Frank Gehry Masterclass Review

Frank Gehry Masterclass Review


Eric here with 30 by 40 Design Workshop. I’ve just completed Frank Gehry’s MasterClass,
this is my review of it: what to expect, what you’ll get, who I think it’s for, my favorite
lessons, and whether I think it’s worth taking. You’ve probably heard the quote by Jim Rohn
that says, “you are the average of the five people you spend the most time with”; if
you’re a regular viewer of the channel you’ll know that I live and practice architecture
on an island just off the coast of Maine and although it’s not the most remote place in
the world, it is isolated and I’m always looking for ways to increase the amount of time I
spend immersed in new ideas and around other thought leaders. Taking master classes is one of the ways I
do this. The courses are delivered, by-and-large, via
talking head style video chapters ranging in length between 5 and 16 minutes. Together they guide you through the motivations
of Gehry’s design philosophies and his creative process and each is peppered with personal
and project related anecdotes from his expansive career. You’ll receive a downloadable PDF course workbook
with additional reading and recommended resources as well as “homework.” You’ll also have access to a private forum
and office hours where students can upload videos and receive feedback from other classmates. Select students will apparently have the chance
to have their work critiqued by Gehry himself which is presumably why they are preferring
video over written submissions. The class is self-paced, meaning you’ll have
access to all the course content immediately once you enroll. It’s divided into 17 chapters or short lessons
and this includes a short introduction and a summary. This one, like all MasterClass courses, gives
you lifetime access for $90. The quality is nearly flawless. MasterClass is known for their high production
value and in this regard, it doesn’t disappoint. It’s cinematic and beautiful to look at
and the quality definitely matches Gehry’s authority on the subject matter. Most of the class is set in his never-before-seen
model archive and the dolly shots revealing the intricate details of his models I thought
were especially engaging. I kept hoping for more of that though. The parts I enjoyed most were where Gehry
would interact with the models recounting the precise decisions that led to the finished
architecture. He seemed most at ease at these points as
well. Now, it’s unreasonable to expect anything
more than a superficial overview of the profession, of his ideas, and his work in a course like
this especially at this price point. The parts that resonated with me were the
ones where I could directly see how the ideas being discussed translated into the built-work. Hearing Gehry’s thought process is engaging
and enlightening, but given the compressed time format they are for the most part delivered
in generalities. We see glimpses of his work, but aren’t really
immersed in it. Even the setting – in his model archive – the
models are treated as backdrops rather than devices for teaching. This, in my mind, is just a missed opportunity. We hear the struggle of a lengthy, celebrated
career, the failures, and the achievements, but we’re left to guess at the transformative
act whereby the eloquent serpentine sketches are magically converted into the titanium
clad museum in Bilbao, for example. We’re left wondering about the alchemy it
takes to manifest his architecture. As an architect, I have nothing but respect
for the talent and skill it takes to navigate the myriad forces affecting the construction
of such wonderful, sculptural, unconventional, and risky architecture. The musings in the course, however, don’t
offer a deeper understanding of how that happens only that he’s very good at it. In this way, it’s one-dimensional. All that said, the supplementary material
seeks to remedy this by offering avenues for your own, self-directed, deeper explorations. If you’re looking for process and more of
our raw look inside his practice you should check out Sydney Pollack’s documentary, “Sketches
of Frank Gehry.” I’ll link it up in the cards. I think there are three that stand out for
me. They are: Generating Ideas, Design Obstacles,
and Residential Projects. The chapter on Generating Ideas felt the most
relatable and human to me. I was able to get a genuine sense of what
his design process is like and it was reassuring to hear that he suffers from the same procrastination,
the same fears, and insecurities that I feel when taking on a new project. In the Design Obstacles lesson there’s a wonderful
discussion about this notion he has that within all the constraints of building he assumes
he has about 15% of freedom to make his art. This chapter accurately portrays the reality
of practice, which really is like a complex puzzle. Building is difficult and failures are bound
to be a part of the process. All of this is to highlight the fact that
creating the architecture he’s created – building timeless work – is exceedingly difficult. The chapter on Residential Projects found
me taking notes on process that directly apply to my practice and I can see how it would
offer the casual observer a window into the process of what it’s like to work with a “starchitect”
on the design of a home, something very few people will ever experience or be able to
afford. Now, Gehry is a polarizing figure in the architectural
world. You’ll either love or hate his work, rarely
is there an in-between. He’s also one of the few architects who defies
the art and science equilibrium architecture so often equivocates. To me, he’s more artist than engineer, although
he relies heavily on engineering to achieve his art. This – in part – is what drew me to take the
course, to discover how I might cultivate the artist’s mindset in a field where there’s
immense commercial pressures on our work. Another reason I enrolled is that I have a
hard time with his work; it defies sensibility to me. So, I wanted a deeper understanding of his
motivations. And then, of course, this kind of personalized
access to the mind and design process of a world-renowned architect, it’s still a novel
thing. Who wouldn’t jump at the chance to learn from
this level of architect, a true master? So, even if you disagree with his motivations
or the physical architecture I think you’ll come away with a better appreciation for how
he’s arrived at the work. Not to mention the fact that Gehry has run
an office since 1964, and it’s one that’s created – what are sure to be – the enduring
architectural icons of our time and that alone demands study and respect. All of the MasterClasses I’ve taken are general,
skin-deep explorations, of fascinating vocations. Naturally, it’s difficult to get very deep
on such complex topics like filmmaking, music production, or architecture in such a short
course. In this way, all MasterClasses suffer from
an audience problem. It’s likely that the information won’t be
detailed enough for a practicing professional, yet for the layperson some of the subject
matter may still be too esoteric to have relatable meaning. However, that doesn’t mean there isn’t an
immense amount of value here. It’s hard to go wrong if you’re interested
in learning more about Gehry’s work, if you’re just interested in the architectural
profession, if you’re an architecture fan, or a student, or a professional, or you’re
from another creative profession looking for some cross-pollination; some external inspiration. I came away with a better understanding of
a master practitioner’s design process and some meaningful advice that I’m already applying
in my own practice. This class, in his own words, isn’t designed
to teach you to be like Frank Gehry. As he often emphasizes, we don’t need more
Frank Gehry’s in the world, what we need is people to be comfortable being themselves
and, to me, that’s the real point of all of his teaching. Now, if you’re a technical learner, looking
for precise, tutorial-like specifics, this probably isn’t your course. But, if you’re looking for a one-on-one, conversational
peek into the career and life of a master architect, you’ll love it. It’s inspiring to know that even – or especially
– rogue figures can succeed. And, I think you’ll find his notoriously prickly
personality, endearing. Now, if I had a criticism it’s that there’s
a little too much talking head. Video is an opportunity to narrate a story
with movement and it’s almost entirely missed here. To sit nearby and learn from a Pritzker Prize
winning architect with a massive body of built and unbuilt work behind him, a practitioner
in his 80s, who arrives to his studio each day and faces the blank page, it’s a great
opportunity and I’m certainly not a Gehry fanboy necessarily, just a perpetual student
of architecture. So my recommendation? I think there’s something for all of us to
learn from Frank Gehry, it’s an unqualified yes, I think you should take this course. You can sign up for the course using the links
in the cards above or the description below. So let me know in the comments: are you planning
to enroll? Hit that like button if I’ve helped you decide
in any way. Until next time, cheers!

