How To Make The 3D Pop-Out Photo Effect In Photoshop – Out of Bounds Effect

How To Make The 3D Pop-Out Photo Effect In Photoshop – Out of Bounds Effect


How To Make The 3D Pop-Out Photo Effect In
Photoshop Welcome back to another very exciting tutorial
here at the PhotoshopTrainingChannel.com. My name is Jesus Ramirez and you can find
me on Instagram @JRfromPTC. In this video, I’m going to show you how to
create the 3D Pop-out Photo Effect in Photoshop. If you want to follow along, you can download
the watermarked previous or license the full resolution files from Adobe Stock. You can
find the links to these images right below this video in the description. We’re going to start out with these two layers,
the Photo frame background and snowboarder. I have them on two separate layers, of course.
And what we want to do is we’re going to isolate this black area here. We can, of course, create
a selection around the black area to isolate it, but I like working with vectors better
because they give you smaller file sizes and they’re easier to edit. So we’re going to
create a vector around the frame. So I’m going to press Z on the keyboard. I’m holding the
Z key. I’m not letting go of it, and I’m going to Zoom In to the corner here and release
the Z key, it will bring me back to the Pen Tool, which I had selected. Make sure that
you have Shape on the Options Panel on this drop down. Click on one corner then click
on the next, hold the space bar, pan down. Click on the bottom right corner and then
click on the bottom left corner. I’m going to hold the space bar, again, click and drag
to pan up, and complete that path. Now, the color and the shape doesn’t really
matter, so I’m just going to make it red, just so that you can see it. There it is–red.
What I’m going to do now is enable the layer of the snowboarder. I’m going to click and
drag her up to the top of the layers panel, and I’m also going to double tap here on the
Zoom Tool, just so we can see the image at 100%. And, actually, now that I’m looking
at it at 100%, I’m actually going to right-click on it and choose Fit on Screen so that I can
see the entire composition. Then I’m going to press Ctrl J, Command J on the Mac, to
duplicate. So now I have two copies. I’m going to disable the one on the top by clicking
on this I icon and the one in the bottom here, I’m going to clip to the shape below it. So,
with that layer selected, I’m going to press Ctrl Alt G, Command Option G on the Mac. Then,
I’m going to enable the layer right above that and I’m just going to make a selection
around the snowboarder. So I’m going to click on the Quick Selection
Tool and I’m simply going to click and drag around her. Now you don’t have to be very
precise at this moment. You can just click and drag, and we’ll worry about the details
later. So we’re just going to select her as quickly as we can. So I’m just clicking and
dragging, and notice that my selection is not very accurate. You shouldn’t spend too
much time at this moment. If you select an area like this part here that is obviously
not going to be a part of the selection, I’m going to hold Alt, Option on the Mac, click
and drag just to refine that selection just a little bit more. You know that I have the selection active
around the snowboarder. I’m going to select that top layer and click on the Layer Mask
icon to create a mask around the snowboarder. So what I’m going to do now is click on this
top layer, hold shift and click on the layer below it, so they’re both selected, and I’m
going to click on this chain link icon here to link those two layers. What that allows
you to do is when you move one of those layers with the Move Tool, it moves both, and they
can be in different groups and they can be separated. So that allows us to keep those
two layers together. What I’m going to do now is press Ctrl T,
Command T, to Transform, to scale this and adjust it accordingly. If you can’t see the
corner handles that you want to click and drag on, you can press Ctrl 0 (zero), that’s
Command 0 on the Mac, for the bird’s-eye view that allows you to see all four corner handles.
Then, I’m going to click and drag on this one here to scale it down by holding Shift
Alt, That’s Shift Option on the Mac. Now, at this point, we can go back and adjust the
layer mask if we need to, so I’m going to Zoom In just so we could see the areas that
we need to work on. So we need to work on this area, and then, the blue outline around
her body. So we can adjust that by clicking on the layer mask in the Properties Panel.
You can click on Mask Edge. If you don’t see the Properties Panel, you can go into Window,
Properties, click on Mask Edge, and then, maybe shift the Edge with a negative value
and see how that has adjusted so. And keep adjusting it and making sure that that line
is gone, but we don’t lose any detail that we want to keep. Also, with this brush selected, I can click
and drag here on the hair, and hopefully we’ll get a better selection. I didn’t do that good
of a job here, so I’m just going to leave it like this for now and I can come back with
the brush tool and fix that in a moment. So I’m going to press OK, click on the Brush
Tool, paint with white in areas that I want to keep, so I’m just going to paint with the
white in these areas here, and I know I’m selecting some of the sky, but that’s okay.
I’m going to get rid of that by pressing X in the keyboard, which swaps the foreground
and background color. And with black, I’m going to paint on that layer mask to get rid
of the sky here, and I’m not going to take the time to do so now. I will do that after
the tutorial and you can see the final image, but I’m just going to go around the entire
image and just make sure that everything is masked out accordingly. And in most of these
areas, everything seems to be okay. I know we got to work on this area here, and like
