Canon EOS 7D Shutter Speed Tutorial

Canon EOS 7D Shutter Speed Tutorial


a nice short episode of making I’ve made
I haven’t made any videos for a while but I just thought like this quick one
on this kind of 7d and today I’m gonna demonstrate how to change the shutter
speed and to get a really good shutter speed for like if you’re an Instagram
user or your loved shutter speed use an how to change you really on this model
so I’m going to switch it on first so that’s the switch ones them and switch
this on so you switch it on once I’ve switched it on I’m gonna put it into AV
mode so it’s already at the moment on AV mode as you can see so once I put it on
AV mode I can now play around with the shutter speed so if I click on this this
little cue button here okay so if I click on the little Q button it will
take me to the main menu ok so once I’m in the main menu I can then change
various things within there so if I go back to the queue and there’s my shutter
speed so essentially all I need to do is change that and how I would do that is I
can either I can revolve this rule little wheel bottom wheel button here
and that will allow me to change the shutter speed so if I just do that I can
change shutter speed so I can take your one 4/20 to the second 50 to the second
eighth of a second and I can take it back for through the way around so if I
take it 400 you can see it’s dead quick and if I turn it the other way so if I
can click on this cue button here and turn it the other way and I take it to
no one minus one point three seconds and take a picture this time moving my
camera around I should get a little bitch motion blur in the picture and you
can see it’s it’s overexposed the picture so I haven’t got card in here
but I’m just demonstrating this so if I do that again so if I see if I click on
the cue button there’s my shutter speed and if I take a picture move it around
you can clearly see there it’s overexposed okay so show speeds mainly
for using with in low-light you know you want to increase the shutter speed so
you got more like coming through to the aperture so therefore your pictures will
be better exposed you need to control it via the shutter
speed and aperture in order to get the right consistency you know obviously I
so plays a factor as well in low light so that’s something you need to think
about but summarize basically you just put your camera on to put it into AV
mode so it’s at the moment in AV mode there you go and then if I sort of press
my camera on click on the cue button that is my shutter speed and to change
you all I do revolve around this to increase and decrease my shutter speed
to get the best exposure for the before the image any questions about shutter
speed pleased to keep my shot so if you want to be low shutter speed like light
drawings and all that sort of so I’m really want to take this number down by
revolving this you know to get that nice exposure you might need to sort plan on
with your ISO as well and you have your aperture ratio to get the right noise
level down to get the nice image that you want okay this is obviously this
camera is not touchscreen so I’m not so I’m using the touchscreen features on
here because they don’t exist basically however you know it does you know it is
quite useful in terms of the your shutter speed you know I’ve got a live
mood live view here as well so as you can clearly see in my live view I’ve got
it in for camera mode here’s my shutter speed so I can also change you by the
wheel up here as well so there’s a weird there’s a wheel here and I can move this
in an at and I can also use this as well I want to do that you can see you can
see the number will change as you can see that okay if I bring a bit closer
maybe there you go so the number changes and then you know the more the more
seconds like seconds I’ll give it the more explaining focus it is the less
I’ll give it so if I take it dad you can see my screen starts to get out of like
it becomes white because there’s too much light going through to the sensor
so you know you’ll essentially what it is that the show is a gay and you are
controlling the matter light that goes to the sensor okay so as simple as that
okay so if you like you point and let’s see a visual then
obviously you can see by this but obviously if you want to see in your
quick time view which is this one here then you can see in your quick time view
and it will show you all the dials etc to show you what the views are okay
summarize I’ve just shown you shutter speed perfect for slow shutter speed if
you are thinking about taking those pictures in low light and you want to
create drawings like drawing shall I say sorry any questions please post and I
will be happy to respond to any questions you may have thank you for
watching guys see you next time

Photography tips – Steps to becoming a happy photographer

Photography tips – Steps to becoming a happy photographer


– What is up, guys. Welcome to my YouTube channel, where we talk all things photography. I’m up, right and breezy, this morning, We’re down by Tara Hill,
and I’m gonna shoot some cityscapes, to see how we get on. Hold on, this isn’t what
my YouTube channel’s about. I’ve been trying to force
the issue, this morning. It’s a kind of proven model. YouTuber, photographer,
B-roll, this and that’s that, but I don’t enjoy shooting cityscapes. I’m just kinda forcing myself to do something that I don’t enjoy,
because I see others do it. So on that note, let’s get into the video. (classy downtempo music) So this morning, I went
out to try and shoot some cityscapes, and
that’s normally what I do. I do what YouTubers who do that, and who have big
audiences, and I am trying to grow my YouTube channel, so I felt this pressure to go out
and try and recreate that. I live in London, there’s
some great buildings, the sun hadn’t risen, it
was a perfect opportunity. But the more I walked around, the more I felt this pressure on my shoulders, and it really reminded me of this pressure that I used to feel when I first took up photography, when I was in college, and they gave me a camera, and I had to go out and take
pictures around the street. I felt so self-conscious, this was almost before mobile phones had cameras on them, this was 10 years ago, so
no one was really using ’em, but I felt so self-conscious
with that camera. I had in my head this idea that, wherever I’m pointing the camera to, someone’s gonna stand
behind me and look at it, and just think, that’s a shit
photo, why are you doing that? That’s kind of rubbish, you’re
not a good photographer, so you’re wasting your time
(multiple voices talking). Now, this is when I just
picked up a camera in college. And actually, on that note, I didn’t pick up a camera again, ’til sort of midway through uni, which was three years later. So I started to feel
this pressure on myself, this morning, to do something, and I’ve not felt that in awhile. I shoot stuff out on
location all the time, whether that’s people
running through the streets, or any sort of fitness
thing, or in central London, or in cities, or outside, and
I do enjoy taking landscapes. But landscapes, not cityscapes. And yeah, I just started
to feel this real pressure on myself, to the point where I just put my camera away, and thought,
I’m not gonna do this. But what it did do was inspire me to make this video,
because there’s one thing that I want to cover a bit more of, on my video, and that’s the mindset of photography, as well as giving tips and tricks on how to use your camera, and how you use Photoshop,
and Capture One. I want this channel to bring
value in a different way. There’s plenty of other
channels, tutorial channels, out there, but I think, especially if you wanna be self-employed, especially if you wanna do photography, or anything art-based, freelance, as your own business, there’s a lot of pressures and stuff
that come with that, and I can only speak to
what I’ve experienced. But hopefully, it can
kinda reassure people who are going through the same thing, that they’re not alone, and
it can maybe warn people just beginning their adventure as a self-employed photographer, it can maybe kind of warn you
of the potential pitfalls, and stuff, that you might come across. Really, that’s something
that’s kind of dogged me for the whole time, since I’ve lived in London, really, the
last sort of six years. I’ve always felt pressure from myself, to the point, upon viewing others, that I need to be shooting certain things. And authenticity is what
people can relate to, so in the end, I put my camera away, and that kinda brings
me onto my first point, about caring about what
other people think. I’m not shooting photographs
for the sake of others. Really, you have to find something that is genuinely you, and then
it will become much easier. So something I’ve found,
in the last two years, is, I’m really honed in on,
is sport, and athletes, and the athletic lifestyles,
and storytelling. So whether that’s
getting across the effort that someone’s putting in, in a workout, or the process that it
takes to make a product. So really, my first point to becoming a happier photographer
would be, assess yourself. You can do that in a few, various ways. One of them would be
what I just said, there, make sure you’re shooting
stuff that you enjoy, that you are about, that
you’re enthusiastic about. Shoot stuff that you enjoy doing, and not stuff that you think
you should be shooting. And that’s really easy
to get caught up in that. I’ve got caught up in
that plenty times, myself. Yeah, you can get nice photographs, but is your heart really in it? That’s really what you
have to be questioning yourself about, and if
it’s not, don’t do it, and don’t worry about the interest, that may or may not be there,
in your chosen subject. If you really like shooting plants, or any ass random thing, then don’t worry. Just shoot it, because
ultimately, the happiness is your number one goal, and that’s
what you have to focus on. Just shoot in what you enjoy. Wow, that was a ramble, jeez. In assessing yourself, take real stock of what you’re consuming. I can’t remember what YouTube channel it was, or what I was
watching the other day, or who it was I was listening to, but they said, when
you’re scrolling through your Instagram, if an
account isn’t filling you with warmth, or
bringing something valuable to your life, then click Unfollow. And I am so guilty of this. I follow so many different photographers, and originally, I thought I
was getting into operation, the people, either in
the same field as me, or more successful than me, or, I would scroll through Instagram, and all you see is a
congregation, an aggregation, of everyone else’s work. So you scroll through Instagram, and it gives you this false impression that everyone is super busy, every day, shooting stuff, and if you’re freelance, and you’re not busy every day, it’s really easy to get dragged
down by that, being like, oh, hey, I’m not working enough. I’m not doing enough, look at
all these people doing work. Whereas actually, that
guy who just posted that, it’s the first thing
he’s posted in a month. He’s going through this, or she’s going through the same struggles as you, and be brutal, and don’t
worry about offending people, but really kind of have a bit
of a cull, on your Instagram, and really only follow
things that, follow accounts that are bringing you value, and making you feel good about yourself. So that would be my point,
just follow accounts that make you feel good,
and not the accounts that you maybe feel that you have to. I’m only speaking from experience. So for example, shooting sport, and being around athletes, makes me happy, but like I mentioned earlier, I felt like I needed to shoot fashion, because I was surrounded
by people in fashion when I was working at studios,
and for other photographers. So I felt like, ah, this
is the way it needs to go. I know I really love doing this stuff, but everyone else kinda says I should go this way, so I’ll go that way. So try and realize what it
is that makes you happy, what it is that makes you happy shooting, and don’t worry about
other people’s opinions, or whether you feel there’s
a market there, or not. There is always a market for something. Your happiness is your own responsibility, and once you take ownership of that, you start putting into place the actions which will bring about your own happiness, and others around you will
start to feel the benefits. So I guess what I’m trying
to say is, regardless of what you may or may not think you should or should not be shooting, if it makes you happy, just do it. And that might be simple advice, it might be a bit cliche,
but it’s the best thing that I’ve been trying to get through to my head in the last 12 to 24 months. This has been a really
difficult video for me to make. I hope it’s kinda got my point across, or they’re not points,
they’re just thoughts on things that I’ve encountered recently, chains of thoughts, ways of thinking, and the kinda mechanisms that I’ve tried to put in place, that
help you kinda navigate your way through life, as a photographer, or a freelancer, because it’s not easy. It’s difficult, especially without wanting to sound too cliche, but especially with the ever-apparent pressures of the Internet, whether
that’s social media, or otherwise, everyone else’s success and failures are kind
of put on a platform. And it’s very difficult to watch everyone else’s success,
even successes, even though everyone goes through the same struggles. And it also kind of makes
you wanna hide away, ’cause you don’t want
people to see your failures. But hopefully, with some of the things that I’ve explained, and gone through, and talked about, here,
in this video, you can at least find way of shooting
things that make you happy. And ultimately, if you’re shooting happy, you’re gonna shoot more,
and you’ve got more chance of successes, unlike my speech today. It’s been horrendous. That was a bit of a ramble, today. I hope it brought some value to you guys. I’m trying to implement more videos of this style into my YouTube. Ultimately, I want my
YouTube to be a reflection of what I think, and
go through, in my life, so whether that’s, say,
behind-the-scenes videos, photography tips or tricks, or methods of thinking, and
practices that you can put in place, to ultimately
help you be a better, but more importantly,
happier, photographer. Thanks for watching, guys, and
I’ll see you in the next one. (introspective music)

