How to Edit Your DJI Mavic 2 AERIAL HYPERLAPSE Raw Images


Hey, this is Matt with Blue Mantle Films, and today I’m gonna go through my post production workflow for making hyperlapses. This video is a follow-up to my last video, which I released a week ago. This one is how to take the raw images that the Mavic 2 captures, and to post process them until you get awesome-looking hyperlapses. Now the response to last week’s video was really, really positive. There are 1500 new subscribers since last week, which is easily the fastest this channel has ever grown, and so I just want to take a moment to say welcome to all the new subscribers. Thank you for being here. So, I don’t use Lightroom very often, other than to process these hyperlapses and so I’m sure there are more efficient workflows out there. But I’m hoping that regardless that there’s some value in this. Hey guys, so I just hyperlapsed a storm that is off in the distance, I don’t know how it’s going to turn out, but I think it looked kinda cool when I saw it on the screen. So I chose the wrong hyperlapse to use for this video. There are definitely a lot cooler ones, but unfortunately I already spent hours and hours editing this video to this, what ended up being a pretty mediocre hyperlapse. The process is still the same, so as you watch this video, just know that this applies to cooler-looking hyperlapses also. One little tip, overarchingly, is that I think it’s a good idea to be aware of keyboard shortcuts. Using shortcuts can really speed up your workflow, and help you to get through these edits faster so that you can get more videos done. Okay, so let’s go through a daytime edit! I’ll load up Lightroom. We’re going to import a new one. Here. 172. These are the ones we’re importing, so go ahead and click “Import”. And then even though it’s still importing, I’m just going to start this. So press “D” to go into “Develop”. Okay, now obviously this is overexposed. We’re gonna bring the exposure down. Also going to bring the highlights down, so we can get rid of this glare that’s up here in the upper lefthand side. We’re to bring the shadows up a fair bit. Let’s add at a little bit of contrast. This gives you an idea of why it’s so, so valuable to shoot in raw. You can pull so many details out of an image, by processing it from the raw files. I feel like this is too warm so we’re gonna cool it down just a tiny bit. Command Z to undo, Command Shift Z to redo. And then you can see the difference. Okay, I’m also going to add a little bit of Clarity. Not too much, that can easily be overdone. And the other thing too with Clarity is that it affects images differently, depending on what is in the image, and so it can make your image flicker over time, so you have to be pretty mild with how much you use that one. Maybe even just a tiny bit of saturation. Okay so I like that so far. This image by itself is pretty boring. It doesn’t have good composition right now, but it’s the full movement that I’m hoping ends up looking good as it goes through and kind of circles around this little island that was right here. Alright so now we’re gonna go down here, We’re actually going to do some lens distortion correction. I think around 8 gets rid of some of that barrel distortion. And then “Constrain Crop” so that gets rid of the white that you see on the edges. Also going to zoom in and take a look at noise reduction, see if there’s anything that we needed to do for that. Maybe just a tiny bit. You can see some noise in the sky. And then I also I want to do a tiny bit of sharpening. Okay, now this one’s going to be interesting, and one of the reasons why I chose this one to process is because the light changes pretty significantly from the beginning to the end. So we’re gonna have to see how to find the happy medium, and split the difference. So we’re gonna go back to grid mode, press “G”. Select this one. “Command Shift C” copies the settings. Hit “Command A”, And then Command Shift V. will paste the settings to whatever you have selected, so in this case to the whole sequence because we have the whole sequence selected. Now we’re going to go to the end and see what those edits look like on the end. Way too dark. Holy cow. Now I will say this is gonna be kind of interesting, this may be one that I end up using LRTimelapse for. LR Timelapse is something that allows you to keyframe your metadata of these raw images, which means that from, say, from the beginning of the sequence to the end of the sequence, I can have exposure set at a negative, 1.2 at the beginning of the sequence, and then by the end of the sequence I can be increasing the exposure slowly, throughout the whole sequence, until I get a much more proper exposure by the end of the sequence. I don’t want to use LRTimelapse in this tutorial. I feel like I’m already throwing enough at you with Lightroom and Premiere, so what I’m going to do is I’m going to try to split the difference, and then in Premiere, once I have a fully-exported video, then I will increase the exposure. So we’re gonna put the exposure at -0.5, and we’re gonna take a look at that. So that’s obviously dark and we don’t want it to be that dark at the end. But we’re going to see how it turns out. Let’s try increasing the shadows a little bit. There. So, “Command Shift C”, “Enter” to select everything. “Command A” to select all of them I’m gonna go back into grid mode. Okay, and then “Command Shift V”, or “Control Shift V” if you’re on a Windows. All right there. I pasted all of the settings across all of them. We’re gonna go to the top, and look at the first one. Let’s see how this turned out. Definitely too bright. Okay we’ll try -.75. That’s — that’s acceptable. I’m going to increase the contrast a little bit. It’s not quite what I want it to look like but that’s acceptable. So then again… Now we’ve pasted the settings across all of them and now we’re going to go to the end one. Hmmm… I think that’s the best we’re gonna get without using LRTimelapse. The light changed too much between the beginning and the end, and so we will keyframe in Premiere to try to get the exposure right. So go back to grid view, and then I’m going to export. Choose our location. Choose. I’m going to save them as JPEGs. At this point I’ve already done the post processing, I’ve already pulled out the digital information that I hope to pull out of it, and so I don’t mind as much saving this as a JPEG. It’s still not perfect. If I had a faster computer I would try to do a better one, but for this, a JPEG is is sufficient. And then we’re going to export. So I’m going to skip ahead and I’ll pick it up again once it finishes. Okay so it has now finished exporting out of Lightroom. So we’re gonna import Downtown Sarasota 2, just the first, one make sure that “Image Sequence” is selected. Okay, now we drag this to a new sequence. You go down into the effects panel, and you type in “warp”, so that you can load that up, and drop that on there. Now again this is gonna take some time, so while that is processing I’m actually going to get started already on trying to keyframe the exposure, because you can still look at the frames, even while it’s analyzing. So we’re gonna go to the beginning of the sequence. We’re going to go into the “Color” panel. So we actually are going to adjust this just enough so that it makes Lumetri active on the clip. And go back into “Editing”, go down here to “Basic Correction” And we’re going to keyframe the exposure. Make sure you add a keyframe. Let’s go to the end of the clip. Yeah, so this is where it’s really dark. So we are going to keyframe the exposure up significantly. Let’s try 2. That’s closer. I’m gonna bring the highlights down a tiny bit. And then maybe 2.3. Alright, so that’s how we’re going to do it. Let’s go back in here, Let’s see how Warp Stabilizer is doing. Okay. So what I want to do is, I’m going to change the smoothness down to 25, and what I’m looking at is this Auto-scale. I want that to be — there we go — around 102% or less. Because I don’t want a lot of distortion in the corners of the image. So I’m gonna hit “Preserve Scale” and that will keep it consistent across the whole clip. Alright there we go. So this point depending on what you want to do — once you get to this stage — what you want to do with the clips, One possibility is that you just want to export individual clips, and save them out as their own individual video files. Which I do sometimes. I do for the sake of stock footage, and then I do also for the sake of having, sort of a clean, finished version of the hyperlapse. But if I know that I’m working on an edit, and I just plan on using the clip in that edit, I have it here in the timeline. These are technically their own sequences, but they act like clips, and then I can drop them into my edit wherever I would like them to be. Okay, so that’s it! If there are any suggestions that you guys have for this workflow — ways that I can improve it — I would love to hear that. Just tell me in the comments below about some of the things that you do as part of your post-production process, your post-production workflow. As I said, Lightroom is something that I’m still kind of learning. And so I know that there must be ways that I can improve this process. I think that’s all. I’m going to cut this here — I probably have an hour and a half of footage for this tutorial now. So please like, comment, subscribe. All the normal YouTube stuff. I’m really hoping that this channel can keep growing, that we can keep building this community. So thank you for watching, and I’ll see you in the next one.

