Fuji Guys – FUJIFILM XP140 – Top Features

Fuji Guys – FUJIFILM XP140 – Top Features


Welcome back to the Fuji Guys channel
my name is Gord. It doesn’t often snow here in Western Canada, but when it does,
that’s a great day to be able to take along a Finepix XP140. In addition to
being waterproof to 25m under water, it’s also great for up to -10
degrees centigrade. It’s also drop proof and dust proof. So
in this video I’m going to first go inside and warm up and then I’m going to
take a look at some of the top features of this camera. So if that really
interests you by all means keep on watching. One thing that makes taking
photos with the XP140 real easy is the Auto SR mode or automatic Scene
Recognition. The camera will analyze the scene and choose one of 58 different
scene positions this optimizes the settings for that particular scene. If
you have people in your picture then the subjects eyes will be in proper focus
every time. When you first power the camera on and it’s in the Auto SR+ mode, you have the option then of having subject tracking. If you have faces in your photo
pushing that button each time we’ll alternate and rotate through the various
people that are in the picture that point you can get exactly the face
that you want to be in proper focus. If there’s no faces in the photo what
happens is when you lock on the subject no matter where your subject ends up
going through the frame the camera will automatically stay with it and track the
focus directly on to that main subject. There are other modes that you can use
in addition to Auto SR. When you push the menu button you can go into shooting
mode and from there you have a choice of standard program, multiple exposures some
creative filters in there as well as scene positions like sport or landscape
or nigh. Make your choice hit the menu button and now you’re ready to take
photos again. The XP140 also has face and eye detection. This helps to improve
portraits. Means people’s faces will always be a nice sharp focus, and there’s
a few options you have within there. When I power on the camera,
because I know I’m going to be taking a picture of a portrait of someone I’m
going to under the portrait mode. So I push the menu button and then shooting
mode, I choose portrait from there now I’ve got my choice of whether or not I
want to have the face or the eyes in focus and then which one. So I push
the menu button again and then I go drop it down to AF/MF setting and then move
over to face detection and eye detection settings. From there you have a choice of
the face detection is on but the eye detection is turned off. It doesn’t
matter whether it’s one or the other then you can have it where it’s
automatic and the camera will decide whichever is closer of the two eyes to
the camera it will focus on that one. Then if you want you can purposely make
it so it’s only they pick the right eye or only gonna make the left eye. When
you’re in certain modes you’ll notice that the FACE ON/OFF is disabled. This
is because normally when you’re taking pictures of people you want to have the
face in nice sharp focus. If you have the scene position set to landscape for example you won’t have eye or face detection enabled and at
which point FACE OFF and EYE OFF will be enabled on the menu screen. Once
you’ve made your choice hit the menu button go back and take your great
portrait photo. The XP140 offers seamless Bluetooth with Wi-Fi
connections so you can very quickly and easily transfer images from your camera
to your smart device as well as transfer geo-tagging information from your smart
device over to your camera. When you first power the camera on it walks you
through the steps. If you miss that or wanted to re-pair another device you
go into the menu setting and then you go down to the bottom part where it talks
about connection setting on page 2 of the setup menu and then you have the
choice for your Bluetooth settings. Go into here and you want to set pairing
registration. If you don’t already have the free Camera Remote App installed on
your smartphone there’s an QR code on the back of the camera you can scan that and
it the smartphone will automatically take you to the correct location. The
smartphone app is due for an upgrade about the same time that the XP140
becomes available so what you see on my screen might be a little different than
what at the app actually looks like. So start the app on my phone and now I want
to choose pairing registration and then the camera will do a little bit of
communicating. I see my camera listed on my smart device I tap on that and then
it’s going to do some further communication and we’ve got it connected.
On the back of the my camera now it will ask whether I want to set the date
and time from my smart phone. I always like to say yes. The reason for that is
now when I’m traveling the camera will
automatically update the time from whatever time my smartphone has. Let’s
take a look at some of the options we have within the Bluetooth menu on the
camera. So again going into the connection settings side and then
Bluetooth settings we can, if we want, we can delete that pairing registration you
can actually have up to five different, sorry 8 different pairing
registrations per the phone so you can have eight different devices all
connected. You have to choose which device you have connected up at the same
time if you ever lose your device or you want to delete it from the list you can
delete it from here. You can turn the Bluetooth on and off if you want to and
you can have this auto image tagging and you can have it where it’s set to
automatically tagged the image to be transferred over to your smartphone. What
I like to have instead is the seamless transfer and what that does is it will
automatically as soon as I take a photo transfer the image over to my smartphone.
So let’s turn that on for the time being and then I also have the smartphone sync
setting on the second page and what that enables me to do is to set the date and
time of my phone over to my camera if I want to, or if I want I can have the
location transferred over, or my favorite choice, is to have location and time. At
that point every five minutes or so the camera using, Bluetooth technology,
