APERTURE and DEPTH OF FIELD, made easy. WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY. Botswana.

APERTURE and DEPTH OF FIELD, made easy. WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY. Botswana.


Hello! It’s Danielle from Pangolin Photo
Safaris on our home turf, the Chobe River. Today I am going to answer a question
that we often get asked, and that is how can I blur my background to the maximum? That basically means, how can I use depth-of -field? to my advantage, or how
can I control the depth-of-field? Today we have got some waterbuck to demonstrate the concept, and they’re quite nice, because they stand tall for a while.
Great to demo this on. So, the first way of doing it, is to control the distance
between yourself and the subject. Which is great, because we are in a boat, so we can either come closer or further away from the subject. The closer you are to the subject the more the background blurs. The second way of doing
it, is to control the distance between the subject and its background. So, as you can see, the background is quite far away, and that’s also fairly in your control,
as you can position the boat to choose a background that’s further away, if you
want more blur. The third way, is to use your zoom. The more zoomed in you are, the
more the background blurs. The last and obvious way to do it, is to
decrease your f-stop. So, take a shot at f/16. Then take a shot at your lowest
f-stop. Go down to f/6.3 or to f/4. Leave everything else the same
and take your shot. Zoom in and notice the difference in your background, and
you will see that that’s how you blur your background. For more videos, subscribe to our channel, or hit the bell icon at the bottom to get notified when the next video is
available. Until next time. Bye bye!

Business Portrait On-location Photo Shoot (behind-the-scenes & Photoshop)

Business Portrait On-location Photo Shoot (behind-the-scenes & Photoshop)


So we’re on our way to a shoot at a car
dealership. I was hired to take pictures of all of the employees there for their
website. So I’m bringing my 5D Mark III, and what do you have there, Tony? -this is the backup camera it’s a 5d mark
II and you have the 70-200 which is perfect for
headshots. This is a 24-105 the nice Sigma f/4 and
again it’s just a back up, we shouldn’t ever need this. We also don’t plan to use the flash, but
if everything else fails if that Cyber Commander fails to trigger the strobes.
we can use the optical slaves from the flash here. -It’s always good to have a back-up, plan
on something failing. So we’re going to load up our car here
and just tell you what here we’re bringing as we load it up. This is our large Paul C. Buff
collapsible soft box so that will give a nice diffused light if there isn’t
adequate lighting in the dealership. -This is the Paul C. Buff Einstein E-640
which will attach to that soft boxe, this will be our main light. Here I have just a
bracket on the stand, it’s just useful to have one of these, you can attach
anything to it. -These are our Vagbond Mini by Paul
C. Buff and they’re batteries to hook our strobes up to/ -That way we don’t have to attach or have power
cords running everywhere where people might trip over it, it’s a little easier
outside of the studio. This is a reflector and we have
diffusers inside as well. Getting pretty crowded in there. -And this
is going to be a hair light or background light as we need it, just a
second light. It will be triggered by the Cyber Commander just like that Einstein
light and will run it from the other Vagabond. -I was told there would be a nice
background there but you’re never sure, we didn’t scope out the place yet so I
was going to use the white side of this backdrop in case their background wasn’t
very appealing. Throw that in there. I also brought a
lint brush just to make sure everyone is nice and clean. I have some painters tape to mark the
spot where everyone can stand so that everyone’s in the same location. And… some tape to hold the backdrop against the wall. -And this is a Panasonic
GH2 on a tripod, this is just going to be a b-roll camera for the
behind-the-scenes. The GH2 is a micro four thirds camera and it’s a little bit
old now but records great 1080p video and it runs forever, it doesn’t shut off
after 30 minutes like most DSLRs do. -I think that’s it. We just have to grab our coats and head
out. -Let’s go. -Alright. You might be able to find an angle where
we could get this line of cars in it, we have to stand up a little bit to look
down but we might be able to do that. -I was thinking this is a little too
colorful. -Yeah it is. You want to do it in my office then? -I have that, the other side is white. -yeah
the wall might be easier, I don’t know how much room there is in there. -yeah -The one other thing for this Tony, is that
we don’t have the nice natural light. -Yeah the lightning is, uh… rough. -We’ll have to use this.. -it’s a little tight to bring
lighting in. And I think we’ll just have one of us
stand behind him with the reflector -Yeah, I think it’ll be easy, so let’s get one more,
I’ll get my settings I’ll put a mark on the floor and we’ll get it done. You guys ready? Yeah will you be my model one more time? So I’m really glad that we picked a spot
that has natural light because a lot of the people here are different heights
and I would have had to adjust the softbox with every different person, it
would have been a lot more set up. So my recommendation for you would be to look
for natural light and bring a flash for fill light. -But be prepared in case it
doesn’t work out and you have to have artificial light. One of the reasons we
picked the 5D Mark III for this job is it takes two memory card slots and it can
write to both cards simultaneously. That way if one of the cards has a
problem we have another copy and we don’t have to go back and reshoot
everything. Yeah there you go. I didn’t think that it was the best I
could have done, I would have preferred if they came into the studio. I mean I know that that wasn’t possible. So now I’m back in my office and i’ve uploaded my pictures. I’m going to show you how to sort
through them, rate them and even edit them. Now that I have my photo in
Photoshop, I’m going to start by cleaning up my subject’s skin. So I have a filter
called portraiture and I love it and it does a really good job. It smooths out the
skin without taking away all the pores, which can kind of leave people looking a
bit lifeless and doll-like. So i’ll zoom in a bit more on his face so I can see
exactly what Portraiture is doing. I don’t want to lose any of these fine
lines or anything like that because it would make him look unnatural. So you can see, I can up the threshold
here and it smooths them out way too much. Looks like a boudoir shot or something
and this is a professional photo so he’s definitely not going for that. These
sliders here control the details. So this would control the large details and
smooth it out less if you were to bring them down and I actually think that looks
pretty good. Let me turn down the fine details a bit so
play around with it, it’s definitely to taste. And my only suggestion would be to
not smooth out people skin too much. Not even women. If you notice any residual marks, you can see there are a few just little
pores you can leave them in and use other tools in Photoshop to take care
of that. So i’m satisfied with this for now and then i’ll zoom in and use my
other tools to take care of any other small imperfections. So I want my spot
healing brush and i use my left bracket. I don’t want to remove too many things
because once again it will look just too unnatural and smooth. I think that looks pretty good the one
other thing I’m going to do is in person I didn’t see that his brow is furrowed at
all so I’m going to take the little furrow out of his brow. And I’ll just
use my lasso tool, circle it, delete and then use content
aware fill, that usually does a good job. And then use Ctrl D to deselect the area. I like to just zoom in to make sure it
looks natural and that actually doesn’t look too great. So I’m gonna try it again. That looks much better. The next thing I’m going to do is just brighten his teeth a little bit. They look great,
they are nice and white, but we’re used to seeing very white teeth in in the media so it’s
nice to just kind of brighten them up a tad bit. And here i added a new layer and i use
the overlay layer I select my paintbrush and use bright
white. You’re going to think this looks insane
but you just fill in just the front teeth. This is really bright, but once i’m done
i’m going to turn down the opacity and it will look natural. We’ll see I don’t want to whiten them them too much. So I’ll zoom out and make sure it looks natural. You can even turn down your opacity on
your brush a little bit it to get these back teeth, but remember that the back
teeth are usually a bit darker, so if you make these really bright, let me show you what I mean. I can’t really because i have the
opacity down, but if you make these too bright it won’t look good. Ok. So the teeth look nice and next I’m
going to just brighten his eyes a tad bit. So i’ll use my Dodge tool, I have the
mid-tones selected and my exposure down to thirty percent and I just do a little half circle. Let me see And the next thing I’m going to do here,
just because he has fair skin is just fill in his eyebrows a
little bit. They’re in the midtones, so I have the mid-tone selected and my
exposure is really low, it’s only sixteen percent, and i’m just going to define
them a little bit. Lastly I’m going to brighten up the
background. I’ll do that by selecting the background
and i’m going to use let’s see, I think I’ll use my magic wand tool
to fix the areas that it’s selected that I don’t want selected I can use this
tool to subtract from the selection but I usually like to press alt, the alt key,
and then it does it for you. You can also use this button here to add to the selection, but i’m actually going to use
layer masks and i’ll show you how. If you aren’t great at selecting by hand, you can
also use the mask tool which i think is easier. So i’m going to show you how to
select the background better using the mask tool. So i will go to the
brightness and contrast and i’m going to raise the brightness of the background,
you can see i missed a big chunk, but that’s not a big deal because then I can
go into the mask and use my paintbrush with either black or white to add or
subtract to the selected area. So white is going to add to the selected area, so I
will make my brush bigger by pressing the right bracket and then just paint it
in. And I selected the wrong parts here, so i’ll use black to get rid
of that. So you can see this is the before and it
still looks natural just a bit brighter and better and this is the after. Since they’re professional photos, you
don’t want them to look too glamorous or touched up that can actually be
embarrassing if they’re going to be meeting with a client and in their
picture they look 40 years younger, that’s going
to be off-putting to the client. So make sure that it looks like they
look in real life but just the best version of themselves. That’s it, pretty simple! If you like this
video please subscribe to our channel and if you like our lessons and teaching
style you can check out our book Stunning Digital Photography. Thank you!