CAREERS IN ANIMATION –  Certification Course,Degree,2D,3D, Animation studio,Salary Package

CAREERS IN ANIMATION – Certification Course,Degree,2D,3D, Animation studio,Salary Package


Hello all this is devyani from freshersworld.com Welcome to our video channel on jobs and careers Today I will be talking about the career opportunities in Animation With Indian now regarded as a global hub of
animation industry, a career in animation promises to be a very lucrative deal. It is
a career option that is high on creative satisfaction and with experience and portfolio of work
monetary increase in evitable. This is a highly skilled based field that can be pursued by
those who have knack for design; out-of-the-box thinking and can generate innovative ideas
as well as concepts. The career field many expert feels that is
on a fast track as it is expected to grow at 20 per cent with en estimated worth of
Rs 1200 crores. The job market is going to bloom and industry will require skilled professionals
to work for them at good packages and positions. The Indian animation industry has a firm hold
and grasp on the two very important areas comprising of animation and special effects
designing. Aspirants with formal education in two dimensional
(2D) or three dimensional (3D) work skills, can easily become qualified animators. Students
can take up professional diploma degrees or certification course in animation and multimedia
as part of the higher study options. It would be advisable that aspirants seek specialisation
in several fields: three dimensional (3D) or two dimensional (2D) modelling, interaction
design, games design, animation, special FOX Creation and character design. The core requirement for an aspirant looking for a career in animation is that he/she should
have excellent creative and artistic capabilities. These include that they should have a flair
for drawing, caricaturing or sketching. Nowadays many national and international projects are
being deployed using Flash software so an incumbent should be having knowledge of it. One can study in well-known institutes like Maya Academy of Advanced Cinematics (Mumbai),
Arena Multimedia, Aptech Limited Pan India, Picasso-Centennial Animation College and the
very popular one started by filmmaker Subhash Ghai Whistling Woods International (Mumbai) Work wise the job options are far too many. With several broadcast companies with their
channels such as Cartoon Network, Pogo, Nickelodeon that are exclusively showing animation content
the grown is phenomenally vast. Even now animated characters are used in movies and advertisement
so animation studios need animators who can create eye catching characters to grab attention
of viewers. The other aspect of animation is Visual Special
Effect that is used in films both in India and abroad. Special effect studios are always
on look out for fresh and good talent who can conceptualise and create special effects
for films and animation movies. For starting as a junior animator post on-the-job
training from leading animation studio they can earn between Rs 10,000 and Rs 15,000 monthly.
On the other hand with experience and seniority an animator can fetch anywhere from Rs 30,000
and Rs 40,000. If one has an outstanding portfolio then studios will pay even Rs 50,000 a month.
For those who rise to the post of a creative director they can look to earns double the
amount. Even gaming industry is one lucrative option to opt for.
For all the jobs and career overview on this sector the students can log in to the www.freshersworld.com we will be back with such more videos so stay connected with us do not forget to hit the subscribe button below