The Image Toolset – Part 11 – 3D Selective – Using Primitives with 3D AOVs  – Flame 2020.2

The Image Toolset – Part 11 – 3D Selective – Using Primitives with 3D AOVs – Flame 2020.2


Hi everyone, Grant for the Flame Learning Channel. In parts 5,6 and 8 of the Image Toolset series… We looked at the 3D AOV capability… Where you could produce a selective matte for your image… Based on supplied 3D information. So you could create isolation mattes… based on the z-depth of the image… the normals of a 3D object… as well as the movement of an image based on motion vectors. In the Flame 2020.2 update… You’ll learn about a new tool to refine your 3D AOVs… Known as “Primitives”. This allows you to constrain the effect of a 3D AOV… By placing virtual 3D objects in 3D space. I’d also like to add… That if you are new to 3D Selectives… I suggest watching part 5, 6 and 8 of the Image Toolset series… To explain the basics and fundamentals of 3D AOVs. Now if you’d like to follow along with this video… Click the link in the description below… Or type the link displayed to download the media. Please note that for colour management reasons… the QuickTime clip is Rec709… And the EXR sequence is Scene-Linear Rec709sRGB. Now start off by opening the QuickTime file as a sequence… Select it… And switch to the Effects Environment. I am currently using a 3-up layout… With the Manager on the left… Result view in the middle… And a Selective Matte view on the right. You can set this up manually each time… Or save it as a custom layout for easy access. Now to illustrate Primitives with 3D AOVs… You will need a Z-depth pass… In order to generate the selective. The EXR example does have an embedded Z-depth… As it is rendered CG. However, live action footage… Like this shot… Do not normally have the supplied depth information. So to make this work… You will use Machine Learning to generate the depth data. Select the Selective in the Manager… And switch to the 3D AOV menu. Change the Type to Primitive… And click CREATE MAP. A z-depth map will be generated… And it appears in the Manager. If you select it and press F8 for the Image Object view… You will see the generated depth pass. If you wish to know more about machine learning… And how it works in Flame… Please watch the Machine Learning series… on the Flame Learning Channel. So this depth pass can be used to create isolation mattes… As seen in previous 3D AOV videos. The difference with the Primitives option… Is that these isolations are contained within virtual 3D objects. Select the Selective in the Manager… And turn on the 3D AOV. Hover over the right viewport… And toggle to the Selective Input. When the viewport is active… You will see a spherical 3D widget… Which is limiting the isolation matte. To see effect in the Result viewport… Go ahead and perform a quick grade. This can be any SelectiveFX… And not just the MasterGrade. Now using this widget… You can move the virtual sphere in 3D… Based on the generated depth pass. For example… You can grab the centre of the widget… and move it around horizontally and vertically. If you want to use proper axis handles… switch the Tools from SELECT to TRANSLATE. It’s not mandatory… But it can help constrain the movements. If you want to move the widget in Z-space… Hold SHIFT and drag the widget to different areas of the image. Using the Z-depth pass… You can snap the widget to different depths within your shot. For example, place the widget on the buildings… Just behind the ruins. If you prefer a more controlled way of moving the primitive… You can adjust the position sliders in the menu. So what’s the advantage of using a virtual primitive with a 3D AOV? Well, if you temporarily switch to the RANGE type… You will see that Z-depth… Isolates all the objects that are included at certain points of depth. In other words, all the objects at that point in distance… Are included in the isolation matte. So not only do you have the buildings… But you also have the trees and other objects. Switching back to the PRIMITIVE type… You’re able to really focus what you want to isolate out of the depth data. In some cases, this is more efficient than using a Gmask with the Selective. Now you can adjust the radius and ratio of the widget using the sliders… Or you can switch the Tools to SCALE… And adjust the widget interactively in the viewport. The centre point of the axis adjusts the radius… While the end points control the Y and Z ratios. The final controls you have for refining the 3d Primitive… Is the falloff slider to soften the edges of the primitive… And the gain slider to change the intensity of the 3D AOV. Similarly to all other 3D AOVs… These values can all be animated… And this is fed into the Selective pipeline… where you can shrink, dilate and blur the outcome… As well as blend this with the Keyers and masks in the current selective. Now if you didn’t want the roundness of a sphere constraining your isolation… You can switch the Shape Type to Cube… Which gives you straighter lines. Let’s use this cube to brighten up the darker areas of the ruins. Ensure you are using the SELECT or TRANSLATE tool… Hold SHIFT… And snap the cube to the foreground region. Switch to SCALE… And you can reshape the cube… to only cover the floor region of the ruins. If you start pushing the gamma and the gain of the MasterGrade… You can bring detail back into that part of the image. If you choose to, you can also adjust the colour… to make it slightly warmer. So there are plenty of uses for Selectives. And using Primitives with the 3D AOVS… give you that extra level of control. The next example I’d like to cover is CG based. The big difference this time… Is that you have a Z-depth pass as before… But you also have a 3D camera from the 3D application. This can offer a bit more functionality… compared to the first example. So switch to Batch… And import the EXR sequence… Which must be tagged as Scene Linear Rec709/sRGB. Set the Batch duration to 24. Now this is a multi-channel clip… And if you toggle F4 to look at the channels… You have a beauty pass… The alpha pass… And a Z-depth pass. This was rendered using Arnold and Maya… And the Z-depth is using absolute values… As opposed to normalised values. This is something you’ll need to define for the selective. Go back to Batch… And add an image node from the Batch node bin. Connect the Beauty pass as the Red front input. To use the accompanying Z-depth pass… Select the Image node… And add a new media input. Connect the Z-Depth pass into the front input… And you’re ready to go. As a reminder, you could do this in an Action node… But the image node automatically sets up the selective for you. Double-click on the Image node for its controls… And like you did previously… Switch to a 3-up view with ALT+3. You have the Manager, Result view and the Selective Matte view. Now the supplied Z-depth pass… Or any other data pass for that matter… Is based on the 3D camera… That was used in Maya… or whatever 3D application you are using. Since this camera was exported… And made available for Flame as an FBX file… It is recommended that you import… and apply the same camera data to the shot… Before using any data passes… like the Z-depth for instance. This will ensure that any data passes will be mapped to the matching camera data… And things should hopefully align up much easier. So first off… To import the 3D camera for this render… Call up the context menu in the manager… And choose the IMPORT option. Navigate to the EXR sequence… And here you will find the FBX file containing the 3D camera. Now very importantly, Flame uses pixels as its units of measurement. Whereas 3D applications, like Maya… can have different units of