Moda Fotoğrafçılığı Tüyoları Vol.01

Moda Fotoğrafçılığı Tüyoları Vol.01


So another photoshoot today. I put a shirt on, why?
Cause I’ll go out in the sun. I’m experienced from last time. We’re staying at this amazing place. The best light I’ve ever seen. I don’t think I’ll ever be able to shoot
Vlog with such nice lighting. Well, there are too many requests. These requests have one thing in common. And that is… Everyone asking for photography techniques
since I’m a photographer. They ask me to tell them how to become a
fashion photographer. First of all I can not teach you how to be a
fashion photographer. You definitely study
fine arts first. It doesn’t have to be photography. I could be graphic design,
interior architecture, or even plastic arts would do. But you have to be in touch with
fine arts somehow. Because the education you will get in fine arts
will teach you so much By the way I changed my angle
since I found this beautiful light I’m trying to make the best of it. This education you will get
will equip you. Because when you study you don’t just learn the basic rules. You get to see different ages and paintings from the past
How they were done, what influenced them How did the social events affect people,
How did people read them. Anyway I’m not going into details to make a long story short,
education sure helps. People are not getting education for no reason. And there is technique also,
but I’m not going to talk about that. There are a thousand of videos
on Youtube anyway and people who teach great. Plus I wouldn’t call myself a photographer
who shoots using photography techniques. I’m not the type of photographer
who would go in a studio, set up 150 lights, Measure DIN, this that, the Kelvin scale, I’m more into shooting in natural light. But what I can tell you is;
set experience I think it’s very important,
because the more comfortable you get on set the better you shoot. To be able to control the set,
To be able to direct the set to become a photographer
who can also direct is very important. I can give a couple of hints
regarding this, Maybe more.. I’ll try to post these tips
as I recall them. Starting today, let’s see some of these tips… Make sure to go see your
shoot location beforehand Be sure to check Sun angle,
it’s very important. There are apps such as Sun Seeker,
Any many more. I use Sun Seeker. Check where the Sun rises from. For example the Sun rises in here,
goes direct, and it sets here. When it sets here around 4pm The sunlight is not useful for me,
So make a plan accordingly. We came to check the location, And saw the light is not useful
for us after 4pm So we go down to the city after 4pm,
around Alacati. We’ll shoot the different shots
over there. You have to make this
planning ahead. In the meantime, look at this guy
playing music in his car Making the whole bay listen
to his choice of music This is so disrespectful. If I was one of the people on this beach
I would make a scene. This is one of the streets that
we’re going to shoot. Using Sun Seeker,
I can see around 4pm this building, where?
Right there… The street will be under
this building’s shadow So what I know now, thanks to this app, The app I was just telling you about, If I get here around 4pm
I’ll be able to use the Sun light As I want, until 7pm So what does this help me with?
It’s a huge advantage for my shoot planning. So I say I go to the beach
in the early morning Use the sunlight as long as I can Then come here around 4:30pm
and shoot effectively until 7pm Now this, is a huge advantage The most important part is to go
and do the planning The wind is crazy today,
you can’t imagine! I’m not even sure if you can hear me? I made a major mistake today. Normally I’m great using
these apps. I didn’t use Windy, Windy shows you
the wind details on your location Not just at the moment,
a week, 10 days Shows you the wind forecasts
and reports. But I didn’t check that. It was so bad today, The dust because of the wind Would go into the eyes of the models
Ruin their hair Because of the dust in their eyes,
They would be in tears Our camera lenses filled with dust as well,
And not working You have to use this technology I mean why wouldn’t you use it
when you can. So I definitely suggest you to use
these type of helpful programs I made a mistake by not using them. Now another important subject, Digital image technician. I mean it’s important where the computer is when we transfer the photos. If you place the computer
where everyone can see it Whoever is on set would all
be all over the computer And when they are all over the computer They see all the raw images And see all the details of the photographs And may obsess about little details. So what do we do,
We do not place our computer Where everyone can easily access For example we’re in a car right now. -Baris.
-Hello As a result, people do not
want to enter this car Why, because it’s hot in here,
Not enough space.. It’s not comfortable And when it’s not They can’t stay long And they don’t
obsess with little details. So they go and take care
of the shooting instead. For example when we used to
shoot film There were no computers. We were shooting film so
no-one would see what we shot So they would have to take care
of the shooting At the shooting they would fix
if something needed fixing on the model or on the clothes
the models are wearing They would fix what seemed wrong. Now with the computers We handle everything on Photoshop People got lazy so they do not pay attention to the shooting,
So it’s a problem. So it’s best not to
place it around. Also, another thing
I shoot on a memory card When I shoot on a memory card, There is something called ‘TETHER’, you connect
your camera to your computer via cable So when you shoot with a cable
they never pay attention to the shooting They all go on top of the computer
And see the shots from the computer So it’s even worse I say shoot on a memory card. And also do not place your computer
in an accessible place Shooting on a memory card
is really important. There might be a little
problem though. Especially when you are shooting
in sunny locations. It’s hard to see through LCD, and your
photographs would lose their beauty. So that’s why we use
this device called Loupe You put it behind the LCD and
look through the hole. That way you can concentrate better
on the photograph Also avoid the light and
other factors around. Another plus side of using a loupe is you get to choose the one you like
and show the client that one. or whoever that is You can only show the photos
you want them to see And be in control of the shoot. I think it’s important,
so shoot on a memory card. Definitely shoot
on memory card. Now I’m going to show you
blockage technique. We use this often
on our shootings. So there is usually a crowd
behind me when I’m shooting This crowd is the client, the agency
and the production. They wonder what I shoot
and when you’re shooting you see the reflection of the crowd
even if you don’t want to And you get distracted. Now I’m going to show you how my assistants
perform the blockage technique. OK, so I’m shooting. Hold on a sec, the camera was off. -Go ahead man, blockage!
-Blockage. I started to shoot,
İ shoot like this. You see the client? Like this. This is called a blockage technique. There is a flash version of this
which I’m going to tell you later. So the model poses like this,
if she puts it like this it will look like she is
missing her lower leg. Or if she position her joint like this,
it will look like she is missing an arm. So the joints should be open. Like this. This, it looks like
you don’t have a leg. So the joints should always
be in the right position. No problem with the color,
I got sunburned really bad. as always. I don’t wear sunscreen
And the reason is it sticks to my camera And when it collects dust
it’s a big problem I’d appreciate it if you have
any good sunscreen suggestions My last advice would be
about the mood board. Normally there would be a mood board
coming from the agency or the stylist regarding the shoot If there is none,
You should prepare yourself a mood board To see in which light,
in what poses how you will direct your models. For example, Even if I have one from the agency or from the editor I always make one for myself
as a reference So I can explain my models the mood,
what type of woman they are, What kind of location and
light we’re going to use etc. So we make sure
we’re on the same page. I advise you to have your
own mood board. And share it with your models. Also when you work on this before It will be a nice reference for you as well. This would be my last advice
to you. I’ll try to share these tips
on future videos as I recall them. We finished this shoot smoothly. There were no problems. Actually it was one of the smoothest
shoots ever lately. See you on the next video.

THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE UPGRADING YOUR CAMERA | PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS HINDI

THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE UPGRADING YOUR CAMERA | PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS HINDI


Have you ever thought that the camera that you own is probably outdated? Probably its time for a new camera I hope I had that expensive, beautiful camera but then with the budget constraint I am unable to buy that… 🙁 If you own a camera already, is it the right time to upgrade? is there a need to buy a new camera , right now? Do you feel you will improve on your work with your new camera? Lets discuss on that..! 🙂 Firstly, let me tell you I was very confused if I should make videos in English or Hindi then, I created a poll and based on the result of the poll I have planned to make videos in Hindi, but you may find me speaking in English.. here n there… Coming back to the topic, let me share with you.. until some days back…. I have been thinking about upgrading my current DSLR to something really new and expensive one.. like.. Canon 1DX M2 OR Sony A7RIII with which I could make more beautiful pictures and videos with them….!! I used to get these thoughts consistently so, i thought that I need to have very strong reasons to either BUY them OR drop my plans of upgrading….!! So, when I thought of upgrading , they were technical advantages of the new Camera…. but when I thought about it logically I felt, probably its not the time for me and then I decided NOT to… Now let me share the reasons why it was not necessary for me to upgrade and I feel these reasons are going to help you as well to decide for yourself if you indeed need an upgrade..and eventually you may cancel your plans …. Why I thought about this….. I figured out there were so many things in my own Camera that I did not know very well… the reason could be that, I have not yet completely exploited my Camera..!! and even before I exploit my camera to the fullest, i am falling for new and expensive ones… So, the thought of going for a new camera is not great… My 2nd question was have I applied all possible techniques and skills in my genre of photography and then decide that the only thing to pending is to buy a new advanced camera? there are many things actually that I can do with this camera..! 3rd important question was … its a general tendency to think about a new camera for getting good quality photos…. but is there anything SPECIFIC that I am missing out on this camera, related to my interest/ work which I see in the new one? I had a 500D canon DSLR camera I had upgraded it to 5D M3 5D M3 was so important for me because I was into wedding photography…. I desperately needed a full frame camera specially to exploit my wide angle lens. I also needed a Camera with 2 card slots obviously because I did not want to change cards during an event and miss out on any important moments.. 5D was the only camera that was having 2 card slots those days… I rented 5D for around 10 weddings I really liked it ad I thought I should buy… So, even you need to think if there are any SPECIFIC TRIGGER POINTS which is compelling you to upgrade If the answers to all the 3 questions are ‘YES’ then you can go ahead and get a new/ expensive Camera If not..! its high time that you start exploiting your current camera.. Let me tell you… when a beginner photographer looks at a picture clicked by me and asks me ..” which camera? actually the question is wrong the question is irritating and invalid if the questions would have been could you let me know the settings…. which time of the day you did this shoot? whats lens did you use to get these result? All these are important questions…! In fact DSLR body’s contribution is negligible… except for clicking the picture and saving it to your memory card..! this can be done by any DSLR…. Yes, we can differences in ISO sensitivity, colour range and dynamic range… but its very negligible…. Potato jet- is a youtube channel, this guy is a film maker… he has compared Canon 80D , a mid range DSLR with ARRI ALEXA a Hollywood film making camera… If we look for differences we don’t find much.. Of course, we see differences … but nothing that can make a difference to you creativity …. the link for the video is in description, look for yourself….. One more important information…. Photographers find it difficult to handle flash after watching a lot of youtube videos, after a lot of trial and error, after experimenting in a lot of different lighting conditions…. I learnt how to use and so will you…. you will slowly understand the relationship between the flash power and shutter speed…. but without understanding the concept , if you just go for a high end flash for a better light… I can assure that you will not have it… the result will not be good…. So… expensive flash, expensive cameras, expensive accessories won’t help you… Then… What will? Its always about techniques, knowledge, skill and experience …. you need to develop this.. if you develop a skill today or understand a technique no better investment than that…… By using your knowledge and skills, you can even make beautiful photos out of a 7 year old camera… And … keep on thing in mind… Best camera is the one … on which you have maximum expertise.. And even big budget Hollywood films have used cameras like 5D M2 and 5D M3 in many of their sequences If a 1 – 1.5Lkh camera can replace 5+ lakh body…. then we can definitely use our old, existing heap cameras to make very beautiful pictures.. Parker walbek – one of my fav youtuber he shows in his video how a simple room can look cinematic when recorded with a mid range simple camera.. this happens with experience and understanding of light….! the full video link is in the description… do have a look.. Today, I have shared enough instances/ examples, given you some reasons.. to give a second thought on buying a new camera body…. Do expensive cameras really make a difference well, we will see a difference… but very little…. Major difference is made by your knowledge, technique, skill and experience … rather than thinking I wish I had an expensive camera…. Please give a thumbs up and let me know if you have liked this video… 🙂

