are just too generic to
be effective. For instance, how many times have you seen
a business presentation with something like this? For a more modern, professional design, avoid
images that lack context or are too literal in meaning. Instead, look for imagery that’s connected
to your work, but in a more subtle, relatable way. Of course, it’s not just about content. There’s also a technical side to images, which
can have a big impact on your work. It doesn’t matter if the photo you’ve chosen
is absolutely perfect in every other way—if it’s blurry or pixelated, it could give the
wrong impression. Look for high-quality images that are sharp,
clear, and free of distortion. In general, bigger is better, because it gives
you more to work with. A large, high-resolution image can always
be cropped or sized down, depending on the needs of the project. Unfortunately, it doesn’t work the other way
around. If you enlarge a smaller image, it immediately
loses quality. That’s because most images are in something
called raster format. They’re made up of thousands, sometimes even
millions of tiny little pixels. When you view a raster image at its original
size or smaller, the pixels are invisible—they’re just too small to see. But if you zoom in or enlarge it… the results
aren’t pretty. Vector graphics are quite different from raster. You can make them any size, big or small,
without losing any quality. That’s because they’re made of something more
complex than pixels—they’re rendered using a special form of geometry. You’re not likely to find vector graphics
outside of professional design settings, but it’s good to know what they are. Few stock images are perfect as-is, even if
they’re technically high quality. Maybe the image is the wrong size or the colors
could use some work. Fortunately, even basic programs let you make
simple adjustments nowadays. Look for these options the next time you need
to fix or enhance an image. Cropping can be used to change the size, shape,
or focus of an image, making it useful in many different situations. Try this feature if your graphic is the wrong
dimensions, or if it includes something you’d rather cut out. Cosmetic adjustments let you enhance certain
image qualities, like brightness… contrast… saturation… and color. If your favorite program offers filters or
presets, you can change your image dramatically with very little time and effort. Resizing an image will ensure it’s the perfect
fit for your project. Just remember: you can’t make images bigger
than their original size without affecting their quality. If the image you’re working with simply isn’t
big enough, it’s best to choose something else. Alternatively, find a creative way to work
with the image size you have. Adding photos, graphics, and other visuals
to your work is a great way to make it more engaging. Even a simple background image can transform
your design into something special. Just remember what you’ve learned about image
quality—both technical and conceptual—and your work is sure to stand out for the right
reasons. We hope you enjoyed learning the basics of
images. Check out the rest of our design topics, including
typography, color, and composition.

Best cameras for filmmaking in 2017

Best cameras for filmmaking in 2017


Hi guys! Welcome back to another episode.
Following the popularity of our previous “Best cameras for filmmaking” video – we thought
we would update the list and give you the Best cameras for filmmaking in 2017.
There are a few things to consider before heading to get hold of your new camera. What
do you want to use it for? Feature films? Vlogging? Action filmmaking?
What about your budget? Do you have funding to spend on the most up-to-date gear? Or are
you an indie filmmaker trying to make the most of your budget?
Since our last video, the market has been on the move. The following options aren’t
the cheapest available but we think they give you the best value for money. We want to give
a couple of different options without breaking the bank and we’ll be sure to link all products
in the description below so you can go and check them out.
Do bear in mind that the older cameras we covered in our last video are still completely
viable options. Whenever a manufacturer brings out a new version of the product, the older
versions always drop in price – certainly something to keep in mind if you’re looking
to stay on budget. The Canon T7i is the bigger brother of the
T6i which we previously mentioned. As expected it does come with a number of bolstered features
which makes it a really awesome option for people trying to do cinematic style filmmaking.
In the latest version the processor has had some attention and now comes with the DIGIC
7 which allows for superior image procession and faster operations.
A higher ISO range means that this camera is great for shooting any low-light situations.
Coupled with what is claimed to the the world’s fastest live-view autofocus system you’ll
be able to change perspective in the blink of an eye.
These changes do a lot add more versatility to your camera, giving you a better piece
of equipment for more robust and adaptive filmmaking.
Taking a look at more action filmmaking, the DJI Osmo+ has now been released with a whole
host of awesome new features including a 3.5x optical zoom which opens up a whole new world
of opportunities for you and your filmmaking. You can now shoot 4K video at 30fps and even
1080p at 100fps if you want to create some smooth slow-motion, like we explained in our
last Q&A. You also get more advanced time lapse features,
stabilization technology and the hardware which comes with the camera has also been
improved with the addition of a higher capacity battery and a compact battery charger, which
is great. Now those all come as standard but there are
some advanced options for the Osmo but they are reflected in the price so it really depends
on what you want from your camera. Those were our picks but if you’re not so
restricted by budget you could invest in the Panasonic Lumix GH5 – with It’s stunning
4K footage and professional features. I mentioned slow-mo before and the GH5 takes
it to a whole new level. You can record 1080p at 180fps which is a superb quality and then
you can slow it down 7.5x and still playback at 24fps which is just insane. It is. So get
it. It’s pretty good. Another option is the Canon 5D Mark 3. It’s
only 1080p but it does have a full-frame sensor to make things look really pretty visually.
It’s not as great at video work as the GH5 because it doesn’t have great sound recording
unfortunately. But, as mentioned in our previous video, Canon
cameras do come with interchangeable lenses, so you can save some money, if you already
have a lens, by just purchasing the body of the camera.
There are so many great cameras out there and what works well for one filmmaker may
not work so well for another. It all comes down to what you want to create, your budget
and your capabilities. We’d love to hear your thoughts on what you
think is the best camera of 2017 down below in the comments, let’s get a discussion going.
We hope you’ve enjoyed this episode, do remember to subscribe and please click that little
bell otherwise you won’t get notifications of our other cool content, and there’s some
really really cool content. We will see you next week.
Bye!