measurement such as centimetres, meters, etc. So it’s crucial that you get the conversions correct… Otherwise the camera will be off. In this case, set the SCENE UNIT TO PIXELS to a value of 1. Choose the FBX file and load it into the scene. The next step… is to assign the camera data to the surface object containing the CG render. This ensures that the camera data will be taken into account… When applying Selectives, nodes and data pass maps to this surface object. To do this, hover over the result view… And switch to the schematic view. If you pan the view, you can locate the 3D camera. Now connect the surface to the 3D camera node. So the camera data is now being fed into the surface object… And any nodes you use with the surface object… Will consider the 3D camera data. Switch back to the Result view. So the next step… Is to assign the Z-depth pass to the Surface object. Switch to the node bin… And ensure the Z-depth pass is selected in the media list. Next, using the context menu over the surface in the manager… Add the Z-depth map to the image. Now remember that I said that this Z-depth pass uses absolute values. So call up the Z-depth controls… And switch the input type from NORMALISED to ABSOLUTE. So by interpreting the Z-depth data… As well as using the assigned camera information… This should ensure the depth values are mapped correctly within the 3D scene. If you select the Selective in the Manager… And go to the 3D AOVs… You can choose PRIMITIVES… And activate the tool. To see the widget… Switch to the Selective Input view with F9. If the widget is off-screen… You can adjust it with the sliders. Once you see the centre of the widget… You can interactively adjust within the scene. So hold SHIFT… Snap the widget to one of the spheres… And then scale the radius to match. With that done, perform a quick grade through the selective. Now since you have associated the CG render with its original 3D camera… As well as applied the primitive with the 3D AOV… The primitive widget is actually part of the 3D scene. If you scrub the time-bar… You will see the widget move… Because it is considered as part of this 3D scene. So you can place the primitive anywhere within the scene… And it should react as if it was there in the first place. This occurs when the POSITION setting is set to WORLD. The other option you have… Is even when you have all this camera data…. You can still lock the primitive relative to the camera… Instead moving with other objects in the 3d scene. So change the Position setting from WORLD to CAMERA. Looking at the sliders… You can now position the widget relative to the camera. You can also interactively place the widget with SHIFT and drag. When you scrub the time-bar… The widget remains locked with the camera… And doesn’t appear to move with the rest of the 3d scene. The final use case of working with Primitives and 3D AOVs… Is when you want to use them with a traditional Action Composite. I’ll go back to Batch… And go into this Action node with a 2-up view… to illustrate the workflow. Here we have a typical composite… that consists of 2D images and a 3D object within the 3D scene. Now after building this composite… You would like pick certain objects in 3D space to apply an effect. This can be done with a Selective… using 3D AOVs and Primitives. But the big difference compared to the previous two examples… Is that this is a live composite. If I switch to the Perspective with SPACE+F4… And you hold ALT to orbit the scene… You can see the full 3D environment. Switch back to the result view with F4. Now the 3D AOV requires depth information to function correctly. This is not problem… Since the Action 3d Compositor is automatically generating the z-depth pass. To see this, go to the Output menu… And if you scroll the Output Selections list… You can locate the Z-depth pass. We’re only using it internally in Action… So you don’t need to enable it as a render pass. Scroll back up the list… And view the composite output. Now in order to apply a selective to the output of Action… You will need to add it to the default camera. Call up the context menu over the “default” camera… And choose ADD SELECTIVE. In the browser, I’ll go with the Glow SelectiveFX to demonstrate the example. So the Glow SelectiveFX is affecting the entire composite result. Double-clicking on the Selective in the Manager… You can tweak various aspects of the SelectiveFX. To use the Selective with a 3D AOV and primitives… Go to the 3D AOV menu… Choose the Primitive Type… And click Active. Using the 3-up view… You can monitor the result view… As well as look at the Selective Input View with the primitive widget. Hold SHIFT and you can snap the widget… to any object at different distances within the Action 3D Environment. So all the controls work like the previous examples. You can expand the radius of the widget… And set it anywhere within the z-space of the scene… to apply the SelectiveFX. With the position set to WORLD… When you scrub the time-bar… The primitive widget acts like any other object in 3D space… And moves as part of the scene. To make it lock to the camera’s movement… switch the Position to Camera… and it will remain in the same position relative to the camera. You can still snap to the depth of an object… And place the widget anywhere in the 3D scene. But when scrubbing the time-bar… The widget remains in its current position… Aligned with the Action 3D camera. So hopefully this gives you a wide range of uses… with 3D AOVs and primitive objects. In summary, the point of using the Primitive objects with the 3D AOVs… Is to generate an isolation selective based on Z-depth data… And then limit that further… By virtual 3D objects sitting within the depth of the 3D scene. This would not be possible… If you just did a standard depth selection… In combination with a key or mask. So hopefully this can expand on more creative 3D potentials… when using Selectives… and you can apply any SelectiveFX shaders… to meet your VFX… and look development needs. Don’t forget to check out the other features, workflows… And enhancements to the Flame 2020.2 update. Comments, feedback and suggestions… are always welcome and appreciated. Please subscribe to the Flame Learning Channel… And click the bell to be notified for future videos. Thanks for watching… and hope to see you soon.

60 Second Photoshop Tutorial : Put an Image in Text -HD-

60 Second Photoshop Tutorial : Put an Image in Text -HD-


One of the best ways to make boring text in Photoshop more interesting is to put an image inside of it. First grab your text tool
and find the font that has put on the most extra holiday weight. I’ll be using Impact as is nice think font
that will allow us to see a good deal of our image. Next scale up your text. Now place the image you want to use above the
text layer. After that move your mouse between
the text and image layer and hold alt. When the mouse changes click to create a
clipping mask. Or right click the image layer and
select make clipping mask. Now move your image layer around to create an
interesting composition for your text. Next we can add a bit of depth to get
the text up off of the background. Go to the FX panel and add on a small bevel and emboss. Then add on a slight drop shadow. This will pull the text away from the
page. Lastly you can add on whatever
decorations you would like. I have a santa have that I cut off the
picture of a relatives head that should work nicely on our text. Now look at that. We
did that in snow time and I think that our text is looking good enough to throw
on our tacky holiday card. If you liked this 60 second tutorial be
sure to subscribe, rate, comment, and share with your friends.