I said, I’ll do that after I’m done with the tutorial and you can see my final result.
But for now, we’ll just leave it as is. I’m going to press Z on the keyboard, right click
and choose Fit to Screen. And what we’re going to work on now is extra
elements that are going to help our composite look much more realistic and much more interesting.
So, from the Adobe Stock Library, I downloaded two elements that we’re going to use. We’re
going to use this shovel with the snow, so let me just double click on that to open that
up. And, by the way, the links to these files are on the description. You have to download
them from Adobe Stock. They’re not free, but you can use a watermarked preview to practice
on. So I would recommend you doing that, just so that you can have a way to practice and
learn. So, the first thing I got to do is get rid of the shovel. So I’m going to click
on the Lasso Tool and I’m going to make a selection around the shovel, and as you can
see, it’s not very accurate. That’s okay. Then I can hold Shift and Backspace or you
can go into Edit, Fill to bring up the Fill Menu. Under Contents, choose Content Aware
and press OK. And Photoshop will Fill In those pixels and make the shovel disappear. I’m
going to press Ctrl D, Command D on the Mac, to Deselect, and this is what we’re going
to work with. The first thing that we need to do is mask out the snow from the ground. So I’m going to go into the Channels panel
and I’m going to look for the channel that’s got the most contrastóin this case, the blue
channel. I’m going to click and drag on the blue channel and drop it here in the new channel
icon to duplicate it. Now with the duplicate channel, I can start making adjustments to
it. The first thing I’m going to do is fill with white the areas I want to keep for sure,
so with the Lasso Tool selected, I’m just going to click and drag and make a very rough
selection on the areas for sure I want to keep, which is all this top part here. Now
that I have a selection active, I can fill with white. White is currently my foreground
color. To fill with the foreground color, you can hold Alt and Backspace, Option Backspace
on the Mac; then Ctrl D, Command D on the Mac, to Deselect. Now we got to work on this bottom part. There’s
a feature in Photoshop called Apply Image. If we go into Image, Apply Image, what Apply
Image allows you to do is to take an image and apply it onto itself using a Blend Mode.
In this case, we’re taking the blue copy, apply in the Screen Blend Mode into itself,
so notice what happens here on the snow on the edge. It essentially turns white, which
is what we want. You could, of course, apply a Multiply Blend Mode and it will give you
a different result. In this case, I think I’m going to go with Screen, and then, I’ll
just work on the edges in the next step. So I’m going to press OK and what I’m going to
do now is go into Image, Adjustment Levels, and bring the levels to the rightóthe dark
values to the right. So we have more contrast between the snow and the ground. And remember,
we’re going to be making this selection; anything that is white in the screen will be selected.
Anything that is black will be deselected. So I’m going to drag this one over to the
left a little bit. I’m looking at the edges here and, maybe, drag this one to the left
as well, and press OK. Now, what I’m going to do now is click on the Brush Tool, select
black as my foreground color so I can paint with black. I’m going to increase the size
of my brush by clicking on the right bracket key on the keyboard and I’m just going to
paint with black. And, again, you don’t have to be very accurate. As long as you get close
enough, you should be good. And I’m just painting these pixels away which represent the floor.
And, once again, I’m going to go into Image, Adjustment, Levels, and darken up some of
the darker pixels and brighten up the midtones a little bit, and press OK. So this selection
looks like it would work, so I’m going to press Ctrl, Command on the Mac, click on the
blue copy icon to make a selection around it. Go back into the Layers Panel and the
Background Layer, which is the only layer that we have on this document. I’m going to click on the New Layer Mask icon
and notice now that the floor is no longer there. Now, it’s not a perfect selection but
it’s going to work because the color of the floor and the color of the table are very
similar colors and I think we’re going to be able to get away with it. So what I’m going
to do is I’m just going to simply click on the layer, select the Move Tool, click and
drag the layer over onto the other file by hovering over the tab, and then, coming down
and releasing, and there’s our file. It’s a really big layer. So we’re going to need
to scale it down; Ctrl T, Command T on the Mac, to Transform. We can’t see the corner
handles, so I’m going to press Ctrl 0 (zero), Command 0 on the Mac, there’s the corner handles,
and now, I’m going to adjust them accordingly. I’m holding Shift as I’m clicking on these
corner handles to keep the file constrained. The angle is not really matching my scene,
so I’m going to right click on it and choose Flip Horizontal, and from here, I can match
the scene a little better. I can even distort it if I want to, maybe right click on it and
choose Distort, just to get a better perspective of the scene that we’re working with, maybe
something like this, and press Enter when you’re done. Now that we have this file in
place, I’m going to press Z on the keyboard, right click, Fit to Screen, then I’m going
to press V on the keyboard to get the Move Tool and, maybe, I can move it around if I
need to, and I’m going to click on the New Group icon to create a new group. I’m going
to click and drag this snow layer in there. I’m going to collapse it and now it’s in that