Your first travel camera and lens [Fuji x-t20 & 18-55mm f2.8-4 review]

Your first travel camera and lens [Fuji x-t20 & 18-55mm f2.8-4 review]


– Hey guys, in today’s episode I’m gonna take you
through two national parks and over 300 miles of motorcycling to bring you some photography captured specifically with some of my favorite gear for travel and adventure photography, the X-T20 and the 18-55
variable aperture zoom lens. But before we get into things I just wanted to remind everyone that next week we’ll be giving this guy, the X-T20, away, so it’s not too late to enter the drawing for that. So we’ll announce the winner to that early next week, as soon as we have our grubby paws on the new Fuji X-T3 to replace it. So anyway, look forward to that, and I hope you enjoy today’s episode. (“To the End” by Falls) Alright so you’ve got a trip planned, you’re super-excited about it, it’s something you’ve been planning for months and months. It’s gonna be special and maybe you’ve got an iPhone or a point-and-shoot of some kind but this time you think, because you want this
trip to be so special and have a special place
in those memory banks, you think maybe it’s time to invest in a camera that can really deliver something with a little bit more oomph, so you think maybe it’s
time to up your game. What camera do you choose? Well guys, the options really are endless and you’re going to get a lot of advice and opinions. But you’re here for my opinion and I definitely have opinions. I’ve done a lot of adventuring with a lot of different gear and my personal choice, right now anyway, which is end of summer, 2018, is this guy right here, the Fuji X-T20 with just one lens, the 18-55 F2.8 to F4 variable aperture image stabilized zoom lens. Now of course, Fuji is not the only manufacturer who makes a superb offering
in a small package. But for travel there are some specific reasons why I personally choose Fuji, and like all things these are all going to be controversial. Others will disagree with me and choose to leave nasty comments because, for many people, photography has become religion. To you people I say, “Watch less YouTube and take more photos.” For everybody else, let me explain why I love
Fuji for travel photography. But to do so I’m going to take you on a little photo adventure with me. I’ll give you a sampling of what this little guy can do and why I like it so much. So strap on a helmet and
let’s go take some photos. (“To the End” by Falls) So first let’s talk about why Fuji. There are several reasons why I like Fuji as a travel or adventure platform and the first and most obvious reason is the size and weight. To illustrate this I’m gonna draw in the sand here. On one hand you’ve got IQ, that’s image quality, right. And then you’ve got your continuum. And on this side we have size, I’m just gonna put S, size and weight. I guess I could put C. C for convenience. The X-T20 is right here. That’s why I love it. Over here we’ve got the GFX, or something like that, where the sensor is the size my hand. Over here we have a GoPro, a tiny tiny sensor that’s super-convenient. The X-T20’s right here where it’s pretty good image quality and really convenient. The second reason I love the X-T20 and the Fuji platform in general is the wonderful shooting experience. These are cameras that are as fun to look at as they are to shoot with. The buttons and dials provide a tactile experience that are nostalgic of a time when photography felt more pure and less processed. These cameras appeal to people who see their camera not just as a tool but also as a companion. The other the thing I really like about the X-T20 is it’s interval timer. I’m here at Canyon Overlook looking out over Zion and it’s the middle of the day. It’s not the the greatest
lighting in the world. On the other hand there is a lot of cloud movement. So that can be interesting. It can lend itself well to a time lapse where I’m not actually that interested in a photo, per se. So the X-T20 does a great job there as far as giving you a time lapse to remember your moment. The next reason love Fuji is maybe a reason that’s
a little less obvious and that is Fuji’s sublime color science. (blues music) As a brand with a strong legacy of superb film engineering, Fuji has put together not only a strong base color science but also some spectacular film-like color profiles for JPEG shooting that after years of shooting I personally feel can’t be rivaled. And I know this brings up a whole can of worms, this whole discussion on JPEG verses RAW which is the stupidest argument ever. Those us who don’t mind shooting in JPEG know when and why we do it. For me personally I love shooting in JPEG on Fuji when I’m traveling because those photos come out spectacular straight out of the camera with that filmic, documentary look I know I wanted before I hit that shutter button. Look, there’s nothing
wrong with shooting RAW and spending a lot of time poring over every hue and saturation value if that’s what you love doing, but for many people that’s not why we love photography. – You’re welcome. – Yeah, thank you so much.
– I’m Bill Spencer. – Alright Bill.
– Your name is? – Andrew. – Branch?
– Uh huh. – Okay.
– Yeah. – Glad to have met you and you’re always welcome. – Thank you, thank you. Bill was nice enough to let me meander about his car cemetery. I don’t know, he calls it his junk yard. I could spend all day here. Seriously, this is like my photographic heaven. Guys it’s the act of photographing and documenting a place-time that is most significant. It’s far more important than what RAW photo editor you use, and as far as color is concerned I don’t mind trusting that job to the hands of color scientists who’ve spent decades perfecting a pleasing set of defaults to work from. Fuji really has nailed it, and so many others, in
comparison, haven’t. With many other brands it feels like their attention to JPEG color profiles are an afterthought at best or gimmicky at worst. So I realize, at the end of the day, that color is going to be something that is personal. It comes down to personal preference. But again, you came to me, and I’m just gonna give