Use Snapseed to Create Dramatic Images on your phone | Snapseed Tutorial | Android and iOS

Use Snapseed to Create Dramatic Images on your phone | Snapseed Tutorial | Android and iOS


Welcome to this video where I am
going to show some editing with Snapseed The first thing I do in this
picture is utilize the curves tool to bring down the
shadows on the road here. It really impacts the whole
image but you will see in a moment how we can isolate the curves
to only the dark parts of the road Now that this is done, we can
view edits, click on curves in history And then start masking
in only the effects onto the parts of the image
where we want those changes. The history and masking
in a non-destructive way is one of the features of Snapseed that
makes it a great tool for editing photos Once I’m happy with the curves masking, In this case I’m just going to
put the curves down to 50% and add those details from the curves tool
to the sky and trees above the horizon. There we go… Now you can see the curves is only
affected on the dark parts of the road Next I’ll take the Selective
tool and increase saturation and details of the yellow line in
the middle of the road increase the contrast playing around with the brightness saturation and details settings really gives a striking image. Once completed, I will go into the details tool to bring out more detail on the road and in the trees. Also, playing with the basic editing tools such as changing the saturation the ambiance and
the brightness overall gives a more and
more dramatic effect. Now I’ll take the selective tool and adjust the contrast and detail on the dark parts of the road. I’ll copy from the left over to the right the same selective tool
settings to have balance. There we go… Typically, I’ll use
the HDR-Scape tool to bring out detail
on the whole image Here, I’ll go to history and mask in only changes
from the HDR-Scape tool to the top of the image
above the horizon. There we go…
I’ll also typically use the lens blur tool in
many of my images I turn it to more of
a horizontal pattern and increase the depth of field by blurring the
bottom of the image. It gives a prime
lens focus feeling. And the vignette tool is
another one of my favorite capabilities of Snapseed and this brings out more vividness to the image, decreasing the brightness along the edges. Almost done… Again, bring out more
detail with the details tool. And with the Selective tool, really try to bring
out more detail on the foliage in the background above
the horizon in the trees. and… in this case I didn’t really like the leaves
there in the front so I’m going to use the healing tool to try and remove some of them. In this case, I
don’t do a great job matching the image within
the proximity of the healing tool. but with the blur there,
it’s not a huge problem, and not really noticable
when zoomed out. And I think that’s it… just check the image
one more time… And this is looking pretty good. I think I’m good for now. So this is the original
image, unedited. taken with a Samsung
s10 phone (I think). And this is the resulting image after the edits done with
Snapseed. I really like this. So thanks for watching! I hope you may have learned
something about Snapseed! Cheers!