for low power will automatically update the location as well as the time.
This is great when I’m traveling, allowing me to be able to know exactly
where my photos were taken as far as which waterfall or which fountain or
which museum I was in. So let’s go back and take a photo of my friend here and
over on my camera on my smart phone rather I have a few different options
within there. I can have a remote release when I push the trigger button it will
automatically take a photo. I also have the option for remote control after a
few seconds it will populate the information through here the first time
around. I do have to connect it up to allow it to be able to talk to the
network. On my camera now the first time out it wants to be able to connect I
just want to make sure that I’m talking to the right device. I don’t my devices don’t get pirated Now on my screen I can actually see all the
different things live view and I can control the camera from my device and
take photos from my device. If I want then I can actually push
playback and now I’ve got all these images that are currently on the camera
and I can pull them over one at a time or I can select all of them and import
all of them. I have a few controls on my smart phone as well things like if I wanted to I can start recording a movie. So those are some of
the different options you have using the Bluetooth and the free remote to be able
to connect up to your camera and talk directly to your camera. the XP140 features image stabilization. It’s based on the sensor and what that does is
helps to counteract if ever your hands are shaking or if by chance you’re
taking to take a photo in the wind and you’re blowing ever so slightly and
there’s a few different options you have within there as far as the different
types of settings for image stabilization. If you push the menu
button and go to the second screen down at the bottom is where you’ll see image
stabilization mode from here you have a few choices including continuous and shooting. What continuous is the image stabilization will always
be on so even when you’re looking at the image, the image stabilization is
active. If you choose shooting it’s just when you press the shutter button when
the image stabilization kicks in. There’s also OFF depending on the setting scene
mode that you happen to have the camera in. Why would you want to turn image
stabilization off well if ever you have the camera mounted directly onto
something that’s very stable you want to turn that off. Otherwise the camera will
go looking for movement and inadvertently create a little bit of a
feedback loop. You wouldn’t want that to happen. The camera also has a five times optical zoom. It starts at 28mm which
is a fairly wide angle which allows you to take landscape shots. There’s a five
times zoom so when you press the T button or telephoto, that will zoom
in more and more on your subject. The W makes it more wide-angle. Up on
the top left hand corner you can see a scale as far as where you are on the
within the zoom range. There’s also an intelligent digital zoom you need to
enable that first be able to be able to use the extra zoom power on
camera and that’s located on the third screen of the shooting menu. You need to
turn that on. Once you’ve turned that on you’ll notice up in the top left-hand
corner of your screen, your zoom area now has a blue as well as a
clear or black area and so what happens is you zoom first where the entire zoo
optical range. You need to let your finger off of the T button and then you
can push it again to be able to get into the additional digital zoom within there.
When you’re choosing the wide-angle again you need to let go of the W button
first to be able to zoom out through the entire range. So that offers
you a really nice wide range of shooting options when you’re looking at zooming
on your XP140. The XP140 can record movies including up to 4k at 15 frames
per second. Full HD at up to 60 frames per second or even 720p. There’s also the
option in full HD or at 720p of square movies. Kind of fun for Instagram. There’s
a few choices you have within there to record a movie all you have to do is
push on the very top button there’s a dedicated movie record button. Press it once to start press it a second time to stop. Let’s take a look at setting up the
various menu options when it comes to movies. Pressing the menu button going to
the shooting menu to the second page is where you’ll find the movie setup. The
first top line is you’ll see the movie mode. This is the resolution and the
aspect ratio. Whether you wanted to have it in Full HD at 16 by 9 or square at
one to one. After that when you make your choice you can then go to full
high-speed recording. I’ll come back to that in just a moment. There’s also the
focus mode depending on the mode you have the camera set up to you’ll have
choices in here. If you have it set to scene recognition it will automatically
figure out the appropriate focus mode to be in but otherwise you have a choice of
either continuous AF or single AF. There’s also the wind filter, if you are
in windy outdoor situations you probably want to turn that on. That helps to cut
down on the wind effect that you sometimes hear in microphones. Going back to high-speed video modes you can record up to four times high-speed movies so
when you play them back they’re up to four times slower than they normally
would be. You first have to turn that on in order to start the high-speed movie,
but let’s go back to our standard movie. Once I made my choices I just hit the
DISP/Back button. Go back, press the video button on the top of the camera to
start the recording. Press it again to stop. Easy as that. The XP140 features an
interval timer and you can create, in camera, resulting movies from those
series of images. There’s a few choices you have in there as far as the
resolution you can record it in. 4k at 15 frames per second, Full HD at up to 60
frames per second, from the images that you capture in the camera. There’s a
couple steps you need to do to be able to make that happen. First is you go into the menu and you go into the second page where there’s the
time-lapse movie mode. Here’s where you would choose what the resulting