you my personal opinion. The third reason that I love shooting Fuji, third, fourth? I don’t remember what, I don’t know number we’re on. But, it’s the lenses. If you need a system that’s going to give you But the reason, but the reason I like Fuji lenses as opposed to all the others is that they’re small and Fuji’s invested heavily in trying to build sublime top quality glass in a small package, that APSC package. And they nailed it. The sharpness, the build quality, the color, the contrast, the ease of use. Fuji’s high-end APSC lenses are probably the most important reason why I don’t ever want to switch away no matter how many advances in camera body technology
Sony makes, for instance. It’s those small, spectacular Fuji lenses that keep me from selling it all and jumping ship like so many other people. This is beautiful, by the way, right here. But anyway, this lens is is no different. Maybe it’s not considered by some to be a pro lens, but I use it for pro level stuff as well as travel and I have no issues with it at all. (chill electronic music) Guys, this is Fuji’s kit zoom lens, and in the world of photography the kit lens typically has serious negative connotations. It implies low quality,
beginner photography. That stop-gap choice you pick up until you can afford the really good lenses, quote unquote. If you look back at the video where I first tried this lens, I wasn’t even sure at that point if I wanted to keep it or not. But a year has passed and I have to say this lens has been on my camera body as much as any of my pro lenses have. Some of my favorite photos came with this lens. There’s several really
good reasons for that but I’ll have to tell
you about those tomorrow because it’s after sunset and I don’t know where
I’m staying tonight. I need to find someplace to stay. So, talk to you tomorrow. 5:45 AM. The way I feel inside right now, this is why I could never be a full-time landscape photographer. But this morning I’m
doin’ it for you guys. So let’s go to Bryce Canyon. (motorcycle starting) As a lazy landscape photographer, the thing I really love about Bryce Canyon is that you can just drive up and get out and walk a few hundred feet and you’re there at
these spectacular vistas. None of this fussing about with hiking and, naw, none of that. Now last night I was talking about this lens. And I have a few things to say about it but first I wanna say that if you’re new to photography, for more general use I would strongly recommend actually sticking to a prime lens or two. Prime lenses are important for beginners. They teach you more about composition than you can ever hope to learn by zooming around with a zoom lens. But having said that, for travel, it’s really hard to have
the flexibility you need with a fixed focal length. There are people who are really attracted to the Fuji X100 series, for instance, that have these fixed
23 millimeter lenses. And in all fairness, those are very attractive and very small devices, but when I traveled with those guys I felt like I was missing a lot of shots, that reach that I needed, that a zoom lens can provide to really get what I was after. So, I mean, if you’re
doing a lot of travel I’d say don’t give in to the draw and the romance of the X100 series before you’ve tried this system. When your traveling you just never know what sort of scene you’re gonna want to capture, and this lens provides you with enough flexibility to capture it. (chill electronic music) Of course there are wider Fuji lenses and some will say these are better for
landscape photography, but for those times I find it works great to just a stitch several shots together into a panoramic. As long as you have a
tripod or steady hands there really is no need
for a super-wide lens. What I did not realize is we’re about, I don’t know if you can see that, you probably can’t. We are about half way from where I stayed the night and where I would like to go, and I did not realize this, but apparently, the pavement ends. (blues music) It looks like I’ve happened upon some sort of motorcycle
event or something. Might as well get some shots while I’m here, I guess. So I mean, it’s not a sports action camera and lens by any stretch of imagination, but, I mean, on the other hand, it did okay, you know. Continuous autofocus
on the XT20’s not bad. I just love the
versatility of this camera. It can do just about
anything you need it to, in a pinch. A lot of people will say, well it doesn’t have a
wide enough aperture, you can’t really get that strong bokeh. That’s definitely true. It’s not going to compete with the 1.4, or even 1.2, of other Fuji prime lenses as far as getting that blurred, out-of-focus background for that really nice subject separation. But on the other hand, in travel photography you rarely need that level of separation. In fact, often, you want everything to be a focus. But if you really want bokeh the trick is to zoom out fully to that 55 millimeter max focal length and they get as close as possible, keeping your subject in frame. This will maximize the bokeh ability of the lens and sensor. (“To the End” by Falls) The other thing I like about this lens is that it has image stabilization. That means that you can get sharper images at lower shutter speeds. It also makes this lens perfect for video. And when I travel it’s nice to be able
to capture video also. The other thing about
video and this platform, is it has this little auto mode that’s meant probably for beginners, which is nice if you
happen to be a beginner. You don’t want to fuss about with all the various dials and what not that are associated
with shooting manually. Since I’m a vlogger I like to be able to, if I’m shooting normally, I’ve got everything set up for video or for photo stills for cinematic settings, ideal for the the correct
frame rate and shutter speed. But if I want to pull that camera around and start videoing myself I don’t want to have to worry about getting the exposure wrong. And you know what, if I’m filming myself it’s not as important that those cinematic type
settings are in place. So I just flip it onto auto mode and turn it around and I can vlog and not have to worry so much about if my exposure is locked in just right because I can’t see this screen. So guys those are all the reasons that I can think of right now why I like this set up. I sort of like it, if you can’t tell, and I highly recommend it to you for your next vacation experience. If you’ve enjoyed coming along with me consider subscribing and definitely check out my other videos on my motorcycle photography adventure. In the meantime, remember: Kindness before cameras. We’ll talk to you again real soon.