Camera projection part 1: from 2D image to 3D set

Camera projection part 1: from 2D image to 3D set


That was a scene from The Splinter Cell, an
awesome fanfilm from Atomic Productions which was released late in 2014 and happened to
be one of the first major uses of HitFilm 3 Pro’s new Projector effect.
I’m Simon Jones from HitFilm.com, back with a brand new tutorial. Today I’m going to
be looking at using Projector to create simple 3D sets from 2D images.
In this tutorial you’re going to transform this still image into this establishing shot,
complete with a 3D camera move. Let’s take a closer look at the finish shot. Note how
the grassy field shifts perspective as the camera moves.
If I switch to the perspective view you can see what’s actually going on. There are
two planes, positioned in 3D space. This one represents the field and this one represents
the line of trees. The projector effect has been applied to both of these planes. The
projector is taking the still image and warping it onto the 3D planes. Viewed from above you
can see how the image has been stretched onto the floor plane. But as I move around to the
point of view of the camera, you can see that the distortion disappears. It’s a similar
concept to advertisements painted on football pitches, which are distorted in such a way
as to only look correct from the TV camera’s point of view.
If you want to follow along with this tutorial, first download the project files which include
the still image. You should find the link below. The image was sourced from littlevisuals.co,
a great website of free, public domain stock images. Make sure you bookmark that website!
Launch HitFilm 3 Pro, and create a new project. I’m going to go for a 2K DCI project at
24fps, but you can use whatever you’re used to. I’ll click Start Compositing, which
will automatically create a new composite shot ready for some VFX work.
First thing to do is import the still image, with the import button or by dragging it in.
I’ll add it from the Media panel to the Composite Shot 1 timeline. I’m going to
rename my composite shot by opening its Settings. I’ll call it Final Shot. I’ll also reduce
its duration to 5 seconds. I’m currently using the Editing workspace.
Because I’m working specifically on a visual effects shot, I’m going to go up to the
Workspaces menu and switch to Compositing. This adjusts the layout to be better suited
for comp work. Zooming out with the mouse wheel, I’ll select
the image, then hold Shift and drag on the corner points to resize it until it’s about
the same width as the frame. Holding shift makes sure that the aspect ratio remains the
same. This still image will be what we project onto
the planes. So it’s equivalent to a film strip you would put in a real projector.
I’ll now create a new plane from the New layer menu on the timeline. I’ll call it
Screen, and set it to 4096 by 3112, so it’s nice a big. I’ve called it Screen because
it will be performing the same function as a real cinema screen, and displaying whatever
is being projected from the projector. The colour doesn’t really matter but I’ll
go with the preset grey for now. If you look in the Media panel you’ll find
that plane is now available, called Screen. This is useful because we’ll be using it
several times. On the timeline I can now rename this particular instance of the plane without
changing the original. So I’ll select it, hit F2 and rename it to ‘Field’.
Currently this plane is 2D, so I’ll click on the dimension icon and switch it to 3D.
This will also add a new 3D camera. The plane is currently right up in our faces, so let’s
fix that. In the layer’s Transform properties I’ll change its X orientation to 90, which
flips it around so that it’s flat. I can now use the controls in the Viewer to move
the layer around. For this shot I want this layer to be the
grassy field. So I’ll move the layer down, until its farthest edge is more-or-less aligned
with the bottom of the brick wall. To make it easier to see what’s going on, head into
the Effects panel and add the Grid effect to the Field layer. This will give a quick
visualisation of the 3D set you’re creating. We now need to create our treeline. To do
this I’m going to duplicate the Field layer by selecting it and pressing Ctrl+D. This
new layer I’ll rename to Trees. In its transform properties I’ll switch the orientation back
to 0, so that it’s standing up again. This layer now needs to be moved back in 3D space
to align with the back edge of the Field layer. To do this I’ll switch to 2 Views, with
the left one being my active camera and the right by a top view. I can now push the tree
layer back into position. I’ll also switch to the Front view and move the layer up so
that its bottom edge is aligned as well. Switching back to the Perspective view, you can see
that these two layers are now in position and ready to receive the projection.
I’m going to move this container by dragging the empty section of its title bar, and drop
it down here, so that I can have a larger Viewer area.
Now it’s time to add the Projector effect. I’ll do the Field layer first. After adding
Projector from the Effects panel I’ll also switch off the grid effect as it’s not needed.
In the Projector’s controls I’ll set ‘Projection from’ to the Source image. You can see in
the Perspective view that it’s not quite right – all it’s doing at the moment is
projecting the 2D image onto the plane like it’s some kind of 3D clipping window. That’s
because we need to set up our projection camera. The composite shot currently has a single
camera. I’m going to rename this to Main. This camera is the one I’ll be using to
create the shot itself. I now need a second camera to act as my actual projector. So I’ll
duplicate the camera layer with Ctrl+D, then rename the duplicate to ‘Static’. I’ll
move this down in the layer list so it’s next to the Source layer, to keep things tidy.
Think of the static camera as being equivalent to a real projector. In a cinema setup, you
wouldn’t ever want the projector itself to move, because that would be utterly rubbish
for the audience trying to watch the movie. It’s the same thing here.
Back in the projector controls, I’ll set the Camera to use our static camera.
You can now see that the projection has been distorted. In the active camera it still looks
correct, because from that point of view the distortion creates the ‘correct’ result.
Because we’re using a 2D layer as our Projector source, the effect considers the source to
be attached directly to the camera – just like if you had a film strip loaded into a
real projector. Let’s set up the treeline before we start
moving our camera around. In the Field layer, I’ll select the Projector effect and copy
it with Ctrl+C, then select the Trees layer and paste the effect onto it with Ctrl+V.
I’ll also need to turn off the Grid effect on this layer.
So, in the ACtive camera view the image looks completely normal, because our Main camera
is in the exact same position as our Static camera. But over in Perspective view, you
can see that we now have the image projected onto our 3D planes.
If I now use the camera controls in the ACtive Camera view to push the camera forwards, you
can see the perspective begin to shift. In the perspective view, note how the Main camera
is now in a different position from the Static camera.
Don’t forget that the active camera is always the highest one on the timeline – which is
why the controls are affecting the Main camera and not our Static camera.
As the Main camera moves around, we get 3D perspective shift. I can actually turn off
the Source layer’s visibility, because it doesn’t need to be visible at any point.
There are, of course, limitations to this technique. If you move your Main camera too
much, you run the risk of seeing the edges of the projection. Equally, if you push the
projection too far you’ll start to see obvious stretching in the result.
Where the technique is most useful is for creating subtle establishing shots. It’s
why it’s a good idea to get lots of stills photography of your sets and locations – it
means that if you realise halfway through your edit that you could REALLY have done
with an extra establishing or mood shot of your location, you can create it digitally,
complete with a subtle 3D camera move. Projection was used for the Splinter Cell
shot because no such shot had been filmed, of the camera moving up the corridor. I was
able to take a still image of the location and turn it into a convincing 3D space.
Back in the field shot, I’m going to turn on keyframing for the Main camera’s position
property, then shift that keyframe to the end of the timeline. I’ll then move our
camera up on frame 0, creating a simple
camera move. One thing that’s not quite right about this
field shot is that the sky is evidently part of the same layer as the trees. There should
be a bit of parallax shift going on there. So let’s quickly fix that using some of
HitFilm’s other effects. I’m going to select the Source layer and
duplicate it with Ctrl+D. I’ll then hit the ‘Make composite shot’ button and call
the new composite shot ‘Treeline matte’. Inside the new comp I’ll turn the Source
layer on, then I’ll go to the Effects library and find the chroma key effect. This I’ll
add to the image. Up in the Controls panel I’ll now use the
color picker to select the blur of the sky, sampling from fairly close to the treeline.
What we want here is a nice detailed key on the trees. Switching to the chroma key Matte
view makes it easier to see what’s going. I’ll increase the Gain until most of the
sky and clouds have disappeared, then clip the foreground to create a more solid treeline.
I’ll then use the Rectangle mask tool to draw a quick shape over these lingering clouds.
I’ll invert the mask using this button on the timeline, and I’m done. Quick and dirty,
but it’ll do the job. Don’t forget to switch the chroma key view
back to Result when you’re done. Switching back to the FInal Shot timeline,
I’ll now switch off the Treeline matte layer’s visibility. Then, in the Trees layer’s projector
settings I’ll update the ‘Projection from’ setting to use the new Treeline matte layer.
I can now set up the sky as a separate layer. So I’ll select the Source layer and duplicate
it again, renaming it to ‘Sky’. I’ll move this up in the layer list to be underneath
the trees layer, and will turn it back on. Currently it’s a 2D layer, so it doesn’t
move at all when we move our camera. I’ll switch it to 3D, and then use the Top view
to shift the layer back in 3D space to be behind the trees layer.
Because I’ve pushed the layer so far back, it’s no longer filling the screen. So I’ll
scale it up until no black edges are visible. I’ll also drop it down a bit to make sure
we don’t glimpse the trees in the sky layer. We now have a bit of subtle parallax going
on with the sky. Combined with the perspective shift on the ground created by the projector
effect, this is working as a convincing shot. Because it’s based on a real photo, you
can get surprisingly photoreal results with minimal efforts.
Because this now exists as a 3D space, you get some added benefits. For example, I can
create a new Text layer with the Text tool. I’ll type in something exceedingly obvious,
like….PROJECTOR. Let’s make it nice and big and chunky. I can now set the text to
be 3D, and can position it directly within our little set. It then just works in relation to everything else.
If I switch over into this pre-made composite shot you can see that I’ve added lights
and shadows to the text. This is easy to do, because we have already created our little
3D set. You can even turn on the camera’s depth
of field feature to add some shallow DOF to your shot. Projector gives you a LOT of flexibility.
This tutorial has covered a simple but effective example – you can of course create more complex
shots. Take a look at this awesome shot created by Triem on the HitFilm.com forums, in which
he’s integrated 3D models with a projected 3D corridor set.
This tutorial is part 1 of our look at the projector effect. There’s lots more you
can do with it, so make sure you subscribe to your YouTube channel or our newsletter
to stay up-to-date with our latest videos. Many thanks for watching!

Resize and Crop Images with GIMP Tutorial

Resize and Crop Images with GIMP Tutorial


I’m going to how to resize and then crop
an image using Gnu Image Manipulation program (GIMP). We call it GIMP. So first I’m going to open my folder of images
and drag and drop the image I want to manipulate into the GIMP window. Now I’m going up to the image menu and I will
select scale. And here you can see my image is 1000 pixels wide so I know that the area on my webpage that I want to put this image in is
650 pixels wide. So I’m going to change 1000 to 650. And you can see there’s a little link icon
on the side here – this is good. That means that when I change the width, the
height is going to automatically change to stay within the right ratio. We’re not going to skew this image at all. And now I have a 650 pixel wide image. So I’m selecting the crop tool. It looks like an X-Acto knife. I’ll use this tool to make the image fit exactly
within the slideshow area dimensions on my website. So I’m going to draw a box roughly where I
think I want to crop the image. And now, I’ll head over to the toolbox and
I’ll adjust the height of the image. I need 400 pixels. I’ll click and then click once in the corner to
make the crop. Now finally, I’m going to export the image
and the default is JPEG, which is just fine for my purposes. I will rename the image so I don’t mix it
up with the other versions of this. And click export. I don’t need to change any of these defaults. And the new cropped image will appear inside
the images folder where I started. Thanks for watching, I hope this helps

Drawing pictures with music!