4 Lessons in Creativity | Julie Burstein | TED Talks

4 Lessons in Creativity | Julie Burstein | TED Talks


Translator: Joseph Geni
Reviewer: Morton Bast On my desk in my office, I keep a small clay pot that I made in college. It’s raku, which is a kind of pottery that began in Japan centuries ago as a way of making bowls for the Japanese tea ceremony. This one is more than 400 years old. Each one was pinched or carved out of a ball of clay, and it was the imperfections that people cherished. Everyday pots like this cup take eight to 10 hours to fire. I just took this out of the kiln last week, and the kiln itself takes another day or two to cool down, but raku is really fast. You do it outside, and you take the kiln up to temperature. In 15 minutes, it goes to 1,500 degrees, and as soon as you see that the glaze has melted inside, you can see that faint sheen, you turn the kiln off, and you reach in with these long metal tongs, you grab the pot, and in Japan, this red-hot pot would be immediately immersed in a solution of green tea, and you can imagine what that steam would smell like. But here in the United States, we ramp up the drama a little bit, and we drop our pots into sawdust, which catches on fire, and you take a garbage pail, and you put it on top, and smoke starts pouring out. I would come home with my clothes reeking of woodsmoke. I love raku because it allows me to play with the elements. I can shape a pot out of clay and choose a glaze, but then I have to let it go to the fire and the smoke, and what’s wonderful is the surprises that happen, like this crackle pattern, because it’s really stressful on these pots. They go from 1,500 degrees to room temperature in the space of just a minute. Raku is a wonderful metaphor for the process of creativity. I find in so many things that tension between what I can control and what I have to let go happens all the time, whether I’m creating a new radio show or just at home negotiating with my teenage sons. When I sat down to write a book about creativity, I realized that the steps were reversed. I had to let go at the very beginning, and I had to immerse myself in the stories of hundreds of artists and writers and musicians and filmmakers, and as I listened to these stories, I realized that creativity grows out of everyday experiences more often than you might think, including letting go. It was supposed to break, but that’s okay. (Laughter) (Laughs) That’s part of the letting go, is sometimes it happens and sometimes it doesn’t, because creativity also grows from the broken places. The best way to learn about anything is through stories, and so I want to tell you a story about work and play and about four aspects of life that we need to embrace in order for our own creativity to flourish. The first embrace is something that we think, “Oh, this is very easy,” but it’s actually getting harder, and that’s paying attention to the world around us. So many artists speak about needing to be open, to embrace experience, and that’s hard to do when you have a lighted rectangle in your pocket that takes all of your focus. The filmmaker Mira Nair speaks about growing up in a small town in India. Its name is Bhubaneswar, and here’s a picture of one of the temples in her town. Mira Nair: In this little town, there were like 2,000 temples. We played cricket all the time. We kind of grew up in the rubble. The major thing that inspired me, that led me on this path, that made me a filmmaker eventually, was traveling folk theater that would come through the town and I would go off and see these great battles of good and evil by two people in a school field with no props but with a lot of, you know, passion, and hashish as well, and it was amazing. You know, the folk tales of Mahabharata and Ramayana, the two holy books, the epics that everything comes out of in India, they say. After seeing that Jatra, the folk theater, I knew I wanted to get on, you know, and perform. Julie Burstein: Isn’t that a wonderful story? You can see the sort of break in the everyday. There they are in the school fields, but it’s good and evil, and passion and hashish. And Mira Nair was a young girl with thousands of other people watching this performance, but she was ready. She was ready to open up to what it sparked in her, and it led her, as she said, down this path to become an award-winning filmmaker. So being open for that experience that might change you is the first thing we need to embrace. Artists also speak about how some of their most powerful work comes out of the parts of life that are most difficult. The novelist Richard Ford speaks about a childhood challenge that continues to be something he wrestles with today. He’s severely dyslexic. Richard Ford: I was slow to learn to read, went all the way through school not really reading more than the minimum, and still to this day can’t read silently much faster than I can read aloud, but there were a lot of benefits to being dyslexic for me because when I finally did reconcile myself to how slow I was going to have to do it, then I think I came very slowly into an appreciation of all of those qualities of language and of sentences that are not just the cognitive aspects of language: the syncopations, the sounds of words, what words look like, where paragraphs break, where lines break. I mean, I wasn’t so badly dyslexic that I was disabled from reading. I just had to do it really slowly, and as I did, lingering on those sentences as I had to linger, I fell heir to language’s other qualities, which I think has helped me write sentences. JB: It’s so powerful. Richard Ford, who’s won the Pulitzer Prize, says that dyslexia helped him write sentences. He had to embrace this challenge, and I use that word intentionally. He didn’t have to overcome dyslexia. He had to learn from it. He had to learn to hear the music in language. Artists also speak about how pushing up against the limits of what they can do, sometimes pushing into what they can’t do, helps them focus on finding their own voice. The sculptor Richard Serra talks about how, as a young artist, he thought he was a painter, and he lived in Florence after graduate school. While he was there, he traveled to Madrid, where he went to the Prado to see this picture by the Spanish painter Diego Velázquez. It’s from 1656, and it’s called “Las Meninas,” and it’s the picture of a little princess and her ladies-in-waiting, and if you look over that little blonde princess’s shoulder, you’ll see a mirror, and reflected in it are her parents, the King and Queen of Spain, who would be standing where you might stand to look at the picture. As he often did, Velázquez put himself in this painting too. He’s standing on the left with his paintbrush in one hand and his palette in the other. Richard Serra: I was standing there looking at it, and I realized that Velázquez was looking at me, and I thought, “Oh. I’m the subject of the painting.” And I thought, “I’m not going to be able to do that painting.” I was to the point where I was using a stopwatch and painting squares out of randomness, and I wasn’t getting anywhere. So I went back and dumped all my paintings in the Arno, and I thought, I’m going to just start playing around. JB: Richard Serra says that so nonchalantly, you might have missed it. He went and saw this painting by a guy who’d been dead for 300 years, and realized, “I can’t do that,” and so Richard Serra went back to his studio in Florence, picked up all of his work up to that point, and threw it in a river. Richard Serra let go of painting at that moment, but he didn’t let go of art. He moved to New York City, and he put together a list of verbs — to roll, to crease, to fold — more than a hundred of them, and as he said, he just started playing around. He did these things to all kinds of material. He would take a huge sheet of lead and roll it up and unroll it. He would do the same thing to rubber, and when he got to the direction “to lift,” he created this, which is in the Museum of Modern Art. Richard Serra had to let go of painting in order to embark on this playful exploration that led him to the work that he’s known for today: huge curves of steel that require our time and motion to experience. In sculpture, Richard Serra is able to do what he couldn’t do in painting. He makes us the subject of his art. So experience and challenge and limitations are all things we need to embrace for creativity to flourish. There’s a fourth embrace, and it’s the hardest. It’s the embrace of loss, the oldest and most constant of human experiences. In order to create, we have to stand in that space between what we see in the world and what we hope for, looking squarely at rejection, at heartbreak, at war, at death. That’s a tough space to stand in. The educator Parker Palmer calls it “the tragic gap,” tragic not because it’s sad but because it’s inevitable, and my friend Dick Nodel likes to say, “You can hold that tension like a violin string and make something beautiful.” That tension resonates in the work of the photographer Joel Meyerowitz, who at the beginning of his career was known for his street photography, for capturing a moment on the street, and also for his beautiful photographs of landscapes — of Tuscany, of Cape Cod, of light. Joel is a New Yorker, and his studio for many years was in Chelsea, with a straight view downtown to the World Trade Center, and he photographed those buildings in every sort of light. You know where this story goes. On 9/11, Joel wasn’t in New York. He was out of town, but he raced back to the city, and raced down to the site of the destruction. Joel Meyerowitz: And like all the other passersby, I stood outside the chain link fence on Chambers and Greenwich, and all I could see was the smoke and a little bit of rubble, and I raised my camera to take a peek, just to see if there was something to see, and some cop, a lady cop, hit me on my shoulder, and said, “Hey, no pictures!” And it was such a blow that it woke me up, in the way that it was meant to be, I guess. And when I asked her why no pictures, she said, “It’s a crime scene. No photographs allowed.” And I asked her, “What would happen if I was a member of the press?” And she told me, “Oh, look back there,” and back a block was the press corps tied up in a little penned-in area, and I said, “Well, when do they go in?” and she said, “Probably never.” And as I walked away from that, I had this crystallization, probably from the blow, because it was an insult in a way. I thought, “Oh, if there’s no pictures, then there’ll be no record. We need a record.” And I thought, “I’m gonna make that record. I’ll find a way to get in, because I don’t want to see this history disappear.” JB: He did. He pulled in every favor he could, and got a pass into the World Trade Center site, where he photographed for nine months almost every day. Looking at these photographs today brings back the smell of smoke that lingered on my clothes when I went home to my family at night. My office was just a few blocks away. But some of these photographs are beautiful, and we wondered, was it difficult for Joel Meyerowitz to make such beauty out of such devastation? JM: Well, you know, ugly, I mean, powerful and tragic and horrific and everything, but it was also as, in nature, an enormous event that was transformed after the fact into this residue, and like many other ruins — you go to the ruins of the Colosseum or the ruins of a cathedral someplace — and they take on a new meaning when you watch the weather. I mean, there were afternoons I was down there, and the light goes pink and there’s a mist in the air and you’re standing in the rubble, and I found myself recognizing both the inherent beauty of nature and the fact that nature, as time, is erasing this wound. Time is unstoppable, and it transforms the event. It gets further and further away from the day, and light and seasons temper it in some way, and it’s not that I’m a romantic. I’m really a realist. The reality is, there’s the Woolworth Building in a veil of smoke from the site, but it’s now like a scrim across a theater, and it’s turning pink, you know, and down below there are hoses spraying, and the lights have come on for the evening, and the water is turning acid green because the sodium lamps are on, and I’m thinking, “My God, who could dream this up?” But the fact is, I’m there, it looks like that, you have to take a picture. JB: You have to take a picture. That sense of urgency, of the need to get to work, is so powerful in Joel’s story. When I saw Joel Meyerowitz recently, I told him how much I admired his passionate obstinacy, his determination to push through all the bureaucratic red tape to get to work, and he laughed, and he said, “I’m stubborn, but I think what’s more important is my passionate optimism.” The first time I told these stories, a man in the audience raised his hand and said, “All these artists talk about their work, not their art, which has got me thinking about my work and where the creativity is there, and I’m not an artist.” He’s right. We all wrestle with experience and challenge, limits and loss. Creativity is essential to all of us, whether we’re scientists or teachers, parents or entrepreneurs. I want to leave you with another image of a Japanese tea bowl. This one is at the Freer Gallery in Washington, D.C. It’s more than a hundred years old and you can still see the fingermarks where the potter pinched it. But as you can also see, this one did break at some point in its hundred years. But the person who put it back together, instead of hiding the cracks, decided to emphasize them, using gold lacquer to repair it. This bowl is more beautiful now, having been broken, than it was when it was first made, and we can look at those cracks, because they tell the story that we all live, of the cycle of creation and destruction, of control and letting go, of picking up the pieces and making something new. Thank you. (Applause)