How I COLOR GRADE in Adobe Premiere PRO CC

How I COLOR GRADE in Adobe Premiere PRO CC


What’s up guys, so one of the questions I often get asked is “Armando, how do you color grade your youtube videos?” And today I’m gonna walk you through the different steps that I take to color grade my videos in Adobe Premiere Now, before I begin I wanna take a little bit of your time to tell you guys about Skillshare They are sponsoring this video. And Skillshare is basically an online learning community with over 15.000 different classes in design, photography and video. Now, after this video, you may have a couple of questions Maybe you’re not familiar with a couple of things about color grading and you wanna learn more. Or you wanna learn more about your camera, you wanna learn about ISO, shutter speed or white balance. So, what I’m gonna do is leave a couple of classes links down below so you guys can go ahead and check out they’re all very cool and awesome And if you guys click on those links You’ll get 2 months free trial so you guys can go ahead and try it out learn as much as you can and it’s a really great platform, speacially if you guys even wanna teach yourselves there are spots availlable so you can teach and even earn a little bit extra money Again, great platform. Links will be down bellow in the description. So, let’s go ahead and begin this tutorial. I have two different video clips here. I have one with an A7S2 and another one with a Canon 5D Mark IV And there’s a reason for that and I’ll tell you guys a little bit later. So, Adobe Premiere has this thing called workspaces You wanna make sure you are in the color tab And I’ve created a couple of short cuts here so whenever I’m editing a video I go into my editing work space And then whenever I want to color grade I go ahead and just click on color and it brings me to that workspace So make sure that you are in the color tab So the very first that I wanna do is edit this A7S2 footage and go in to the color space so, the… color workspace. And the very first thing on the right hand side we’ll see is called basic correction so we wanna color correct this image for us before we color grade it. and the first thing is the temperature And again, this is all personal preference So, for example, the temperature I can either cool the image So I’m go ahead and cool it a little bit so you guys can see what that does Now when you look at this image it looks like it was shot in the winter it looks cold. And that’s not the look that I wanna have I wanna have a little bit more warm tones So all you need to do is just move the slider over Now I’m gonna plus that to about 10 I like that a lot. It gives a little bit warmer tone But not too warm where it’s like super hot, ok? Now, one thing about Sony, and this is why I’m showing you guys this is that Sony cameras tend to lean over the magenta color And GH4 Panasonic tends to lean over to the uh greener tones or the greener tints So you’ll look at the video file and you’re like “gosh it looks really green on Panasonic footage” And then on Sony it tends to wherever reason go into the magenta So this is where you’ll get to pretty much change that And you can really tell here on my fingers it looks more reddish, right? So I’m gonna go ahead and do it negative… do it negative 5. That looks a lot better So, and you’ll see it here when I take the effects off. So I’m gonna go ahead and turn it off And then turn it back on It looks a lot better just by doing those quick adjustments, ok? Now, the whole thing about color correcting is we wanna make sure we match the image As we remember it. True to life. Or if we have multiple images that we shot in that scene We wanna make sure that that whole entire scene matches So that whenever the camera angles change they don’t look like they were shot in different days, or you know, it doesn’t look off. Everything looks like it was shot in one continuous motion So that’s the whole thing about color correcting And we wanna do that first. So for example: the exposure, that’s part of the color correcting. Making sure like the highlights are not overblown and stuff like that So, for me the exposure, the way I like it it is pretty much spot on I wouldn’t really change it but some people might say it’s a little bit underexposed and you can look at tools, specific tools that you can see if it is underexposed but I look at more like how I like it if I see it and it looks good for me that’s the way I color correct, ok? And that’s the thing: there’s no right or wrong way to do it, so I went ahead and did plus 0.2 exposure And some people might say “Gosh Armando, that’s like really good I would leave it alone” For me I like more of a darker look, so And you’ll see that a lot on my videos, so I’m gonna go ahead and just zero it out Um, next I’ll touch the contrast So, I wanna bring up the contrast just a tad maybe to about 20-25 Um, actually it looks pretty good on the 20 down, little bit to 21. Actually that looks pretty good. So basically what contrast does is it makes the darks darker. And the highlights a lot brighter so it basically almost Um, gives it that punch that contrasty look That you really want, um I really like to add a little bit of contrast not too much Um, but it’s something that, again, personal preference. I’ll show you guys if you overdo it It kind looks overdone, right? Overcut. So let’s go back to about 20. 22 is good Highlights look really good to me I’ll bring it up just a tad so about 13 looks fine And then the shadows, again, I like that dark image, so I like to crush my shadows And I tend to do that a lot, so Maybe just like negative 5. I don’t wanna do too much But just a little bit. OK. Now, whites that’s basically all of the whites that you see like the highlights If you’re wearing a white shirt or if there’s like a white background You can bring those up or down so this is actually a really good way to either bring it up or bring it down And this is case, looks fine to me. Not gonna touch it. Blacks is the opposite. This is like my hair, this is like the tree. Again, looks fine to me so I’m gonna leave it alone. Now one of the things about shooting a video, you can shoot it in a very flat picture profile Which means like I’m gonna go ahead and Turn the effects off This looks pretty flat, now, this was a custom profile that I created inside my Sony camera Now, you can shoot very flat works, just like completely disaturated But I kind of had it in a way where I would be able to work with it easily in post, so… Uh, in terms of saturation I do like my images a little bit saturated not too much so I’m go ahead and do 110. Oops, not 11, 110, there you go! That is looking a lot better, that’s the look that I want so looks really good. Now, again, if you look at the Sony image you can start seen… Look at my skin tones right here speacially on my fingers They look very reddish, so I can go back to the tint And maybe do negative… Let’s go ahead and do… negative 8! There it goes! It looks a lot better already. So you can always go back and adjust. Depending on how the image looks of course So now everything looks good. I got everything pretty much balanced out to the way I remember seeing it. Or the way I like the “look” right? So now the next thing is