resolution of the movie will be beforehand. So let’s choose from this
instance 1080p at 59.94. I know and go into the interval timer shooting mode
and here is where I want to choose what the interval is between each image
capture. If the image captures are more than a couple of seconds, the camera will
power down in between the various exposures. This helps to save battery
power. Just before it’s ready to capture the next image, power back up
again capture the image and then go back into power saving mode. So in this
particular case I’m going to just choose a couple seconds just for
demonstration purposes. So I’m going to choose five seconds in between allowing
me to move my little friend here. Then there’s the number of times I need to
choose. I need to choose how many times the camera will take pictures that’s for this instance. Let’s take 10 images and then I want to
choose and then I hit OK and I choose whether I just want to save a series of
still images. These are the full resolution images or if I want the
camera to create a time-lapse movie from within there. Let’s create a time-lapse
movie within there, I hit OK and whether I want to start it now or whether I want
to start it in a few minutes or an hour or two later on from now. I can start up
to 24 hours later than when I start. I push the shutter button to start things
happening. Let’s set it to zero so we’re all ready to go, let me take my first
shot I’m gonna move my little friend a little bit just so we capture some nice
images here. So I am going capture a total of 10 images. Each time around I’m going to
move him ever so slightly and then I’m gonna bring my other
little friend in here and bring him in so he starts to show up. The camera does
a countdown and also account up as far as how many images it’s captured
each time around. Couple more to go here It’s now captured all the images and
it’s doing a little bit of processing work to be able to put all that together again. Now when I have my resulting movie it’s a captured image of all the
different things in there. Again if you’re going to want to have a
time-lapse movie you probably want to have a lower frame rate the reason being
when you have a lower frame rate it won’t playback nearly as jumpy or as
quickly if you are going to go with the higher frame rates you want to have
either a little bit less movement or a lot more movement in between each one
otherwise it doesn’t quite look quite proper. It might take a little bit of
experimenting to you for you to be able to get the various settings to make sure
you’ve got the right frame rate, as far asthe right interval, but
it can be a lot of fun. One thing we do recommend whenever you’re going to be
doing interval shooting put it on a tripod or put it on something solid so you don’t inadvertently have some camera movement within there. That’s how you can quickly and fairly easily make interval
time movies that are quite a bit of fun with your XP140. The XP140 has a couple of different burst or continuous modes this is great for capturing action like
people jumping off diving boards or jumping over ski hills. You can capture up to
15 frames per second if you want. You can capture up to 10 frames per second at
full resolution or capture up to 15 frames per second in 4k resolution. The
resulting images are about 8 megapixels. Which still will print up very nicely as
well as show on your screens. Here’s how you get in a couple of different modes
of the burst modes for the XP140. On the back of the camera you’ll find a
dedicated burst mode button. Pressing it the first time will get jump you into
high speed mode and you have a choice of either 10 frames per second, 5 frames per
second or 3 frames per second. Depending on the mode that you have the camera set
into. You may not be able to jump down to 4K resolution. I suggest you put it into the P mode first and then you can jump
into 4k resolution. Pressing the button again and will drop down to 4k burst mode.
Now when you press the main shutter button it’ll capture 15 frames during one second at 4k resolution and you’ll be able to play those back on
your TV set again or be able to share those images directly and immediately. So
that’s a great way to be able to capture exactly the a point of action that
you’re looking for with the XP140. The XP140 has a few different self timer
modes allowing you to either get into the frame yourself or wait until your
subject is smiling before it starts taking photos. Here’s how you get into
those various modes. Press down on the control ring and you’ve got the self
timer mode and you can choose either two seconds, this is great if you have the
camera on a tripod and you want to make sure there’s no camera shake. When
you press the shutter button the camera will wait two seconds and then take the
picture. Alternate there’s ten seconds this will allow you to time to be able
to get into the frame yourself. There’s also face auto shutter. As soon
as the camera recognizes the face it will start taking photos. There’s also a
smile. The camera will wait until the subject is smiling before it will start
taking photos. There’s also buddy and you have three
different choices of the two people that are in the picture you can either have
near, close up or super close. There’s also a group shot at which point you can
choose between one and four people and the camera will wait until it’s
recognizes the specified number of people before it starts taking the
photos. Let’s see face auto shutter. Press the Menu/OK button to confirm your
choice and now the camera will wait until it sees a face and as soon as it
sees a face it’ll start taking photos and continue to take photos until you
press the display back button. Those are just some of the features found on the
Finepix XP140, hope you enjoy it and found out a few things about your camera.
If you should have any questions about this video feel free to leave them in
the comment section below. Subscribe to our Youtube channel and you’ll be
notified whenever there’s new videos posted. You can follow us on Twitter
@fujiguys look for us on Facebook as well as Instagram and until next time
I’m Gord of the Fuji Guys thanks for Watching!