How to make an architectural portfolio (for Architects, Interns and Students)

How to make an architectural portfolio (for Architects, Interns and Students)


Okay, we’re talking about portfolios today. What to include, what not to include, where
to host yours, and tips for designing and maintaining one. We’ll cover everything you need to know
to make one that’s flexible and useful over time whether you’re a student or a professional. Be sure to stick around at the end for details
on how you can have your portfolio reviewed on the channel. Your portfolio is a professional statement
of who you are, the kind of work you do, and your process. It speaks for your brand in your absence and
everyone needs one. This is the last paper-based portfolio I created
back let’s just say, it was a long time ago the last time I was seeking employment
with another firm. Putting this together wasn’t terribly difficult,
but it also wasn’t very time efficient. And, it was expensive to maintain, keep up
to date, which is probably what kept me from regularly updating it. Because your portfolio is already out-of-date
when you publish it, a paper copy’s long-term utility is questionable. Now, I’m not going to show you how to create
one of these. You really only need one portfolio and that’s
a digital portfolio. Within the digital sandbox though there are
a subset of decisions you’ll need to make. Will you use an app on a tablet for example,
a multi-page PDF, a web-hosted portfolio, or a self-hosted website? No matter where you choose to host it, the
currency of a digital portfolio is imagery, usually in the form of J-PEGs. You’ll also need some text, a bio and a
backbone of metadata. Digital platforms allow your work to be easily
shared, collaged and manipulated and they can quickly be replaced with new work as you
complete it. They also allow you to use audio and video
to present your work. A digital portfolio’s distinct advantage
is related to online search and metadata. But we’ll get into that in a minute. Among digital portfolios, there are important
differences; not just any digital portfolio will suffice. Probably the easiest thing to do is to host
your work on someone else’s online platform. Free or low-cost online portfolio hosting
on sites like Behance, Issuu, Coroflot, and others offer modern, minimally styled portfolio
templates, which can be set up in a matter of minutes. But consider that you’re sitting beside
thousands of other designers looking for exactly the same thing you are: to stand out in a
crowd not to mention all those pop-ups and adverts. Ask yourself if that’s really the best place
to distinguish your brand. Another straightforward option is to install
an app like Morpholio or Portfolio on a tablet and curate your images there. It’s handy for face-to-face client or employer
presentations, but it suffers from some of the same limiting factors related to the physical
portfolio and you’re only an app update away from it no longer functioning as you’d
expect. This approach is effectively a digital picture
frame and ignores all the useful data embedded in your digital works. Data you could be using for discovery. Ideally, your goal should be to control every
digital asset you possibly can and all the branding surrounding it. Everywhere. If Behance ceases to exist tomorrow, or that
tablet app doesn’t work because you just updated your operating system, where does
that leave your portfolio? You can’t control what you don’t own. This is why I think the only real portfolio
option today is a self-hosted website. Now, this isn’t a difficult exercise, I
promise. If you don’t have one, I recommend using
Squarespace because the templates are minimally styled with simple navigation and full-screen
galleries. This allows your work to be the most prominent
content on the page and keeps you from spending more time designing the container for your
portfolio than the content inside. The best portfolios not only showcase your
work, they narrate who you are as a designer, how you see the world, and something about
your personal design process. Use it to narrate your story. At a minimum, I think your site should include
two pages an About page and a Portfolio page. As you have time you can build it out from
there. First, the Portfolio page. Only include your best work. You only have a short time to convince someone
you’re worth a second look, a couple of minutes at most. A few remarkable projects are preferable to
many half-baked ones. Supplement with minimal, descriptive text
in the sidebar. The infographic style which overlays paragraphs
of text on the image won’t be read by anyone online and it only serves to confuse the viewer. You should look to other professionals to
see how their portfolios are structured. Take note that they’re using properly exposed,
well-composed photographs of buildings, with deep blacks and white whites. Simple line work for floor plans, elevations
and sections when they exist and they directly present models and renderings without any
overlaid text. They’re forcing you to focus on the work,
not a sidebar or lots of text or fancy icons. You should learn from this. Precisely what you choose to show should be
influenced by the type of work you’re seeking. Now, this applies to students, interns, and
professionals alike. If you fill yours with slick computer renderings
and no sketches it tells me that your primary competency is computer rendering. If you’re seeking a computer modeling position,
that’s probably a good strategy. However, if you’re looking to be a lead
designer, show your process: your sketches, your models, alongside your renders. Sketches. Now, hand sketching and the ability to graphically
communicate your ideas is fundamental to our practice and it will always be. It’s one of the most sought after skills
in our profession at every experience level so be sure to include them in your portfolio. Models. When I see a hand-built model in a portfolio
I stop and take notice. I recognize, on this one, that it’s a personal
bias of mine. But, the reason I mention it is to encourage
you to research the places or people you want to work with. Understand what resonates with them. If you ring that bell, you’ll distinguish
your portfolio from everyone else’s in their eyes. This goes for businesses looking to establish
a presence in a niche or with a specific clientele as well. Computer Renders. I think computer renderings are fantastic
when done well. But I also think they’re a bit of a commodity
today. The best renders illustrate your artistic
viewpoint: a building’s true nature, the messiness of the world, a narrative, a story. This is much more appealing to me than rendering
every last shiny pane of glass and every perfect, happy, balloon-wielding child walking toward
it. Showing some versatility is a plus too, even
for seasoned pros. Sculpture, photography, drawing, furniture
design, filmmaking; whatever creative pursuits you engage in when you leave the studio should
have some sort of home in your portfolio. Including academic or theoretical projects
is usually your only option early in your career. As you begin practicing and building things,
always be photographing and documenting your work with your portfolio in mind. Process imagery typically gets lost along
the way when you’re busy, but it’s often just as compelling as the final work. It’s proof too of your skill as an architect
and your ability to shepherd your ideas through the battlefield of design and construction. There comes a point in your career when you’re
transitioning from student academic work to built-work. Tailor your portfolio to the narrative you’re
advancing. I would expect an intern architect to have
fewer built works than a newly licensed architect, while a mid-career architect is likely to
have all buildings and no academic work in their portfolio. The jump to professional photography is a
big step. But, think about the time investment of designing
and building the work. Isn’t that worthy of hiring another pro
to document it properly? It has little value if the photographs don’t
complement the quality of your design. And, image quality directly correlates to
what you can charge for your services. Again, it’s all about the narrative. Professional photography projects a narrative