Drawing pictures with music!


*Fast Music Playing* Just incredible If you don’t know who Aleksander Vinter is (Also known as Savant) You should be following him, he’s an amazing music producer He started posting these MIDI drawings that he does This is the most popular one I think so far, it’s gotten 3 Million views in about a week He’s done a monkey, (nope, that’s a rare Pepe, Andrew) A T-Rex A dragon that plays the Super Mario theme. I don’t know how he’s doing this but I’m gonna try and figure it out today. And obviously I’m gonna make a unicorn. I’m gonna make This Unicorn *Music Playing* *Alert Sound* *Music Playing* *Opens box, takes out paper, waggles paper, printer prints* So here’s my thought process. My transparncey is lined up with this edge of the screen. So if anything happens to it, I can always put it back In exactly the same place. I made a MIDI clip and set a tempo And kind of test it out. How long it’s gonna take to play the whole unicorn And this MIDI clip is a fixed size So if I wanna go in and do some edits I can do it, But I can always zoom out And get to the same place To see the whole picture of the unicorn Without notes being in the wrong spots The first thing I’m gonna do is trace the unicorn as accurately as I can. *Music Playing* I have now traced it to the best of my ability It was a difficult balance to strike between getting the image to come across And also getting in enough detail that felt like a good picture So this was just drawing it, not thinking about the music at all. Let’s see how amazing it sounds! *Jumbled up music playing* Nailed it! *exhale* Okay! And now we attempt to make this sound musical. And I can It’s gonna sound better Okay. First thing let’s quantize All the notes to 30 secooooooonds And this just get’s everything on beat. Still looks like a unicorn, Okay. I’mma move this whole thing up Because a lot of the notes were kinda low. I’m just gonna see how many of those low notes we can get rid of And have it still look like a Unicorrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrn (Discordant notes in the background) Just kinda free hand remaking this mane. Come on mane! I’m gonna say that still looks pretty good for a unicorn mane But it isn’t so busy right off the bat Let’s give it another listen… *High Pitched And Low Pitched Unharmonistic Music Playing* Ooh… maybe I made this to tall! That’s a huge range of notes. It’s still really high and really low. Our lowest note is D So I’mma say where in the key of D Minor So if i was using a minor key. So now I’m gonna go in the first bar and delete every note Or move every note so that it fits in D Minor Or a melody that would go over top of D Minor *Note moving noises* *Kind of Jumbled Up Music Playing* What I’m learning Is that it’s pretty difficult To make it sound good Just using what I have drawn So I need to take the idea Of what I have drawn And recreate most of it With the music in mind I get a feel for the shape of the picture I zoom in, I make adjustments to the notes musically I zoom out to see if it still looks unicorn-y Also, look at how our picture changes when I zoom in SMOOSH DAT UNICORN And I got a first bar now that sounds pretty musical *Good Music Playing* Let’s keep going *Cool Harpsichord Sound Playing The Good Part* I’m starting to hear this was kind of a baroque piece So I have slowed down the tempo And changed the instrument to this nice harpsichord * Harpsichord Music Plays And Then Gets To The Bad High Pitched Part* Bad high pitch part appears Look at this awfulness Corrupt file I saved my MIDI Unicorn, no problems there I went to have lunch When I came back to open it up It was corrupt Sad inhale and exhale* This is super annoying! So next video I will give you A glorious MIDI Unicorn And for today You can have this *Horrible Music Playing* And now I will thank you for watching And dejectedly walk away *Sad, Defeated Sounding Piano Music Playing*

How to Import Images into Premiere Pro


mmm that’s real good Hi, this is Janet from Manhattan Edit
Workshop and today I’d like to talk about how to import stills into Premiere
Pro. First I want you to note in our preferences, general preferences there’s
an option called defaults scale to frame size. Note that that is currently turned
off. So I’m going to bring in this file with default scale to frame size turned
off and let’s see what that does. I’m just going to bring in this file here
and drop it on the timeline. You can tell by looking in the preview area that not
the entire image is showing up in the program monitor. If I look here this
tells me the size of this image 1680 wide by 1050 tall. But my timeline is 720 x 480. So what I’m seeing in my program monitor is the center part of the
photograph the outer parts are not visible. You’ll especially notice it if I
shrink this down and click you’ll see the wireframe here is representing the
full size of the original still and what we’re currently seeing through the
program monitor is what we would output. So this is great because it does allow
me to pan around the image while keeping the quality high. Now for comparison
let’s reinforce the image but this time I’m going to change the general setting
to turn on default scale to frame size. So I’m checking that saying okay and I’m
going to re-import it there we go so There we go. We’ll drag our re-imported image and you’ll notice first of all that we do see the entire image if I scale down
this time you can see it’s including all of the image in the wireframe and this
is what we would output. I could make this bigger by expanding the wireframe
but this is not the original image therefore I will be scaling up the
rasterized file and it just may not look good. When I have the default scale to frame size set. Premiere Pro creates a copy of
the still that’s at the same frame size as your sequence. So what I’m currently
working with here is the 720 x 480 and not the original size which was 1680 x
1050. Now if I want to change that I can always right-click on the clip and turn
off scale to frame size. Notice the wireframe changes I’m now looking at the
original so this would be fine to scale up or to do some pan and zoom
adjustments. So if you want your imported stills to match the frame size of your
sequence you should make sure that in the Preferences general settings your
default scale – frame size is checked. Otherwise if you want to be able to pan
around an image and to be able to adjust the scale of the original file you want
to make sure that default scales of frame size is deselected.