Mitsubishi DJ-1000: World’s Smallest Digital Camera (in 1997!)

Mitsubishi DJ-1000: World’s Smallest Digital Camera (in 1997!)


Greetings and welcome to an LGR camera thing! And this is the Mitsubishi DJ-1000 digital
still camera, costing $249 US dollars when it launched in the latter half of 1997. And yep, that is the same Mitsubishi that
you may know for their cars and trucks, although it’s not from the same division. Mitsubishi Electric was and is a massive company,
with dozens of branches, subdivisions, and business units. And of course one of those divisions made
digital cameras in the ‘90s, but it seems it was short-lived. The DJ-1000, or DJ-1 as it was sometimes called,
was Mitsubishi’s one and only consumer digital camera, one of the most unique of its kind
in 1997. It was by far the smallest and lightest-weight
digital camera in the world when it was announced at PC Expo ‘97 in New York, weighing in
at just 2.8 ounces or 80 grams. But it also didn’t receive widespread distribution,
initially sold exclusively through T-Zone stores in the US, of which there were only
two when the DJ-1000 hit the market. It also saw distribution in Mitsubishi’s
home country of Japan as you’d expect, and in Europe under the Umax brand where it was
known as the Umax PhotoRun. But yeah, these days you’d be hard-pressed
to find anyone that remembers the DJ-1000 at all, much less owned one, so I was more
than happy to find this one new, complete in box. Inside is a neatly-packed plastic bag full
of goodies, a cardboard tray with memory card stuff, and finally the camera encased in bubble
wrap. And man, I knew this thing was gonna be small,
but wow. It’s really small! It’s about the size of a deck of cards,
able to fit happily inside a shirt pocket. Compare this to the most popular digital camera
of 1997, the Sony FD Mavica, and the difference in size and weight is ridiculous. Granted the Mavica used 3.5” floppy disks,
so maybe comparing it to the something like the Fuji DS-7 is more appropriate, but still. Even against that the DJ-1000 remains miniscule,
which is extra impressive considering the Fuji uses SmartMedia cards and the Mitsubishi
uses CompactFlash. Yeah that’s right, the thinnest camera on
the market used the thickest memory card format on the market, go figure. It came with this two megabyte memory card
in the box, easily the lowest capacity CF card I’ve ever seen. This version of the package also came with
this PCMCIA card adapter, ideal for laptop users, though from what I’ve read Mitsubishi
also offered a desktop package with another adapter. As for the bag of goodies you get the photo
retrieval software for both Windows 3.1 and 95 in English and Japanese, a very blue soft-cover
carrying case that holds that camera quite snugly, a wrist strap that attaches to the
right-hand side of the camera, and several bits of documentation in both English and
Japanese. I especially dig this instruction booklet,
with its automobile service manual aesthetic and a message saying that it is important
to you. Although of all the cameras I’ve covered,
this is the ultimate in terms of simplicity, so almost all of this information pertains
to using the DJ-1000 software for Windows. And well, looking at the camera you can see
why. There’s almost nothing going on here, you
just turn it on, point, and shoot. That’s it! No settings to set, no adjustments to adjust,
nothing but a power switch and a shutter button. There’s not even a flash on the front, only
a passthrough window for the viewfinder and its tiny camera lens, a 5.8mm fixed focus
lens with an aperture of 2.8 and an auto shutter speed ranging from 1/60 to 1/15,000 of a second. On top is the shutter button and the power
switch and along the bottom is where you insert the memory card. There is no tripod mount. And then there’s the back of the camera
which is covered in a surprising amount of text. Guess they didn’t have anywhere else to
put this stuff so why not, because there’s not much going on back here. Just the viewfinder, a spot to install two
triple-A batteries, and this pair of LEDs. Since there’s no LCD screen and no sound
from the shutter, these are your only indications that anything is going right or wrong with
the DJ-1000. The top red LED lets you know if there’s
card activity or the battery is low, and the bottom LED flashes green, red, or some combination
of the two to indicate memory card status. When you power it on the lights all light
up and then the bottom LED turns green if it’s ready to take a picture. Press the shutter and you’ll see the top
LED turn red. When you’re running low on memory the bottom
LED lights up green and red, then solid red for the final shot, and eventually it’ll
flash red when it’s full. The two megabyte card holds fifteen photos,
but it supports CompactFlash cards up to fifteen megabytes, which provides an image capacity
of 113. Interesting to note that one of these high-capacity
cards would’ve cost more than the camera itself back in ‘97, at around $260 apiece. And you really wanted a second card back then
because there is no way to delete photos from the camera, so it’s either swap cards or
transfer your images to a computer. Once you’ve taken some pictures it’s time
to develop them through a Windows PC. And yes I do mean develop, since this stores
images in a proprietary file format exclusive to this camera. So even though it uses a standard CF card
that’s readable on a modern PC, you still need the DJ-1000 Viewer software that it came
with. Otherwise all you’ll see is a folder with
a bunch of DAT files, so open up the Viewer application and run the Index command. It’ll then read the photos, generate thumbnails,
and from here you can convert them into standard bitmap images one by one. So let’s take a look at them! As usual with older cameras I enjoy taking
photos of things that would’ve been around when it was new, in this case the late 1990s. And yeah, for that purpose this camera fits
the bill wonderfully. There’s something about that early consumer
digital camera aesthetic that charms the pants off me no matter what. And the DJ-1000 in particular has a look to
it that made it really fun to play with over the past month or so. The image quality isn’t too bad, though
the saturation is always low and the color temperature skews to the cooler side. It also has this particular type of spotty
pixelation and dithering that becomes more apparent on vivid, solid colors, kinda looks
like an early FMV game. Take a look at this comparison to my phone’s
camera and you get an idea of how it’s affecting things. Makes it pretty exciting to take pictures
and get ‘em onto a PC so you can see what unpredictable weirdness you ended up with. Then there’s the way it handles specular
highlights and lighting of a certain range in brightness, check it out. You get these green streaks protruding downward
from anything bright enough, like reflecting sunlight and white or shiny surfaces. This alleyway shot in particular looks crazy,
it made it look like the building in the background was casting a shadow but it was actually just
freaking out at the bright blue sky up against the dark brick walls that turned purple. And this one is probably my favorite, it was
taken sideway and then rotated, and with the green trails from the reflecting light? It looks like this car was speeding by, even
though it was standing still at the time. I’ve seen similar things on other older
digital cameras without an infrared filter, but this particular style of strange on the
DJ-1000 is just fascinating to me. And yes I also tried it with a UV filter;
it made no difference! There are also an assortment of image adjustments
you can perform through the Viewer application, like color balance, contrast, and brightness. My favorite though is “sherpness.” Ermahgerd sherpness, it’s so sherp! Then there’s resolution, which is a distinctly
separate function from resizing. The DJ-1000 shoots using a 1/5-inch Sanyo
CCD that by default produces photos with a resolution of 320×240 pixels. But that’s just the “normal” resolution. If you choose “high” resolution from the
Viewer program, it’ll re-open the photo and output it at 504×378. That’s an increase of 57%! And yeah there’s a legit difference, it’s
not just upscaling the image. This is a picture at normal resolution, and
here’s the exact same picture reprocessed in high resolution. It’s still low-res by today’s standards,
but it’s notably cleaner and reveals more detail, and you even end up with an ever-so-slightly
higher field of view. There’s also a bit more of that green light
on the left-hand side, adding one more quirk to the unique visual quality of the DJ-1000. And finally, the last thing I want to mention
is the fact that deleting photos is a bit weird. Like, you’d think you’d be able to just
go into Windows Explorer and delete them that way, right? Nope! I learned this the hard way, but if you do
that then the camera will think the card is still full. Apparently this is due to some kind of conflict
with how Windows 9x and above handles deleted files and the indexing done through the camera
software. I thought I’d just be able to reformat the
card and it’d be fine but that didn’t work either, it just thought the card was
still full. I had to put the images back onto the card,
go into the camera software and delete them there, reindex the folder, and then it was
fine. What a pain. And that is the Mitsubishi DJ-1000 digital
camera from 1997. A somewhat annoying little thing but an absolutely
charming one nonetheless. This is one of those situations where I adore
a piece of retro tech so much precisely because it’s so confined in capabilities and finicky
in functionality. I really enjoy the weird, grainy, off-color
images it produces, and I absolutely love how it feels in the hands. Its thin, lightweight metal construction is
just a pleasure to hold, and the fact that it’s an obscure digital camera from 1997
makes it all the more fun. Shame that Mitsubishi never made a successor,
but oh well. At least we got the DJ-1000! And if you enjoyed this digicam retrospective
then might I recommend a couple more? You can also subscribe for more videos every
week here on LGR. And as always I thank you very much for watching!