Landscape Photography – A beginner’s guide to woodland

Landscape Photography – A beginner’s guide to woodland


If you’re interested in woodland
photography and you’ve always struggled on how to compose your images within
the woods and the forests, this is the video for you. My name is Julian Elliott
and I am a professional landscape and travel photographer. If you want to keep
up with my exploits as a professional landscape and travel photographer make
sure you click on the subscribe button just down there The absolute first step when it comes to
woodland photography is to go to somewhere that you know and that you can
practice. Why? Because you know it. And if you’re familiar with your surroundings,
like this woodland here which is about five minutes drive from where I live in
France, then you’re going to be able to create more successful images from that
particular area and also you’ll get to know the intricacies of this particular
woodland. So for me for example I know when it rains heavily where I’m stood
floods. I’ve had images, I think it was back in April or so, whereby this
whole area was flooded I had a really nice sunny day with blue sky white
fluffy clouds and I was able to get the reflections all in this woodland plus
the reflections of all the tree stumps here. So that is the first step to
creating your successful images within woodland. Get to know one of your local
areas. The next step to think about when
creating your woodland images is the light and the quality of the light.
Woodland is great in that it works both in flat light and also sunny light and
also when you have that low mist and there is the sun breaking through the
mist in the early morning creating those really nice ethereal looking images.
Absolutely wonderful soft light in the morning. You can’t beat it. So as I said
it works great in flat light. Today we have flat light. It’s a very overcast day,
there’s no long shadows anywhere and it pretty much works as you will see, not
necessarily here, but certainly in the next location
that we’ll be working on further on into the video.So that’s the next step you
must think about is light and the quality of the light in your woodland. Once you’ve got to know your local
woodland, and you’ve thought about the quality of the light that you want in
that woodland, the next step to think about is lens choice. Obviously we have
wide-angle; 50mm; short telephoto and long telephoto. Each of those
lenses will work in a particular area of woodland. Wide-angle, for example, is great
if you’ve got some foreground interest. We don’t really have any foreground
interest in this particular woodland so the next step up is to think about is it
somewhere around 35 or 50 millimeters that we’re going to work in. Here, because I
visit it very often, I know that around 50 mil and above works. Why? Because it
helps to compress a lot of the trees together and create a very nice
composition. Telephoto it kind of works in here but it brings things maybe too
close. So here, for example, I’m always thinking it’s around 50 to 70
millimeters. So 50 millimeters how our eyes see and then 70 millimeters so it starts
to compress things just a little but not too much. But what I’m going to do is I’m
going to take a picture.The same picture, the same composition and show you why
each of them does and doesn’t work so you can see what it is that I’m talking
about here in this particular woodland. I’ve set up my camera and I’ve put on a
zoom lens which is 28 millimeters to 70 millimeters and that’s because it gives
me most of the focal lengths that I would use in this particular woodland
specifically for me 50 millimeters and 70 millimeters. At the moment it’s set at
28 and you can see it’s it’s okay is probably maybe a little bit too wide. But
what I’ve done is I put this central trunk here in the middle this is what I
really want to focus on and you can see on the third’s here there is actually a
trunk and a trunk as well and the foreground is maybe just off the bottom
of the third and going toward the middle but not quite. But it’s just too wide and
especially on a day like today there’s nothing in the sky and it’s just white
and it’s going to be blown out so that’s 28 millimeters wide angle and that for
me is why this particular scene doesn’t work at wide-angle. If I turn live view back on again and I
go into 50 millimeters you will see, if I slightly adjust my composition just a
little bit, just around here that things start to become more compressed these
trunks in the background are becoming more prominent whereas they were quite
far away because of the wide angle of the lens so they’re starting to become a
lot more compressed into the scene and it’s how we see it with our eyes as our
eyes see around 50 millimeters focal length. So you can see there on the 3rd
we’ve got these trunks here so they’re starting to come in nicely. The
foreground is dropping down just a touch we’re losing the sky so when losing the
emphasis on what’s going to be an overexposed sky. Things are starting to
look that lot nicer. Let’s go in just a little bit more so if I go to roughly
here, and what I’m doing if I just turn live you back on, I’m paying very close
attention to these corners here. So this here this branch, this trunk here is
frustrating for me so I’m zooming in just to remove it from the frame then
I’m going to push this down just a little bit and then what you’ll see is that we
have an image that’s starting to look a lot more composed and a lot more
organized and we’re starting to see the wood for the trees so if I take that
image then you’ll see the difference between this image and the wide-angle
image and how using 50 millimetres and longer in the woodland can help
emphasize those tree trunks. Bring things closer together. Compress them and help
to create a more balanced image. As I said, you can use wide-angle but I think
you’ll find a lot of the time you’re probably working 35 millimetres and up
where you’re starting to get more of an emphasis on bringing things together and
creating a more balanced image. For the composition of our images it’s
good to start somewhere like this and the reason is because it’s an orderly
wood. It’s actually a man-made wood everything’s been planted in an orderly
fashion and so you can work things out a lot quicker than if you were to go in
just to a woodland, in your local woodland that’s been there for hundreds
of years. Because everything’s planted we can start to find compositions a lot
easier and then we can take that knowledge and transport it into a normal
woodland that’s been there for hundreds of years and it’s just a tangle of branches,
trees, trunks and whatever else. So I’ll just
explain some of the compositions that you can do here in this particular type
of woodland so you can get an idea how we’re going to transport it back
into a proper woodland and that’s been there for a few hundred years or. So this
is the first type of composition that you could do in this managed woodland.
You can use the avenue here and here to create a line of interest going in and
in to go back towards here. The only slight problem with this is there isn’t
really anything back here to create any interest. There is some moss or something
up there in the tree I think it might be mistletoe back there it’s lying on that
third. Detail-wise what I am looking at, and I might do in a bit, is just here
there’s a huge mushroom which I might go and take a shot of. It looks quite
interesting. But that’s the kind of first kind of composition that you could do
here in this managed woodland. This is another example of a composition
that you could do here in this managed woodland. It’s similarish to when i was
demonstrating the focal length in that the tree trunk is in the middle and
other things start dropping in behind it. However this time the grass is more
along the top third but it’s another example of something
that you could do here in this managed woodland when you’re starting to see the
wood for the trees. Hopefully you’ve seen in this managed
woodland how I started to create compositional elements to be able to
bring some kind of order into a final image. So what I’m going to do from here
is decamp into an ancient woodland and we’re going
to see how we can manage that and bring some kind of order to the chaos of an
ancient woodland. So we’ve swapped managed woodland for chaos. Ancient woodland. Where do you look? Well if you take some of those elements of composition like
the rule of thirds or like the managed woodland where we placed the tree trunk
in the middle. If you start to look around and start positioning yourself;
the tree trunk here or here and just move so when you move here you’ll see
behind in the background that the other tree’s move. Try to position things in
such a way that you order the chaos of this ancient woodland. So I’ve found
something it’s taken me about 15 minutes or so just wandering around in here just
to have a look see what it is that I could find and I’ve started to pick
things up. I’ve never actually walked in this woodland. I’ve driven past it many
times. It’s only five minutes from my house. But I’m taking the time today just to have a look; see what’s here and see what
I can do with the chaos of this ancient woodland. As a first composition and the
first time here this is something that I’ve found just wandering around as I
said to see what it is that I could come up with. So I’ve placed this tree here not
it’s kind of on the third but not really is actually off the third itself and
then I’ve placed the foreground so it’s just up shy of the middle and then
there’s a color here and the background from all the autumn leaves. As well as
that I’ve started to try and make some sense of the background. So I’ve used a
corner up here for one of the branches that’s going off and up here as well. It
could possibly be just adjusted slightly there and the very simple reason is so
I’ve got this branch going up in this corner here and also here I’m creating
some separation which I didn’t have before. So that it’s not just a tree trunk in the corner here there’s actually some
color going here so you’ve got these bands of color and the tree trunks
themselves. Down here you have this new tree that’s growing up which is creating
interest on the third. So that’s the first composition that I’ve done here. I’ll
just take a snap and then you can see when the image pops up in a minute how
that looked when we were here in this part of the woodland. Let’s move on to
something else and to show you how to bring more order to the chaos that you
see in front of you. There’s two more elements that I want to
add into composition within your image. The first is leading lines and as you
can see that’s running through me there’s this path that’s probably just
been created by animals such as deer and boar that we get here in central France.
They’ve created a pathway through the woodland. And that is another
compositional element that you can add in. Leading lines will always take your
viewer from the edge and bring them into the image let them look around and let
them explore. The next thing that I want to talk about and it’s extremely
important in woodland is the polarizing filter. And what that does is it
removes any glare from the leaves so yesterday it was raining a lot here so
there’s a lot of water on the ground. A lot of water on the leaves in the trees.
That polarizer filter is going to cut through the glare and be able to add
in more saturation to the image. So I will just show you what it is that I’ve
set up at the moment to give you an idea of how it is that I’m looking at this
scene and what you might be able to take away from it and be able to put into
your own images. This is the image that I’ve set up. I saw this path here while I
was walking along the main path. It’s not the main path obviously as I said it
looks like it’s been made by animals as it’s indistinct but it’s distinct enough
to give us an idea of a compositional element. And as you can see I’ve started to
arrange things here so this tree here the trunk is on the bottom third then
which is going out and then up to the top. I’ve cut out a lot of the sky as
it’s distracting and I’ve just started to arrange everything else so I’ve made
sure that there’s no trunks that are intruding on the edges here of the frame
and there’s no unwanted elements there at the top. So that for me, it starts to
create some order again out of the chaos that we have here in the woodland and
also as I said there’s a polarizer on the front which is taking the glare away
from the water that’s on the leaves that was from the fallen rain
yesterday so that’s helping to saturate the image a lot more than it is. So I’ll
take it a photo with the polarizer and without the polarizer so
you can see the difference and why it is that you should actually make sure you
have that polarizer with you and that it’s not just for those blue sky days. For this last sequence on woodland
photography, I want to use a blue sky day combined with the color in the trees to
help enhance the composition because very often all we hear about is the rule
of thirds; leading lines and s-curves. All these kind of things in composition.But
we never really hear about color. So if you look at a color wheel you’ll see
that yellow and blue are near to one another on the color wheel
thus they complement one another in any composition that you might
choose to use them in. The other thing that I’m going to do is I’ve changed my
lens to a wide-angle lens. So here I’ve got a Canon 17-40 millimeter lens. So
very, very wide angle of view. And when I look up, which is the last thing
that I want to do, it’s actually going to help the trees loom in above me while
looking up at the blue sky and the golden colors of the yellow leaves up
there. All the autumn color. So let’s take a shot and then see what it is that I’m
doing with that shot. So what am i doing when I’m looking up at those trees
trying to get an image that pleases me? Well the first thing that I do is I put
my camera in aperture priority and that’s very simple. The only reason I’m
doing that is just to take a few things off my mind what I’m composing my image
handheld. And in aperture priority I’m then adding in around one stop of
exposure compensation just to open things up a bit. The 6D has enough
exposure latitude that I know it will give me what I want for around
two-thirds of a stop or a stop over the the middle point on your exposure meter.
The next thing that I’m doing is I’m enabling the back button focusing on my
camera so that when I’m looking up my thumb is doing the focusing so I press
where I want to in the image to focus the camera and then when I’ve got what I
want my index finger then clicks the shutter to get the composition that I
want. So that’s it for this tutorial on
woodland photography. Hopefully you’ve picked up a few things here and there
and see how I finely compose some of my other images although it’s done in
woodland it might give you an idea as to how to really look at what it is that
you’re doing when you’re composing your images on the back of your camera. Will
there be more tutorials? There will be more tutorials! There’s going to be a
tutorial on a 10 stop ND filter very soon. As well as a few others so
make sure you click the subscribe button down there in the bottom right hand
corner and you’ll get notification whenever it is that I upload any videos.
So thanks very much for to all of my subscribers. See you again soon!

