Business Portrait On-location Photo Shoot (behind-the-scenes & Photoshop)

Business Portrait On-location Photo Shoot (behind-the-scenes & Photoshop)


So we’re on our way to a shoot at a car
dealership. I was hired to take pictures of all of the employees there for their
website. So I’m bringing my 5D Mark III, and what do you have there, Tony? -this is the backup camera it’s a 5d mark
II and you have the 70-200 which is perfect for
headshots. This is a 24-105 the nice Sigma f/4 and
again it’s just a back up, we shouldn’t ever need this. We also don’t plan to use the flash, but
if everything else fails if that Cyber Commander fails to trigger the strobes.
we can use the optical slaves from the flash here. -It’s always good to have a back-up, plan
on something failing. So we’re going to load up our car here
and just tell you what here we’re bringing as we load it up. This is our large Paul C. Buff
collapsible soft box so that will give a nice diffused light if there isn’t
adequate lighting in the dealership. -This is the Paul C. Buff Einstein E-640
which will attach to that soft boxe, this will be our main light. Here I have just a
bracket on the stand, it’s just useful to have one of these, you can attach
anything to it. -These are our Vagbond Mini by Paul
C. Buff and they’re batteries to hook our strobes up to/ -That way we don’t have to attach or have power
cords running everywhere where people might trip over it, it’s a little easier
outside of the studio. This is a reflector and we have
diffusers inside as well. Getting pretty crowded in there. -And this
is going to be a hair light or background light as we need it, just a
second light. It will be triggered by the Cyber Commander just like that Einstein
light and will run it from the other Vagabond. -I was told there would be a nice
background there but you’re never sure, we didn’t scope out the place yet so I
was going to use the white side of this backdrop in case their background wasn’t
very appealing. Throw that in there. I also brought a
lint brush just to make sure everyone is nice and clean. I have some painters tape to mark the
spot where everyone can stand so that everyone’s in the same location. And… some tape to hold the backdrop against the wall. -And this is a Panasonic
GH2 on a tripod, this is just going to be a b-roll camera for the
behind-the-scenes. The GH2 is a micro four thirds camera and it’s a little bit
old now but records great 1080p video and it runs forever, it doesn’t shut off
after 30 minutes like most DSLRs do. -I think that’s it. We just have to grab our coats and head
out. -Let’s go. -Alright. You might be able to find an angle where
we could get this line of cars in it, we have to stand up a little bit to look
down but we might be able to do that. -I was thinking this is a little too
colorful. -Yeah it is. You want to do it in my office then? -I have that, the other side is white. -yeah
the wall might be easier, I don’t know how much room there is in there. -yeah -The one other thing for this Tony, is that
we don’t have the nice natural light. -Yeah the lightning is, uh… rough. -We’ll have to use this.. -it’s a little tight to bring
lighting in. And I think we’ll just have one of us
stand behind him with the reflector -Yeah, I think it’ll be easy, so let’s get one more,
I’ll get my settings I’ll put a mark on the floor and we’ll get it done. You guys ready? Yeah will you be my model one more time? So I’m really glad that we picked a spot
that has natural light because a lot of the people here are different heights
and I would have had to adjust the softbox with every different person, it
would have been a lot more set up. So my recommendation for you would be to look
for natural light and bring a flash for fill light. -But be prepared in case it
doesn’t work out and you have to have artificial light. One of the reasons we
picked the 5D Mark III for this job is it takes two memory card slots and it can
write to both cards simultaneously. That way if one of the cards has a
problem we have another copy and we don’t have to go back and reshoot
everything. Yeah there you go. I didn’t think that it was the best I
could have done, I would have preferred if they came into the studio. I mean I know that that wasn’t possible. So now I’m back in my office and i’ve uploaded my pictures. I’m going to show you how to sort
through them, rate them and even edit them. Now that I have my photo in
Photoshop, I’m going to start by cleaning up my subject’s skin. So I have a filter
called portraiture and I love it and it does a really good job. It smooths out the
skin without taking away all the pores, which can kind of leave people looking a
bit lifeless and doll-like. So i’ll zoom in a bit more on his face so I can see
exactly what Portraiture is doing. I don’t want to lose any of these fine
