Model Testing | How To Build A Fashion Portfolio With Talent Agencies | PRO EDU Photography Tutorial

Model Testing | How To Build A Fashion Portfolio With Talent Agencies | PRO EDU Photography Tutorial


(upbeat music) – A model test is an
opportunity for a photographer and a model to build
their portfolios together. If you start in model testing, it’s gonna open doors in the
fashion photography field. The end result that needs to
happen in a great model test is that that model looks
their absolute best. When photographers fail at this, it’s not because they’re
bad photographers. It’s because they just don’t know what agencies and agency
represented models really need. In this tutorial, you’re gonna learn who to shoot and how to shoot them. I think we might do a hair and
makeup change at this point. Exactly. That arm can even like, yes. One foot bent that way, and
turn this foot this way. You’re gonna learn about
working with modeling agencies to shoot quality models. I love that ’cause that
lengthens your lengths, which your agents will love,
so bring that back out. Kick that foot. Good. You’re gonna see me shoot two
different types of models. We’re gonna take one model
that’s considered editorial. Go for it. Yes. And another model that’s
considered commercial. So let’s do that hand. Wrap it around your neck and then we’re gonna lean
in and gimme a little laugh. Perfect. Love that. We’re gonna use simple lighting, some natural light, some strobe. And then you’re gonna
open up your body to me as you come in here. Let’s try it. Perfect. Yes, perfect, good. And simple camera techniques. I love when I come lower with the model and they look like above me. It just exaggerates that. To get the quality that you want in as fast as possible time. Good. I think we’ve got that. With this tutorial, you’re gonna get my
Comprehensive Posing Guide. This is a great resource
to see what types of poses agencies are going to wanna see from a successful model test. Oh gosh, I love that! I’m gonna give you an
email template to send to modeling agencies. It’s gonna have the right
tone and the right language that’s gonna increase your success rate. My favorite thing that you’re gonna get from this tutorial is my
top secret packing list. It’s gonna make your
process so much easier, and it’s gonna give agencies
exactly what they want. Whether your goals are
to build a new portfolio, monetize model testing
or take that next step in your fashion photography career, these resources are foundational so that those things are easy,
seamless and quick for you.