Photography Tips | How To Hold A DSLR Camera

Photography Tips | How To Hold A DSLR Camera


What’s up? I’m Lydia Bailey. Are your images blurry? Do your images suffer from camera shake? Well, I’m here to help you to hold your
camera correctly… so your images are pin-sharp. To avoid camera shake, you really need to
know how to hold your camera correctly. where you’ve got an expensive DSLR, or a
smaller point and shoot, these 10 tips will help you take sharper images. Put your left hand out as if you’re about to serve a plate of food. And then, put your camera on top of you left hand. which will hold the weight of the camera. It can also control the focus and the zoom rings. Your right hand is able to press the shutter and operate the other controls. Next, tuck your elbows into your chest so you’re forming a stable triangular-shape like a human tripod. Now ,I’m going to show you what it looks like in profile view. As you can see, I have three points of contact. When shooting in portrait orientation
always make sure that your right hand is on top of the camera. Otherwise, this way is too awkward and you have to hold the weight of the camera as well as press the shutter – not
good! Part your legs slightly as it also improves balance. Finally, if there’s insufficient
light and you’re using a slow shutter speed, you’re gonna need a tripod. You will not be able to hand-hold a camera at shutter speeds slower than 1/60th of a second. Tripods come in a variety of shapes and sizes. You’ll be surprised at how
affordable, compact and… …cheap some of them can be. Well, I hope this video has helped? Don’t forget to download our FREE e-Book… …and if you want to learn more… subscribe to our YouTube channel! For more helpful tips, download our FREE eBook. and if you found this video inspiring…
thanks for subscribing to our YouTube channel. thanks for watching!

Wildlife Photography 101 | Bean Bag Basics How-To

Wildlife Photography 101 | Bean Bag Basics How-To


Hi everybody my name is John E. Marriott and in this Wildlife photography 101 segment we’re going to talk about one of my favorite camera accessories for wildlife photography when you’re photographing from a car, and that is, a bean bag. So a bean bag is basically a little bag, It could be made out of plastic, cotton, canvas, really any sort of material, and inside is beans, or rice, or lentils, and it just allows the bag to be flexible and moldable so that you can slap it down on a windowsill, and have it form a nice little spot you can stick a lens in and photograph wildlife out of your car. You may be wondering why would I photograph Wildlife out of my car? Using your vehicle as a blind actually allows you to approach a lot of the large predators in particular, quite a bit more closely than you would otherwise. On foot a wolf might only let you get 300-400 meters away, where as in a vehicle with the vehicle turned off and you sitting there quietly putting a bean bag up on your windowsill sometimes wolves will come 25, 50 meters away from you, and you’re able to use those big lenses to photograph really nicely. So when I’ve got my beanbag set up. I can plop the camera in there and it acts just like a tripod. You can actually leave it hands off and have it sit there, or you can rotate it around and follow Wildlife around, very stable and allows you to get much lower shutter speeds than you would be able to get just hand holding out of your window. The other key thing when you’re using a bean bag, particularly on a day like today, where it’s really cold and you’re in the winter, is you got to keep your heat down really low because as soon as you open up this window and put your beanbag on it, you don’t want heat waves coming out of the car and ruining your shot. And then the final tip that I’ve got for using a bean bag, is you’ll notice on here I’ve got a bit of tape on my lens. Well that tape is to hold my focus ring so that when I’m moving my, lens back and forth on the bean bag it’s not changing my focus. So that my autofocus in the camera is allowed to work as it should and stay tracking on that wolf as it walks towards me. Thanks for watching everybody! I hope you enjoyed this little Wildlife photography 101 tip. Don’t forget to go and grab your bean bag and we’ll catch you next episode. Don’t forget to subscribe so you don’t miss it!