the creative process. This is the color grading uh… uh… part. So, color grading is basically a specific look you wanna give your film, or your video So for example: if you guys ever seen “Mad Max” that has a very warm yellowish tone And the reason for that is because they wanna make sure that when you’re watching that video looks like the desert is very hot. Something completely opposite to that is like “The Matrix” “The Matrix” is very cool, very greenish tones So again, it’s the look and feel that you wanna portray as a filmmaker and you wanna give that to your audience. Same thing like something like “Saving private Ryan” it’s a very desaturated colors, granted that was shot in film so is treated differently But again, that’s the look and feel that they went for to make sure that that video or that film looks like it was shot, you know, back in, you know, World War II So, a lot of people like to use Luts Adobe has some actually pretty great built-in Luts and we can cicle through them so if you just hit the right tab, like, this is called Cinespace, and if I click on it Pretty agressive. Now, of course you can tone it down by the intensity. That’s one thing I love about Premiere is you can kind of… it’s basically like setting the oppacity to like 50% so it just blends it in really nicelly One of my favorites Luts that I actually do tend to use quite a bit It’s called Fuji Eterna 250D. I love this Lut. In fact, I’m go ahead and apply it and show you guys that looks pretty good. In fact, if I probably take it down to maybe… 50% I could almost say Just the way that looks looks awesome, so, I’m go ahead and turn the effects off Basically the color grade that we did That’s before, and this is after. I mean, seriously, I could leave that and I’d be happy, but, For the sake of this demo, I’m actually gonna turn the creative part out of it, We’re just gonna do all from scratch. So, no Luts today, or no Luts in this particular look. And then Faded Film is the next thing we can do So we talked a little bit about Faded Film in a video I did and I’ll leave that one linked down bellow So Faded Film is exactly what that tells you wants to give your film or your video a faded look. I’m go ahead and crank it up a little bit. And it doesn’t look bad, I mean, at 24% It looks nice, I mean, it brings up the shadows quite a bit over here on this side. And you can see, it’s a little bit… it’s not too grainy but it’s… It looks nice And I can live with it, and I’m ok with it but not for this, this is not the look I want So, Faded Film: 0 Now the other thing that I do on my cameras I turn the sharpening all the way down. So I like to add sharpening in post And typically I do about 10 to 15 depending on the shot. I feel like the shot is pretty good at the way it looks I’ll just add a little bit of sharpening so I’m go ahead and add 10. Now again, I like very saturated images, I like very… uh… images that look vibrant So Vibrance it just that it’s gonna add more vibrance to the image it’s gonna add more color. What I’m gonna do is just bring this up. Usually I like to use about 30. So 27 looks great to me as is. I can even add a little bit more saturation but no, I’m leave as is. Now, there’s thing thing, or people like to call it the “Hollywood Look” And that’s where the highlights are orangy and the shadows are very cool So you can do that here. Here’s where you can do the “Hollywood Look” So the highlights, we’re gonna go ahead and do them a little bit more orangy and then the shadows we’re gonna make them cooler And that gives it that Hollywood vibe. A lot of people like to use it, you don’t have to but, I mean, it does look pretty cool. Uhm, so that’s that… The curves… Now, remember I told you, For whatever reason, Sony just loves those magenta colors And I still feel like my fingers have that reddish tint So here’s where I can go ahead and take care of that, so, in the curves, I can go ahead and just click on this little, uh… The red channel the red basically saturation curve and just bring it down a hair. Just a little bit. Just a hair. That’s it. And that made a big difference. Now watch pay attention to my… to my actual fingers. I’m gonna go ahead and turn the effect off And then I’m go ahead and turn it back on. That looks a lot more balanced to me Now if you are shooting in S-log or very flat a lot of people like to do this, They’ll go back… Let’s go back to the white one here and they’ll bring the highlights up a little bit and then they’ll crush the shadow, almost creating like a little S curve Now, since I didn’t shoot this is S-log my curve is not gonna to be as agressive But that looks pretty good. I’m gonna go ahead and actually leave that Uhm, the other thing is if I want the greens to kind of pop more I can even do this by this hue saturation curve, or not curve, excuse me, this wheel and I’m gonna go ahead and just select the green here And then watch. Pay attention to actual tree here. Look how aggressive that looks, well I can bring it down, disaturate it. So, let’s go ahead and just bring it up a little bit, make the greens a little bit more aggressive I like that. Again, it looks… For some may look fake but that’s the look that I want, ok? So far this image is looking pretty good. The next part is the color wheels So this is where we can adjust the shadows, the mid tones and the highlights So, again, I can go ahead and the mid tones if… Mid tones look pretty good. Actually I wanna bring up the mid tones a little bit higher, so that looks pretty good right there, and then The shadows I feel like I can also bring them up just a tad more or, excuse me, that was highlights Shadows, there we go! Right there! That looks pretty good! I’m very happy with this image, Let’s go ahead and look again! What it looks like before And then what it looks like after. So a huuuge difference And we’re not using any Luts this is all done in Adobe.. uh… Premiere The last thing is secondary color. Now I do tend to use this from time to time because Again, sometimes I like things a little bit more saturated, so what I like to do is I like to you know, for example: if I wanted a specific item to be a different color or if I wanted to make it or enhance it more I’d use a secondary color. I’m show you guys how to do this. So you have this little dropper tool, I’m go ahead and select the tree Punch in right here and then what you wanna do is click on Color/Gray, ok? So this is gonna show me the area that has been selected And then I’m gonna go ahead and click on this little plus sign for the little dropper. I’m gonna just keep adding. Actually that’s pretty good just add a couple more areas here. Just keep adding I think I actually did a pretty good job with that second one. Oops! Too much! Uhm… There you go! I’m just gonna leave it like that So now I’m gonna go ahead and uncheck Color/Gray and watch this I’m gonna turn the saturation really high See? Or I can disaturate the tree. See? Look at the difference; So you can select different colors So a lot of times even people that shoot weddings Maybe she is holding on to red roses or something like that the roses are the only thing in color and everything is in black and white You can do a lot of cool special effects with this so you can separate colors and stuff