Star photographer and director RANKIN co-hosts a Euromaxx Special

Star photographer and director RANKIN co-hosts a Euromaxx Special


Today Meggin is posing for star photographer Rankin. He has invited her to join him in his studio
in north London´s Kentish Town district. Hi everyone. Welcome to this special edition of euromaxx. I’m your host Meggin Leigh and co-hosting
with me today is our very special guest. World famous photographer Rankin. Thank you so much for having us in your studios
here in London. It’s a pleasure. Well you name it from the Rolling Stones,
David Bowie and Madonna, the Queen, even Miss Piggy – you pretty much filmed and photographed
them all. So I guess it’s fair to ask you for my first
question what is a day in the life of Rankin like? Oh it’s quite long because I get up very early
so I probably wake up about five maybe five thirty. I get up ,I check my emails very quickly. I then take my dogs for a walk for about an
hour and a half. I come back so I am back by about six to seven. I do e-mails till about 9:00 30 and then I
come on set generally or if I’ve not got a shoot which is very rare I’ll do meetings
and then I’ll probably finish about ….well I always have a lunch at 1:00 and always have
a meeting. Never have a lunch on my own and then I’ll
probably finish about seven and then I have meetings until about eight thirty. Okay so sounds pretty ordinary even though
you’re surrounded by celebrities when you do actually do a shoot
Yeah. No I’m pretty much a workaholic so everybody
thinks I’m a photographer and a director but I’m actually much more than that. I have a publishing company, I have an advertising
agency, I rep directors, I rep photographers , I have my own studio. I have another studio which we just bought. Yes I’m kind of buy. Right, well Rankin helped us put the show
today together we’re going to be talking a little bit more in-depth about your publishing
company, we will come out later right. But you know your subjects vary very differently
from superstar athletes like LeBron James a basketball star to actresses to singers. Walk me through through the creative process
of how you start a shoot. It is always different. You know sometimes it would be me that’s come
up with the idea, sometimes it’s an agency or sometimes a client. Sometimes it’s a celebrity that comes up with
it but you basically start with a brief which is like a treatment. You have preproduction that gets all the stuff
that you need for the shoot together, you get on set with the celebrity or the model,
the subject, go into hair and makeup. If it’s a kind of concept behind it. There might be a makeup concept then we’ll
spend ages doing the concept.. I call it glam presume which means I’m waiting
for glam and then we get on set and we shoot digitally which means that everything is seen
by everybody and it’s a very open forum so everybody can comment on it. Sometimes that doesn’t work for you because
maybe the celebrity is not in a really good place that day so you have to persuade them
and it can be very difficult. But most the time it is pretty good because
it’s very collaborative. Okay we want to take a look at the work and
life so far of Rankin. Rankin’s portraits are world famous. He manages to do what most photographers can
only dream of: capture unforgettable moments with stars like Arnold Schwarzenegger or David Bowie, and
politicians like Mikhail Gorbachev or Tony Blair. Many of his works have become iconic….like
this official portrait of Queen Elizabeth to mark her Golden Jubilee. The British photographer is in demand worldwide. He shoots photos and creates ad campaigns
for international labels. Rankin has even made a name for himself as
a film director. Born as John Rankin Waddell in Scotland, in
1966, he demonstrated a good sense of humour early on in his self-portraits. When he was in his early 20s, Rankin decided
to make photography his career and moved to London. That is where he got his big break back in
the early 1990s. Together with his college friend Jefferson
Hack he founded youth culture magazine “Dazed & Confused”. Stars like U2 frontman Bono, model Kate Moss,
actress Kirsten Dunst and pop star Justin Timberlake graced the covers. Rankin now publishes four fashion- and lifestyle
magazines and has issued more than 40 books of photographs. He has his own studio, publishing house and
ad agency. His latest print project is: “Hunger” magazine, which has appears twice
a year. And with his ambitious project Rankin Live!,
the photographer shows that he can make ANYONE look like a cover model. Since 2009 he’s shot pictures of thousands
of ordinary people like here in Berlin. It’s an ongoing adventure which takes him
around the globe. Sometimes even famous faces aren’t immediately
recognizable in Rankin’s photos…. like Icelandic singer Björk or top model Heidi Klum. Whether it’s his celebrity portraits or art
photography, Rankin has created many iconic images — including some that will go down
in history. So you have done so much in your career what
would you say was perhaps the breakthrough. Not one thing but a couple of things. Probably photographing Bjork was a big thing
but setting up Daze magazine and then photographing the Queen. Well tell us about that. I had done a lot of research into the Queen
and found that she had a sense of humor. So I was really focused on getting a photograph
of her with that sense of humor. While I shooting her part of my camera fell
off and she started laughing. So once I’d seen that I was like that’s what
I’m going to get. And I just started going. Mam, can you smile please, Mam can you smile
until she smiled. And then I got it. Now you’ve also worked with ordinary people. What are the challenges there? The challenges of working with real people
are pretty much the same as working with celebrities. You just have to make people feel comfortable. And I think it is always more difficult to
photograph famous people because they go to their face their way of being shot and to
get them out of that is is more complicated, whereas with real people it’s more about just
making them feel good. You know, make them feel comfortable ,yeah. So what is your preferred medium for working? Film, photography, print? I think that probably photography’s where
I’m happiest because it’s what I first came to. You know I picked up a camera when was 21
and it was a big big deal for me because it was like a light bulb moment so photography
is definitely my first love. But I think film is so difficult to do and
get right. So it’s my challenge in my life and I don’t
think I’ve nailed it particularly yet with drama but I’m doing quite well with commercials
and music videos. And in 2011 you started yet another magazine
hunger. Yes. Why is it called Hunger. I started hunger because I left Dazed as a
creative director and I missed the kind of the team aspect of it because you get so much
information and ideas from working in a team. And I was still hungry. So hunger seemed like a good name. Now the subject in our next report is media
artist EM Cole. Tell me a little bit about how you discovered
her. I met her through my agent Sophie who works
for me wrapping photographers and I said I want to meet some new photographers and she
said oh check this girl Em Cole call out she’s really interesting and I saw her work and
I was like Oh there’s some things I’m familiar with. So I asked if I could meet her and she came
in and the first question I asked her was: what’s what’s your interest and your obsession
with technology. Because most people your age are more about
analog and they’re kind of looking backwards and she said well I looked around the industry
and it was full of middle aged white men. No offense! And then I was hooked and said you’re amazing. And then she told me her story and it was
so intense and her way of dealing with what’s happened to her was through her work. So I was very taken by. Well staying on the subject of Em Cole and
her work we want to take a closer look now in our next report. Works by British multimedia artist Em Cole
are colorful, provocative and often unconventional. Photos and videos are her preferred mode of
creative expression. “My whole aesthetic is built around treading
that line between something that’s grotesque and something that’s enticing. I feel like photography in film is a flat
medium so I want to bring out the sensory feeling from it. So if I can get people to feel something through
the textures or the colours in my imagery that’s just fantastic.” Em Cole studied Information Experience Design
at London’s Royal College of Art. There, she discovered her passion for photography
and video art. “So I ended up just kind of playing around
in the photography studio a lot. I found the immediacy of photography so much
more rewarding than kind of spending 24 hours on a sewing machine trying to make a T-Shirt. You know I could just throw stuff in the shot
and throw people in the shot and get the picture.” She nows works predominantly as a photographer
and director. Much of her work is inspired by surrealism
and artists like Salvador Dali and René Magritte. For instance her short film “I’m Your Venus”. “It’s poking fun at the female ideal and drawing
connections from the past art of classical Renaissance nudes which are perceived as the
most ideal beauty and connecting it to digital culture today with Instagram and filters and
everyone’s trying to beautify themselves and get this you know perfect image to go out
in the world. So I kind of recreated a new female ideal. Kind of an avatar a digital avatar based on
both of those things.” Much of Em Cole’s work revolves around the
sterotypical presentation of women. As a teen, she, too, fell victim to digital
abuse when pictures of her were distributed on pornographic websites. After unplugging for a few years, she’s back
online with fresh confidence. “If you’ve been bullied out of a space you
shouldn’t be ashamed to be in that space you just deserve to be there just as much as anybody
else. […] I mean I get nude in some of my work,
sometimes I’m pushing it. Like stuff it. I’ve got control of that. You know I’m not going to let somebody else
take control of my online image if it’s going to be there, it’s going to be mine.” Humor and irony are two important stylistic
devices Em Cole likes to employ. Regardless of whether the topic is serious
or not. Like in her video “Sloppy Seconds”: “If you’re talking about anything serious
or especially problematic social problems then humour is a universal tool to you so
that people can relax and once people are relaxed they’re so much more likely to get
an understanding of your work Em Cole certainly can’t complain about not
getting enough commissions. And the British media artist is confident
that her caeer will continue to blossom. There is a lot
to see in Rankins Studio. I especially liked his Rankomat Photo Booth. So Cole is not only a media artist you have