of confidence to your clients and justifies your professional fee. If you can’t afford professional images
invest in a good DSLR and learn to use it along with Lightroom and Photoshop. Be sure to watch my video on what I use in
my studio. If you’re including project images from
a previous employer be sure to get permission and purchase the rights to use the images
on your site beforehand. Photographers – like architects – retain
the rights to their work, architects typically purchase a license to use the photos for marketing
purposes. Now, let’s get into the second page you
need on your website slash portfolio, the About page. This is your chance to show your personality. A brief bio is helpful just don’t get too
cheeky. Draft this as you might your Twitter or Instagram
bio. Everyone is sort of accustomed to quickly
skimming these for information and they can say a lot about your character with very few
words. Link up a PDF of your CV or your resume. Also, include links to your social profiles
somewhere on this page: LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram, etcetera. People can click as they want or need more
information. And, don’t forget to include your preferred
contact details and make sure it’s a professional email address, not something like: meat-boy
ninety-six at hotmail dot com. If you’re seeking an internship, or you’re
a student, you can list a range of relevant skills. Be sure though that if you list it a skill
that you can honestly stand behind your competency. Can you confidently make something with whatever
it is you’re listing? If the answer is yes, keep it otherwise leave
it off. Now, skills I would look for when hiring are
any that display your creative problem solving skillset. Hand graphics: can you sketch, draw, watercolor? If so, show me. Visual communication is extremely important,
what digital graphic skills do you have: Photoshop, Lightroom, InDesign? Architecture is as much about good communication
skills as it is about design skills an effective communication begins with writing. Do you blog? Have you published anything? Have you given any public presentations? Any web development skills? Do you know WordPress? Are you a social media influencer or expert? Tell me about your online marketing skills. Do you know anything about e-mail list development
using ConvertKit, AWeber, or Mailchimp? Then there’s CAD skills. Now, I don’t necessarily care what flavor
of CAD you know, because to me it’s just another tool; a means to an end. If you know one CAD program, chances are you
can learn any CAD program. How about digital modeling and rendering? Do you know SketchUp, 3DSMax, Rhino, Lumion,
etcetera? Present the skills you want to be hired for. Work that wasn’t designed by you. This sort of goes without saying, but this
should extend to projects you didn’t have a creative force in realizing. Almost all architecture is the result of a
team of people; architects understand this and if you’re working in a large firm, you
may not have generated the building concept. Honestly state your role. If you were part of a team say so, don’t
claim credit for something you didn’t do. Next up, old work. Your portfolio isn’t an archive of every
work you’ve ever completed. Populate it with your best and most current
work. Projects from five years ago might look dated. Next: a lot of text. People aren’t going to read a life history
or paragraphs of text, especially online. Structure your text for legibility. Think in the Heading One, Heading Two, Heading
Three style format. What’s the hierarchy of information you
want people to understand? Spelling errors. Enough said. Bad photos. If you don’t have good photography for a
project, leave it out. Poor photography calls into question your
other work as well and your judgment for including it. Next up, construction documents. I’m going to assume if you’re building
things in the world, you’ve sort of got this figured out and if you’re an intern
or graduate that you don’t yet. So, including these isn’t terribly useful. Next: irrelevant work experience. Unless you creatively mowed lawns into amazingly
detailed tartan grids as an art experiment, don’t include this kind of thing as work
experience. And, hobbies. If a hobby is a creative outlet for you, thread
examples into your portfolio gallery rather than sharing it as a separate interest out
of context. If you build your portfolio like this as a
stand-alone website perhaps the most useful by-products to you are the meta-skills you’ll
learn by doing it. These confer a real competitive advantage
to you as an applicant. If you know something about web development
chances are good you’ll have the basic skills to update nearly any website out there. If you’re familiar with blogging, it also
means you probably know something about writing, and you probably have a sense for what it
takes to visually and verbally communicate your ideas. It means you understand something about SEO
and search rankings and marketing. These are meta-skills that transfer to every
possible vocation you might consider in the future. So even if this exercise doesn’t land you
a job in architecture or a new client, you’ll have the experience that can be brought to
bear on a range of life paths and leveraged to shape your future. Without a website, you might as well not exist. But, just having one doesn’t guarantee you’ll
be discovered. The metadata you include in your site is as
important for discovery in search as the images you upload to your portfolio. Search engines can’t see images so they
rely on the metadata appended to the image when it’s uploaded. Make sure to include metadata for every image
you add to your site. Use minimal, keyword-rich text to describe
both your project pages and the images. Title each image descriptively, using the
alt-text field and make sure it’s sized to load quickly. Don’t expect five-meg J-PEGs to perform
very well in search. You want to optimize your images before you
upload them. Presenting your portfolio as a website is
a known, comfortable experience for most everyone in your target market. And, it doesn’t involve emailing around
fourteen-meg PDFs to a potential employer or client. You’ll simply send a link in your cover
email. When I receive a job inquiry with a fourteen-meg
attachment in my inbox, I delete it. I think it’s bad form to thrust a large
uninvited document into someone’s inbox especially without any kind of introduction. Contrast this with a friendly email that makes
a personal introduction and includes a link to a website that says something like, “Hey,
love your work especially the insert whatever project you like, uh, if you’re ever looking
for someone to complement your design team I’d so appreciate your consideration.” Now, the truth is I hear this kind of genuine
plea for a human connection so infrequently, that I’d absolutely click on the link and
look, even if I wasn’t hiring. Do you want to know what I do get all the
time? Those fourteen-meg PDFs attached to emails
that read, “Dear Sir or Madam, please look at my work and contact me at your earliest
convenience to discuss my potential employment with your firm. My resume and portfolio are attached for review.” These are immediately deleted and I can almost
guarantee that every architect I know would do the same. A website is a resource you can direct as
you wish, something you control. As you finish projects and make new connections
you can direct everything else you don’t control online – things like social media
profiles and email lists toward that asset and you can use it to your benefit. It’s easy to update and the metadata associated
with each update ripples through the Internet as Google’s spiders continually crawl your
site, opening it up to search traffic, referrals, and new opportunities. Now as I mentioned in the beginning of the
video, if you want to have a chance to have your portfolio reviewed on an upcoming YouTube
live-stream here, email me a link to your portfolio, no fourteen-meg attachments, right? And I’ll chose a few to critique in an upcoming
live-stream. Now, the only way I can get in touch with
you and let you know when I’ll be live-streaming, is if you’re a subscriber. So, if you’re not already subscribed be
sure to do so and click the bell so I can notify you when it’s time to tune in. Cheers.