group. Next I’m going to hold Alt, Option on the
Mac, and click on the Layer Mask icon to create a black layer mask which hides everything.
Then, with the Brush Tool, I can paint with white on this layer mask to start revealing
some of that snow. So I’m going to use the bracket keys on the keyboard as I work to
increase and decrease the size of my brush. So I’m just painting with white. Just bring
in some of that snow. And if you make a mistake, you can press X on the keyboard to paint with
black and, maybe, shape the snow a little bit better, so, maybe something like that.
What we’re going to do now is work with different elements, so I’m going to open up the Libraries
Panel and I’m going to open up this file here, which is these snow elements that were also
downloaded from Adobe Stock. By the way, if you don’t have Photoshop CC, you won’t have
the Libraries Panel, but you can still download the watermarked previews onto your desktop
and bring them into Photoshop as you would any other image. So you can still work with
the previews. So, what I’m going to do now is just select
one of these elements and bring it over to the file that I’m working with. So I’m going
to click on the Lasso Tool and I’m going to select this element first. So I’m going to
select it, go to Edit and Copy, or you can press Ctrl C. I’m going to deselect that element,
Ctrl D, Command D on the Mac, go back into the file that we’re working with and I’m going
to paste it here, Ctrl V, Command V on the Mac, and there it is. As you can see, it’s
a high resolution file, which is good. I’m going to change the Blend Mode to Screen,
so the black pixels disappear and we only keep the bright pixels, in this case, the
snow. Then, I’m going to press Ctrl T, Command T to Transform, Ctrl 0 (zero), Command 0 for
bird’s eye view, and I’m going to scale this element down. I’m going to press Ctrl 0, Command
0 again to zoom back in, and I’m just going to rotate it and make it fit accordingly. Now, in this case, I’m going to flip it horizontally.
So right click on it, flip horizontally, and keep rotating it, so maybe something, something
like this. And I can, you know, scale it more if I need to, or rotate it more if I need
to. So whatever distortions I need to do for it to work, so, maybe something like that.
So I just press Enter to accept that transformation, and I’m going to use one more element. I’m
going to use this one right down here. Again, Ctrl C to copy and paste that in here. Change
the Blend Mode to Screen, Ctrl T to Transform, that’s Command T on the Mac; Ctrl 0 (zero),
Command 0 on the Mac, and scale this one in as well, and I’m going to zoom in and rotate
this one into position, maybe right about here or so. But I want this one to be in the
back, so I’m going to click and drag this one and place it way back here. And I’m going
to press V to select the Move Tool and I’m going to move it around just to fit it into
position, so maybe something like this. And, actually, I just realized that I made
a mistake. Notice how this element gets cut off right in this area? That’s because this
element needs to be right here. It needs to be in-between the layer that’s popping out
the subject and the layer that is clipped to the vector, so right in-between those two.
So, now the snow follows through into the frame. Now the last thing that we’re going
to do is we’re going to work with shadows. So, first, with the snow here on the table,
it needs a shadow. So I’m going to open up this group, double click on the snow layer
here and click on Drop Shadow. Notice the little drop shadow there. You can use the
settings that I have here if you like. Notice that I’m not using black. I’m using the dark
burgundy color, which is similar to that color you see right there, right under the frame,
and just brought the Intensity down to about 25% using Multiply, and notice the light is
coming from the right. The light on her face is coming from the right and so is the light
hitting the frame. So you sort of want to match that with the shadows, so the shadows
will be on the left side, sort of like here, behind the frame. So this is what this is
showing. So if I were to bring it up to 100%, this
is what that looks like. Obviously that’s too much, so leave it at about 25% or so.
And what I’m going to do now is right above this snow element here, I’m going to create
a new layer and I’m just going to paint with this color here under the board, so you can
click on the Eyedropper Tool. Select that color and maybe make it a little bit darker
because it’s too light, something like that, and just continue that shadow that’s coming
off the board. And, actually, let me drag this layer up on top of the group and just
continue painting that shadow that’s coming off the board, so maybe something like this.
And then, change the Blend Mode to Multiply, and bring that shadow way down, so, maybe,
something like that. Now, the only difference between the final image that you saw in the
beginning and this one is that with the final image, I took a little more time working with
the mask a little more time placing the elements, and moving things around so they fit a little
bit better. But these are the techniques that I use to create this effect. If you decide to create an image using tutorial
or any of my tutorials, then upload it to Instagram with the hashtag #PTCvids. Every
so often, I do a search for that hashtag, and if I find your image, I’ll leave a comment. And that’s it for this tutorial. I hope that
you enjoyed it and that you learned something new. If you have any comments or questions,
leave them down below. If you enjoyed the tutorial, don’t forget to click that Like
button and share this video with a friend. If you haven’t already, subscribe to the Photoshop
Training Channel now. Thank you for watching and I’ll talk to you again soon.