featured her on online and in the latest edition or upcoming edition of your magazine. Tell me a little bit more about this collaboration. Well I met her through my agent as I said
and she is somebody that I think people should be aware of. So I was very very keen to get her featured
online. I got her featured in Dazed as well. I think that when you meet someone you really
think is brilliant at what they do you really really want to get them as much PR and publicity
as you can. We’re standing right here in the middle of
London. You’re from Scotland. Why Camden Town? Why Camden Lock? Oh I moved here because …it isn’t Camden
it is Kentish Town…When I moved here it was pretty much the only place in North London
that I could afford to move. So we got a really beautiful studio around
the corner and I moved here in 96 just over there and I have lived here and in North London
since about 96. Well you know moving from Scotland to London,I
mean I’m just guessing, but it must have felt like you were a small fish in a big pond. Yeah I didn’t know anybody in the industry
when I moved to London. I was very much from a kind of non commercial
photography, a non art non advertising background, so it was a very strange experience and that’s
why it was great to meet Jefferson at college because we were both in the same boat .. From Dazed and Confused? Yeah we both both ended up kind of trying
to kind of make a mark here without any support from anybody really. And why here why not Hollywood for example. I mean you work with so many of these famous
faces. I think back then we had no clue that we’d
ever be working with Hollywood. We were very much focused on you know we were
both at college when we met and we started the magazine Dazed at college and it was really
just a way of us kind of documenting and creating culture that was around us. So Hollywood wasn’t even on our radar. I want to pull it a little bit back to social
media again. I mean you started out in classic publishing. Now we live in the digital age you’re also
really active on social media. As a classic photographer, but also someone
who uses social media to promote your work, what is your responsibility when it comes
to teenagers and image in these images of beauty online. Well I think everybody that picks up a camera
professionally has a responsibility to the subject matter, to who you’re photographing,
to why you’re photographing them. But I think nowadays, well I’ve kind of learned
that through process, knowing that when you sort of push the boundaries you have to really
know why you’re doing it and what your intention is . But the problem is, is that now people
have got no idea of that responsibility and are using it kind of willy nilly. So I think I actually now have more of a responsibility
to put a light on that or put some sort of focus on that. Well said. All right. For our next report which Ranken also helped
choose today. We’re going to take a look at teenagers, social
media and social media obsession. Are teenagers winning or losing in this digital
age? These days, you can do much more with a phone
than just make telephone calls and send text messages. News apps help you keep up with what’s going
on in the world, 24/7. Or play games to your heart’s content. And if you need a train ticket, you can buy
it with your smartphone. Thanks to streaming, you can always access
your favorite music. Social media platforms such as Snapchat, Facebook
and Instagram (00:30) allow you to communicate with your friends non-stop. The possibilities are endless. But what do young people most use their phones
for? “To find out when the next bus is coming,
for music, audio books, everything.” “I think mostly to interact with other people
and also to take some good photos.” “I used it mainly for city map, you know,
to discover the city on my own, I listen to music a lot, and obviously social media.” “I use it it to surf in internet, to make
pictures, and to speak with people.” One app is particularly popular at the moment. Instagram, Instagram, Instagram, Instagram,
Instagram, J’aime tout sur Instagram ((Ich mag alles an Instagram))+++ Users can upload pictures and videos using
varous filters, share them with others and like entries. Instagram already has over a billion users,
double the figure 2 years ago. People share their favorite experiences. Vacation snaps are particularly popular, as
are pictures of animals (01:37) and of tasty-looking food. It’s a perfect platform for showing off! And users love it. Especially as it offers them the possibility
to present their life in a different way. “Definitely it’s not the real world, I edit
stuff, everyone edit things”+++ “Instagram is kind of our fake life, because
this is not what is really happening in our life.” “There are reports everywhere that things
are always being edited out.” “There is definitely a lot of them on Instagram. I think a lot of people edit their photos.” You can even change the way you look with
some apps – and undergo a digital beauty operation. But this is not unproblematic. Studies have shown that digitally enhanced
versions of the ideal body are having an impact on people’s perception of themselves. You can even change the shape of your eyes
in one click. “It’s weird. It really makes a difference.” Digital tools make it easy to have plumped
up lips. “Oh, that’s really weird. Makes me feel uncomfortable doing that, changing
my face like that. If you got used to doing that all the time
than you wouldn’t like yourself without it. Or you can have a narrower nose if you feel
like it. “It’s as if we were surrounded by perfect
people, but that’s nonsense. It’s not the case at all. Nobody’s perfect.” Andreas Niggestich teaches schoolchildren
and their parents how to deal with social media. Some children already have smartphones at
the age of 8. Why are they such must-have accessories? “It’s mostly about social recognition. It’s a need that we all have and the social
networks tap into this need very simply, literally at a click. I can upload a picture after buying a new
pair of sunglasses, share it with my friends and get instant feedback.” Niggestich wants to ensure that young people
use their phones and computers responsibly. In other words, continue to use them but not
excessively. “The question is always whether you can do
something without a smartphone, are you still able to – it’s important to teach children
that they can survive without their phones, that they can get through a day without them.” Phones and social networks can be as addictive. So sometimes the only answer is to switch
them off! Now you wanted to talk about teenagers and
social media addiction. Why is this topic important to you? Well photography as a medium has become very
democratic. Llots people are using it because of smartphones. And I found myself on different social media
platforms kind of wanting to go back to them and check them a lot. And I suddenly realized probably about three
years ago that I was addicted. I was addicted to what people were thinking
of my work, how people were relating to it, was it being liked. And I thought well if this is me being addicted
to it then if you’re a 10 or 12 year old kid how’s that affecting you. How’s that influencing you. And I started to talk to people about it and
I just got this overwhelming response from people that they were having the same feelings. So I started to do some research on it and
it was really obvious there was a lot of statistics coming out on it that actually people were
addicted and that a lot of the platforms were designed to be addictive. And I just felt that we have a responsibility
because it’s photography that they’re using they’re using them as a way of talking to
each other. Photos are not about capturing a moment. They’re a way of conveying a moment. And because that’s something that I do I just
felt responsible and I felt that we should do something about it. Okay well because you said you felt responsible
what have you done? I mean have you taken any action or anything? Yeah well funnily enough I am actually taking
quite an interesting action. Iam trying to set up a symposium in November
with my publishing company to actually discuss all these things and I’ve been writing what
we call white papers which are like essays on it and trying to get a group of people
together to write an essay, a series of essays on it. All right so you say that you did become addicted
to social justice and seeing what people were saying about you. Do you still use social media? I do but I’m also looking into other kind
of more ethical ways of using social media because the problem with it is that it’s not
necessarily the people that are running the companies that have got a problem it’s the
algorithms that they’ve created that are just constantly feeding our desires and that is
something that that we need to investigate and discuss. And I’ve been trying really hard to look for
alternatives. But yes I still use it. It’s impossible for me not to use it because
it’s part of my business. It’s part of life and.also I don’t think you
can change anything from the outside I think you need to be changing it from the inside
and creating content that’s a little bit different or trying to challenge people or even having
fun with it because I’m obviously somebody that likes to take the mickey out of things. On a lighter note now selfies are meant to
be fun. I think they’re very very dangerous. You do? Why do you think they are dangerous? I think they create a modulistt look that
people are perpetuating through this same type of imagery. And I really think the problem is that if
this is what you putting out as you’re happy life, you’re online life so to speak then
what’s your actual life like? Also people are looking at these images of
people and they’re thinking it’s real or they’re thinking even if it’s fabricated they have
a better life than them and I think that sets people up against each other. And back in the day when photo shop came along
all of the media especially the magazines got really criticized for using photoshop
on celebrities or role models. Now you can go and buy something called face
tune and you see people using that on social media. And that inherently is one of the worst things
you can be doing because not only are you creating a fantasy version of yourself, that’s
also going to mess with other people’s heads as well. So you’re messing with heads in both ways. Well I’m glad to hear that you’re trying to
do something positive in that direction. But unfortunately we are out of time for today. Yes. Rankin thank you so much for having us in
our studios and for co-hosting our show I hope we made you feel comfortable as co host
and co- editor in chief today. Thank you. You did. Thank you. All right. And with that we are out of time on this special
edition of Euromaxx with our special guest today,photographer Rankin. From me and the rest of the crew here from
London. As always thanks for tuning in. We’ll see you again soon. Goodbye!