The Invisible Artist: Blending Into Liu Bolin’s Paintings

The Invisible Artist: Blending Into Liu Bolin’s Paintings


[Music] you [Music] in idea she was your the user totally she one decision don’t see you totally sentences concern so well together so both of you see younger so you can to be a team to be lonely that’s what this isn’t even you used to look inside English who were fed to change teachers that page about the insomnia talking social ye ganache was when I used to taught you so eager than go to put the delete your vampa Oh watch me okay sir with your that copy don’t come daughter entangled she the food that was her death I found out that Berlin was coming to London to exhibit some of his previous work at a scream gallery in Soho my friend works at the gallery and said that he was going to be making some new work and said I should come down and get involved Berlin was creating two new pieces of work all involved money he was fascinated about how the British were very patriotic and he decided to use the Queen’s Head or Queens face in both of these [Music] you mean job today Amber what Orion on cookies you should yeah pochenko is a three-part nigga you you when you want we enter that I put on the Judoon in borders too soon since I’m not an installed on your arson now who triggered portrait and should put him for peace on the region Pathan Yamaha and so I hunted me get the yield on you you wouldn’t know what to say I would like you didn’t need to tell you something maybe look between the scenes I hope to be returned to the camp an example yeah soon baba necklace which I can see beyond what even is oh so no EMP so tense enough maker and children may opt children like a father say that you simply need to go back to the basic line generator hope you will just be young so is wrong Thursday the term city the function to your tacky the city to see niggas house today [Music] what to do control them all that evil say what the books you constantly taking me and my friends arrived on the Sunday morning we were really excited and there’s a real kind of buzz in the gallery itself there was a group of volunteer painters and a group of volunteers that were going to be painted we were one of the volunteers being painted we were given these great t-shirts which had white gridded lines and dots on them we were then asked to go into a room and have our photograph taken we were asked to stand very straight and tall against a black surface and keep our eyes wide open you have another bundle you will build her with young paper that’s how you’ll see soon there you go baby look on the shorts you sure here so much useful by you join you join your father each in Photoshop the linen cut and resized our images you brought all the people into the one surface of coins he made our layers opaque and place them where he wanted us we were then matched with one of the painters and told to stand very straight in front of a white wall he explained to his painters how important the shapes of the coins were as opposed to the details because when someone looks painting from a distance they’re more likely to pick up on something is wrong in the shape than the finer detail he uses acrylic paint and he wanted to make sure that color palette was the same over all of the different people the painters took the image that had been printed out and started to draw on the grid pattern and paint us in I didn’t realize how long the painting process was going to take it took three or four hours it was very hard to stand still it’s really interesting to see how villains work has progressed over the years from when he started just painting himself into pieces to now having a massive team and scaling the project’s up the idea of making someone invisible was quite a simple one but I think it’s a great way of highlighting a message or an issue but in our question do you even wouldn’t fit in a jeweler yes sir what in kinds of this room but use it well again I even come even continue singing I come to certain occasion on your way whatever she do to him you know usually valley girl to the up so the you needed me teach the condos how you call one go she’s a college here that box I’m gonna talk in the tribe or even maybe in the job dude kind of were the cookies room that’s me you put him so – cool KOCO five minutes she knows what done in Canada every issue the to me is referred to a teacher so I will put on in each other than to you so many years a quick but you let proven system audio that kind of 0.2% usually took in the pattern equal negative see the is Alicia Virginia convention was Emily usually unison young man and we hit C 1 del Virginia quicker Leno cheater yo Thunder who were waiting time that she todos [Music] you [Music]

Jerusalem Fine Art Prints Artists Books

Jerusalem Fine Art Prints Artists Books



slammin hot like the water from your day the Lochte room shall advance that the vow Shelly Potter and in Lowell saloon sheriff that woman and if of my gosh Kalama hotel a specimen don't a davao domination is a an a new pet name occult or by agencia Clairvaux da hammoudi me share dynamic event a Hotel Kiev Adagio thermo Cavett Mishima Stephanie can clear the collaborative Hall of Fame Shelley de chelly a racial yollop tech note bellum autumn autumn of Coachella wanna cover two big Italian what – tractor killing the rocky yourself short Amitabha Amitabha social manga words mu epsilon0 mystical allow in Alma Lazio valerian is me what I love about the studio is first of all the incredible technical abilities this is a place where there's never no there's maybe the answer not yet but there's always this constant pushing the limits of the technology and the papers to find a way to do something being here from the very beginning of the chiclet technology one might say that it has advanced in the last ten years incredibly the quality of the work is really unlimited well underneath Mahadeva technical Foose memorizer they yell it signify technical amaze and we had the Annie need Hampton my short break is over we are three cars Allah it's your Artemis the overheated Marcia was here a maximum stair hollowfication yeah Zelo he not an Aloha surface area Macomb co-organizer bell rings hello throw over gamma face it at the Warka door the machinist beholding let's hear that the virtual blossom Valley Aslan would call a Colima hot zone vltava result you

Can I Draw REALISM with only 12 Colored Pencils?

Can I Draw REALISM with only 12 Colored Pencils?