like that So, this is a very cool tool that you can use. I have it at 110 saturation for the tree which I think looks great. So, overall I would probably leave my image as is. I mean, this looks pretty good, probably the only last thing that I would do Is going to Vignetting, because remember, I’m holding a phone So I want to emphasize. I want my audience to look at that phone. So I’m gonna add a little bit of Vignetting, so I’ll probably add like negative 1 And that’s it, like the center focus, or the focus is on that phone So, I’ll go ahead and turn Vignetting off and on. Again, this is the look that I want. There’s no right or wrong way to do it. So, uhm, if you like it leave it on, if you don’t turn it off I tend to use Vignetting whenever I wanna emphasize on a particular product I’m gonna go ahead and leave that on and so far that looks really good So, why am I showing you Sony footage? Because I shot this a long time ago when I used to shoot a little bit more flatter compared now to Uh, a trick that I want to talk to you guys about on my Canon 5D Mark IV And this has nothing to do with Canon in particular It just has to do with something that I’ve learned and I’m gonna give credit to Devon Supertramp Cause I actually learned this from him or I got this tip from him And it’s: whenever a shoot a video I tend to pretty much set the camera to the colors that I want In other words, why complicate my life and shoot in like, S-log, Or shoot something in a very flat profile and have so much work to do later. Now, that’s great if you’re filming a movie, or if you need something or you’re gonna send it off to somebody else to color grade and they need to be able to push those colors But for me, I wanna keep it as simple as possible So the way I set my Canon is I wanna make sure that the way I see it on camera is exactly the way I want it to be almost pretty much final So there’s the picture right here. This is a video file that I shot using my airpod video NOw, if you look at this image, it looks fantastic, I mean, You could… this is, this is raw. I mean, not raw like video file, Like this is what I shot is exactly… What you see is what you get basically. And this is it. There’s nothing, there’s… No edits have been done to this video file And a lot of people would say “Gosh Armando, that looks fantastic” And it does. It actually looks pretty good. But we’re still gonna go ahead and tweak this video here We’re gonna go ahead and make it a little bit better So the first thing I would do to this is add a little bit more warmth cause I like Yeah, there we go. Just that nice warm. That made already a huge difference And again, I’m a huge fan of Canon colors so in terms of like tint Haha I don’t have to mess with it, I mean it look great! Exposure is pretty much spot on. The car is a little bit over exposed, but I’m ok with that because I do wanna portray that it was a golden hour So, again, temperature is very important because you know golden hour you know is a lot warmer and stuff like that. So highlights I do wanna tone that down a little bit So I’m go ahead and just notch it down to maybe like negative 30 And remember depending on the type of video camera that you’re using you’re able to push the image a lot more because some cameras you’re not able to do that like as soon as you start pushing the image things start to fall apart and Canon has, for me personally, one of the best cameras including even the Panasonic GH5 you get 10 bit 422 And you’re able to really push the image a lot and you know, go each direction Unless you’re shooting like a RED and you’re shooting raw, you can do pretty much endless possibilities It’s like you’re shooting in god mode basically. Uh, shadows look great to me, again, I like a very punchy look So, I’m gonna crush my shadows I think negative 22 looks really good I mean, the image just looks at the before and after. Before. After. I mean, over all looking really nice Our whites, because again, we got a little bit of whites here I wanna tone that down just a hair I think that’s good. Negative 15. Black’s perfect, and then let’s go ahead in creative Now let’s go ahead and use a Lut, let’s use one of my favorites Luts which is Fuji. Oops! Fuji, there it is. And I’m actually gonna turn it down. That looks really good, but I’m gonna turn it down just a little bit I’m gonna go 50% Wow, I had a Faded Film on accident. haha Alright! 50%! Lovely! Lovely, lovely picture, ok? Don’t wanna add any Faded Film. But that looks great. Uh, the “hollywood look”, ok? So highlight just bring it up a little bit to the orange And then the shadows bring them, cool them down. Loving it! Loving that picture! Again, we’re not messing a lot Again, this is what I’m telling you about, if you get the image right on camera you just have to make small little tweaks And that was the whole point. Curves, not gonna mess with it, I think I’m very happy with the curves the only thing I actually forgot here is satu… Not saturation! Excuse me a sharpening. Just a little bit. 10 is fine. That’s that’s basically it. I don’t wanna add vibrance, image looks great. I don’t wanna add any, you know, Faded Film, I don’t wanna add any of the other stuff And then finally, uh, Vignette. That’s the only thing I’d probably add to this image cause I wanna emphasize on the airpod So I’m gonna go ahead and do negative 1, and that looks awesome See, that’s what I’m saying like, why complicate my life? Look how quickly I did or was able to color grade the Canon file because I did everything on camera basically Compared to something like Sony where I’d shoot a little bit more flatter and it would just take me a lot longer to push the colors around So, let’s go ahead and look at the before Which now when I look at the before it loks a lot different now it doesn’t look as great anymore, right? and now the after, that looks like a movie! You look at this frame The only thing I need to add is cine bars, you know? and this looks like a freaking movie and that’s basically it, I mean, I don’t complicate my life. Adobe Premiere is very awesome when it comes to the tools that it has for color grading or color correcting I mean, everything else, this video, or this image looks fantastic and this is the actual image that you saw if you guys watched my airpod video This is exactly the way I color graded it So, let me know if you guys have any questions, obviously there’s a lot more to it there’s more advanced tools that you can use but for the most part this is a basic Uh, how I basically do everything when it comes to color grading. I mean, I don’t really complicate my life too much. I like to shoot like I said everything in camera. A lot of people like: “Wow, did you shoot in log?” Like they think… They think in order to get a great image you have to shoot in log There’s a huge misconception If it looks good on camera, then that’s the way it’s gonna look whenever you put it in post prodution So, anyhow guys, I hope you guys enjoy this video. If you like these types of videos make sure you give it a thumbs up and also reshare them because it does help out the channel. Follow me on Snapchat and Instagram Stories for behind the scenes Thanks again for watching! And you guys will catch me in the next one Adiós! [Music]