BASICS OF GREEN SCREEN – Everything You Need To Know

BASICS OF GREEN SCREEN – Everything You Need To Know


Another Green Screen Video? Seriously? I was going to make this into a separate series
of short videos so it wasn’t so long. Then I received a comment on one of my videos
that said, “You talk more than my grandma. Now start the f…. topic!” So this episode is not only going to be really
long, but I am dedicating it to all the grandmas out there! Actually, I wanted to keep all this info in
one place. If you’re impatient, or only want to re-watch
a portion of this, I’ve put links in the description below. Second, due to some other comments I’ve received,
I feel compelled to state the following… There may be something to learn here, or,
at least refresh your memory on some basics. If you think you know all about this already,
then just go watch something else. Just sayin’. If I walked onto a set, I would let everyone
do their jobs. That’s what they were hired for, and are usually
better at doing their specific jobs than me – I can’t do it all. For green screen scenes, everything is set
up properly, it gets shot, then handed over to more people, who perform their jobs, and
everything looks great. Doing it by yourself is not the same as doing
it on a set with a crew of people who already know what they are doing. You are the person who buys all that crap,
sets it all up, films it, lights it, probably stars in it, edits it, does the compositing,
renders it, and posts it. And that’s a lot of jobs. Now I’ve seen an awful lot of videos on YouTube
that were done using a green screen. Some are really excellent. Some really suck, including some of my own. So I figured, there’s something that these
pro guys are doing that non-pro guys aren’t. Like sound. The first point of failure for sound is bad
recording. Everything after a bad recording, is spending
a lot of time to fix it in post, which makes sound recording and editing look like a pain
in the ass, when in fact, it was the bad recording in the first place that was the fail. So my thought was: what’s the FIRST point
of failure for green screen work? What makes everything after that point a pain
in the ass? So I did a lot of research, talked to some
pros, and worked it backwards to see what the first point of failure was. It isn’t software tools, they use the same
ones. It isn’t the cameras or lenses, I’ve seen
pros pull a key from DSLRs and video cameras. It isn’t the green screen – I’ve seen some
low cost green screens and the keying was great. It can’t be the lighting, I mean, you buy
a green screen kit with a couple of lights and it’s supposed to work, right? Let’s take one of these cheaper green screen
kits, which work fine by the way, and you normally get two or 3 lights with it. So, you set up your green screen kit, put
all your lights, and voila! Except there is no voila! You get your footage into editing, can’t figure
out what the hell is going on, your keying looks like crap, you mess around with it forever,
then give up, decide green screening is just too hard, or, there’s something you don’t
get, or, you decide you need a better camera, lens, room, studio, watch a shit ton of green
screening videos, still don’t get it, and you continue down the chute to green screen
hell. Well – it isn’t your fault. This, is NOT – a green screen kit! It’s a 3-point lighting system for your subject,
which happens to include a green screen. So there’s the first point of failure: Lighting the green screen. Notice I didn’t say “lighting”, I said “lighting
the green screen.” Lighting, and lighting the green screen are
NOT the same thing. They are TWO completely different lighting
steps. You’ve got to set up the green screen, and
light IT properly, THEN light your subject the way you normally would. Screw the actors and objects and everything
else – just light the screen properly. In other words, you need to treat your screen
and your subject separately. Now, a lot of green screen videos will go
along and then briefly say, “…and make sure you light the green screen evenly, so you
don’t have any hot spots…” And then they move on. Well, what the [bleep]! If that’s a major point of failure, and it
is, why not say how come, why, and how to do it? In talking with pros, 90% of problems pulling
a key, is usually improper or uneven lighting and hot spots. The other 10% is someone wearing green, shadows
on the screen, too much motion, and a few others. That 10% is easy to fix, as we’ll cover later. So let’s handle this 90%. Now I’m sure someone watching is saying, “But
I have lights. And they look awesome!” Well, you don’t know what you don’t know,
right? Well, here’s a new one: You don’t see, what you don’t see. For example, look at the lighting here. It looks fine, right? It’s not. Your eyeballs are awesome, and super accommodating. The camera is not. This screen has uneven lighting and hot spots
that make it a pain in the ass to pull a key. So let me repeat this – uneven lighting and
hot spots on a green screen are the evil devil child. And just to make sure I really drive this
point home: It’s the difference between clicking an eye
dropper and making a few adjustments, having nice flowing hair, being able to see glass
that looks like glass, and being able to move freely in front of the screen. It’s the difference between having fun doing
green screen work, or, spending hours, days, or weeks masking things out, and never quite
getting it right. So, how do we know we have uneven lighting
and hot spots, and more importantly how do we correct it? One simple method for seeing uneven lighting
and hot spots is by adjusting your camera’s shutter speed. For example, as I adjust the shutter speed
higher and higher, it lets in less light – it makes everything darker. Now you can see the hot spots here and there,
and the lighting is uneven. It’s not the best or most reliable way, by
far, but it can be used if you have to use it, as it’s better than not seeing it at all. My favorite, and more trusted way, is by the
use of an app which looks at your setup like a camera does. I have one called Green Screener. Here’s the app on my iPad pointing at my green
screen. Now you can really see what’s going on. Even if you have those large soft boxes that
come in your “green screen kit”, you’re still going to have a problem. And once you see this, you’ll start going
absolutely insane! These hot spots and uneven lighting is why
you have trouble, and why it gets complicated. Now, you can adjust these lights and mess
around with them and end up with something that’s somewhat acceptable. But you need to just stop! You’ll spend hours messing around with this
and adjusting things and you’ll never get it the way you want it. Or you’ll just settle with “that’s good enough”
or “I’ll fix it in post” and when you get there you’ll hate yourself. So we’ve determined the first point of failure
is lighting the green screen. Well, the next point of failure, and the reason
you have hot spots and uneven lighting on your green screen… …is because you’re using the wrong lights. And that’s the missing ingredient. You should be using different lights for lighting
the screen. That’s also why in my last episode was those
cheap DIY bank lights, which you should go watch right now if you haven’t, otherwise
you’ll miss this important point. So go watch it and I’ll wait. Go ahead. You can come back to this video, just go and
watch it. There’s a link here – you just click on it,
and you can watch that. OK, so now you get it on bank lighting and
why. So let’s set them up. On a screen like this behind me, you’d want
maybe two bank lights on each side, and a couple on top and maybe even the bottom. But to prove my point, we’re going to use
just two of these DIY lights, one on each side. Place your new bank lights on either side
of your green screen. You want the middle of these lights positioned
about the middle of your frame. Get your Green Screener app up and running. Now take a look. Still hot spots and uneven lighting? Just move the banks lights forward and backward,
and adjust left to right, and you’ll eventually get an evenly lit no hot spot green screen. Depending on your camera and room, it will
take some finesse, but once you are practiced with the lights and the app, it gets really
easy. And if you always shoot in this type of environment,
like I do, just lock it all down once you’ve nailed it. Now that WE KNOW the screen is evenly lit
with no hot spots, let’s test out this one click theory. And I am going to do the worse thing possible
and that is make sure I have a glass in the shot. Even worse, I am going to use the not so awesome
UltraKey found in Premier Pro. I’m not banging on UltraKey. Its use is more of a “I want to see what my
footage and background will look like before I spend the time to do a real key.” But using UltraKey will ensure anyone using
any editor can do this. So we bring in the footage to Premier Pro. We add the Ultrakey Plugin to the footage. We click on a green area around me. BAM! Let’s add a background. BAM! If there’s still a little black mush, select
this pull down, select advanced, and BAM! Not bad, huh? Especially for this type of talking head video,
it works nicely, and more importantly, it’s quick. Now, if you want to mess around with the different
parameters in the UltraKey to refine all this, go ahead. If you want to do more precise keying, bring
this footage into After Effects and use Keylight, which is awesome, to pull the key, you can
do that too. It will only be better. As you know, trying to correct rotten footage
in post, is a royal pain in the butt – it’s always better to get that footage shot well
up front in camera. Well, now that you have the best possible
lighting on your green screen, it will be as easy as hell to pull a fast key. Better yet, if you decide to mess around for
more complex keying, you won’t be wondering what the hell is wrong. It should just work, because you took failure
point number one out of the mix! Neat, huh? Here’s some extra tricks and tips while doing
green screen work that will make it even easier when editing. You don’t need some super high end expensive
green screen. Here’s that simple one I showed earlier that’s
pretty cheap, comes with lights, and works. Now, I don’t get why people don’t smooth out
their green screen. These little bumps and folds will create shadows
and make it a pain in the butt to pull a key. You don’t need to iron it. You can use clamps to pull the screen taut,
or use something like these large paper clips. You can also get a small steamer like this
if you like, but I found it’s better to pull the screen taut with clips. It doesn’t have to be totally taut, but at
least make sure when it hangs, there aren’t any creases or bumps that will create shadows
or lines. If you stand too close to the green screen,
you’ll cast a shadow, especially if you didn’t pay attention and are trying to use all your
lights to light you AND the green screen. It gets near impossible to pull a key with
shadows, and you’ll find yourself spending a lot of time dicking around with this. Worse yet, you will get green light spilling
onto your actor, called spill, which you won’t see until you are in post editing, and that
is a pain in the butt to key. Here’s a few ways to fix this. Remember, we light the green screen and get
it perfect, THEN we place the subject away from the screen, say 3-5 feet, then light
them separately. It’s best to be in front of the bank lights
so they aren’t hitting you with light. If you don’t have enough room, it might be
better to setup in another location than try and deal with shadows. Another trick for small rooms is to make sure
your green screen isn’t lit darker than your subject, as that will also cast shadows from
the subject and the lights. The best is a green screen just slightly darker
than the light on your subject. You should use a back light (or hair light),
as it really helps pull the subject off the background, and in this case, the green screen. It also sharpens the edges between you and
the green screen making the key easier to pull. I’ve found it’s better to use a soft light,
such as this one with a diffuser, like the one that came with my cheap green screen kit. Another trick is to use a magenta gel on the
back light. That’s a gel that looks somewhat pink. Magenta is what you would call a “minus” green
gel. In other words, it somewhat cancels out the
color green. This will cut down on some of the green spill
light bouncing onto your subject, making keying even easier. As already covered, you should light the green
screen first, THEN light the subject including the back light as already covered. Assuming you are doing that, keep this in