lines or anything like that because it would make him look unnatural. So you can see, I can up the threshold
here and it smooths them out way too much. Looks like a boudoir shot or something
and this is a professional photo so he’s definitely not going for that. These
sliders here control the details. So this would control the large details and
smooth it out less if you were to bring them down and I actually think that looks
pretty good. Let me turn down the fine details a bit so
play around with it, it’s definitely to taste. And my only suggestion would be to
not smooth out people skin too much. Not even women. If you notice any residual marks, you can see there are a few just little
pores you can leave them in and use other tools in Photoshop to take care
of that. So i’m satisfied with this for now and then i’ll zoom in and use my
other tools to take care of any other small imperfections. So I want my spot
healing brush and i use my left bracket. I don’t want to remove too many things
because once again it will look just too unnatural and smooth. I think that looks pretty good the one
other thing I’m going to do is in person I didn’t see that his brow is furrowed at
all so I’m going to take the little furrow out of his brow. And I’ll just
use my lasso tool, circle it, delete and then use content
aware fill, that usually does a good job. And then use Ctrl D to deselect the area. I like to just zoom in to make sure it
looks natural and that actually doesn’t look too great. So I’m gonna try it again. That looks much better. The next thing I’m going to do is just brighten his teeth a little bit. They look great,
they are nice and white, but we’re used to seeing very white teeth in in the media so it’s
nice to just kind of brighten them up a tad bit. And here i added a new layer and i use
the overlay layer I select my paintbrush and use bright
white. You’re going to think this looks insane
but you just fill in just the front teeth. This is really bright, but once i’m done
i’m going to turn down the opacity and it will look natural. We’ll see I don’t want to whiten them them too much. So I’ll zoom out and make sure it looks natural. You can even turn down your opacity on
your brush a little bit it to get these back teeth, but remember that the back
teeth are usually a bit darker, so if you make these really bright, let me show you what I mean. I can’t really because i have the
opacity down, but if you make these too bright it won’t look good. Ok. So the teeth look nice and next I’m
going to just brighten his eyes a tad bit. So i’ll use my Dodge tool, I have the
mid-tones selected and my exposure down to thirty percent and I just do a little half circle. Let me see And the next thing I’m going to do here,
just because he has fair skin is just fill in his eyebrows a
little bit. They’re in the midtones, so I have the mid-tone selected and my
exposure is really low, it’s only sixteen percent, and i’m just going to define
them a little bit. Lastly I’m going to brighten up the
background. I’ll do that by selecting the background
and i’m going to use let’s see, I think I’ll use my magic wand tool
to fix the areas that it’s selected that I don’t want selected I can use this
tool to subtract from the selection but I usually like to press alt, the alt key,
and then it does it for you. You can also use this button here to add to the selection, but i’m actually going to use
layer masks and i’ll show you how. If you aren’t great at selecting by hand, you can
also use the mask tool which i think is easier. So i’m going to show you how to
select the background better using the mask tool. So i will go to the
brightness and contrast and i’m going to raise the brightness of the background,
you can see i missed a big chunk, but that’s not a big deal because then I can
go into the mask and use my paintbrush with either black or white to add or
subtract to the selected area. So white is going to add to the selected area, so I
will make my brush bigger by pressing the right bracket and then just paint it
in. And I selected the wrong parts here, so i’ll use black to get rid
of that. So you can see this is the before and it
still looks natural just a bit brighter and better and this is the after. Since they’re professional photos, you
don’t want them to look too glamorous or touched up that can actually be
embarrassing if they’re going to be meeting with a client and in their
picture they look 40 years younger, that’s going
to be off-putting to the client. So make sure that it looks like they
look in real life but just the best version of themselves. That’s it, pretty simple! If you like this
video please subscribe to our channel and if you like our lessons and teaching
style you can check out our book Stunning Digital Photography. Thank you!