Levitation Photography Tutorial: How to Hover with Multiple Exposures

Levitation Photography Tutorial: How to Hover with Multiple Exposures


Hi, I’m Chelsea. And for our book, Stunning Digital Photography we’re going over levitation photography.
Now there are two ways to take a levitation photograph: the first way you just set a high
shutter speed and have your subject jump and it creates the illusion that
their floating. The method were going to be using is that I’ll be propping myself up with these
books here, taking two pictures and then blending the two exposures
together in post to make it look like I’m floating. The
only hardware you really need is a camera and a tripod, but because
this is a self portrait for us we’re also using a remote shutter release
and a few other pieces of equipment I’ll get into later. The first thing you’ll want to do before you take your shot is make your story. So I had envisioned a couple sitting
together and reading by fire so I got these prop books and I got
Tony, my prop husband and found a nice nook of
the house that would look good on camera. So we set up our camera and a tripod and kind of played around with the crop
and the angle to make sure that we have our fireplace in the shot and the lamp and the chair, everything we
thought would be attractive. One interesting thing that we did was I
really wanted it to look warm I wanted it to look like the fire was
glowing and we were nestled up and comfortable in our home. so we got another light on a tripod,
another flash, put an orange gel over and put it
behind our fireplace which actually goes completely through to the
other side and had it flash through at us so that we had nice
warm lighting like the fire was glowing. To trigger the flash that we set up
behind the fireplace, we used a PocketWizard. We also used the flash on
top of our camera to kinda bounce the light off of the wall and
fill the room with light from the other directions so that the lighting wasn’t too
hard. Next, we set our camera timer to an 8
second delay and just kind of posed for a while. Once you get the pictures that you like,
move out of your frame, take a picture of your background and
then it’s time to bring your photos into post processing. Now that you finished taking your
pictures, load them onto your computer and use your editing software of choice to
start merging your photos. It doesn’t matter which editing
programming you use, I’m going to use Photoshop, but as long as they can blend two pictures, you’ll be all set. I’ve loaded my pictures into Lightroom,
so I’m going to click the levitation photo of my choice and then I’m going to choose a
background picture to blend it with. Using Ctrl click I selected both pictures at once. Once
you have your photo selected right click, then choose Edit In, then go to open as layers in Photoshop. Now that
you have both of your pictures imported into your editing program put your levitation photo on top. So you can see, the background is on the bottom. Select both
of your pictures go to Edit, and auto align your layers to make sure
that they match up. Using the Auto projection option works
just fine. Next select your top layer, your levitation
photo, and create a mask. Click on your mask, select your paintbrush tool and make sure that you’re painting in black, and you can start to erase the books out of
your picture. I like to make sure that my paint
brushe is soft and that my opacity is fairly low I have
it at 48 right now. So let me zoom in here, I’ll make my brush a little bit bigger, and you can
start blending away whatever it is you’re levitating on. So one problem we ran into when we
started editing the pictures is that I noticed that the background picture had cooler lighting than the picture with me levitating and I think
it’s because one of the flashes was bouncing off me and making a warmer
light. So what I did was I selected my
background photo and in the adjustment layers I put a photo filter on with the color orange and warmed up the background a little bit
until the color matched the foreground better. That’s pretty good. And since you’re opacity’s low, you can just
kind of blend the pictures together so that the color differences isn’t so obvious. Once
you have your color adjusted, you can continue taking those books out out. Another problem that I
ran into is that my skirt was falling behind the books at one
point so I can’t just use the layer mask and paint out the books. So what I did was I selected a section of my skirt,
making sure that I had the hemline in there, and create a new layer to paste
the piece of clothing into. Now that you have part of the skirt pasted in, you can move it. Go to Edit, Free Transform and line it up with the rest of the hem. Now that you have the skirt in there, it’s really rough,
you can use an eraser and I will just blend it in. This is kind of a
rough example so I’m gonna do a little bit more tweaking and play around with this to get it just
right and then I’ll cut to the finished product. Next I’m going to reimport it into
Lightroom by saving my photo and finish up the rest of my editing there. Now than I am in Lightroom I’ll click on
Develop to finish editing and crop it down a little
bit. Next I’m going to soften my photo up to
give it a warmer, cozier feeling. By just roducing my clarity just a little tiny bit. I usually like to
just play with my adjustments a little bit to get the get a nice feel going in the picture. So it’s
all just a matter taste. And there you have it! There is our
finished levitation photo. There are a few other pictures that I
played around with it as well If you’d like to see more videos from us,
click subscribe above and if you’d like to learn more about
photography, buy our book, Stunning Digital Photography. You can get it on
Amazon, you can get it for iBooks. All the links will
be down below and don’t forget to LIKE us too. Thank you.

3 Tips for Shooting Natural Light: Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace

3 Tips for Shooting Natural Light: Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace


In this episode I’ll give you three tips
for shooting in natural light. AdoramaTV presents Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace. Hi everybody welcome to this episode of Exploring Photography right here on AdoramaTV. I’m Mark Wallace. Well I’m here in Paris,
France and as you can see behind me that is the Eiffel Tower. I was here a couple years
ago and I shot this image of the Eiffel Tower. I sorta like it. It’s
the traditional vertical shot of the Eiffel Tower at night and I
shot this actually with my Fuji X-PRO1. Well this time when I got to Paris I
wanted to do something a little bit different. I want to have the River in front of the Eiffel Tower and I also want to take a cheesy sht I could turn into an old-timey postcard to send back as a
gag to my friends and family to say hey, I’m in Paris. So what I did was I set out to take
pictures of Eiffel Tower. You’d think it would be pretty easy, but it’s been sorta overcast and
rainy and the weather hasn’t been so good and nothing I did worked. The reason for
that well is the light just wasn’t right. It reminded
me that there are three things every photographer should do when
shooting in natural light. The first thing is don’t fight the light.
We can’t change natural light it is what it is. You can’t reposition a
light or do anything with it. If it’s an overcast day, it’s an overcast day, you
can’t just sweep the clouds away. So you need to work with what you have. What I did was I was trying to shoot the Eiffel Tower from the wrong place. The Sun was coming on the wrong side the Eiffel
Tower, so it was washing it all out. I was trying to shoot when it was an overcast day. It was looking sort of glum and I was flight the light that I had and I shouldn’t have
done that. I should have not fought the light. I should have done number two, which is do your homework. You know check the
weather and see what the weather’s going to be like. Is it going to be sunny? Is
going to be overcast or partly cloudy? Use the Photographer’s Ephemeris. Now
this is a great homework tool because you can see
exactly where the Sun is going to be at any time of the day, at any certain place and so using the
Photographer’s Ephemeris I was able to place a point on the Eiffel Tower and
scroll through the day and see exactly where I needed to be when. Then I was able to implement tip
number three. That is be patient. As somebody
famously said ;the Sun will come out tomorrow’ and certainly the Sun did come out the next day and
because I done my homework I knew exactly where I needed to be and I was able to get this photo of
the river and the Eiffel Tower and it looks great. As I was shooting I
found it ironic that the sun all a sudden got hit with
clouds and you can actually see in this very short sequence of shots the clouds
actually.. or the shade climbing the Eiffel
Tower. You can see it get darker and darker and darker and more modeled and so in that
situation you just have to be patient or shoot at a different time or just
wait it out. So don’t fight the light, do your homework
and be patient and that’s going to pay off for you big-time. I have a bonus tip for you
and that is check out this little guy. This is a
small tripod is made by Cullmann. A lot of the places that I was shooting
I wanted a tripod but I couldn’t bring my full size tripod because they’re too
many people and too many restrictions. So I was able to use this little guy
it’s about 20 bucks but I was able to place that on the guardrails and position my camera and that’s what I did when I got this
shot. Now and talk about the pictures I shot those with my Leica M type II camera with my 35mm lens, shot in aperture priority mode at f/8. I think it averaged out to be around
250th, 500th of a second something like that. I put in the video exactly what it was. I focused with hyper focal like we
talked about in the last episode and that’s all there is to it. Aperture
priority mode, f/8, hyper focal let the camera worry about the exposure
and shoot away. Well thanks so much for joining me for this episode. Don’t forget
those three tips, don’t fight the light, do your homework and be patient and you’ll get great results when you’re
shooting in natural light and don’t forget to subscribe AdoramaTV, it’s absolutely free and that way you won’t miss any episodes. There’s ton’s of them out there and don’t forget about the Adorama Learning Center as well there are
tons of articles, specifically I just wrote one about
natural light and properties of light and all that kind of stuff. it’s at the Adorama Learning Center as part of the AdoramaU series. So check that out, it goes into
much greater detail about positioning and quality of light. I think I find that very
useful. Well thanks again for joining me and
I’ll see you again next time Do you want great-looking prints at low-cost? Be sure to visit our easy to use online printing service.
Adorama Pix’s has professionals who treat your
images with the utmost care that you can count on. For a quick turnaround on photos, cards or albums use adoramapix.com