mind: There’s a rule of thumb that says you should
light the subject a couple of stops higher than your green screen. If you’re new to this, you’ll spend a lot
of time jerking around with that, so let’s make this simpler. If you blast your green screen with tons of
light, then you get a lot more green (spill) bouncing off the screen onto your subject,
which means when you pull your key, you’ll end up with a mess. If you blast your talent with a light and
the green screen is really dark, then, as covered you’ll get shadows. So just eyeball this. After setting up your green screen and lighting
it properly, turn the subject’s lights up more, move them closer, or whatever. You just want a nice balance, or a green screen
lit a bit darker than the subject. You may think this is stupid, but don’t wear
green clothes, or have green in them. I did an episode where my shirt was laced
with green. I did another episode where my Christmas hat
had a green leaf on it that I didn’t notice. Two episodes ago, I didn’t notice my Starbucks
cup had a green logo and a green straw. Both of these were pretty easy to fix as they
were on me or in front of me, as you’ll see in a later trick. But it’s best just to look in the mirror and
see if there’s green. It’s way easier to not have to deal with these
things. What if you have green [screen] in the shot? The just use a blue screen and pull the blue
as a key instead of the green. Everything else here applies and should be
just as simple. And note – these keyers – they don’t care
what color you pull. I’ve used this to pull someone out of a shot
standing in front of a whiteboard. It takes a little more work, but can be done. I’ll leave that to your creativity and imagination
on the multiple ways you can use this. With a wide aperture, the background goes
more out of focus, and you can use this while shooting on a green screen. Since the green screen is now out of focus,
it will help even out any inconsistencies from wrinkles or spots. If your subject is moving around a lot, you
can get motion blur, which is nearly impossible to key out. There’s too much motion here, and the green
and the hand will get all mushed together. Just up your shutter speed to like 70 or 80,
and that will take out the motion blur. This will keep the green and the thing from
mushing together, and you’ll get a good key. But don’t set it too high, or it will look
weird and unnatural. If the footage looks better with motion blur
in it, you can always add motion blur back in later to make it look more realistic. For example, here’s a shot in adobe after
effects. You don’t want noise in your shot, as it makes
it hell to key, and then you’re back to masking stuff. To keep the noise down, keep your ISO low,
which is done by proper lighting of the talent or object being shot in front of the green
screen. In other words, light the hell out of the
subject, light the green screen a bit darker, and adjust your ISO and exposure to the subject,
NOT the green screen. If you’re above 800 ISO, you need more light.
320 and 640 will be OK. Before you shoot, just frame everything green.
No masking. Or, just frame it knowing you’re going to
up scale a bit in your editor, so you don’t have to mask anything. Or, frame it so the masking is really simple. Of course, you don’t want to frame it and
have the person lifting their arms out of frame, and then put it in some background
as a long shot. In this case, just resize the back ground
so it looks like you meant to do that. Just remember to think about your framing
before you take the shot. Sometimes when you get your footage in, you
find that there’s something in the shot that is green, like this straw and cup. I’m lucky, as the straw and cup are in from
of me, which makes it easy to fix. Just make a copy of the layer above the current
layer, mask out the area that should be green, then remove the keyer, in this case, UltraKey. If there’s a lot of movement, you may have
to track the shot, or add keyframes to move the mast around as needed. These same principles work in After Effects. For this type of episode, this works really
well. I just click and key out quickly, and add in my background. I use a sort of 3-point lighting consisting
of a key light, a fill light and a back light. Now there’s two methods you can use for lighting: One, you light yourself, and then find something
to put in the background that matches that general lighting or looks good. The other, is you know what the background
or footage is going to be, so you study the lighting in the shot, and light yourself to
match that. Both work, and it depends on what you are
doing. Feel free to adjust your shot, or the background
you use to match these up. I already talked about spill from standing
to close to the green screen, which you shouldn’t DO. But I’ve had many a shot ruined as I didn’t
take into account the green coming from a place I didn’t realize it was coming from. The front. If you have a monitor pointed at you so you
can see what’s going on, the monitor will have green shooting at your clothes, face
or glasses. If you don’t know this you’ll drive yourself
mad. The best solution is to turn the monitor off
while filming yourself, or change it to display in black and white so you don’t get spill. You can also get spill if you have a window
behind the camera. Anything between you and everything that way,
if it reflects, like a window, monitor, reflector, etc., should be turned off, covered, or taken
away. Now, if you decide there should be a shadow
on a back wall in your background, add the shadow in afterwards. Here I shot this green screen, added myself
in so it looks like I’m close to a wall, and I wanted to cast a shadow to make it look
more legit. It’s pretty easy to add it in later. Just use your editor, add in a shadow effect,
and adjust it until it looks right. There are so many ways to get or make backgrounds
for your footage I couldn’t possibly list them all. Now, this video is NOT for people doing heavy
motion in large areas. Most people watching this video will be primarily
with taking a head or body shot and replacing the background. And most people watching this video are one-man
band filmmakers. If you plan on doing these more complicated
shots, then these rules will apply, but, I would highly suggest you get someone who has
experience doing these complicated shots. They know the in’s and out’s and usually have
the gear or know on what you need to get to pull these off. These are the basic practical concepts when
it comes to green screening. If you use a semi-permanent setup like this
for this show, it makes it really easy, as you walk in, turn on your lights, get the
camera and sound rolling, shoot, bring the footage in, pull the key, place in the background,
and you’re practically done. The whole point of this video, is to make
it simple for people who are new, having problems, or who have given up on green screen work. By having the proper lights and lighting,
knowing how to see and correct hot spots and uneven lighting, and knowing a few other details,
it will save yourself a lot of time, and you’ll be able to really use and enjoy this filmmaking
tool. Lastly I don’t want someone walking away from
this really long video, still thinking this is difficult, complex, or hard. Si I’m going to include a short example to
show how simple this green screen process can be. From walking into the room and turning on
the lights and camera, to rendering out the video. OK, for purposes if this demonstration, I’ve
got the sound and camera rolling. There’s one of my lights. There’s my other light, bank light one-two
green screen’s lit. There’s my fill light, there’s my key light,
and my hair light. We’re good. Normally I’d have all this set up and I’d
walk up here. I would start the camera rolling. I would start the sound rolling. And then I’d either snap my fingers or use
some fancy gadget like this. BAM! That gives me a mark between my sound and
my film, so I can get them all together in post. OK. Here we go. I find my mark which is already set up. I’ve already set my focus. I don’t change my focus, sometimes I check
it. My monitor is on. It is set to black and white. So I can see it. So everything’s good, so I start my episode
and I say whatever I say. Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch a
pail of water. Jack fell down, and broke his crown, and Jill
came tumbling after? I don’t know what the hell that means. Good. So then I say cut, juts so I know I’m
done. I would come over at this point, I would turn
off my sound, I would turn off my camera. I would turn off my lights, and I would go
and bring the footage into my computer. So, goodbye. And goodbye. And goodbye hair light, and goodbye keylight,
and goodbye fill light. And goodbye you, and we’ll see you I the editor
area. Import the footage and sound files into Premier
Pro. Place the movie on the timeline. Now place the sound file on the timeline. We’re going to sync the sound, so let’s open
them up so we can see them. Click on the good sound file, then shift-click
on the movie file with the crappy sound. Right click and select Synchronize from the
menu. Click OK and let Premier do its thing. Now I trim the edges so everything is even. I play a couple of seconds to make sure all
sounds well. I select the crappy movie sound and unlink
it from the movie. You can also use control or command -L as
a shortcut. I select and link the good sound file to the
movie, delete the crappy camera sound and move the good sound up just to be tidy. I play a few seconds to make sure all is well. Now I find the start of my pretend episode,
trim to that point and move everything back to zero. Now I find the end of my fake episode, and
trim the clip to there. I move the movie part of the clip up one to
make room for my background, drag my background to the timeline, and line it up to the length
of the clip. Next I scale the clip to take out the edges
of the green screen. On longer episodes I scale first, then I cut,
to save time. I think 110 looks good, and a minor adjust
up. And, I think I’ll adjust it left a bit. Now I go get my keyer, by finding the Ultrakey
plug-in and drag it to my movie clip. I grab the dropper and click somewhere near
me. I click on the Default drop down, and select
Aggressive. For this type of episode, it looks good enough
to me. Now this background looks a bit funny, as
it’s totally in focus. Let’s add some depth with a Fast Blur plugin. I drag it to the background, and make sure
“Repeat Edge Pixels” is checked. Let’s try a blur of 10. That’s a bit much. How about 5. Looks good to me. I scrub through and make sure it looks OK. I don’t like how far away I look from the
back wall, so I’m going to mess with the background picture’s scale and position. That’s looks fine by me. I play it to make sure there isn’t anything
weird going on. Let’s render this out. Now I choose File – Export – Media, which
can also be done with control or command – M. I am rendering to H.264 for YouTube, and I
select my preset for this render. I covered all this rendering jazz in another
video and I’ll place that link in the description below. Usually I would just click Queue to render
this in Media Encoder, but I’ll just render it out now so you can see it. I click the export button, it renders the
audio edits, then the video. And no, that’s not sped up and I apologize
for having a 24 cores, 144 gigs of memory, and really fast SSD drives. The file is rendered and ready to upload to
YouTube. Jack and Jill went up the hill to fetch a
pail of water. Jack fell down, and broke his crown, and Jill
came tumbling after? I don’t know what the hell that means. I’ve also included some links in the description
below to some excellent green and blue screen work for inspiration. You may not be shooting on that level, but
I am sure you’ll learn something from it, and it should spark some ideas that you can
use in your own productions. I hope that helps, and thanks for watching. In this case realize the background so it
looks like [beep]. So let me repeat this. Uneven leeting ah!
[beep]. I’m going to use the not so awesome ultrakey
found in premier pull [beep]. AS you know, trying to correct rockton footage
in post – ah. [beep]. Now the trick is to use a madenta magenta
gel [beep]. Notice I didn’t say lighting – ah shit [beep]. Edits, does a compotiting, renders it and
bahh! [beep]. I use a sort of 3-point lighting system cause
of a key light – arrrgh! [beep]. I’ve also included some links in the description
below to some excellent…[beep]. Like sound. The first major poin point of
failure…arrrggggh!! [beep].