Blackmagic Design Ursa Mini Pro Review – With footage

Blackmagic Design Ursa Mini Pro Review – With footage


The Ursa Mini packed a 4.6K punch in a relatively compact package, but not without imperfections. Which is fine, because now we have this: the Ursa Mini Pro. What am I looking at today? Blackmagic Ursa Mini Pro Ooh yes. And we’re here at the Southbank Centre to video some skateboarding. Sight problem though… I don’t know about their skateboarding skills but they’ve forgotten their skateboard. All right, off we go to film something else with the UMP which has been blessed with some new buttons on its facade. So yes, it’s changed. This bit is new, that’s for sure, it’s got a little black and white LCD Screen. But this is actually smaller. It’s a four inch screen, one inch smaller than its predecessor, not a huge problem. And one thing worth noting is that the startup time is quicker than before. It’s still not really quick but let’s count it in Potatoes One Potato. Two Potato. Three Potato. Four Potato. Five Potato. Six Potato. Seven Potato. Eight Potato. Nine Potato. It takes nine potatoes to switch on, from flicking that switch to actually being on. Nine potatoes: They should actually put that on the spec sheet. But there is one thing about this… I mean ergonomically in terms of putting this on the shoulder everything seems a little bit claustrophobic. I feel like this. The rather basic hand grip and extension arm can’t be extended that far. But apart from that in terms of usability it’s good, with the addition of useful buttons on the near side of the camera useful for ENG work. And this is really useful: it’s got an HFR button so you can flick between… Slo-mo 50p, 25p… But it remembers, like if you set it to 24… It changes between 50 and 24. But if you set it to 25 it remembers that. 25, 50. 25, 50. Brilliant. Love that. But one of the big things with this update is the quick access to framing guides, zebra, peaking functions, and false colour. Anyway, let’s film something. [MUSIC] Why would Chinese tourists come to Chinatown though? It’s like “come to a not very authentic version of your hometown”. I mean imagine that if you go to China, yeah, as a British person, and you go to a British town… It’d be weird, isn’t it? Sometimes I have to kind of like fumble my way to find the buttons because they do sometimes feel pretty similar, but you kind of get used to after a while… …Just if you remember the layout, and thankfully they put the ND filter dial on the front so you can’t get that confused with this one. Yeah so that’s the built-in ND filters. You’ve got one, two, three, four; one is clear. But it’s good that now it has an IR filter so, you know, magenta-green casts are not a problem any more. Well, only one way to find out. Here’s a straight-up skin tone comparison test featuring a subject with skin, between the Ursa Mini with external ND and Ursa Mini Pro with internal ND. [MUSIC] So you’ve got an F1, F2 button, you can assign different things to it. These switches are pretty beautiful, how they feel like some kind of 1980s Hi-Fi: they work. You can just know where they are for ISO, shutter speed, and auto white balance: white balance seems a bit… … It doesn’t seem you need to really push it. Whereas the shutter speed, yeah it does change quite easily. 180: bam, there we are. You guys want to see some footage from the Blackmagic? Well, here you go. The files looked great, grades beautifully, skin colors look nice. You can shoot up to 120fps too, in windowed mode, which is a little fiddly to set. [MUSIC] This thing only goes up to ISO 1,600:
not that high. It’s not abnormal but it’s not C300 mkii and I’m kind of spoiled by that. Also new is the interchangeable mount: you have EF, PL, B4, and even Nikon, oddly. Wow, I mean how many cameras do you need? Just look at that: she’s vlogging; she can’t decide which camera to vlog with. You know what, I think you should vlog with this one. This this one is a much better camera, all you have to do that. Yeah? It’s a bit unfortunate that the screen doesn’t flip all the way round, it kind of does that. You can kind of… Nah, can’t really do that. There we are.
-You are so huge. That’s really, actually what she just said… So that’s what she said. Okay, do you want to swap? There we are.
-Wow, nice, how can I hold it? There we are, hold it under there. I mean look at that. I mean it’s technically possible to vlog with it, it doesn’t autofocus like the C300 mkii but it’s good for building up muscles too. But you’ve just got to love Blackmagic colour science. It looks beautiful once graded. And that’s the 1080 high speed. But it can shoot, of course, 4.6K. RAW! 16-bit! Have that, and then cook it later. That’s a beautiful steak. Don’t know what I’m talking about but there you go. Having an ability to RAW is always a meaty plus: you get that extra information and thus more flexibility when handing that footage in post. Juicy! But look, if you don’t want to shoot RAW, you have the option of ProRes or DNxHR. This works pretty well as a shoulder mounted camera It’s why they’ve got all these fancy new buttons. So, you need that new EVF. And then it works rather nicely. However, the thing with the UMP is that’s not really about the improvements in the files that you get out of it but rather how you use it: it now has AES audio input and an option to add an external SSD, but let’s face it a big thing with this is mainly the buttons and the new dials. What urked a lot of people about the Ursa Mini was how it was in terms of actual use. So it’s good that Blackmagic have actually listened and made refinements with this model. I mean, say that weight. And it’s called a Mini: it’s not exactly mini by a lot of people’s standards. But for that image quality, in this sized package, it kind of is. So there we are and that’s the Blackmagic Ursa Mini Pro. Just enough improvements to make this a really good camera. and got. It’s got big camera performance in a mini package. “Mini” Package. It just shows that Blackmagic Design are kinda listening. …Probably.

Image Tracer

Image Tracer


Users sometimes need to convert raster images to DWG files and manually re-tracing an image is a very time-consuming process. Previously, this involved third party software, But with DraftSight Professional, Premium, Enterprise, and Enterprise Plus products, this functionality is built in with the Image Tracer feature. I have already imported a floorplan of a house. To convert this raster image to DWG file, go to the Add-Ins menu, select Image Tracer, and choose the profile that best suits your image. In this situation, I am selecting: “Floor Plan High Quality, High-Res Image.” Next, highlight the image and the conversion will take place in a matter of moments. If you click on the Advanced Tab, you have various options to improve the conversion. For example, under Line Options, you can switch from Double to Single lines, which can clean up and remove unwanted lines. Once you are satisfied with the results, click OK. If you’re happy with the converted image, you can delete the original image file. In this example, we are going to use the Image Tracer command to convert a logo to DWG file. Go to the Add-Ins menu select Image Tracer and choose the Logo profile. Highlight your logo and the conversion will take just a moment to complete. You can change the transparency of your original image to make it easier to see the converted data. If you’re happy with the conversion, click OK. You can now delete the original image file. The Image Tracer command can easily handle complex images. In this example, we are going to convert this 3D gear image to a DWG file. Go to the Add-Ins menu, select Image Tracer, and select the desired profile. Highlight your image and let the conversion complete. Rather than change the transparency on this image, we are going to click on the Hide Image option to view the conversion. If you are happy with the results, click OK, and you can delete the original image. To learn more about DraftSight Professional, Premium, Enterprise and Enterprise Plus products, visit DraftSight.com.