let's keep your expectations realistic for this video doing the realism challenge with 12 colored pencils is not going to be easy do keep in mind that when people do the realism challenge they use everything at their disposal a Crilley is the master of the realism challenge people use gouache for shadows and they use hundreds of different colored pencils just using 12 color pencils is going to be very difficult to pull it off but that's what this video is going to attempt and it may not be perfect as a result especially because I am not good at realism every time I attempt it goes horribly horribly wrong also learnt a bit from the last and first and only other time I did the realism challenge I picked something too small I picked something grayscale think it would be easier but the problem it was reflective so that the highlights were brighter than the white paper I was working on it just wasn't good so this time having learned from those mistakes I'm gonna go a little larger a little more colorful these art materials the sketchbook that I'll be using today and these twelve beautiful polychromos color pencils they're 20 times as fast as you can't polychromos color pencil polychrome it's polycomb it's competent that's really hard to do these are two of the incredible art supply line up in the Jazz's jazzy album the sale of this box will never happen again and sails in on the 31st of July so if you want the Jazz's jazzy art box you need to go check it out if you want to know what's in the box I'll link in the card in the description to the video where I'll share everything that's in the box and why I picked it for the box it goes into great detail you can check it out there if you want to know what people think of the box I'll link to the video where react to people's reactions to the box and it has a whole bunch of videos where people unbox it and share their so and if you want to know the people who make the box with me and know how its put together and where it comes from I'll link to the video where I go visit the people who made it over at smart but I really want to take time today to have a bit of fun with the sketchbook in the pencils these are some of the heroes of jazz's jazzy art box these are top notch I love this so much I know for a fact these are fantastic I literally so much about this sketchbook recent one of my new favorite kind of sketchbook this is a very nice sketchbook so there you go you don't have to take my word for it people love these things I love these things that's why they're in the box and if you want to get them as well as all the other amazing goodies you can go check out jazz this Jesse art box for a very very limited time now that sales are going to end let's get to the realism challenge so how this is gonna work is I'm gonna open this up and I'm gonna have two sides of the page and the challenge involves setting down a 3d object on one side over here on the left and then replicating that on the right in order to get the best things to try and replicate I of course raided my children's baby toy box I wanted a variety of colors that's got like a lot of complex shadow work so don't do something like that watch the spider I thought if I did that well that could look really cool yeah there's what's this this is a like a teething toy see how I touch it and like things move quite drastically like if the highlights change oh I can't let it move in fact I should pin like the book down with blue tack that feels pretty solid I think that's going anywhere what are our other options we've got some play-doh cutting tools this is like the the baby version of a mobile phone that's pretty cool I mean that's got a real mix of primary colors it's a clean simple shape clean simple shadows but a lot of gradients and a lot of different blends and transitions oh my god my heart is actually start to race this is this is gonna be really difficult oh boy alright let's do it this is the one I'm gonna do the bright stars baby phone toy I'm gonna rotate this because I don't want to draw the complexity of the elephant or the cat some of that alright so I'm set up and my hope is by the end of the following time-lapse I will have here what you see here I don't think it'll be perfect but I'm gonna take my time and do the best I can I am scared because every other time I've done this I've failed miserably wish me luck I have to say this challenge was really really hard and most intimidating at the beginning I tried to use the pencil and roughly sort of measure sections but it's not entirely accurate I just had to do my best on top of that you don't even draw from the perspective of what you're seeing you're actually drawing from what you see on the camera display I mean think about what you're looking at that's the perspective of the camera and I'm copying that therefore I'm not actually watching the paper as I draw I'm looking at the screen so all of you measuring and proportions isn't based on the object itself it's based on the lens of camera and how it shows in the video so it's quite an awkward drawing process but I just took my time chucked on an audio book and tried to enjoy it and say get in but was also as picky as I could possibly be moving on to the coloring was a relief after all that meticulous sketching as I slowly built up the colors careful to leave the highlight areas clean and wide I realized very quickly was going to take a lot of saturated color to look solid but the thing with colored pencils is there's only so much it'll erase so when you put it down really heavily there's no way you can fully erase it to the point that it's gone so then it became a matter of really slowly building up the drawing and constantly watching the object I was trying to replicate to make sure I didn't take any of the coloring too far now you might think that there really wasn't any color blending needed even though I'm only using twelve colors the toy I'm replicating is so primary colored and simple that surely those twelve colors cover it all yeah for the blue that's mostly true and some of the orange but overall there was a lot of blending to try and get the exact hues over see for example the green wasn't just green that was a hint of yellow in the lighter areas there was a touch of blue and the shadows the orange was a mix of orange red and yellow the purple was the trickiest by far as I didn't have a color close to that in my base 12 color so as a mix of AM / blue and a red and I slowly mix them all until I came close enough to the color next them towards the end came the shadow this was quite tricky but also the most satisfying bit because out of everything it was the thing that really made what I was drawing look three-dimensional and also the thing that most clearly showed what I was copying was the object on left as with all of the other colors and values it was a matter of very slowly building it up but I actually did get most of my shadows done with the mechanical pencil gray levers it was much lighter than the black and also smudged nicely to produce a soft transition to the pure white now after that I built up the deeper sections of shadow and ambient occlusion with the black pencil last but not least I used the white gel pen to add that final polish and shine to my painstaking attempt at realism and there it is that is the result of my realism challenge this is a look ok I don't mean to toot my own horn but I am really happy with the way this turned out it's not perfect but it's pretty damn close and I think I think there we go even more realistic if you watch this video and you need to wear glasses in general but you forgot to wear your glasses it's probably looked picture-perfect the whole way through but the funnest part of doing the realism challenge like this is the warp in perspective I'm going to use my phone to cap to the top and then twist its most interesting when you turn angle look at that that's sort of trippy we're going to dimensional and then we're going back to a 3-dimensional replication I'm pretty happy with that before I finish I do want to do one thing that I've never done before so I have never unboxed Jazz's jazzy a box and I want to do that today simply because I've never done it I know it sounds like I will have done it obviously I put the whole box together organized all the suppliers I even displayed them all beautifully when I first released it and promoted to you guys but I'd never received the box and when I went to visit the smiler officers I asked if I could have a box and now that the box is going to finish selling forever and ever really gonna promote it on the channel over again I'm never gonna have another chance to do this so I want to do this with you guys oh this is it my little thank-you cards or anyone guess the box and all of these supplies in the box this is the artwork that comes with the box the signed in print work here we have the fabulous faber castell polychromos pencils one of the true heroes of the box as you can see the colors of these pencils go down so damn well my custom spectrum noir markers huge sat out of course two crafters companion or spectrum are for doing the custom packaging and letting me pick the exact colors I've wanted if the marabou graphics fineliners these are fantastic we have three different font liner sizes and then one brush mount I'm a huge brush pen fan that's why there are three kinds of brush pens in the box so if you like inking or if you want to learn too I have a bit of fun with it there's a lot of fun to be had here I love this thing because it's like it's really sharp and fun you can do a lot of detail but it's technically a bit of a brush pen you can really get a little bit of line weight variation in there but it's almost like a plastic tip so you can really do a lot of work with it really solidly really sharp and fine like look how funny and yeah this is a brush pen and I don't have to worry about you know losing detail but I can also get a lot of that a lot of a variation that's a gorgeous bit really loved if the prismacolor color eyes pencil I'll of this for construction work my favorite mechanical pencil I'm obsessed with mechanical pencils but I'm also really picky so I love this thing we have the Express at blending card again this was extra but this is the same type of card that I use for pretty much all of my feature final illustrations in like character design sessions and stuff we have my pencil case this is the thing I take with me and travel everywhere I have it packed like this it's missing a couple of things I've been using in this video but that's that and then of course we have the Hannah mule sketchbook this is an amazing sketchbook I mean you can see how I use it in this video and if you're interested to see how people use any and all of these our suppliers go check out the hashtag jazzy art box I really love hardcover sketchbooks they just obviously feel like they're gonna last a lot longer and they feel really premium in the hand I am just in love with how all this came together and I'm so grateful for everyone who supported the box partners over at smart art who made this possible and has sent it out to everyone really worked hard to get the best suppliers to work with and send me samples and have a lot of patience with how picky I can be this is a weirdly like a bittersweet moment for me because this is the last video where I'm gonna be shouting it out and thanking you guys for getting it really at the end of the day and after all that it's just one of those amazing things that I'm just so grateful to have been able to do with you guys and for you guys and you know it just like really highlights how special this community isn't and the amount of awesome stuff we get to do together and how fun art and creativity is so this is it Jazz's jazzy art book I thank you so much for watching this video and also for making things like the jazzy art box possible by being such an awesome community and supporting us so much and showing so much love with the hashtag and just with your positivity even people who didn't get the box sharing their creativity or the suggestions or their encouragement it's all just been such an overwhelmingly amazing positive experience so I just wanted to thank you from the bottom of my heart from making this possible I've talked about it a lot I'm finding I'm struggling to stop talking about it because it's the last time I'm talking about it with you guys this has been awesome thank you so much for watching this video and until next time I'll see you later