The Image Toolset – Part 8 – 3D Selective – Adding Motion Blur – Flame 2020.1

The Image Toolset – Part 8 – 3D Selective – Adding Motion Blur – Flame 2020.1


Hi everyone, Grant for the Flame Learning Channel. In parts 5 and 6 of the Image Toolset series… We looked at the 3D AOV capability… Where you could produce a selective matte for your image… Based on supplied 3D information. So you could create isolation mattes… based on the z-depth of the image… Or the normals of a 3D object. With the Flame 2020.1 update… We have now the ability… To use motion vector data… To generate an isolated selection. So you can identify an object’s movement and direction… And use that as the basis for a 3D Selective. You can feed the isolation matte into any SelectiveFX shader… And be as creative as you like. However the use case, you’re about to perform… will show you a creative yet practical use for the Motion 3D AOV. Simply put, you’ll add more motion blur into a shot… Using the 3D Selective workflow. Now if you are new to 3D Selectives… I suggest watching parts 5 and 6 of the Image Toolset series… To explain the basics and fundamentals of 3D AOVs. For everyone else… if you’d like to follow along with this video… Click the link in the description below… Or type the link displayed to download the media. Now import the downloaded media… And either open it as a sequence… Or edit it into an existing sequence. Looking at this clip in the player… You will see a shot of a guy taking his bike down a ramp. Now there is a little bit of motion blur… But the shutter may have been set high… So the subject is still quite sharp. Adding a bit more motion blur… will enhance the movement further. As a side note, if this was a CGI image… You could be supplied with a Motion Vectors data pass. You could use that with the 3d Selective. However since this is a live action shot… At some point, you’ll have to generate the Motion Vectors pass in Flame. So you’ll use the Image TimelineFX for this example… Since there are no other external inputs. If you were provided with a separate motion vectors pass… I would suggest using either the Image or Action node in Batch or BatchFX. Switch to the Effects Environment… And if you don’t have this layout already… press ALT+2 for the 2-up view. Manager on the left with 8… And result view on the right with F4. Now expand the selective in the Manager. By default, the Selective is using the MasterGrade SelectiveFX shader. This is fine for grading. But to add motion blur… Delete the MasterGrade… And add a SelectiveFX through the context menu. At the bottom of the list… Choose the Motion Blur SelectiveFX. Now this shader’s controls… Won’t do anything without a motion vectors data pass. So if you were supplied with one… You could add it as a Motion Vectors map via the media list. But remember I said earlier… That you would need to do that in Batch or BatchFX… With an Image or Action node. In this case, there is no Motion Vectors Map… So you need to generate it… And this can be done quickly in the timeline… Using the Image TimelineFx. Go to the Selective Controls… And switch to the 3D AOV menu. Change the Type to Motion. Now click CREATE MAP. The Motion Vectors are generated for the shot… And you can verify this in the manager. To view the Motion Vectors… You can select it in the manager… And over the result view… Press F8 for the Object View. Scrubbing the sequence… You can see the motion vectors update per frame. With the Motion Vector Analysis… You can cache on scrubbing… Or click the Cache Range button. You would use these to improve performance if required… And I cover these features in great detail… In the Motion Warp tracking videos for Flame. Select the Selective for its menus… And press F4 to return to the result view. Now go to Frame 25… And turn up the Motion Blur Exposure to 10. So the cyclist has plenty of motion blur… But if you look at the background… The motion blur is affecting other moving people and objects in the shot. You could use Keyers and masks in the Selective… To isolate the Cyclist. But since the data has already generated for motion… You can use that as the 3D selective. So enable ACTIVE to turn on the 3D Selective. Now just looking at the result view… You can’t really tell what the Motion 3D selective is actually affecting. So let’s use another view to see the selective… As well as monitor the result. Press ALT+3 to switch to a 3-up view. Now set the manager to one view with 8… The result view to the middle viewport with F4. For the final viewport… Hover over the third view… And press F9 to switch to the Selective View. Currently you should see the Selective matte output. This is the matte that is being generated by the Motion Vectors. Admittedly, this doesn’t help in this context… When trying to target specific objects for the SelectiveFX shaders. Instead, press F9 over the Selective View again… And this will toggle to the Selective Input. You can now see the image with an overlay… Of where the Motion Blur will be applied. Currently, it’s affecting the people in the background… And not our cyclist. So this is where the 3D AOV Motion controls will be invaluable. In the interface, you will see a widget… Which allows you to define the direction… As well as the speed of the object. So as you move the ball around… The overlay updates… Showing you the direction being chosen for the 3D selective. In the case of the bike… It’s travelling to the bottom left of the frame. So position the widget to point in that direction. Now the overlay is affecting most of the frame… Because you need to define how fast the object needs to be moving… In order to be considered by the Selective. This is known as the Motion Minimum… Which is quite low at this point. You can increase this slider… Or you can pull the widget more away from the centre… And that will perform the same operation. Around 0.18 will be fine. Looking at the overlay in the Selective View… Only objects travelling in this direction… Above a certain speed… Are considered in the Selective. So using the widget… You can really mould where the Selective will be applied… Based on Motion. Looking at the bike in the Result view… You can see the Motion Blur being applied in the desired area. Now you can also set a maximum speed cut off… As well as increase the gain and fall off of the selective. But another useful slider is the Angular Threshold. So you’ve defined a direction for the bike… However, when you scrub to the beginning or end of the clip… The bike moves horizontally and not towards the bottom. So these frames are not considered in the Selective as much. So using the Angular Threshold… You can expand the angle of direction considered for the selective. So now the bike should be covered for whole shot. As a tip, the 3D AOV values can be animated. So if something changes direction quite drastically… You can animate the Selective to match. In addition, you can still use Keyers, masks… And all the tracking tools to segment a subject with motion… To isolate it further in the shot. This is something you can try on your own another time. You can now switch back to a 2-up view with ALT+2… And you can scrub through the result view. If the edges seem a little harsh on the motion blur… You can use shrink, dilate and blur the result of the selective… And this should fix most of these issues. However it is worth mentioning… that Motion Vector analysis in general… Works pretty well with motion heading in a straight direction. You may encounter artefacts with spinning motion such as wheels… As well as when two objects cross over each other from opposing directions. This is simply the nature of current technology. So in summary… The Motion 3D Selective allows you to isolate a portion of your image… Using the speed and movement of objects in your shot. This is all determined using Motion Vectors… Which can be supplied by CGI… Or generated through a Motion Vector Analysis. And like all the other Selective tools within the Flame products… You can apply any SelectiveFX shaders to these isolation mattes… And this can certainly give a new added dimension… in any grading, VFX and look development work. Don’t forget to check out the other features, workflows… And enhancements to the Flame 2020.1 update. Comments, feedback and suggestions are always welcome and appreciated. Please subscribe to the Flame Learning Channel for future videos… And thanks for watching.