Image is powerful: Cameron Russell at TEDxMidAtlantic 2012


Transcriber: Maria L. Guilló
Reviewer: Ariana Bleau Lugo Hi. My name is Cameron Russell and for the last little while
I’ve been a model. Actually for 10 years. And I feel like there is an uncomfortable tension
in the room right now, because I should not have worn this dress. (Laughter) So, luckily I brought an outfit change. This is the first outfit change
on a TED stage, so you guys are pretty lucky
to witness it, I think. If some of the women were really horrified
when I came out, you don’t have to tell me now,
but I will find out later on Twitter. (Laughter) I’d also note that I am quite privileged to be able to transform
what you think of me in a very brief 10 seconds. Not everybody gets to do that. These heels are very uncomfortable,
so good thing I wasn’t going to wear them. The worst part is putting
this sweater over my head because that’s when
you’ll all laugh at me so don’t do anything
while it’s over my head. All right. So, why did I do that? That was awkward. (Laughter) Well… (Laughter) Hopefully not as awkward as that picture. Image is powerful, but also image is superficial. I just totally transformed
what you thought of me in six seconds. And in this picture I had actually
never had a boyfriend in real life. I was totally uncomfortable
and the photographer was telling me to arch my back and put my hand
in that guy’s hair. And of course barring surgery, or the fake tan that I got two days ago for work, there is very little that we can do
to transform how we look. And how we look, though it is superficial and immutable has a huge impact on our lives. So today, for me, being fearless means being honest,
and I am on this stage because I am a model.
I am on this stage because I am a pretty white women. In my industry we call that a sexy girl. And I am gonna answer the questions that people always ask me
but with an honest twist. So the first question is,
“How do you become a model?” And I always say,
“Oh, I was scouted,” but that means nothing. The real way that I became a model is I won a genetic lottery
and I’m the recipient of a legacy. And maybe you’re wondering,
“What is a legacy?” Well, for the past two centuries
we have defined beauty not just as health and youth and simetry that we’re biologically programmed to admire, but also as tall slender figures and femininity and white skin. And this is a legacy that was built for me and it’s a legacy that I’ve been cashing out on. And I know there are pople in the audience who are skeptical at this point, and maybe there are some fashionistas
who are like, “Wait — Naomi, Tyra, Joan Smalls, Liu Wen,” and first I commend you
on your model knowledge, very impressive.
(Laughter) But unfortunately I have to inform you that in 2007 a very inspired NYU PhD student counted all the models on the runway, every single one who was hired, and of the 677 models that were hired, only 27 or less than 4% were non-white. The next question people always ask me is, “Can I be a model when I grow up?” And first answer is,
“I don’t know, they don’t put me in charge of that.” But the second answer and what I really want to say to these little girls is, “Why? You know, you can be anything. You could be the President of the United States, or the inventor of the next Internet, or a ninja cardio-thoracic surgeon poet, which would be awesome because
you’d be the first one.” (Laughter) If after this amazing list they’re still like, “No, no, Cameron, I want to be a model”, then I say, “Be my boss”, because I’m not in charge of anything, and you could be
the editor-in-chief of American Vogue or the CEO of H&M
or the next Steven Meisel. Saying that you want to be a model
when you grow up is a akin to saying that you want to win the Powerball when you grow up. It’s, you know, out of your control, and it’s awesome
and it’s not a career path. I will demonstrate for you now
ten years of accumulated model knowledge,
because unlike cardio-thoracic surgeons
it can just be distilled right into it right now. So, if the photographer is right there and the light is right there like a nice HMI and the client says,
“Cameron, we want a walking shot.” Well then this leg goes first,
nice and long, this arm goes back, this arm goes forth,
the head is at three quarters and you just go back and forth.
Just do that. And then you look back at your imaginary friends
(Laughter) three hundred, four hundred,
five hundred times. It will look something like this
— (Laughter) — hopefully less awkward than that one on the middle,
that was — I don’t know what happened there.
(Laughter) Unfortunately, after you’ve gone to school and you have a resume
and you’ve done a few jobs you can’t say anything anymore, so — if you say you want to be
the President of the United States, but your resume reads
“Underwear model 10 years” people give you a funny look. The next question people always ask me is, “Do they retouch all the photos?” and yeah, they pretty much
retouch all the photos, but that is only a small component
of what’s happening. This picture is the very first picture
that I ever took and is also the very first time
that I had worn a bikini, and I didn’t even have my period yet, I know we are getting personal, but, you know, I was a young girl. This is what I looked like with my grandma just a few months earlier. Here’s me on the same day as the shoot — my friend got to come with me — Here is me at a slumber party a few days
before I shot French Vogue. Here’s me on the soccer team
and in V Magazine. And here is me today. And I hope what you are seeing is that these pictures are not pictures of me,
they are constructions, and they are constructions by professionals, by hair stylists, and make up artists
and photographers and stylists and all of their assistants,
and pre-production, and post-production,
and they built this. That’s not me. OK, so the next question
people always ask me is, “Do you get free stuff?”
(Laughter) I do have too many eight inch heels which I never get to wear,
except for earlier, but the free stuff that I get
is the free stuff that I get in real life and that is what we don’t like to talk about. I grew up in Cambridge and one time I went out to a store
and I forgot my money and they gave me the dress for free. When I was a teenager
I was driving with my friend, who was an awful driver,
and she ran a red and of course we got pulled over,
and all it took was a “Sorry, officer” and we were on our way. And I got these free things
because of how I look, not who I am,
and there are people paying a cost for how they look and not who they are. I live in New York, and last year of the 140.000 teenagers
that were stopped and frisked, 86% of them were black and Latino
and most of them were young man. And there are only 177.000
young black and latino man in New York, so for them it’s not a question of “Will I get stopped?” but “How many times will I get stopped?
When will I get stopped?” When I was researching this talk
I found out that of the 13 year old girls in the United States 53% don’t like their bodies.
And that number goes to 78%
by the time they are 17. So the last question people ask me is, you know,
“What is it like to be a model?” and I think the answer
that they’re looking for is if you are a little bit skinnier
and you have shinier hair you will be so happy and fabulous. And when we are backstage
we give an answer that maybe makes it seem like that, we say “It’s really amazing to travel” and “It’s amazing to get to work with creative inspired passionate people,”
and those things are true, but they’re only one half of the story,
because the thing that we never say on camera,
that I have never said on camera is “I am insecure.”
And I am insecure because I have to think about
what I look like everyday, and if you ever are wondering, you know, “If I have thinner thighs and shinier hair,
will I be happier?” you just need to meet group of models, because they have the thinnest thighs
and the shinniest hair and the coolest clothes
and they are the most physically insecure women
probably on the planet. So when I was writing this talk
I found it very difficult to strike an honest balance,
because on the one hand I felt very uncomfortable
to come here and say, look I received all these benefits from a deck stacked in my favour. And also I felt really uncomfortable
to follow that up with “And it doesn’t always make me happy”. But mostly it was difficult to unpack a legacy of gender and racial opression when I’m one of the biggest beneficiaries. But I am also happy and honoured to be up here and I think that it’s great I got to come,
you know, before ten or twenty or thirty years had passed and I had more agency on my career,
because maybe then I wouldn’t tell the story of how I got my first job, or maybe I wouldn’t tell the story
of how I paid for college, which seems so important right now. If there is a take away to this talk, I hope is that we all feel more comfortable acknowledging the power of image in our perceived successes and our perceived failures. Thank you. (Applause)