Canon 50mm Lenses for Astro Photography / Milky Way | Comparison & Review

Canon 50mm Lenses for Astro Photography / Milky Way | Comparison & Review


I don’t know do you want to do any intro where you’re like hey this is Brendan hey guys this is Brendan Porter with photog adventures tonight for gear time we’re gonna do a 50 millimeter shootout and we’re gonna focus on Astro and see how it goes [Music] okay guys 50 millimeter shootout 50 millimeter 1.2 L 50 millimeter 1.4 ultrasonic 50 millimeter 1.8 STM 50 50 50 millimeter 1.8 mark – we’ve got a nikkor 50mm meter 1.8 retro adapted for my cannon and a techie Mar multi super multi-coated 1.4 also adapted for that us snouts so tonight we’ll be taking these guys out shooting some stars in Milky Way with each lens and seeing how they compare this is Crater Lake National Park so as you can see there’s an awesome big crater that Lake is huge this is where we’ll be doing the 50 millimeter shootout so as the Sun Goes Down and the stars come up I’ll put those 50 millimeters on the camera and start shooting stars I’m guessing right now it’s probably 75 maybe 70 maybe 72 and I’m standing on a ginormous pile of snow and it’s 70 degrees and the Sun setting behind me there and I don’t think is gonna see that look at that yeah those colors are amazing okay so come with come with me to the spot that I found down the bottom of this hill of snow which is just before with the cliff you can see there’s a few peach trees right over here there seems to be a lot less mosquitoes here and so I could set my camera up right over here and you can just over on the other side of that’s a flat Ridge you can’t see it but I’ll show you maybe I’ll show you right now then I’ll come back and get my camera stuff so I’m gonna slide down this hill a little bit you can see walking down sliding down okay as you come down here you’ll see this nice little ledge with some nice easy step-down rocks and it’s look perfect ledge now I think I’m gonna have to get my my little weight that goes underneath the tripod that holds the legs sturdy cuz it’s pretty windy right now so and this is on the ledge on the ledge here and the wind is this coming straight across so help to set that rock up a heavy rock underneath my tripod and hope that everything is heavy enough and then the Milky Way will be rising right around here so it’s gonna slowly come up and then it’s gonna start arcing up it’s probably starting now actually and then when the Sun Goes Down we’re gonna see it about half way probably rising over over that Ridge there so okay guys I’ve got this little rock bag that goes in between your tripod in my tripod sit over set up right here on the ridge it’s pretty dark out here the Milky Way is nice and bright I’m gonna my camera bag over here my lenses and stuff in it and I’m gonna use this little bag from Vanguard it’s gonna go under the tripod and put them to all three legs and I’m a big rock in there and we’ll see how you can help the stabilization of the tripod because it’s pretty windy tonight it’s not windy right now which is nice but the gusts are coming and going so I’m going to put a rock on their legs and okay something directly from here too but I saw a good deal on this bag if he was less than $10 and so I went ahead and bought that and thought putting my bag in case I need it this is the trip I finally get to use it so it’s pretty cool right now I’ve got my Tamron mounting on my camera I’m gonna take that off and start with the 50 millimeter 1.2 L hey guys so I’m back here in the studio and I’ve got the pictures loaded and I brought them in a Photoshop I didn’t do any processing at all they’re just completely raw and I’m gonna show you guys how the images turned out now I didn’t take pictures the camera was in the same spot but the Milky Way was moving especially at 50 millimeters it zoomed in quite a bit so even though I tried as hard as I could to line up I’m the pictures and get the exact same part of the core as I could they’re not exactly identical but that being said you still can get a pretty good pretty good view of what’s going on with the lens and how it performs and all that good stuff so let’s jump right into the 50 millimeter 1.2 okay so how did the 1.2 L turn out it was pretty awesome actually so as you can see here in Photoshop these are completely raw the only thing I did was save them as a JPEG from Lightroom and import them into Photoshop so nothing else was done no processing at all and so as you can see the image is pretty good it’s you know when i zoom in to a hundred percent and you can see you know there’s a lot of definition there doesn’t seem to be any movement in the Stars everything’s pretty sharp I think I got things pretty sharp and I was taking the pictures so what everybody wants to know is about the chromatic coma that happens in the corners as you can see here these little winged things that show up triangles angel wings every lens is a little bit different the 50 Miller’s the 50 millimeter is not too bad as you can see the row few keys right here and when you zoom into it you start seeing these triangle shapes so so you know that could ruin your image a little bit but at 50 millimeters you’re not gonna be taking a single image or you’re gonna be stacking and you’re gonna be mostly focusing on the center of the image and you can crop out stuff you don’t like I guess but you know not ideal you know not not the best the angel wings are pretty defined here that being said most lenses of this age are going to have that you know in there because a lot of the lens makers back then didn’t even realize that was happening and now they’re starting to make new lenses with that in mind so that being said the 50 millimeter 1.2 L did a fantastic job the the speed at which I took is that was at four seconds so with only a four second exposure and f/2 stopped down to f/2 these images are incredibly bright for and the detail is just fantastic I mean the dust trails and the stars that it’s picking up through the dust trails is phenomenal it’s just absolutely incredible so I really really think it turned out well especially if you’re using the 1550 millimeter to do a panoramic what you’re gonna do probably 95% of time when it comes to using a 50 millimeter at night and when you’re doing a panorama you can actually work around those angel wings the chromatic coma by just stitching them together and you’ll be surprised Lightroom will ditch most of those angel wings and if you do about a third of the you know image so you take an image here and you scoot it over and you cut off like this much to the next one so you’re overlapping at least by a third then you’re gonna be in really good shape okay so let’s move on to the 1.4 usm the next one down on our list so as you can see you’re the core slightly off to the left some more I got more focus in a row a few keys so you can see that the destinations gonna be better but as you can see as we move to the corners look at that the angel wings are soup or defined here I mean look at that I would consider this I mean it to go more deeper in the corner look at that I would consider this a lot worse than the 1.2 and I think the 1.2 is maybe an older lens I don’t there same generation I’m not sure when then when they were made but I think they were fairly within like the within a 4 or 5 year difference I think wasn’t theirs and those lenses were built so this is definitely worse at 1.4 as you can see it’s a cheaper camera you’ve got the angel wings all over the place I mean and these are super defined angel wings whereas the 1.2 you’re getting just like these little triangles and it’s not looking too bad you know not looking bad at all when you compared to this I mean this is crazy really defined angel wings but setting that aside and focusing on just that center of the image it’s pretty darn good I mean it’s getting a lot of light the same exact settings f/2 same for seconds and the same eye so as the 51.2 and as you can see I mean this star here look at the definition of that it is incredible so for a third of the price and if you’re gonna do being being doing yeah so for a third of the price and then you be doing Panos anyways man that is quite a contender I’d say that one point four is looking really nice and you know when you have things like this guy but I just super defined I mean that is just beautiful look at that star there’s only enough to and the skidding is great like spikes light spikes it is awesome so if I compare that light spike to the one point to that guy was over here and it’s you know the light spike on the 1.4 is actually prettier in my opinion the one point two’s downside is that it has a lot of regular chromatic aberration you can see here I mean the pink and the Purple’s coming out these lights at f/2 I mean you don’t get rid of that until you’re down to like f4 or f5 point six and you know it lets a lot of light in but you got a lot of chromatic aberration deal with plus a chromatic coma so the one point for think does a better job it seems to be less I mean look it’s like these are blues not purple and pinks and there’s a little bit of purple here but you know the chromatic aberration isn’t as intense as one point two that’s what I noticed at one point two wide open man it’s a lot of it’s a lot of aberration going on there I mean yeah I was not impressed when I first got that thing and started taking wide-open shots man it was insane but Lightroom does fix that again these are Raw’s these are not processed so you can kill a lot of that chromatic aberration with processing but right out the bag man the one point for sure is looking pretty good especially