Adobe Illustrator CC Tutorial - Using Layers

Adobe Illustrator CC Tutorial – Using Layers



hey guys will Patterson here and welcome to a new alliterated CC tutorials and today I'm doing a tutorial but layers because people wanted to know more about layers within Photoshop now this could be a long video and you're probably wondering why but there's so many things within this powerful function called layers that you need to know when doing illustrator a lot of illustrators will say that they don't use layers but if you're a designer and a graphic designer you making logos illustrator is such a powerful tool within layers sorry it's such a powerful tool that you can use to hierarchy base your workflow and to organize where everything goes to make quick and clean edits when changing your images so as you can see here I've got like just post live created from a website a prophesy apparel go check it out if you want and I've got tons and tons of layers but if you don't know where the layers are go to a window and then go down to layers or press f7 just to get it quickly you'll get this little box here and if you having trouble then there shouldn't be anything in there if you've got a new document up what I'm going to do is I'm going to create a new document so you can see there we go just create that then I've got my layers panel here and it should just look like that so it should just say layer one with a black square sorry a white square on it okay so I'm going to show you a few things about layers this could be a long video so prepare yourself okay so the first thing I want to show you is that the background layer has these two icons on it and every layer has his eye icon if you used to Photoshop then you'll know some of the tools within the layers of Illustrator but if you are in Photoshop don't be fooled thinking that it's just the same because it's not it's quite a bit different and it feels different as well it's actually more efficient for illustrator okay so the layers part of illustrator is a lot like Adobe InDesign so we have the visibility toggle with the eye so anything that is not got the eye on it you can't see and what you can do is you can press and drag to see which layers you want to see it or not so I'll just click on everything that same with this one here is basically the toggles lock and you can lock things so you don't edit them so if I was to unlock the background I could press the background and move it however willy nilly but if I was to lock it you can't actually select it so it makes it easier to select things with it in the background so you're not going to mess it all up I could do this the same as the eyes so I can drag all the way down to toggle and toggle everything awesome so what we have in these layers are basically loads of groups so in the first layer of up here which is black lines which is just coincidentally first that is why I'm going for it we can see which layers these are on so on this tight bit there if we wanted to see what was in them and you didn't know and you've got loads and your document just press this little button there and what that does is that selects it within that I'm going to zoom in here press Z and zoomin in within that we should have shapes that you've put into that layer or that are already in that layer and basically within these is we have this sort of magenta square on them but within these we have a red one and then within strengthen something different but within this one we have like a greeny sort of thing in them a greeny border on them what this means is that they're on different layers and the delay is a color coordinated you can edit them so the first thing I want to show you is how to edit your layers so black lines here we I'm going to see which is in there all these are in there because I've just selected them I'm going to double click on the side of that and we can change the name we can change the color and we can even go to the color part here change whatever color we want literally to whatever shade you want if you're on a Mac or whatever we can change it to ever it's a template and you can dim the images that's useful for like if you tracing over things like a piece of artwork with a blob brush tool or you want to dim the image so you can trace it back over it with a pen tool it's useful for that also another way to change the name is just to double click on the layer name not on the side of it sampling the layer options up but on the name you can double click on it and change it ok so the next one is we're going to look into grouping so if in this we have like if we look into this and we just expand that you can see we've got loads of them it's really big we've got loads and loads and layers here in this and these are all paths and these are all actors differently it let me show you so firstly click on this path layer I can just select it like so on the layers panel I would click on this one you can select it but what if I wanted to create a sort of a group and then have other layers within this black lines later what I'll need to do is within this I'm just going to press the meatball function and what it's going to do is going to select each and every single one of these and you can see which are selected with the green sorry the magenta squares on the outside indicate selected out there you go if you just hover over it then I'm going to press command G where's it gone well it's gone to a new layers going to a sub layer called group and you can even edit the name of these as well we have guides which are in layers as well which is crazy and you cannot see you can't as you select them but you can views them view them and stuff like that okay so that's in a group we can just call this black lines one but whatever want to create a new sub group to do is I'm going to go to a new document over here and I'm going to create a background layer so in this first layer which I'm automatically set to I'm going to create just a square around the border and then I'm going to change the color to a nice green and then I don't want any sort of stroke around it or some okay and then what I'm going to do is within this I don't know why it's been a bit strange we've got sort of a path going on there within this we've got this path within the layer I'm going to edit this layer to call it BG then I want to edit the color by double clicking I'm going to edit it to cyan and the problem is that illustrators got a bug at the moment so if I wanted to change this color as well you just have to click and close it and then open it again okay so we've got this path but whatever what it's something else in the background but I don't want to sort of move this but all we have to do is lock it but I don't mean lock the main layer I mean go into the layer and lock the actual green outline so I'm going to call screens square because part of kind of want to make and then we've locked that then what I'm going to do within this layer here I'm going to create another sub layer which is basically a kind of the group I'm going to call these circles and then I'm going to create a circle within that group like so I'm going to change the color to something ridiculous that doesn't look good and then I'm going to simply make it smaller a bit I'm going to edit them like so and then I'm going to move them and then bring them down and then I'm going to copy them all the way down like so and then highlight them all again bring them in now that's great because they're all in this one layer if I went in here you can see each and every circle is on a separate layer so we can call it circle if we wanted to one two but I'm not going to do it actually that's stupid but whatever I wanted to create a group if I could do this automatically that would be so much easier so what I'm going to do is in within this you'll see in a second so we've got loads of layers here board to create something different within the circles I'm going to select all these circles but I have a passion marquee in them or by going to a circles bit here and just pressing on it I'm going to press command G that will create group within this and then in that group you'll see all the circles that's how you create that now I've done the background layers I'm going to come off that but press this little arrow key and press the overall lock so you can't actually go on to it I would create a new layer to have something over the top of it so I'm going to have another square on the top of it like so and then I'm going to change the color to something ridiculous again this is not meant to look good it is just to show you exactly what to do with in Illustrator within this I want to create something in this layer so I'm going to create maybe press M and I'm going to create another square and then change the color again like and then we've got two of these things and these aren't actually in a proper layers I'm going to close square and then change the color of it because you can't really see it very well if I can to gold and then there I want to create I don't know maybe let's create another layer actually as create another layer so I want this circle this square here to be on a different layer so the easiest way to do is not to go to the layers and bring it all the way up all you can do is you could press this square bit here and you'll see that there's a square highlighted on here I'm going to press alt and drag this up to the blue layer what that's done is it's copied it over to the blue layer but what if I wanted to just bring it up swap it I've just swapped it to the blue layer by just dragging it up and then basically that is how I've done it so these are on two separate layers like so we can also make clipping masks on this but this is going to be done on a new video I'm going to go back over here and make sure haven't missed anything out okay so within these layers you'll have loads of groups and stuff especially groups are especially helpful not just for the layer stacking but also so you can just click on them automatically let's try and find the group we're trying to find okay it's from another group okay it's not really a group show find a good group that's not a group either so the bunch of paths I'm not doing any here we go okay so group here okay see all else is very well but within this if I was to click off this if I was to click a group it was a group more together in the selection which is why it's helpful so if you were to be on layers and stuff then I would say the best thing to do is to play around with it yourself there's only so much I can say about it I know this is a strange video and I know a lot of people probably will say I didn't understand a word you were saying there but I hope some of you could understand the sort of basics of what I was doing there but all you need to do is really have a practice with this and then see how you grow within the layers so if you have any questions about this leave a comment underneath and then I'll try and answer them but if you think the questions are to be announced and make sure you check in the description are in another comment because I won't be answering the same question twice because I've done that for the past year and it's been a bit difficult to do so yeah thank you so much for watching the someone just became a patreon to me thank you so much if you want to support what I do and so you can keep getting free content then go check out my patreon page at the end of this video because that's where you can tip me a few dollars or $1.00 per video that I do of a tutorial and then that'll help me keep things absolutely free but don't feel pressured to do it it just really helps me and you'll also get prizes like t-shirts and Skype calls and one-to-one lessons and stuff so make sure that you do that if anyone wants any one-to-one lessons as well by the way email me because I'm going to be going over a few things and one-to-one lessons are going to be done for patreon so if you want to become a 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