60 Second Photoshop Tutorial : Put an Image in Text -HD-

60 Second Photoshop Tutorial : Put an Image in Text -HD-


One of the best ways to make boring text in Photoshop more interesting is to put an image inside of it. First grab your text tool
and find the font that has put on the most extra holiday weight. I’ll be using Impact as is nice think font
that will allow us to see a good deal of our image. Next scale up your text. Now place the image you want to use above the
text layer. After that move your mouse between
the text and image layer and hold alt. When the mouse changes click to create a
clipping mask. Or right click the image layer and
select make clipping mask. Now move your image layer around to create an
interesting composition for your text. Next we can add a bit of depth to get
the text up off of the background. Go to the FX panel and add on a small bevel and emboss. Then add on a slight drop shadow. This will pull the text away from the
page. Lastly you can add on whatever
decorations you would like. I have a santa have that I cut off the
picture of a relatives head that should work nicely on our text. Now look at that. We
did that in snow time and I think that our text is looking good enough to throw
on our tacky holiday card. If you liked this 60 second tutorial be
sure to subscribe, rate, comment, and share with your friends.

Acetone Transfers – Transfer an Image onto Wood

Acetone Transfers – Transfer an Image onto Wood


Hi everyone, and welcome to Bob’s Wood Stuff. Today I’ll be showin you how to do an acetone
transfer, which is a great way to get a design onto a piece of wood, or to get a joinery
template or a carving template onto a piece of wood. These are the supplies you’ll need for this
project. You’ll need acetone for doing the transfer. You’ll need a design that you can transfer. A board to transfer it onto. A respirator, because acetone is pretty dangerous. And some gloves. I like these thick rubber gloves because I
can keep using them again and again, and they protect against acetone. You’ll also need some masking tape, and a
spoon for rubbing the paper. The first step is to print your design on a
laser printer. It needs to be a laser printer because those
use toner instead of ink, and toner works much better for this process. Make sure to print your design in mirror image
so that it transfers correctly. Cut off any excess paper from your design,
while leaving it in a rectangular shape. Use the masking tape to secure a couple of
spots on the same side. You’re going to be flapping this piece of
paper up and down, so it needs to hinge on the masking tape. After puting on your respirator and gloves,
take a rag and pour a little bit of the acetone onto it. Gently wipe the acetone on top of the paper,
and you’ll start to see your design show through. You don’t want to put more acetone than this,
because it will cause the toner to pool and mess up your design. Once you can see the design, start rubbing
the paper with the spoon, and this will push the toner into your wood. You don’t want to do too large of an area
all at once, just do a small area. Keep rubbing it with the spoon until the acetone
has dried and you can’t see your design anymore. Acetone dries pretty quickly. Occasionally you’ll need to flip the design
up to see how well it transferred. Some sections require several applications
to get all of the toner onto the wood. [music] And there we have it. A nice design has been transferred onto this
wood, and now I can decorate my shop with it. So the acetone transfer turned out really
well. I put some poly on it, so I can put it outdoors
on my shop. And it’s just a really good technique to know,
so you can put a design on a piece of wood.