Neon Noir Lightroom Tutorial

Neon Noir Lightroom Tutorial


all right so I’m gonna show you guys how
I’m going to edit this photo it seems to be pretty popular this style so I want
to show you guys how I do it now like what I said last time is I’d like to
find something that is white try to make sure the white balance is correct that’s
usually the first thing I do and by now this could kind of become like an art to
me so it’s pretty quick so I’m gonna increase the contrast all the way decrease
the highlights I’m gonna increase the shadows the whites just until they peak
you see that red that signifies I overdid it something I’ll scale it down
right about there now increase the blacks all the way but that does not mean it’s
gonna stay this way it just means that’s how I like now I like my pictures a
little soft not always too soft but actually I’m gonna eyeball this actually
I like it like that so I mean this is really to your style it doesn’t have to
be exactly the way I do it if you want to have your clarity like there it’s
fine you wanna jack it up that’s fine too so I like my picture soft
people people usually say that I increase the saturation all the way and
shit like that but it’s not that’s not even the case I actually decrease it
there’s no set number it’s just the way I see it if it looks good to me that’s
the way I’d leave it so that’s looking more or less better the way I want it
now I don’t always change the highlights but I think I’ll add a smidgen of purple
just like that barely noticeable there we go so now I like to reduce the noise little
bit to go to luminance and add a vignette something like this, I’m gonna increase the
highlights in the vignette area actually what I would like the way I see this is
I want this to be lit but I want the area around it to be dark but the
vignette’s not cutting up for me so I’m gonna come to the radial filters over
here I’ma lay a filter right over it and Invert it, I’m a decrease
exposure but not too much like I said I’m just gonna eyeball this and however
I see the photo how I envision it that’s what I’m gonna do it
you guys don’t have to copy me exactly I mean if you don’t like something you can
just do it the way you want to do you know I’m just giving you guys like a
base like this is the way I like to do it and you don’t have to like this
completely now I wish I could increase the contrast so what I’m gonna do is I’m
just gonna slowly add more blacks in there there you see not all the way
now I actually maybe maybe I will deal with that vibrant so up a little bit
more okay that looks fine so I want to see
these signs over here in these cables that’s kind of a big point to my picture
and uh I’m gonna go over here and increase the highlights so we can see the brighter parts
starting to come out over here which is what we want
I’m gonna remove this part I’ll do something else right there
increase the highlights there you go it’s time to add more pop to our photo
which is what we want now I’m gonna make another brush this time I’m just gonna
add to the shadows maybe we can change We can change the brush later so it’s fine so like I said this is to each their
their own so however you want to do your photo and that’s up to you but this is
the way I like it and what else can we do
I want more pop in these lights some do yet another brush this time going for
the highlights so you know toss it in there not too much and we want this kind
of wire to shine a little so yeah let’s see how it looks
okay these lights are a little bit too bright so we don’t want that we want
them bright but not too bright and this is basically what you’re doing you’re
gonna paint your picture you know how you see it how you want it this is the
way I envisioned it and actually I envisioned this being a little bit more
but not too much so I’m going to do yet another brush so this is all a process
you know see let’s try 20 okay looks much better so
I’m just adding highlights to places that should have highlights you know
kind of where all this little white sparkle okay that’s good now I don’t
like them being this saturated so I’m gonna actually reduce the saturation a
little bit with you guessed it another brush yeah we don’t want them to look
like tomatoes and like I said there’s no set numbers
to this I mean you do this the way you want to do it and I really really want
to see the top over here because that’s like the main thing for me so the
brushes are not doing it time to increase the exposure a little bit and
some contrast do we have contrast yeah yeah so I’m liking that much better
already you know it’s good but I don’t want the lights to be too bright either
so there you go you have a noealz style photo and I hope you guys are enjoying
this these kinds of tutorials and videos please be sure to subscribe and follow
me on Instagram and if you have any questions or if you want to share your
photo with me be sure to tag me I’ll check it out for sure and I’ll see you
around you