Drawing pictures with music!

Drawing pictures with music!


*Fast Music Playing* Just incredible If you don’t know who Aleksander Vinter is (Also known as Savant) You should be following him, he’s an amazing music producer He started posting these MIDI drawings that he does This is the most popular one I think so far, it’s gotten 3 Million views in about a week He’s done a monkey, (nope, that’s a rare Pepe, Andrew) A T-Rex A dragon that plays the Super Mario theme. I don’t know how he’s doing this but I’m gonna try and figure it out today. And obviously I’m gonna make a unicorn. I’m gonna make This Unicorn *Music Playing* *Alert Sound* *Music Playing* *Opens box, takes out paper, waggles paper, printer prints* So here’s my thought process. My transparncey is lined up with this edge of the screen. So if anything happens to it, I can always put it back In exactly the same place. I made a MIDI clip and set a tempo And kind of test it out. How long it’s gonna take to play the whole unicorn And this MIDI clip is a fixed size So if I wanna go in and do some edits I can do it, But I can always zoom out And get to the same place To see the whole picture of the unicorn Without notes being in the wrong spots The first thing I’m gonna do is trace the unicorn as accurately as I can. *Music Playing* I have now traced it to the best of my ability It was a difficult balance to strike between getting the image to come across And also getting in enough detail that felt like a good picture So this was just drawing it, not thinking about the music at all. Let’s see how amazing it sounds! *Jumbled up music playing* Nailed it! *exhale* Okay! And now we attempt to make this sound musical. And I can It’s gonna sound better Okay. First thing let’s quantize All the notes to 30 secooooooonds And this just get’s everything on beat. Still looks like a unicorn, Okay. I’mma move this whole thing up Because a lot of the notes were kinda low. I’m just gonna see how many of those low notes we can get rid of And have it still look like a Unicorrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrn (Discordant notes in the background) Just kinda free hand remaking this mane. Come on mane! I’m gonna say that still looks pretty good for a unicorn mane But it isn’t so busy right off the bat Let’s give it another listen… *High Pitched And Low Pitched Unharmonistic Music Playing* Ooh… maybe I made this to tall! That’s a huge range of notes. It’s still really high and really low. Our lowest note is D So I’mma say where in the key of D Minor So if i was using a minor key. So now I’m gonna go in the first bar and delete every note Or move every note so that it fits in D Minor Or a melody that would go over top of D Minor *Note moving noises* *Kind of Jumbled Up Music Playing* What I’m learning Is that it’s pretty difficult To make it sound good Just using what I have drawn So I need to take the idea Of what I have drawn And recreate most of it With the music in mind I get a feel for the shape of the picture I zoom in, I make adjustments to the notes musically I zoom out to see if it still looks unicorn-y Also, look at how our picture changes when I zoom in SMOOSH DAT UNICORN And I got a first bar now that sounds pretty musical *Good Music Playing* Let’s keep going *Cool Harpsichord Sound Playing The Good Part* I’m starting to hear this was kind of a baroque piece So I have slowed down the tempo And changed the instrument to this nice harpsichord * Harpsichord Music Plays And Then Gets To The Bad High Pitched Part* Bad high pitch part appears Look at this awfulness Corrupt file I saved my MIDI Unicorn, no problems there I went to have lunch When I came back to open it up It was corrupt Sad inhale and exhale* This is super annoying! So next video I will give you A glorious MIDI Unicorn And for today You can have this *Horrible Music Playing* And now I will thank you for watching And dejectedly walk away *Sad, Defeated Sounding Piano Music Playing*