How to reshape images without distorting in Photoshop content aware scale

How to reshape images without distorting in Photoshop content aware scale


I my friends and welcome to my most favorite Photoshop feature of all time. We want to make this bigger without it. Look at it magically grows bigger. So we’re going to resize things without distorting them. And if things distort OK like I man here and I’ll show you how to protect the mean so handsome so if a dude doesn’t get stretched we’re going to get to some more advanced uses as well. Well we just want more surf because we need to end some ticks store stretch for a banner ad maybe a double page spread it’s all using the cool content with scale. Let’s get going in Photoshop right. So we go exercise files from a new folder. This one is over five. Cropping a lining distorting. If you can open up all of the content a with scale 1 to 7 is quite a quite little tips and tricks we can learn with content with scale. First tip is I can’t see one case’s little double Chevron here. You can click on this and it shows you everything that’s open. It can do to square one and let’s say that you’ve got this image but we just need it to be square for some unknown reason. Instagram we use need to be taller because there needs to be text in here you need a structure this way because it needs to be kind of the right size for maybe a double page spread for a magazine. So first thing we need to do is we need to unlock the background. So double click background give it a name. Don’t tell anybody that I do but you should. Next thing I want to do is like generate some space up here you could use image canvas size OK and they just you can type in a size that square. I just like to grab the crop to grab it hold it and drag it to the size I want to be out there. HAVERTON now the magic talk. OK so what’s under it. It’s this one hit content a with scale. So I’d like transform right transoms is going to do this. That’s not what you want. You want this magic wand here counting to go get ready. City holy man just invented more background quha. And when you’re finished and that is the magic tool that’s been there for a long time and if you’re like a lot of advanced uses like you know to be shocking or on your face I love it. And I kind of picked an easy one. But in all honesty it kind of works like that without any help. Only about 30 percent of the time but 30 percent of the time. Good rather than a clone tool stamp madness we all have to do it right. To try and fix it all up but don’t worry the other 70 percent there are tricks to kind of make it work for that as well. Let’s look at it counting the way scaled to this one. Just the same just a little wine for you to practice with. Let’s do it together. First thing let’s rename the background land. Just double click in the background. My Cocteau clicking once I’m holding down the old key and dragging the corners and it goes from all sides just to give myself like how far can this go well here. OK now I’m going to use my. It contained a scale. Now you see I’ve got a shortcut here. That’s not the by default. I added it to keyboard shortcuts and I made my own one because I use it so much and so much I give it like the world’s most sure. I know it. Anyway I shall cut my hair. Leave me learn what I want to do now is it to see how far this goes. Look at this is particularly good as well. It works really well in these small unique high contrast images amongst kind of more generic stuff where I find something like this really useful is if you’ve done like I do a lot of advertising Benas I’ve got a course on HMO banner ad making. OK. And this is perfect for it because you get these kind of weird leaderboards Kalitta boards are a pain right because they are that shape but look all we can do with Konting the scale or the skyscrapers or the long and thin goes along here. OK. Maybe not resizing like that maybe just invent more background this way. Quha let’s look at another use case and this one here. Cool image. I just need I need space over here to add text and if my parents name my grandma a crop to want to put some space in over here please. But if I tried to fill it with a color is this kind of like subtle gradient in the background. I’ll show you a little trick. So if I wanted to fill it I can make a new layer put it underneath and grab my Java tool. I can click on this color. Then I want to fill this layer with it a cool little trick is holding down the option key on the mic. OK on a PC and just hitting your backspace or delete key the one just next to the plus can it fills with the foreground color. Any trick you can see there it’s kind of blended in a couple of parts but not over there. Ah but what if we could use owl dance crazy show up with still using it it contained to wit scale. And watch this and check and say I want it over here is going to Keepon like using this poor image till I get this giant area for my come by my orange flyer or double page spread and I’ve got this kind of cool thing spanning across go up. I’m going to say Kohath losen this of course. I love showing people continuous scale but let’s say you’ve used it before and you run into trouble it’s like it contained a wisco. And let’s look at this handsome man member named the background’s going to stand out. My background a bit. And now I want to resize it. We’re going to run into a couple of problems or one big problem. Watch this. And they Mangere austerity some pretty good job of everything else. Right. So how do we fix Trichy man. Basically we just need to protect him so we can select. I’m going to like the cool thing about it is protecting a person with a selection can be as blunt and as quick as using the rectangle Machi tool and say that but there I want you to be protected. So once you’ve got a selection this little tip is a little hard to remember. He might want to write this one down. So get to select you save the selection. I’m going to call this one man pick OK. De-selected don’t need it anymore. So you say you selection that’s the important bit. Now let me go to it. Continue to a scale. There’s this option this is protect man and I’m just looking at my selection. Now when I drag it out it protects them in return. Quha. Now let’s look at one that kind of almost works. I feel like I need to show you this because if I end the day you’ll be like hey it’s not working on my one so you can go through that same process super quick and just making it big and you use my Konting to wisco So we’re going to run into problems with the bottle here. Q So it just starts getting a bit too tall you might actually find that that’s fine. Who knows how big the bottle is anyway but you know so let’s say we want to protect that. So what we need to do is do a selection. You can use that quick selection or the magic wand 2 or the last two any two you like. I’m just using the rectangle Machi to member save the selection. Give it a name. De-select. And it’s going to work to a degree where this is all but so it works works works. Looks a lot better than it did before. But eventually it just go. It gives up and goes I can’t keep doing it. Conky protecting that area is better than a walls. There are times where it just won’t work. I felt like I need to keep that in the class because sometimes it doesn’t work. What you might do in that case is we looked at content with fill in the last video some is going to kind of sit a limb here and use my cantin to see a scale which we’ve already done because the side to side with the right is this height that didn’t. So instead of kind of dragging this up to the top I’m going to grab my rectangle my Kito grab all of this and I’m going to say please go to it fill and use content where Phil and I got to look at the document and try and fill this background and de-select and it’s done a pretty good job. So kind of a combo deal. The stuff we learned in the intro scores canina with Phil Plus some of the newer stuff with content. A scale now we kind of worked around this one to make it work. They are just images that are too busy too noisy there’s no small part of a more generic background and there are just lots of high contrast areas so let’s have a look at this one and I’ll show you. Sometimes there’s no fixing it. Isko is code like it’s pretty amazing what it’s done like it’s got some interesting things. Case so the most generic stuff I’ve found was in this coffee cup this coffee in the middle here the plate is try to duplicate then it’s done an OK job but I wouldn’t know where to start with this image. And I guess I want you to know that if you need to explain this one it’s tough it’s really cropped in what I probably do is I’d mask out all of these guys separately find a new wood background to stick it on. That was bigger than what I had. Then I can separate them all out manually. It would take a lot longer but I can’t think of a bit away for that one. Let’s go to the chevrons and find the last one. The A little tip I want to give you is sometimes say this when he I need some I need more Wavves because I need to put the text for the better way that I’m doing. So again the name that layer grabbed my crop touring and make some space up here. And if I just use the whole thing which we’ve been doing up until now. Fine but it’s not what I want. It’s given me more sand and more waves. What I want to do is just use my rectangle Machi to drag a box around the stuff you want and then transform just that part. Most people try and do the whole image. We can just do a pop maybe sky because you need a bigger sky for logos and stuff to go into. So just make a selection. I’m going to go to continue to wisco and check out these people down here and that’s the cool thing about it is that the people will stay the same way the waves get bigger and believable the waves. Gil Tola the people stay fine Wisma you can tell I love content a scale enough that I gave the world’s worst shortcut by my friends that get into the next video.