Adobe photo shop Complete Course Class #1

Adobe photo shop Complete Course Class #1


Hi Viewer! My Name is Mubashir And I’m Admin of The Global Of IT Today i bring the 1st class of adobe photoshop There are total 30 classes Basic to advance level We will Learn step by step. just your focus needs All Classes will be in HD IF you face any type of problem then just comment down, and send us your problem, i’ll solve it soon So, here we go!! Before i start my class make sure you’ve adobe photo shop software If you have not then just type “theglobalofit” on google. After that type adobe photoshop cs6 in search bar Download it by the given links if you face any problem in installation then tell me! after installation just open adobe photoshop This is adobe photoshop interface if some thing missing in adobe photoshop then just go to menu/windows and click on certain button that you want to show Like Tool Bar!!! This is menu bar This is tools bar if you don’t know any tool name then just bring you mouse pointer on any tool, it’ll show you its name There are many tools, we will works on all tools. This menu bar! we will also works on menu bar This tab for colors this tab for adjustment, text styles, you can give color style here when you type text see like me! Just click on one of them Later i’ll provide thousands of styles for text You can also call effect! This is Layer bar! for every work, we need to take layer This is the way of taking Layer see this is opacity See how opacity works This was our 1st class! 🙂 Hope you’ll learn it pretty much In next class we’ll discuss about tools. See you in next class! stay in touch. Bye!

Best online website to edit photo like photoshop ||  Edit photos like a pro.

Best online website to edit photo like photoshop || Edit photos like a pro.


yeah whats up guys welcome to another episode of techno Nepal. I am your regular host Ranjit and i am back with new video so if you are new to this channel make sure you subscribe it hit the notification bottom so that
you will never miss any updates on my youtube channel
furthermore the link of my social media Facebook Twitter Instagram will be in
the description of this video check it out and stay connected so let’s
get to the topic get to the point so in this episode I’ll be showing you
guys one of the websites which I use in in case I have less time to edit my photos 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 so let’s get to the websites the
websites is called lunapic.com so simply if you are not familiar with
the Photoshop or if you don’t have any software to edit your photos just you can
simply use this website so it has got a lot of features which you can actually
use like in Photoshop so first of all go to the websites okay go to the website
at the right top corner of your screen you’ll find upload button over here just
click on it and after going through that you can simply browse the files that you
wants to edit . For me I am just picking one of the image of Ronaldo . So here is the
pictures which I wants to edit. After this you have got a lot of features over
here you can simply go to every single features , which you can use
in your pho to so let’s go for the texts you can simply add texts
whichever you wants to. Let’s type in something and after you typed something over here
just click on apply’ Texts so you can see the text is applied on your image
and if you want to change the color of the text you can simply go on the color
button over here at the right corner of your screen and then select the
favorable color for you. Let’s go for the green right now and once again let’s
apply this so simply you can see the color of the text is changed . Now you can
simply adjust the position of the text which you want to. So now click on apply texts. So as you
can see you can bring the next texts over the one. so i’m just undoing
this effects because I don’t want that and simply by going through the features
that are on the top part of your screen let’s go for the borderand let’s try some
picture frames. So by default they have a lot of frames over here but if you have
your custom frames you can simply upload that as well. So let’s choose one of the frames let’s go for some effects like let’s choose another filter Let’s go for fire filters
so if you applied the fire effects you can simply see in the image looks pocket
so and I cannot explain all the features in
this short video so if you guys want to learn extra things you can simply go
visit the website and try your best to make your pictures looks perfect. So
that’s pretty much it thanks for watching the video. I hope this video is
useful for you guys and I hope you have learnt something so that’s it I will see you
in the next episode till then take care and good bye !

Boost your photo editing skills in Imerge Pro | 5 Top Tips

Boost your photo editing skills in Imerge Pro | 5 Top Tips


Imerge Pro has a lot of great features. Today we’re going to take a look at 5 lesser
known tips to help make your work easier and give you better results. The highlights and shadows warning feature
is perfect for making sure all of the colors in your image stay within a safe range. Not everyone has the same monitor, and it
can sometimes be difficult to tell if areas of your image have crossed into pure white
or pure black. You usually want to avoid this, because it
means your photo is losing detail in those areas. Areas that are pure black will turn blue,
and areas that are pure white will turn red. You can change the color of these warnings
in the Project, Settings, Edit menu. Sometimes when you’re compositing an image
you want to see the layer without effects or masks. When you’re deep in a project you might
have several effects applied, and it can slow you down to turn them off one by one. The forward slash key on your keyboard quickly
turns off all of the effects on the layer you’ve selected. You can also come up to the Effects bar, and
where it says Apply, change that to Disable All. All of the masks have a similar function. The quick insert menu is a fast way to create
new layers, and add effects or masks. Control I is the keyboard shortcut to bring
it up. If you have nothing selected, you’ll be
given the option to create new layers. If you have a layer selected, you can then
add effects or masks. You’ve seen how you can draw masks on your
layers to isolate specific areas. But don’t forget that you can mask effects
as well. At the top of every effect is the circle cut
out icon. Click it to expand and see the different mask
types. This is super useful for isolating effects
to specific parts of your image. And finally, I mentioned this one in the Imerge
4.0 overview video but I’ll say it again because it’s a real time saver. Imerge Pro has the ability to save presets
for both individual and multiple effects. The hamburger icon lets you save an effect
setting for reuse on another layer, which can come in handy if you want to apply the
same effect to several different images. In case you missed our last video going over
the new features in Imerge Pro 4.0, you can find that in the card onscreen. Let me know if you have any questions and
I’ll see you all in the next video.