for the money really nice results so that that might be your best value now let’s take a look at the 1.8 STM and see how that fares okay almost the same shot pretty close you got right in the core here’s a little bit off to the left like the last shot but you’ve got a ton of angel wings worse than the 1.40 look at that guy I mean that is just huge and and it doesn’t get any better on the sides you know sometimes the lenses get worse in the corners and this guy that corners kind of dark when you come over to this side on this corner you can see it you know really defined angel wings even off not too far from the center you’re getting those that big bright star in the middle let’s go to that guy and see if we can see let’s see where he is if we can see the lovely spikes of any kind it doesn’t look like know get some chromatic aberration not really any spiking not too pretty I mean in general overall when you zoom all the way out it’s it’s pretty good you know it let a lot of light in it’s a bit darker though when you compare it to this you know so I mean you can see how much darker that is than this and the settings are exactly the same so and then how much lighter this is the 1.2 I mean look at that I mean that thing is really light that’s darker still darker and then when we go to the so the STM you know there are some things I didn’t like about the STM with the other lenses the for the first two lenses at 1.2 L and the 1.4 USM I could have the ability to depth of field preview the little button on the side of camera that doesn’t actually ever is never level labeled the that both depth of cue preview will actually activate and I can focus and get a better result because I’m dialed in at one point I’m dialed in to f/2 and I can sharpen up you know my focus where the STM is a that’s the downside of STM the depth of field preview when it’s enabled I can’t focus it it like kills the motor and so I thought that was really weird and I don’t know if anybody’s coming across that problem in the past but that could be a problem for you in the future you cannot do depth of field preview and focus the same time because that motor gets deactivated I don’t know if that’s a firmware issue that’s fixed in other cameras or if it’s just because my camera is set a certain way and it’s older I won’t know until I can test that out on other camera bodies but that’s one downside I didn’t like about that is I couldn’t really focus it was a hard a lot harder to focus the with the STM lens so it’s still sharp it’s still it’s a lot of light in its got some chromatic aberration issues a lot worse probably twice as bad as 1.4 and so yeah that’s the downside now off to the 1.8 mark to 50/50 this thing has a lot of chromatic aberration as well it’s got a little bit better star spike here than the STM but not not too good either though that’s handy you can see that’s kind of pretty muddy pretty ugly this 1.8 and nifty 50 is a bit better as far as darkness they’re about the same you know they they both look equally like they’re equally getting as much light in the STM looks a bit sharper the nifty 50 is a lot more cred about chromatic aberration and just seems to be not as optically not as good obviously as you’d expect you know you spend thirty bucks more get an STM it’s pretty sweet and there’s a lot of cool stuff you can do with that and you know if you’re really on the cheap and you really want to start doing Astro and you’ve got nothing but a nifty 50 it’ll still work the focusing is really hard though so the nifty 50 has this crazy plastic focusing ring at the front it’s really hard I mean if you barely move it at just a tiny sliver it could go out of focus so it was really difficult to get that in focus so that could have been part of the problem here my things don’t look like they’re entirely in focus although by looking at a star here you can see that it must have been somewhat and folk it’s pretty good because that that star spike is actually happening so yeah so angel wings yeah like crazy you know like they’re they’re huge and they’re obvious and as you can see I mean they’re all over so I mean there’s just angel wings everywhere because you know it’s $100 lens so what you know what to expect and you get equally on the sides as well even way down here with lower light you get the angel wings all pointing the wings are although wings are always the wings are spread out towards the middle of the image so pointing away in the corner so yeah you know hundred or Lynn’s yeah what do you do let’s move on to the Tamron the old school one point for multi super multi coated techy more techy more 50 millimeter 1.4 so this is an old-school lens you know as you can see the chromatic coma is really prevalent it’s really bright look at that guy in the corner here I mean super bright and as you can tell the image color is very yellow so these lenses tend to get very yellow as they age and let’s zoom in on that star there Oh see but look at that look at that star spike that is beautiful so the optics are the optics on this thing is quite stellar I mean it’s comparable probably to the 1.2 in some degree it’s letting a lot of Lynam you get a lot of detail but you’ve got that yellow that yellow hazing you’re gonna do so so if you’re gonna use a tacky Marv because the optics are great the focus is so smooth you can really dial it in you know you can really get in focus there and you know the best-case example is this star I mean look at that I mean it’s just you can just dial that focus right in on there and if you have something like a matanov mask or something like that and I bought an off mask and something like that you can really dial it in then it’s it’s gonna be great and you can really get some great panels with that so I guess my only concern with the tacky more is if you’re gonna use one if you’re gonna buy one and use one for Astro I mean look at the results they’re beautiful I mean the optics are amazing I got a really clean copy to like really clean the road few keys not as defined but the but the definition of the core is just stellar and so you know turn your white balance way down into the blue like I’d say probably the 3000 on this so if you turned her white balance down to like 3000 and Kelvin and then you take your techy Mar and hook it up and start taking pictures with it then it should balance out pretty nicely although that being said I usually shoot a lot bluer on these other pictures you know as you can see they’re a lot bluer and that’s not the true representation but with the book with my white balance set to about I think I said about four thousand between thirty-eight hundred and four thousand where you normally set it and the tacky more as you can see it’s quite yellow but this may actually be more natural looking and and realistic so I tend to I tend to lean more like Royce des rois likes to lean more towards the Blues and I do – I like the Blues in the night sky but if you’re looking for realism and you dial it down to four thousand take it with the tacky more this could be really close to how it actually really looks so you know those those purists that really think that the milky way shouldn’t be altered of color – what knob and you might achieve it with the tacky Mar you know like that so so Tecmo was really good it’s fantastic old lens it did better than I thought I was gonna do I I was I wasn’t quite sure I’ve used it for video before and I was happy with the results but never took it over at four Astros so as you can see naturally there’s a lot of chromatic a lot of normal chromatic aberration although these colors look different so maybe the chromatic aberration is not as bad as I thought now that’s true because this is purple that’s red it’s solid they’re not mixed together so they’re chromatic aberration actually seems pretty good look these white stars they’re not even they’re not doing anything at all so I mean you do have that chromatic coma happening in the corners you know the extreme corners you go out here and you get those angel wings like crazy but as I mentioned earlier you know when you start doing Panos you could have third of that off and you’re not gonna you’re not gonna have that as an issue so even here this crazy red lumpy one has got some spikes around it too it’s looking really cool so really impressed with a tacky Marv I did a great job become you see here some other galaxies in there that’s picking up it’s just unreal the detail is fantastic and even though it looks like there’s a little bit of movement it’s so hard to get these you know you get these totally pinpointed you know it looks pretty sharp here in the middle and even this isn’t even like that’s pretty close to the middle so yeah just a little bit fuzzy on the con the corners as expected but you know like you do like you do a panoramic and it’s not gonna be an issue so yeah I might have to take that with me couple more times and really test out the TAC team are some more and do a really good panel and maybe directly compared it to the 1.2 L because I got some fantastic shots the 1.2 L in Devil’s garden and Wow really really happy with those results so okay so thanks for joining me in the studio this has been a fantastic test I’ve really really enjoyed doing all these 50 millimeters the one thing that I’m lacking now is the Sigma 50 millimeter 1.4 I believe art lens so as soon as I get my hands on one of those then I’d like to do a test with that as well and kind of maybe mix that in with Dizzy’s with these results and see you know how it all turns out so alright guys hope you enjoyed this hope was informative and good and I’ll talk to you guys later [Music]