How to Render 360° Panoramic Images: Lumion 9 – Tutorial

How to Render 360° Panoramic Images: Lumion 9 – Tutorial


Welcome to Lumion 9, Tutorial 8. In this tutorial we will show you how to create 360 degree panoramic images of your project. To create panoramic images, click on the right hand side, on 360 Panorama. Now move to a nice location, for example, here. Set the eye point at 1.60 meter, put the eye point horizontal eye level and go to one of the slots and store the panorama. You can render the panorama by clicking on this button. So here we have some options to choose from. The resolution, 4K or 8K, the quality level, stereoscopic or not stereoscopic. For stereoscopic mode, you need a VR headset to view it, because each eye needs to see a different image. For monoscopic flat image, you can view the 360 degree panoramic image on a tablet, on a mobile phone, on a web browser. So let’s start with that. Let’s keep this as generic. Render at 4K resolution. So here you see the image created before your eyes. Now it looks a bit funny because it wasn’t designed to be looked at in this way. It was designed to look at in a special browser or viewer, where you turn the view point in different directions. If you now go to your browser, for example, in Facebook you can upload the image. Share it. And now you can look in all directions. You can even make it bigger. So you can share the 360 degree image that you just created in Lumion in a few clicks on your Facebook. Another way of creating panoramic images is to use MyLumion. You can email it to yourself. So now the panoramic image will be created in a slightly different format and uploaded to MyLumion, where you can see it on a browser. Now we can look in all directions by clicking with the mouse and shifting left, right, up, down. You can view it full screen and use the buttons in the corner. And we can see it on a tablet or mobile phone in the same way, by opening the link in the email. You can create multiple panoramic images in the same scene, for example, another one over here and a third one over there, and now we can render them all three in one go and they will have hot links between them. By clicking on this icon, you will see the other spots where we also created panoramas. We can just click on it, and go straight to that position. Now we can do the same on a tablet or mobile phone. If you want to go back to MyLumion at a later stage, you can always go there by clicking on this button. So here my two panoramic images are stored and I can change the text, save changes, and click on it again. And share this link by just copy-pasting the link in an email or another social media account. Now what we did not see so far is the use of Styles. This button is grayed out. Styles are currently not available for panoramas. The reason is that some of these special effects do not work for 360 degree images. If you go to the Effects section and you will see all the effects that are and that are not available for panoramic images. So there are still some important ones left, which improve the image quality definitely, but a lot of them have gone. But you can still get close to the same result by going back, for example, to Photo Mode, and here, copy-paste the style set. Paste effects. So now you still have some special effects. You see that the list is much shorter than what we saw before in Photo Mode, but still there are some effects left. You can also add Real Skies. See how that looks. Copy across to the other ones. Render again. So as you can see now, maybe it’s a little bit dark, but you can add quite realistic effects. Now let’s go to one of the other options, and that’s Stereoscopic. In this case, two images will be rendered, one for each eye, but it uses a different algorithm, so it takes quite longer processing time. Here at the bottom right you can see how much time will probably be spent rendering this image. It can take quite a while so we won’t wait for that. Before we want to do this, let’s go to Draft Quality and set some advanced settings. Reduce the number of slices to 250 and try again. So now it goes a little bit faster. It is always a good idea to see if your image has the right position and settings before you spend time on doing the higher quality rendering. So we look at this image, we see two panoramic images placed on top of each other, one for the left and one for the right eye. These can only be viewed inside a VR headset like the Oculus Go. To view them, you need to transfer the images to the Oculus Go, start the Oculus Go and it will recognize them automatically. In the Oculus Go, you need to go to Navigate, Gallery, and then Internal Storage. And here albums are created, corresponding to the folder names that you created in Windows Explorer. So now you can look around in all directions. Similarly, we can use Dropbox. Go to Navigate, Gallery, and go to Dropbox. You can connect your dropbox account. Once you connected it, you have the same folders as you have in Dropbox available over here. So if you put your images in one folder they will appear here as well. For this you don’t need any wire connected to your headset to get the images
across. This concludes lesson 8 about how to create panoramic images.