Addicted to Buying Cameras – Gear Acquisition Syndrome

Addicted to Buying Cameras – Gear Acquisition Syndrome


I have G.A.S Gear
Acquisition Syndrome Last week I got a Canon 6D Today I got a Panasonic GH5 and a GX8 and a Phantom 4 Pro Drone Two weeks ago I got this light the Godox SL60W
and two years ago I got two of the YN300 from Yongnuo Last year I got the Nikon D750 before that
the Nikon D800 Which I still have Last year I also got the Canon SL2 So yes it’s true I have a bit of an addiction The deals I’ve been getting are great but
the saddest part is I have all this gear and I’m not really using it If you compared my video gear acquisition
to the video gear usage time the graph would look like this emoji here Which you’re looking at on the iPhone 11 which
I just got but don’t really need But but but! I have good reason for all these things Let’s list them out. Shall we? I wanted a big full frame sensor to get into
the high ISO and bokehlicious full frame photography game and my clients helped pay for it I mean I bought this camera with my own money
when I was 17 I bought the lenses first with my crop body
Nikon D90 The 24-70 from Tamron The 85 1.8 which I then upgraded to the 1.4
and the 50mm 1.4 which I got for the same price as my nifty-fifty 1.8 But then I wanted to shoot video and well
the Nikon was crap Couldn’t autofocus on me to save my life and
I didn’t have any friends who wanted to assist when I film So then it became the Canon SL2 with just
one lens a great lens for portraits and self-video
but it just wasn’t wide enough so then my second canon lens a 10-18mm for those big wide shots Fantastic! I also needed to get lights so my eyes and
scene could really pop instead of giving me more chances to film
while I was in college it slowed me down Having to setup and break down lights for
each shoot in my living room meant even more time setting up and less time spent filming Aha! Well now I’ve moved to a bigger apartment set my lights and camera in a permanent spot
and made it all voice controlled that should solve the problem right? Hey Google. Production time. See, this is a really awesome setup and it’s
nice and wide I can show you all my gear but the issue is
my room is usually a mess I mean I’m running in and out between shoots
and actual 9-5 work and so a lot of times I just don’t wanna clean
my room and that little 5 minutes of cleaning is what
keeps me from making videos like this But back to the gear The D800 started having issues missing focus
in a majority of shots and I needed something that I knew would get sharp images for my
clients So it was time to decide between a mirrorless
Z6 with 4K video that was a bit out of budget or more of the wallet friendly D750 What a beast the D750 is! Great autofocus Lovely images High burst speeds and it’s still fairly light weight But! It still doesn’t autofocus during video well
that doesn’t matter if I’m filming wide and on a Gimbal right? Wrong! I’ve had this gimbal for two months and used
it only twice Whoops So anyways I’m using the Canon I love it. The Wifi app is great But I start learning about LUTS and color
grading in Final Cut Pro 10 and I’m possessed by the dream of shooting
a flat image with V-LOG or C-LOG or S-LOG or N-LOG but alas that means getting yet another
camera. So I hop on Craigslist looking for a Nikon
Z6 and stumble upon this GH5 kit with the almighty V-LOG What a flat picture profile so here I am today
filming 10-bit V-LOG internal on a GH5 with 4 lenses that I’ve acquired along with it I learn all the functions and features of
this camera like the automated focus pull and the on-camera LUT preview most importantly I learn the camera doesn’t matter at all It’s all about my will to film and create. So I hope you enjoyed this one.

Best Canon EOS 1300D | Rebel T6 Basic Settings video | set up your Canon  #RebelT6 #1300D youtube

Best Canon EOS 1300D | Rebel T6 Basic Settings video | set up your Canon #RebelT6 #1300D youtube