Tutorial | How to Add Your Website to a Stock Photo

Tutorial | How to Add Your Website to a Stock Photo


Hey everyone, I’m Erin. I’m one half of
the Remote Work Guides, where we help you learn how to thrive in a virtual world.
Now if you don’t already invest time and effort in the way you visually represent
your brand, your business, your product, you need to. You might be surprised to
hear that over 80% of marketing nowadays is visual. In today’s tutorial, I’m going to
show you how to customize stock photography, specifically how to insert
your website into a stock photo. Now I custom-made five images using 3d
technology for you, so this is stuff that’s never been
released, you likely won’t see it and any other blog. It is just for you, and just a
heads up, these photos are tailor-made for Instagram Stories. Now I really like
Instagram Stories because I think it’s a great way to reach a new audience, but if
you don’t want to edit something for Instagram, no problem. Follow this
tutorial anyway because the steps are the same regardless of what photo you
are using. So before we get started there are a few things that I need you to
download, and all the links are down below, so scroll down and look at the
“About.” So I’m gonna need you to go to our website and download your 5 free stock
photos, and you need to download GIMP because that’s the program that I’m
using today to edit these photos. If you don’t already have GIMP or you’re not
familiar with it, I have another video which I’ll put in a link up here
somewhere… basically how to download it, how to use
it, the basic tools, all that good stuff. So once you’ve got those two things
downloaded come back here and we’ll get started. So by now you should have downloaded
your images. I just think 3d stuff is kind of a cool
way to do stock photos. I don’t often see a lot of 3d stuff and I just basically
provided different angles, different lighting, blank screen, blank background, it
gives you a lot of stuff to play with. Here’s the before and here’s the after.
I wanted to look like I was in a cafe, I wanted to add a couple custom graphics,
I wanted to add my website. I think adding your website to these images is a
really powerful way to drive recognition to your product, your website. I just
think it’s really cool and that’s what we’re gonna focus on today. If you haven’t
already, let’s go ahead and open up GIMP, and I’m just gonna drag one of these
files right into the interface. All right, I don’t need these anymore. Okay, so with
this image I want to make it look like I’m sitting in a cafe and I want to put
my website right on the computer screen. So how do we do this? First things first,
let’s cut out this gray square. So again, if you’re not familiar with GIMP, I do
have another video that kind of shows you how to do this at a slower pace. So
this particular one I’m gonna use the path tool because I think that’s the
most accurate way to get the best path – the sharpest – that is, and I’m just going
zoom in so I can see what I’m doing. I am going to click on the left hand side
where my image begins, where it intersects with the table, and I’m going to
make my next point over here where the table intersects with the laptop, and
basically just going to follow the path. I’m going to click up here again at the at
the top of my laptop, I’m going to follow the curve, so I’m basically just
outlining the shape of the laptop and the table. Very, very, simple stuff.
I’m going to zoom back out so I can see what I’m doing again. Once you’ve got your
path outlined, again this is the basic outline of your table and
computer, you’re going to come back to the very top of the image on the right hand
side, click another point, come to the left hand side and click, another point,
and then hit enter to close that loop. Now if you’re seeing marching ants
around the gray area that’s good. That’s exactly what we want. Come up here
to Edit and Cut, and voila, the background is gone. Now, I want to do that again to
the computer screen, so before I can click anything else I’m actually come
going to come up here to Select and hit None, and just click some other tool in
your toolbar. Anything – the point here is we just want to get rid of that initial
selection we made. Alright so I’m going to do it again. I’m going click the path
tool, I’m going to zoom in so I can see my computer screen a little better. Now what
I like to do for this screen in particular is make my path slightly
enlarged so I’m not actually going to click right where a black and the silver
intersect, and that’s because sometimes I feel like after, you know, if you were
to follow along this black line too closely and then make a cut, sometimes
you can still see a faint outline of black, as if GIMP doesn’t cut the whole
color out and I don’t like that. I don’t want to see any black, so I like to
basically make my path a little bit longer so that it cuts out all the black
color and a little bit of the silver. I just think it’s an easier section to
work with. So once you’ve made that path, hit Enter to close the loop. You’ll see
your dancing ants. Come back up here to Edit, Cut, and the whole screen is gone.
Super simple, again go to Select, None. So that we get rid of that selection, to get
rid of these little white lines, again click literally any tool you want in your
toolbar. Okay so we have the basic premise of our template and I’m going to zoom back out again so we can kind of look at this. So I mentioned that I want it to
look like I’m in a cafe and I want the background of that cafe to be blurry
because I don’t want the emphasis on the coffee shop itself, that’s not the point.
The point is for you and your eye to look at the computer screen and my
website. So first things first, let’s download a stock image that you like and
then I’m going to show you how to blur it. At this point you can head to your own favorite stock photo site, you can use a picture that you own,
if you don’t have a favorite stock photo site, no problem, we actually have a blog
post about this on RemoteWorkGuides dot com, tips for how to use it effectively,
we go through a couple different sites that are both paid and free, and I’m just
going to go ahead and open Stock Snap. I think it’s a really nice one and and
search the key term that you’re looking for for your background. So I’m looking
for a cafe, type in my key term and then I can go through and search these
options until I find an image that I like. Now I downloaded one from the site
earlier that I’m going to use, so let me just show you what that looks like. Oh
it’s already on my desktop! Right, so once you’ve got an image that you want to use
and it’s downloaded, you’re just going to drag that background photo into GIMP. Now more likely than not the photo that you’ve downloaded is going to be huge,
AKA – way too big for the file that we’re actually using. So we’re going to need to
tweak it a little bit. So as we wait for GIMP to download (this it must really
be a big big file), there it is. So as you can tell out of this whole entire cafe
picture that I want to use, it’s so big that it’s focusing on this board of ice
and hot coffee, so it’s not at all what I want. I’m going to come over here to my
toolbar and click on Resize, and I’m going to click my photo, and it’s so big I
can’t actually see what I’m resizing, so I’m going to zoom way way out and then from here, I’m just going to grab a corner and going to make this photo much smaller. Once I’m happy with the size, go ahead and hit Scale, and again will
resize it for you. Now we get to wait. Okay wow that was big. All right so once
it’s rescaled, go ahead and drag that main image back into the frame, and I
think this looks okay. So something about GIMP – it’s the same with Photoshop.
Whatever layer on the right hand side, whatever layer is on top, is the one that
you’re going to see firs. So because we want our focus to be on the laptop, the
mug, and the table, we want to drag that layer to the very top. Okay so it’s
better, that’s getting there, but it’s not great. So as I mentioned, I don’t want you
to actually look at the background, it’s not where I want the emphasis to be. Just
going to move this up a little bit. All right, so what we’re going do first (I don’t
like that table there we’re going to move it back down), what we’re going to do is
actually blur this image so that your focus is away from that particular
picture. How redundant can I be? So when you – okay so let’s start over – make sure
that this layer, the stock photo layer, that’s going to be your background is
selected. so I have my Stock Snap image selected, I’m going to come up here to Tools, sorry, Filters, and under filters you’re gonna see the option for blur. Come down
to Gaussian blur and GIMP is going to open this preview window
for you. So the default number that it likes to blur images to is 5. I don’t
think that’s high enough for the particular feel that I’m going for right
now I’m gonna go ahead and arbitrarily pick 30. The higher the number, the more
blurry or image is going to be. That’s what I want for this particular case, I
think a blurred background makes it look a little bit more like maybe I took a
photo, like a physical photograph, with my laptop and coffee mug, thus blurring the background. So that’s better, that’s more what I want. But I also promised you that would put
our website in this on the laptop screen itself, so to do that you are going to
take a screenshot of your home page – or whatever it is that you want to
advertise. So I’m just going to go ahead and screenshot this so I can show you
how it looks. I’m including myself in the photo. Okay so once you’ve got your
screenshot done you should see this image on your desktop or whatever folder
you told it to go to and you’re going to drag your home page into GIMP. Alright
so GIMP has decided to put this layer secondary. That’s cool, if for whatever
reason you uploaded this and GIMP put this particular screenshot
layer first, again it’s the first thing you’re going to see. But we want to make
sure it is behind the laptop layer because the laptop is the thing that we
want to be in the foreground, it’s the thing that we are looking at, so do make
sure that your laptop template, this “afternoon light” is at the very very top
of your layers. Now, we’re going to have to resize our homepage, and then we’re
going to have to actually tweak it so and angle it so it looks like it’s on the
computer itself. It would look way too funky if we left it so that the homepage
was front-facing and flat against the computer screen that’s very clearly
angled. So come over here and make sure that your screenshot layer is
highlighted because if it’s not, GIMP is not actually going to edit the
screenshot. Once you have that highlighted, click on your Resizing tool
and I’m going to go ahead and scale this down so that it more or less fits the
same size as the computer screen. It doesn’t have to be perfect at this point
because we still a lot of tweaking to do. All right, and the next thing I’m going to
do is come up here to Tools, and you’ll see Transform tools, Perspective. Now perspective is the thing that allows us to actually angle the
photo. So what I like to do here is click on the angle (click on an
angle, ha), click on the corner of your screen shot and go ahead and try to align it as
closely as possible to the shape of the screen. So you’re going to drag your corners like so, and you’re gonna try to follow again follow the angle of the computer
screen as closely as possible. All right, I’m going to grab the upper right and I
think if this were a real laptop it might end about here. I don’t know that
seems pretty good. Again you just have to eyeball this, it doesn’t really have to
be perfect yet, and we’re gonna drag this down. Oh it’s running slow today. Okay so
as you can see we’re kind of getting a more sheared angle so let’s just see
what this looks like. let’s go ahead and hit transform, and it actually looks
pretty good. Awesome. So let’s say you want to move it, it’s not quite situated where I want it to be. There’s my shining smiling face in the
corner. Alright let’s just say I wanted to go here, I think, yea, that looks pretty good. You can see my home page, you can see the name, that’s the main focus. All good, and
if you need to tweak it a little more you know you can either go and transform
again and try to re-angle, follow the angle of that computer screen, you can come
over here back to your toolbar and click on the rotate tool. This is another good
one I think. I want my Remote Work Guides to be a little more even. I
think that looks slightly better, and you may notice like I have on my screen
right now I have a little white. The white of the homepage is peeking out
behind my computer screen, that’s okay. I’m actually just gonna erase it. Come up
here to your eraser tool and again if you have this layer selected the
screenshot layer the eraser tool will only erase this white and it won’t erase
anything else so you’re good. Don’t worry about erasing it kind of roughly because
it doesn’t really matter, it’s not going to touch anything else.
All right, we’re almost there, it’s getting there.
Looking at this photo, I don’t really like the angle after all this background
image. I think it looks a little closer than I intended it to so come over to
your layers. Make sure that that layer is selected and we can move or resize as
needed. I’m gonna try resizing, let’s see if that helps at all. All right, I like that
a little better, I think now that I can see people behind, I think it looks like
that I’m farther away than I am, I like the little coffee sign. Looks like I’m out of
shop. Yeah, okay, all right, I’m happier with that. So once you’ve come to a point
where you think you’re – oh there’s one other thing I want to mention! Sorry I
forgot this. You can also tweak the colors and GIMP. The colors, or the
brightness, or all that good stuff. So you know, let’s say you think your computer
screen – the homepage – looks a little too bright, there are a number of ways
different ways to do this. I like to come up to Colors and Curves.
I think curves is a nice way to kind of tweak your photo as needed and have a lot of control over your changes. So you know, you can change the brightness, you can
desaturate something, make it a little darker. I think that looks – whoops!
Don’t do what I just did and close the box because won’t save anything, let’s try
that again. All right so my images tweaked, I’ll move my face, click OK to apply the
changes. If you close the box like I just did, none of the changes will be saved.
Okay so I’m pretty happy with this, I’d be happy putting this up on
Instagram. I think it looks like I’m at a cafe I think you can see my home page or
a blog post pretty clearly. I like it and I think I’m good to go. So once you’re ready to save, you’re going to come up here to File, Export As,
because exporting is how you actually save a file picture file on
your computer. Be sure to specify where you want the file to be saved, I’m
just going to go ahead and save it to my desktop because I think that’s easiest,
and name the file as you need to. So yes, I’ll name this Coffee Shop, if I could type, oh my gosh. Coffee Shop, that sounds good and I can
go ahead and click export. It’s going to ask you to export twice. When the second
option comes up again just hit enter, click expert, and watch your photo
magically appear on your desktop. And we’re just going to look at it. Here it
is. Alright so there’s my final image, we went from a blank screen and a grey
square to this final picture of our laptop in a cafe with our website on the
screen. I think it looks pretty good, I’m happy with it. From this point on I can
just email this to myself, pop it on Instagram, do whatever I want
with it. I really like it, as I’ve mentioned if you want to tweak any stock
photo not necessarily the ones that we’ve provided, it’s the same thing.
You’re going to drag a photo into GIMP, you can cut out background images, you can
cut out computer screens, you can put your own stuff in, so the same principles
apply. Just be sure of follow these steps and you will also have a fully
customized photo that you are happy with. Thank you so much for watching this and
I hope that you learned something valuable from this, and I hope you enjoy
the 3d images! Let us know and be sure to check out more tutorials on this YouTube
channel. Be sure to check out our blog – RemoteWorkGuides dot com, we have some really really great stuff for you all about working remotely, tips, tools, and
resources, it’s all there. So thanks so much for tuning in and leave me a
comment about what you liked about this video, what you didn’t, and please feel
free to suggest anything you want to see. I am here for youm so shoot me a
suggestion and I’ll make a video about it! Alright thanks so much for watching!
Bye!