What if 3D printing was 100x faster? | Joseph DeSimone

What if 3D printing was 100x faster? | Joseph DeSimone


I’m thrilled to be here tonight to share with you something
we’ve been working on for over two years, and it’s in the area
of additive manufacturing, also known as 3D printing. You see this object here. It looks fairly simple,
but it’s quite complex at the same time. It’s a set of concentric
geodesic structures with linkages between each one. In its context, it is not manufacturable
by traditional manufacturing techniques. It has a symmetry such
that you can’t injection mold it. You can’t even manufacture it
through milling. This is a job for a 3D printer, but most 3D printers would take between
three and 10 hours to fabricate it, and we’re going to take the risk tonight
to try to fabricate it onstage during this 10-minute talk. Wish us luck. Now, 3D printing is actually a misnomer. It’s actually 2D printing
over and over again, and it in fact uses the technologies
associated with 2D printing. Think about inkjet printing where you
lay down ink on a page to make letters, and then do that over and over again
to build up a three-dimensional object. In microelectronics, they use something called lithography to do
the same sort of thing, to make the transistors
and integrated circuits and build up a structure several times. These are all 2D printing technologies. Now, I’m a chemist,
a material scientist too, and my co-inventors
are also material scientists, one a chemist, one a physicist, and we began to be
interested in 3D printing. And very often, as you know,
new ideas are often simple connections between people with different experiences
in different communities, and that’s our story. Now, we were inspired by the “Terminator 2” scene for T-1000, and we thought, why couldn’t a 3D printer
operate in this fashion, where you have an object
arise out of a puddle in essentially real time with essentially no waste to make a great object? Okay, just like the movies. And could we be inspired by Hollywood and come up with ways
to actually try to get this to work? And that was our challenge. And our approach would be,
if we could do this, then we could fundamentally address
the three issues holding back 3D printing from being a manufacturing process. One, 3D printing takes forever. There are mushrooms that grow faster
than 3D printed parts. (Laughter) The layer by layer process leads to defects
in mechanical properties, and if we could grow continuously,
we could eliminate those defects. And in fact, if we could grow really fast,
we could also start using materials that are self-curing,
and we could have amazing properties. So if we could pull this off,
imitate Hollywood, we could in fact address 3D manufacturing. Our approach is to use
some standard knowledge in polymer chemistry to harness light and oxygen
to grow parts continuously. Light and oxygen work in different ways. Light can take a resin
and convert it to a solid, can convert a liquid to a solid. Oxygen inhibits that process. So light and oxygen
are polar opposites from one another from a chemical point of view, and if we can control spatially
the light and oxygen, we could control this process. And we refer to this as CLIP.
[Continuous Liquid Interface Production.] It has three functional components. One, it has a reservoir
that holds the puddle, just like the T-1000. At the bottom of the reservoir
is a special window. I’ll come back to that. In addition, it has a stage
that will lower into the puddle and pull the object out of the liquid. The third component
is a digital light projection system underneath the reservoir, illuminating with light
in the ultraviolet region. Now, the key is that this window
in the bottom of this reservoir, it’s a composite,
it’s a very special window. It’s not only transparent to light
but it’s permeable to oxygen. It’s got characteristics
like a contact lens. So we can see how the process works. You can start to see that
as you lower a stage in there, in a traditional process,
with an oxygen-impermeable window, you make a two-dimensional pattern and you end up gluing that onto the window
with a traditional window, and so in order to introduce
the next layer, you have to separate it, introduce new resin, reposition it, and do this process over and over again. But with our very special window, what we’re able to do is,
with oxygen coming through the bottom as light hits it, that oxygen inhibits the reaction, and we form a dead zone. This dead zone is on the order
of tens of microns thick, so that’s two or three diameters
of a red blood cell, right at the window interface
that remains a liquid, and we pull this object up, and as we talked about in a Science paper, as we change the oxygen content,
we can change the dead zone thickness. And so we have a number of key variables
that we control: oxygen content, the light, the light intensity,
the dose to cure, the viscosity, the geometry, and we use very sophisticated software
to control this process. The result is pretty staggering. It’s 25 to 100 times faster
than traditional 3D printers, which is game-changing. In addition, as our ability
to deliver liquid to that interface, we can go 1,000 times faster I believe, and that in fact opens up the opportunity
for generating a lot of heat, and as a chemical engineer,
I get very excited at heat transfer and the idea that we might one day
have water-cooled 3D printers, because they’re going so fast. In addition, because we’re growing things,
we eliminate the layers, and the parts are monolithic. You don’t see the surface structure. You have molecularly smooth surfaces. And the mechanical properties
of most parts made in a 3D printer are notorious for having properties
that depend on the orientation with which how you printed it,
because of the layer-like structure. But when you grow objects like this, the properties are invariant
with the print direction. These look like injection-molded parts, which is very different
than traditional 3D manufacturing. In addition, we’re able to throw the entire polymer
chemistry textbook at this, and we’re able to design chemistries
that can give rise to the properties you really want in a 3D-printed object. (Applause) There it is. That’s great. You always take the risk that something
like this won’t work onstage, right? But we can have materials
with great mechanical properties. For the first time, we can have elastomers that are high elasticity
or high dampening. Think about vibration control
or great sneakers, for example. We can make materials
that have incredible strength, high strength-to-weight ratio,
really strong materials, really great elastomers, so throw that in the audience there. So great material properties. And so the opportunity now,
if you actually make a part that has the properties
to be a final part, and you do it in game-changing speeds, you can actually transform manufacturing. Right now, in manufacturing,
what happens is, the so-called digital thread
in digital manufacturing. We go from a CAD drawing, a design,
to a prototype to manufacturing. Often, the digital thread is broken
right at prototype, because you can’t go
all the way to manufacturing because most parts don’t have
the properties to be a final part. We now can connect the digital thread all the way from design
to prototyping to manufacturing, and that opportunity
really opens up all sorts of things, from better fuel-efficient cars
dealing with great lattice properties with high strength-to-weight ratio, new turbine blades,
all sorts of wonderful things. Think about if you need a stent
in an emergency situation, instead of the doctor pulling off
a stent out of the shelf that was just standard sizes, having a stent that’s designed
for you, for your own anatomy with your own tributaries, printed in an emergency situation
in real time out of the properties such that the stent could go away
after 18 months: really-game changing. Or digital dentistry, and making
these kinds of structures even while you’re in the dentist chair. And look at the structures
that my students are making at the University of North Carolina. These are amazing microscale structures. You know, the world is really good
at nano-fabrication. Moore’s Law has driven things
from 10 microns and below. We’re really good at that, but it’s actually very hard to make things
from 10 microns to 1,000 microns, the mesoscale. And subtractive techniques
from the silicon industry can’t do that very well. They can’t etch wafers that well. But this process is so gentle, we can grow these objects
up from the bottom using additive manufacturing and make amazing things
in tens of seconds, opening up new sensor technologies, new drug delivery techniques, new lab-on-a-chip applications,
really game-changing stuff. So the opportunity of making
a part in real time that has the properties to be a final part really opens up 3D manufacturing, and for us, this is very exciting,
because this really is owning the intersection between hardware,
software and molecular science, and I can’t wait to see what designers
and engineers around the world are going to be able to do
with this great tool. Thanks for listening. (Applause)