Hello. Today I’m going to show you how to
set up new Canon Rebel T6, or 1300D, as soon as you get it out of the box. Hello and welcome to Camerawize. Today
I’m going to show you how to set up your Canon Rebel T6 or 1300D as it’s
called right from scratch. But first let me tell you about the guide that we’ve
got for the rebel T6. It is a really useful introduction to the camera and it
also tells you about the rivals which are available on the market at the
moment . It is an entirely free download and you can click either here or on the
description below to receive it absolutely free. So here we go. This is
the camera pretty much as it came out of the box .I have fixed the strap on – that’s important.
This is the lens. I bought the kit lens with it because I dont have any
other Canon lenses. This is the battery which is fully
charged. It took about four hours but it’s recommended to fully charge the
battery right from the start because it does help the battery life. and this is a
memory card which we’re going to put in. So to start off with. I can turn it around
and you can see here, this on the bottom is where you put the battery and the
card. Open it very simply and the battery – which is a Canon
battery – if you have the Canon logo facing you it slides in very easily and obviously
the way these batteries are designed these days they’re only going one way so
you have to force it, it is probably the wrong way. It has a little clip there
just keep it in place which obviously flick back if you want to take battery
out. This is a memory card it’s 4 GB. Now the recommended memory cards, to be perfectly honest, are from SanDisk. They are the professionals’ choice basically they’re
reasonably expensive but not overly so and the one thing that comes in their favouris that they have a lifetime guarantee. Now please remember that this lifetime
guarantee refers to the memory card not the images on it so if you buy a 16Gb
memory card and you have 15 GB of information on it and then goes
pear-shaped you’re only going to get the card back you’re not going to get the 15GB. So always, as a matter of course, try to save your images, your files and videos somewhere even safer – and usually that
means an external hard drive. But this isn’t a Sandisk I don’t actually know where I got
this, but these things crop up don’t they, and this goes in here
with the label facing you and it goes in so you just need to force it in
until it clicks. Again it won’t go in the wrong way round so just be gentle with
it and then you can close it like that. Now, on the other side you can see I have the lens and the cap is still on here. It’s very important when you’ve got a digital camera to try
and keep dust out of the internal workings of the camera and so as a
recommended practice whenever you change lenses always try to have it facing downward so that dust doesn’t
fall in and don’t mess around just change the lens straight away don’t
have it hanging around wide open. So now this is my kit lens, it is an EF-S 18-55mm. The Rebel T6 will only
have fully functioning EF and EF-S lenses – we’ll go in to that later in more
detail. For this lends you see that there is a white square here and there’s also
a white square here on the ring and you line those two up and then you turn it
clockwise, till it clicks. So that is fitting the battery and
fitting the card and also fitting the lens and now we’re going to go on to
formatting the card and various other things that we need to do to set the
camera. The first time you switch the camera on it will start on the time and
date options. These are changed by pressing set in the Cross Keys and then
up or down to change the numbers. By pressing set again and then left or
right to move to the next set of options. The first set of numbers is the date and
then the second is the time the next option lets you change the date
to UK or American and as you can see when it is changed the date changes
above it too. You can choose daylight saving and time zone. When everything is done press OK Next we go to the menus and change
the language. As you can see the camera is set to manual mode on the mode dial. This is so that you can see all the menu
tabs along the top of the screen. So when I press the menu button here they
will appear. The language option is in set up 2. Use the cross keys to
navigate as you can see there are plenty of languages to choose from but because
we want English we don’t have to change anything. Next we need to format the card. It’s really important that you should format the card regularly . The format
card option is in set up tab 1. It’s important to remember that when you
format your card you will lose everything on the card even those things
you think may are protected. So if you are happy to format press OK. Your card should be formatted whenever you download your files so that any read or write issues can be rectified. Next take a
look through the viewfinder. If you wear glasses or have poor eyesight you might
need to adjust the viewfinder with the dioptric adjuster which is the small
dial right next to the viewfinder. Remember this only changes your view
through here it does not change what the camera sees through the lens. Sometimes when you’re working the LCD screen will automatically switch off. This helps to
save your battery life, but can be pretty annoying. To switch it back on press the
menu button. To change it go to Auto power off, which is in Setup tab 1. As you can
see you can extend it for up to 15 minutes or even disable it altogether,
but I suggest extending it to one minute. And that’s the basic setup thank you for
watching this video. Remember if you want to see a free guide
then click on the link here or the one in the description below. If you want
to see a superb manual about the Rebel T6 then click on the link here or in
the one in the description below and we’ll give you a special code so that
you can get 20% off the price. If you just want to see videos about the Rebel T6 then click here or here and we’ll see you soon.