Canon EOS 1300D : Rebel T6 DSLR camera video review and manual – youtube

Canon EOS 1300D : Rebel T6 DSLR camera video review and manual – youtube


Hello, are you interested in the Canon 1300D or Rebel T6? Well you should take a look at a superb Manual which has been specially written for this DSLR camera. With over a hundred pages, it covers everything from setting up with the basic functions to understanding all the menus and navigating through all the tabs and settings. It tells you about the Dial Modes, the Flash and the Autofocus, how to shoot great Portraits and Landscapes and Action photography and it also shows you how to shoot great video with the 1300D. As well as the Manual you also get four hours of over-the-shoulder training videos which gives you great detailed instruction on how to setup the Wi-Fi connectivity, how to use Flash how to use the Creative Filters and much much more. It has been written by photography professionals and both the Manual and the video captions are in English. If you want to take a look at our Manual then why don’t you click on the link here or the one below in the description, and you can download a free sample with two of our exclusive videos ABSOLUTELY FREE and you’ll also get a Discount Code which will give you twenty percent off our digital manual. Just click on the link and you can download our free sample straightaway!

What does DSLR mean? A simple explanation of how your camera works

What does DSLR mean? A simple explanation of how your camera works


Today we want to give you the easiest explanation
of what DSLR means so you will never forget. Hi Photographers , Welcome to Easy Camera
Lessons. The best photographs evoke emotion and tell real stories. We’ve designed these
lessons to help you to feel more confident to get out there and tell your stories with
your photographs. The letters DSLR actually tell us a lot about
our cameras’s design, the D is really obvious because it’s a digital camera but what about
the rest? Okay so let’s get on to the S in DSLR. The
S stands for single and it means single lens because before the SLR design cameras had
one lens on the top to look through and one lens to shoot through. When they invented
the the SLR they came up with this amazing technology that meant that the light that
came into the camera and the image is the same image that you see through your view
finder. The L in DSLR stands for lens, so know we
have D for Digital, S for Single and L for Lens. What does the R stand for? The R in DSLR stands for Reflex and it’s a
shortened version of reflection. The reason why is some amazing technology that’s here
inside your camera. When your image comes into your camera it
hits a little mirror and then it bounces up and goes into a prism that sends it out into
your eye exactly the same as you see it through the lens. When you hear a real clunk when you photograph
part of that is actually your mirror . It stops R for Reflecting for a minute and it
bounces up and the image goes straight into your sensor, so instead of coming in and hitting
the mirror and going up , the image is going straight through to your sensor to record
your photograph. So there you go DSLR, you’ve learnt something
easy one more thing to keep up there for when you
need it.

Are Camera Gimbals worth The Hassle?

Are Camera Gimbals worth The Hassle?


Are Camera Gimbals Worth The Hassle? To find out I tried out the FeiyuTech G6 plus to get stable footage you either need
good in-camera stabilization or an external gimbal for my videos I like to
have stable footage but getting stable footage can be a challenge particularly
when not using a tripod so in this video I compared the FeiyuTech G6 plus to the
internal stabilization provided within the cameras I’m using I tested out a small Canon DSLR, a Sony
compact camera and a tough compact Olympus camera first of all you have to
set the gimbal up and balance it for your specific camera If you change camera or you change lens
you’re gonna need to rebalance the gimbal it took me three and a half
minutes the first time I balance my canon 200D to me that’s too long packing away is also a hassle as you have to pack away the gimbal and if you want to
pack it away in the case it comes in you have to reset it so it fits in the
case in-camera stabilization is improving all
the time using electronic stabilization in your cameras you get a slight crop
the Sony hvx 90 has three levels of stabilization and you can see the crop
when you go to the most stable version For many of my videos I’ve been using a
GoPro Hero seven black to capture stable footage but the footage I get from my
GoPro Hero seven black does not look as nice as the footage I get from my
smaller cameras oy my dslr’s as you can see the gimbal is better than
the in-camera stabilization or no stabilization So what have I decided after using the Freya
tech g6 plus? I’ve actually decided it’s not worth it I have the Vlog pocket I
have a GoPro Hero seven black I can just put my smartphone in the vlog pocket
without needing to balance it I can just turn on my GoPro Hero seven black purely
because of the fiddly nature of the gimbal I don’t think it’s worth it you

Focal Length Explained 1 – Don’t just zoom – MOVE!