Digital Camera Tips : Resolution Tips for Digital Cameras

Digital Camera Tips : Resolution Tips for Digital Cameras


So to put this in perspective for you, a lot
of the cameras out there are touting this has 12.5 megapixels but it’s $500 dollars.
Where this was a $200 dollar camera which I’m really impressed that it already has 7.1.
So to put this in perspective 2 megapixel camera can actually print a really decent
4×6 image. So if all you are ever going to print is a 4×6 image you don’t need to buy
anything more than a 2 megapixel camera. Now 3 megapixels you can make a pretty good 5×7,
6 to 8 megapixels will get you very good 8×10’s or if you really want to go all the way up
to 16×22 then you are going to need a 24 megapixel camera and that is definitely professional
level, none of the point and shoots have 24 megapixels yet. So the other reason that you
need to have high resolution is sometimes when you take that picture you’re going to
want to do some cropping, so maybe your subject isn’t in the right place or you want to really
just get into their head and their shoulders, so if you buy a camera like for instance this
one is 7.1 so I can easily do an 8×10 which means I could very easily crop out a very
small part of that picture and do a very good 4×6. So just keep that in mind when you’re
out there shopping, that more megapixels doesn’t necessarily mean better for you.

Nikon COOLPIX S630 12 Megapixel Digital Camera

Nikon COOLPIX S630 12 Megapixel Digital Camera


Right now you are
looking at the new Nikon. This is the Coolpix S630. Now, this is the top of the line
digital camera in the new S series, and it has so many features.
Starting off with a 12 Megapixel camera. You have a 7x optical zoom,
with a NIKKOR glass lens, so you can shoot with
a wide angle at 37mm, or also a 260 super telephoto lens
as well. You have the EXPEED processor,
which is their new processor. So you’re going to get super
and incredible quality images. You’re going to get a faster response,
and really natural looking pictures. You have four-way vibration reduction
image stabilization, I know it sounds like a long phrase,
but we’re going to break that down for you when we take a closer look at the camera. You also have a 2.7 inch
high resolution LCD screen. You have scene auto selector. You have sports continuous mode,
that’s a new mode on this camera, face detection,
up to 12 faces. You have red-eye fix
already built into the camera. Smile mode.
You also have this new thing called blink proof mode,
which we’ll show you later, you have D-lighting, which is going
to improve the brightness in dark images. 44 MB of internal memory,
but also you have SD and SDHC capabilities, so you can have all the
pictures you need. 18 scene modes,
including panorama mode, you also got movie mode on here,
and that’s at resolution 640 X 480, or if you want a smaller movie
you also have 320 X 240. And, last but definitely not least,
you have a rechargeable battery, so don’t have to worry about
getting those AAs in here. Okay, so let’s take a closer look
around the camera. Again, you have your
NIKKOR glass lens, you have a 7x optical zoom,
which we’re going to show you now, put this power back on,
we were in standby mode, okay, so we’re going
to go tight, it’s a nice looking zoom. Really really great
if your shooting objects far away. Okay, so you have your power
on and off button right here. Again your wide and your tight
for your zoom up here. Turn it around, you have a
nice little spot, right here, it’s a groove for your thumb,
so you can really hold this camera, get a firm grip on it easily.
You have a play back button. Your mode selection button.
Now you have your selector wheel right here. It actually spins.
And you have a dedicated flash button here. Or, dedicated timer,
here’s your flash, and down below is your macro mode.
You also have your trash/delete button, and your menu button.
Turning over to the side, right here, open you up,
and hidden in this port can you see it?
There we go. There is your USB port
to plug into your PC. And, underneath you’ll see
you have your tri-pod holder, right here, and open this slot up
for your rechargeable battery, and this is where your
SD or SDHC card goes. Okay? So there you have it.
So there’s your little tour. Now, I’m sure your wondering,
how do I get to all these features? Show me around the camera. And that is exactly what
I’m going to do right now. Okay, so I’m going to turn it over
so you can see what’s going on. And, we’ll go and I’ll show you
all the different shooting modes, and you can get to your shooting modes
by clicking this green button right here. So you have auto mode.
So auto mode the camera is going to do a lot of the work for you.
You don’t have to worry about setting, you know, different exposures,
or anything like that. So if you use your wheel
you can go down. Now this is scene auto selector. Okay?
Scene auto selector, right here, with the heart above it,
and the camera is going to change the settings automatically
according to the scene. Now, you can also set the scene yourself.
You have 18 different scene modes; portrait, landscape,