‘I bounce’ photo lesson 5: Greg Gorman – fill light with white reflector

‘I bounce’ photo lesson 5: Greg Gorman – fill light with white reflector


earlier we were using a Black Sun bounce to subtract like from Matt’s face now we’re actually using the reverse of that we’re actually putting a white reflector in there to actually give us a little fill oftentimes it’s not only the key light that is basically creating the lighting for your subject but it is how you either redirect that key light with either adding light or subtracting light and you can see here that we’re actually molding the light sculpting the face with your reflections which is just amazing

film/photography Q&A with Anita!

film/photography Q&A with Anita!


Hi guys, welcome back to my channel. So
today I’m here with Anita, and we will be answering some of your questions
related to filmmaking and photography, so the first question is: hi, I was wondering
what type of lights are the best to use on a budget. So… I really hate questions
about light because I’m terrible at light and I usually try to shoot in
daylight, or I shoot with existing lights so… like… you know… fluorescent light
or whatever lamps I have around the house. So… I would definitely say that you have to be
a pro to use professional artificial lights, mainly because it’s really hard
to get a natural effect. So shoot with whatever you have around the
house. Yeah it’s the easiest I think, especially when you start with photography,
it’s the same thing. It’s kind of much more complicated to try and
introduce lights and as you said yourself even from my own experience,
even if you try and use continuous light for your shoots,
even if it looks natural to your eye, it might not necessarily look natural on
the camera so I would try and master the natural light first and then obviously
you’re much more limited with movement and so on if you if you use artificial
light because you have to kind of keep in mind the angles and so on. So I would
definitely just try and use natural light to start with. // How did you learn
how to edit videos. I’ve been wanting to learn how to do so myself but it’s a bit
intimidating and I don’t know what kind of software to use. // But you don’t edit
your own videos. // Yeah I don’t. // Probably… You have slaves… // I have men doing if for me. I’m a woman so my… my place… I belong in the kitchen. //
Yeah, downstairs. // okay let’s end this video now and go do some cooking. Okay, so, what was the question… You see you can’t even remember the question. That’s the problem. // Yeah so at first I started off with editing
in Adobe Premiere and I do agree, it was quite intimidating, but it only looks
daunting, but when you start playing around with it it becomes a lot easier
so if you are completely new to it I would probably suggest checking out a
tutorial on the basics of Adobe Premiere and yeah I think that’s actually the
best the best editing software you can get at the very beginning. I actually
color grade my films in in DaVinci Resolve and it’s very different from
Premiere, so once again… you know… that’s something new to learn, but Davinci is quite
easy to operate as well. // Oh, I don’t know. I’ve tried Final Cut Pro. My
experience in filming is very limited it’s nowhere on your level but just for
editing my own YouTube videos and so on the Final Cut Pro… // Yeah but you have a…
you have a Mac right? Yes. And I have a husband who helps me with it. I have a man to help me so… (:D) // The next question is: will I shoot a video on
schizophrenia. I probably will, although I’m not sure when, maybe in late 2018… but
yeah, I wish I could film it, but I’m not entirely sure whether I’ll be able to
afford to film it… but we’ll see. // How do you motivate yourself. So, would you like
to answer that first? // No. // I have a very simple answer to that question. So… every time I
feel down about my filmmaking, and that happens very often, because… you know, the
whole process of filmmaking can be quite daunting because there’s so much to do,
you have to write it, you have to edit it, you have to act in it, you have to direct
it, and then you have to colour grade it, find music and so on and so on. So it’s a
lot to take in… But whenever I feel down about my work,
I always watch a good film and sort of… the feeling I get afterwards
is very motivating, very inspiring, so I would probably suggest watching a bunch
of good films or reading a good book and that always inspires me to keep working
on my own stuff. // Yeah, it usually works, or it makes you even more down because you
can’t create something like that and then you just go down the drain. No, I
agree I usually look at different photographers work and so on and kind of
see what inspires me. I usually just try and take it like… one bit at a time also,
because sometimes, especially when I have a lot of work I can become very
unmotivated to do my own stuff and to work on my own projects so it’s just
about kind of taking it slowly… you know… kind of giving yourself the right setup
you know kind of separating yourself from everything that will distract you
and switching on some nice music and whatever whatever and just taking it bit
by bit. Even if it takes longer, you will get there eventually, hopefully. // And one
last tip… // Go to the kitchen??? // Regarding what Anita said about comparing
yourself to the bigger filmmakers or bigger photographers. I used to do that
and it did get me down, but then I sort of tried to explain to myself that
they have a lot more resources, they have a lot more money, they have so many people
working on set, so it’s quite obvious… and they also have a lot more experience, so
it’s obvious that they will be better, but I’m pretty sure that they were not
as good as they are right now. So don’t let that get you down. Don’t listen to her. //
Just practice. And don’t listen to me. // What camera and editing program do you use. Do you
have any tips for cameras and editing programs that are affordable. There’s a whole video on my channel about
this, so you can go and check that out. Is there
anything you’d like to add? Just use whatever you have. I think the best
camera you can get this the one that you have in your hand, I heard… so I heard
apparently. I don’t know. Yeah, no, if you don’t have money just start lower. I see I saw myself like… and even the way I progressed in photography… just use
whatever is available to you, learn how to use it properly and make
the best out of it because you know, it’s easy to make excuses saying that you
don’t have the best equipment, but at the same time if you learn to use your own
equipment properly it will really really work for you. Yeah I think we both
started off with very cheap cameras, and very cheap lenses. You have to
build into it, I mean like unless you’re born rich which most of us aren’t, you
just have to work with what you have, and just make the best out of it, I think. // So
the next question, a lovely girl asked: what’s the best way to start your own
portfolio, whether in video or in photography… and I think the best thing
you can do is just start working and… like, I don’t know,
I don’t know, it’s just… like… I’ve done it so long ago that I can’t really remember
how I actually started, but I think I just picked up the camera and I started
taking photos of my surroundings and then, once that kind of got boring I just
started branching out and reaching out to models and so on. I think that’s the
best way you can go. It’s the same with video, I say just film whatever is available to
you, get a feel of everything and then just kind of start building up from that
I think. // Yeah, you need to have a couple of videos first and then what people
usually do, they create a so-called show reel… so it’s like 30 seconds of their
best material, and yeah that’s basically it. And if you want to, you know, if you want to turn amateur to professional, the best
way you can do is just keep going at it, and try and get your photos published if
you can. Same with videos, just put them up online, you know, put them on like… Vimeo and YouTube and whatever and just, you know, keep going at it and keep going
until people notice you, and when they notice you keep going more
I think that’s the best that you can do, just keep pushing and it’s going to
be frustrating and it’s going to be long, but you just have to keep keep going at
it. Yeah, you have to be patient. I’ve been
doing the kind of YouTube that I’m currently doing for the past year and a half and I only got my first paid job a
couple of days ago, so yeah just be patient and keep filming and if you’re
talented enough, it probably will come to you on its own. // The next question is: is
what you’re doing now what you always wanted to do growing up. // No. I wanted to
be a lawyer. I was convinced I wanted to be a lawyer and then when I was in
secondary school, I wanted to be an architect and then I realized I would be
a very useless lawyer and even more useless architect, because I
hate drawing. And then… but yeah I wanted to do photography for like 11 years now
I think, so like form like 2008 maybe, so considering that I started doing
photography when I was 18, 16 or something like that, I was still a child. So yeah… so I did want to do photography for a very long time. But I don’t know if I wanted to be a princess or something when I was a child,
I have no idea, I am a princess anyway so… // I think I’ve always been into art
related jobs, if I can call it like that. I remember that my first my first
dream was to be a writer, when I turned 10 or 12 or something like that,
when I saw the Lord of the Rings for the first time, I wanted to be in filmmaking,
but I wanted to be an actress. When I was in high school I had no idea what I
wanted to do… And I think that nowadays we sort of expect people… teenagers to
know what they want to do but… I didn’t really… I had no idea what I wanted to do,
and I think I got into photography when I was 17 or 18 as well so for a couple
of years I thought I would be doing photography forever. But then I decided
I’m terrible and I have to ditch photography all together so I ditched
that for like three years but then I was reborn through filmmaking and I think it
will probably stay this way. I think I’m more of a probably more of a storyteller
and I just had to find a proper way to tell those stories so at the very
beginning it was a it was a writer then it was an actress then it was a
photographer and… // yeah bonus question for you as well, why did you decide to
switch from photography to video, like did you have any moment in life or did
you have like a video opportunity where you were like this is what I want to
do instead. // You can watch me answer this question on Anita’s
channel, we did a very similar video over there but it’s more about photography, so I’ll leave a
link in the description and at the end of this video. Okay so this is the moment
where my microphone decided to stop working, but we had so much footage and
there were so many questions, and so many nice questions, I decided to just leave
it in so if you’re having trouble with understanding anything at all, there are
English and Polish subtitles available, so you can turn them on now. What video of yours is your favourite. My favourite video is the video about social
anxiety. Because I
feel like the fact that it was crowdfunded and I had money to buy
basically anything I wanted, totally took it to another level, and it
looks so much better than any of my previous videos. But there is one video I
quite like as well and that’s the Gravity video, a fan made music video for
Jamie Woon… and I actually met him and he said he saw the video and that he liked it. What’s the importance of light in photography and film, do you
have any techniques on how to better use light in favor of filmmaking or photo
shooting. I mean let’s start with the fact that there is no photography
without light, so obviously light is quite crucial when
it comes to your photography and film, and anything, I mean if it’s
dark there is literally nothing so… obviously it’s crucial and I find… even
on my journey as a photographer, especially in the studio because as I mentioned in
my other videos I struggled quite a lot with lighting in the studio. It makes a
huge difference to kind of have the light set up properly before you start
shooting and before you put it into Photoshop or you know any editing
program because it makes the process so much smoother. Some of my latest work, I
was really happy with the lighting and it cut the retouching time drastically
so it’s definitely really really important to get it right before you
kind of have to fix it in Photoshop so instead of fixing it, just doing it
right first. As about techniques, I think the best thing you can do is start
simple and start using light that is available to you so you know natural
light tested in different situations you know try, it when it’s super sunny, try it
at different times of the day because sometimes the light is much better early
in the morning or late in the afternoon rather than you know shooting at 12
o’clock where you have those horrible shadows on your face and so on,
so yeah. And just build slowly from that so if you’re using a studio setup just
start with one light, get familiar with it and then start adding up but just keep
experimenting keep trying different angles and just work from there I think. So… a lot of people that are in filmmaking have this saying that “you
will fix it in post” and… no, that’s worst thing you can do so if you can
reshoot something with better light you should definitely do it because it
usually turns out that fixing it in post it doesn’t work so… when you have raw
files with photography, it’s a little bit easier but in filmmaking… // in
general filmmaking I feel like you have to have everything perfect, especially like
skin and everything because there is no I mean, obviously there’s lots of money for
like…. // yeah there are some people retouching frame by frame but…// it’s just
not possible, you have those those programs that like help you with
smoothing out skin and so on but I find that it’s way more tricky in film that
it would be in photography and even photography, it just doesn’t look right
like you can always tell if something is heavily retouched and heavily manipulated
so… // yeah, and yet again, filmmaking is very much about emotions and I think
that probably lighting is one of the most important tools you can use to
create certain emotions and the use of color is quite important as well. // So the
next question is: what did you study. I studied international economic
relations for 5 years. // I studied photography for 3 than I quit in third year because I
hated the course from the very beginning. I studied in the School of Life. // In the
kitchen? Yes, that’s the one. // What inspired you to create a YouTube channel. So it was pretty
simple with me, I just needed another video website that I would be able to
post my videos on so I never wanted to be a classic youtuber because I started
off even before YouTube was big and I was just making these weird short music
videos or whatever and yeah basically I needed a website where I could share my
work. Yeah, I think for me it was kind of weird because I
obviously did photography. I actually started with model videos, I started playing
around with the videos of like models so like kind of like test shoot like videos
where the model just swirls around for like 30 seconds but I just found this
kind of boring eventually because I mean how many videos like that
can you post. And then I just kind of decided that why not kind of… People seemed interested in what I was showing them so I was like why not just
kind of show them that photography doesn’t have to be complicated and you
don’t have to spend hundreds and hundreds of dollars on equipment and
lighting and all that kind of stuff it can be quite simple and you can get
quite beautiful effects if you just really try and put your heart to it so… I guess that’s why I started. // If you like this video there’s more on Anita’s channel. Anita is
a photographer as you might have noticed already and she does a lot of… like… what
what do I call these… instructional… // tutorials, behind the scenes // on shooting
and on editing photos as well so go check her channel out and yeah, give this video a
thumbs up and subscribe to my channel. I never say that, but yeah you can you can
do it if you’ve enjoyed this video. So as you can tell, probably, by now, we’re both
very socially awkward. So yeah, now you know that I’m not lying about my social
anxiety by I still hope that this video is bearable and yeah I will see you in my
next one. Bye!