Focal Length Explained 1 – Don’t just zoom – MOVE!


Quite often when you go out shooting
with your camera you’ll probably see a scene that you think’s interesting; frame
it up a bit and then zoom around with your zoom to try and get the composition
that you want, but there is a much better way of doing things than this. If you
consider your zoom as a selection of prime lenses, by prime lenses I mean
lenses which can’t zoom, they have fixed focal lengths like 18, 40, 50, 90, 150 whatever it may be. If you use a prime lens you can’t zoom
so you have to move yourself backwards and forwards in order to frame the shot
that you want. When you start controlling your focal length you can control what
the picture looks like, what’s in it and what isn’t, but how do you know which
focal length you’re going to need for which shot that you’re going to take? I’m
going to show you but to do so I’m going to need a nice, friendly, helpful
assistant called Natasha. Hello Nat! This is Jane’s daughter Natasha and
she’s kind of… well I guess I’m your evil stepdad am I that bad?
– Ahhh I can put up with you Mike Ah she’s sweet! Right Nat, could you come and stand here for a moment, go that way
a little bit, there we go – perfect. supposing Natasha and I were standing in our own the garden or something rather than in the street which is a little odd,
I might just think ‘Ah there’s Nat, that would make a nice picture’ stand there and zoom
around and just sort of zoom in and out like that and take a picture and it’s
going to be okay, but I could get a better result if I chose the focal
length for the shot. I’m going to show you a little exercise here which I would
like you to repeat afterwards. What I’m going to do is take the same picture of
Natasha over and over again but at different focal lengths, so you can see
what happens to the environment around her. Now this is going to involve a bit of
lens changing and fiddling around so you may have to bear with me for a minute.
Nat can we go over here? The reason I’ve chosen in the middle of a street is
because you need somewhere which has got sides that go off into the distance and
that has an end behind. Now it’s really important when you compose your shot that you compose it exactly the same each time, so I’m going to give Natasha probably about
a hands width of sky above her head, that’s going to be the very top of the
picture and the bottom of the picture is going to be this seam at the top of
her dress – that will be at the bottom of the frame each time. So first off 10
millimeters, now I’ve got to get right into your personal space here Nat to get the
seam at the top of your dress and only a handful of sky there it is – oop no – there it is – perfect. Now zoom the lens, I’m going to double it to 20 millimeters and do the same thing.
Now that’s made Nat come closer so I’ve got to move back a bit and that’s
only subtle – there it is. All right now we’re going to a longer
lens, from 20 millimeters (camera straps drive me me on the bend)
let’s go to 35 millimeters. So frame the same shot, now I have to move back
because the lens has got longer – again handbreadth of sky, seam on the dress,
excellent. Let’s double that, let’s go out to 70 millimeters so again, she’s
really filling the frame now because it zoomed on to her, so I move back a
bit and very carefully line up – this is a great exercise – oh you blinked, don’t blink!
Right, there we go. Now we want to go out further. I’m gonna
have to change the lens because the next set of focal lengths go out a long way.
We’re going to go from 10 millimeters right out of 500 that means I’m going to
use a whopper of a lens. Even if you don’t have lenses this kind of focal
length, please go and repeat this exercise because it really will help you
understand what on earth it is I’m talking about. Now with the last one at
70 I’m to do the next one at 150, so I’ve set the zoom on the lens I’m not going to
zoom in and out I’m going to frame the shot up with Natasha. Oh look that wasn’t
a bad guess, I’m actually going to go a little bit closer, here we go… train your
eye to look around the viewfinder to line up these gaps like the the bottom
of the dress and the hand breadth of sky. Let’s zoom then on out to 250. Again
Natasha will have come closer in the lens so I’ve got to move back to get the
same shot. Here we go, line up the elements, the gap at the top
and the seam on the dress and then finally we’re going to go all the way out from
250 to 500 millimeters so I’m moving back again. The environment behind
Natasha is changing with each of these shots and this one I promise, you would
never know we were standing in a street… but there’s a lot of fiddling to
get this right – still too close – there it is Good stuff. Nat! Come and have a look So beginning at 10 millimeters, here we go.
Here you are at 10 millimeters. yeah you see how it’s pulled Natasha’s face forward? But look
I’ve got the bottom of the picture as the seam of the dress, the top of the
picture but a handbreadth of sky. As we move on from 10 to 20, see how it’s
changed? Natasha has got a more normal shape. Also look, the cars and
the houses jump forward as we flick between them. Moving on out from there I
think we went to 50 which is a much more normal looking Natasha.
As we move on through – oop we want the other camera as we’re now out to 100 or
so. You see how everything’s starting to take a step forward
each time we extend the focal length until now you don’t know you’re in a
street, and we get to the very last shot there’s no hint of a house or anything.
We’ve just got a clear grey background which is actually the tarmac of the
streets as it goes off up the hill in the distance. This is all you need to do, it
doesn’t matter what you practice this with. If you don’t have a Natasha to take
into the street just put your camera bag on a table in the park or something like
that and take the same shot over and over again, changing the focal length and
moving back so that you get the idea of what’s going on
to the environment and then look at all the pictures one after the other.
This isn’t just the realm of a digital SLR you could do the same thing with a
little compact camera anything that has a zoom on it. If you’re cycling along the sea wall you might not want to carry a monster like that.
Natasha would you mind? We’re going to do a very brief one. Here you go, over
there a bit. If I set the zoom to its widest take the same picture of Natasha getting
right into her personal space, good stuff Nat, and then zoom it to it’s
longest zoom, do the same thing move back. You know if you’re at a party and just got a little camera and you think ‘Oh I’ll take a picture…’ There we go, as you can see the
two are very, very different. Don’t just think I’m going to go and try this in
the morning. Once you start treating your zoom lens as a series of prime lenses
and moving yourself around not being lazy, you’ll really set loose the magic
of your camera and your photography. Don’t leave it, get out there right this
minute! Go and try this.