fireworks, cuisine, and you can see them all as
we scroll through right now. And, if you get to this shape right here,
this is the panorama assist, if you want a 360 view, what it
does is takes a bunch of different shots, and it pastes them together so
you have this full, you know, landscape view of wherever you are. It’s definitely a panorama.
You know. Remember we had to make panoramas
in middle school? I remember that.
Umm, okay, so you have voice recording
righ there. So, let’s say you take a shot
and there’s a special memory you want to remember with that shot,
you can just enlist your voice recording. Okay, so we’ll go back up.
Scrolling down, you can choose between smile mode,
right here, I’m sure you’ve seen smile mode before. Basically what you do is you
hold the camera out, and I’m going to show you right now,
I’m going to select it, you hold the camera out in front of you and it automatically detects when
you’re smiling and it takes the picture. Okay, we have to zoom out first.
There we go. Alright, can you see?
Okay? Alright it’s going to take two. Okay, now, you’re probably wondering
why it took two. Because when you’re in smile mode
you automatically have this new feature called blink proof built in.
So the camera is going to take two pictures and it’s going to save the best one,
where your eyes aren’t closed. It’s blink proof.
It’s a cool feature. Okay, so let’s get out of here.
If you zoom back in, there you go, you hit your mode selection button again,
and we’re in smile mode, but if we want to get out of smile mode
we can be in sport continuous mode. And what this mode does is it
shoots 11 frames per second, and it’s for fast action.
Alright? So if you are at a sporting event,
and you don’t want to miss the shot definitely, you know,
use sport continuous mode and you wont have a problem. Again, high ISO.
You have ISO capabilities on this thing up to 6400.
That’s the highest I’ve seen in a point and shoot camera. It’s essential
if you’re shooting in low light. And it will really really come in handy. Okay, so let’s get out of here. Okay, now we’re going to scroll down to
movie mode. Now you have two options here, you can set your
resolution to 640 X 480 or if you want a smaller movie you’ve got
that 320 X 240 option as well, for uploading to Facebook
or YouTube. And, of you go into your menu,
like so, you’ll see you have
even more options. And, again you’ll see this
electronic VR, which stands for
vibration reduction. Now, let me just take a second
and tell you what vibration reduction is. because this camera comes with
four-way vibration reduction. First of all, it’s going to
compensate for shaky hands by moving the image sensor.
Okay. So you don’t have to worry about that. Second of all, you have
high ISO capabilities, that’s the 6400, okay, that’s also going to help
prevent blurry images. You also have this thing called
best shot selector, what best shot selector does is it
takes, automatically, it takes 10 shots in a row, and it will save
the sharpest image. Okay. So you have those three things.
And last but not least, you have motion detection. What motion detection does is it’s
going to adjust your shutter speed according to the moving
object in the frame. So, those four things make up your four-way vibration reduction
image stabilization. Alright, it’s really, bottom line,
it’s going to help you get crystal clear shots. Okay, so, moving on,
now that you now what VR stands for, we’re going to get out
of movie mode, by clicking menu,
and we’re going to go into play back mode. So when you’re in playback mode
you can scroll through your images, there’s one I took earlier,
another one I took earlier, and if you hit menu,
you have a couple different options, quick retouch,
if you go into quick retouch it will show you, you know,
what you can do in a matter of one click. The camera automatically detects
what needs to be improved with the photo and it does it itself. Alright, so we’re going to go back, D-lighting, okay,
we told you about this earlier. Let’s go back.
D-lighting, now, what D-lighting does is it’s going to
improve the brightness in dark images. You can also print your images,
you can create a slide-show. You can rotate your image,
you can resize your image. Again, you can set a voice memo,
voice recording, copy your image,
and you’re back up to the top. Now, like I said,
this is a top of the line camera. It’s part of the new S series
that Nikon came out with. And, it’s really got incredible
features on here. You’re not going to take
a bad picture with this camera. It’s a great Nikon,
and you have that NIKKOR lens. And, the lens is very important
to get incredible quality, crystal clear images. And that’s exactly
what you’re going to get with this camera. Okay, so that’s all we have
right now. This is the Nikon Coolpix.
This is the S630. Hope you enjoy it,
and we’ll see you next time. For more information on the
Nikon Coolpix S630 digital camera, just visit any of these major retailers
and type in, N13-4504
into the search box. For Computer TV,
I’m Sam. (C) 2008 SYX Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Channel: TigerDirectBlog

Canon PowerShot E1 Digital Camera

Canon PowerShot E1 Digital Camera


Hey you know Conon has come out with a whole bunch of really really cool new digital cameras, and these are just some of them, but I wanted to give you a look at them. The Canon PowerShot E1. This is sort of one of their more entry level point and shoot cameras, not a whole lot of advanced features, but they are really really nice, and they take really really great pictures. This thing is 10 Megapixels, it’s got a nice 4x zoom, and a 4x digital zoom. Now, you’re going to notice, especially since the resolution is so high on this, the 10 Megapixels, you can actually get away with using the digital zoom on this thing, pretty well. It’s not going to degrade your image quality quite as much as it would on a camera with a lower pixel density. But it also has a 2.5 inch LCD, right here on the back. One of the very very nice looking LCD on this camera actually, it comes with a 32 MB memory card, now that’s not very much memory, for a camera that does 10 Megapixels. So you’re going to want to look into making sure you have a larger card. I’d recommend at least a Gig, maybe two, they’re like 5 dollars now. So, you know, it’s Ok. It does 640 by 480 Movie Mode, 30 frames per second so you can get full full resolution, full frame rate video on this camera it features the Canon DIGIC III Processor. Now, the DIGIC III Processor, is not their newest one that you find in all of the really high end Canon cameras, but it is extraordinarily capable and it’s very very good, at taking great… At making sure your pictures have great color, great clarity, and look really really nice. It’s got Optical Image Stabilization. Which is something you’re going to find is incredibly useful. You may have a camera now, where you notice when you’re in low light situations you get a lot of blur. You get a lot of streaking in your pictures you’re having a hard time getting nice clear photos, in low light, or when using zoom on your camera. The Optical Image Stabilization built in to this is going to take care of that. It’s going to make sure that all of your pictures look rock solid, and nice and clear, even when you’re using the zoom, and even in low light situations. It has Face Detection technology, built in to it. In fact, you can sort of see this here I think. If we give this a shot, let me turn on the screen. When I push this, you see it highlights my face, and will focus on the faces in the scene. So it makes… Getting your auto focus taken care of, very very simple. It also does Red Eye Correction, ISO all the way up to 1600, so you’ll be able to get really clear pictures, even in low light situations, and it’s all very very easy to operate. Just a few simple buttons on this thing. On the top you’re going to find your “On” and “Off” button located right here. You have your selection wheel. Now this is going to allow you to scoot through some of the various modes that this camera offers you. Right now it’s in the fully Automatic Mode, which is a mode you’ll probably not going to have to deviate from very often. Because that DIGIC III Processor in this makes sure, that all your pictures are going to look really really nice. But it also has modes for things like lan… For talking pictures of landscapes, for doing portraits. You also have Easy Mode, this is the one that disables all of the other features on the camera, so you don’t have to worry about grandma getting all confused when she tries to take a picture. A whole bunch of different Scene Modes actually located in this camera as well. From everything… From giant landscapes to color correction, to indoor, to birthday parties, you’re going to find that all, in the Scene Modes on this camera. You also have very easy adjustments, available right here. You do have macro, normal focus and Infinity Mode for shooting, sort of getting everything in a scene when you have those big sweeping landscapes. Usually a camera can figure out what it needs for you actually. You can manually set your ISO right here, you can turn your flash Auto, On, Off, and it also handles, like I said, Red Eye Correction right there within the camera. There are a few sort of basic setting you are going to find in here, for setting up your auto focus, for setting up your self timer, all very very simple, very very easy to use, and really it’s very slick. It’s very very easy to take really really nice pictures with the Canon E1 PowerShot, and it’s got incredibly high resolution, it’s got a very very nice lens on, that’s going to take very very nice pictures. And it’s also available in a number of colors and these aren’t sort of your basic colors that you usually see cameras come in. I mean we’ve got like this cool sort of… Looks like something you’d find in a nursery, doesn’t it? It’s like, what do you call it? Baby Blue? Alright, Baby Blue. And look, Baby Pink. Did they ever call it Baby Pink? What is it? Is it just pink? It’s just pink? It’s just pink. So yeah, these are really really solid, point and shoot camera. If you’re looking for something very very simple features, that’s going to take really really nice pictures, and you’re still going to have the ability to tweak and hone your settings a little bit if you really really want to. This is a good one to have a look at. The Canon PowerShot E1 10 Megapixel camera. Very very solid little point and shoot. To grab more information on the Canon PowerShot E1 available in white pink or blue, go to any of the retailers listed here, and type in Canon PowerShot E1. For Computer TV, I’m Bauer. (C) 2008 SYX Services, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Channel: TigerDirectBlog

PANASONIC LUMIX LX10 4K Digital Camera, 20.1 Megapixel 1-Inch Sensor


This Video Review Is Based On :
Price, quality, performance, warranty, brand trust, after sales & service, reusability,
familiarity and easy to operate. A pocket-sized powerhouse, Panasonic’s Lumix
DMC-LX10 Digital Camera offers outstanding performance through the use of a 20.1MP High
Sensitivity MOS Sensor that can deliver sharp stills, UHD 4K video, and more. Combine this
with a compact design that offers a 3″ LCD touchscreen that tilts up 180° for selfies,
and you have an almost ideal camera for everyday carry. In order to provide sharp, richly detailed
images, the LX10 features a fast Leica DC Vario-Summilux f1.4-2.8 lens with a versatile
3x zoom range. This optic features a 35mm equivalent wide-angle to telephoto range of
24-72mm, making it useful in a range of different situations. Also, the 20.1MP sensor furthers
the camera’s abilities with an extended sensitivity range up to ISO 25600 and continuous shooting
at up to 50 fps with an electronic shutter and 10 fps with the mechanical shutter. The LX10 is equipped with a 5-axis HYBRID
O.I.S.+ system for shake-free images and a 49-area autofocus system that will make sure
your images are tack sharp. Hybrid shooters will appreciate the inclusion of high-quality
UHD 4K video recording in the LX10. It can record at 30 or 24 fps at 100 Mbps using the
MP4 format. Also, Panasonic leverages the power of this technology to provide advanced
4K PHOTO and 4K Post Focus features. Kindly See the Description for This Product
Link. Thanks for watching
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