REVIEW: Casey Neistat’s Camera Setup for Vlogging

REVIEW: Casey Neistat’s Camera Setup for Vlogging


Casey Neistat is
a YouTube vlogger that has been gaining
a lot of popularity lately because of his great
cinematography skills. And a lot of people
are wondering what type of camera
setup is he using to make his videos look so good. Well I’ve looked into it. And I’m going to do a
review of his setup. Plus suggest some of
my own modifications and my own little tweaks to it. So, put on my
glasses like Casey. Here we go. [MUSIC PLAYING] Hey guys! My name is Tim Schmoyer. And it’s Wednesday, which means
it’s time to give you guys some unique tips ideas,
suggestions, advice– like we do every week
here at Video Creators– to help you grow your YouTube
channels and your audiences. So the first thing
we’re going to do is run through the whole
camera setup– the gear– and then let’s dig into
some of the specifics about the things you
need to know about how to best use this setup. The camera body that
he uses is a Canon 70D. And the reason why
he chose this one is because it has autofocus
features built in, which are really
nice for getting a good crisp, clear shot. So autofocusing here. The lens that he’s using is the
Canon EF-S 10 to 22 millimeter. Also, the microphone at the top
is called a RODE VideoMic GO. And this is not the
one that he uses. He uses one a little bit
more similar to this one because this is battery-powered. And it gets a little
bit better audio. And you can boost
the signal that it’s sending into the camera. And you can cut
wind and stuff too. But the problem I was having
when I was using this mic is that quite frequently, I
would forget to turn it on. Or rather, I’d
turn it on and I’d have to carry around
the nine-volt battery it uses and then they would die
on me, or something like that. And so I would get these
shots when I was vlogging. I’ve been vlogging with this
camera actually for a few weeks now over at our family’s
vlogging channel. So that’s what I’m
basing all this on. And I would find that
I would just forget to turn this microphone on. So this one isn’t
battery-powered and there’s no on or off switch. It just plugs right into the
microphone port on the camera. And I love it so much better
because the sound quality is still very good. So very directional–
it picks up what’s in front of the camera,
in front of the microphone. And it eliminates a lot
of the background noise– which is awesome. But I don’t have to worry
about another battery and forgetting to turn it on
and then having no audio at all. And then this is
the JOBY tripod. And you can get it
in different sizes. This is the one for mobile. He has a bigger one than this. And it’s nice because these
legs are extremely flexible. You can wrap it around stuff. It makes it very portable. If you just want to get a
quick time-lapse like he does, you can just set the
legs out and set it down. Or you can do what he does
and that’s put them like this. And this gives it kind
of like a selfie stick. It’s very adjustable,
very sturdy. I love this JOBY tripod. And this is how he uses it. Keeps his arm out
of the shot too, rather than holding
it up like this and then having
this in the shot. By the way guys, the
links to all of this stuff is in the description below
this video here on YouTube. I highly recommend you pick
up your gear at B&H Photo. That’s where I get
all of my stuff. Mostly because they are
super, high professional. If you have any questions at
all, you can just call them. They’ll help you decide what you
really need for your project. And their prices are
either the lowest or they are the exact same
price as the lowest price that I can find anywhere on the
internet, including Amazon, or any other place like that. As far as a couple of settings
on the camera that I have found worked best for vlogging–
This is a touch screen. So that is nice. So you could have
this focus one. I found that the
multipoint one tends to keep the most amount
of things in focus while I’m shifting around. If I just want to
focus just on my face and I know my face
is going to be in the middle the whole
time, without moving, I’ll switch it to
that one sometimes. Most of the time, I use a
FlexiZone-Multi subject one there. As far as the audio is
concerned, if you go into here, I found just leaving it at
auto with this microphone works really well. As you can see, even though I’m
standing behind it right now, it’s still picking up
exactly at the right levels just because there’s no
other sound right now. But it does a fairly good job. Sometimes it will peek
into red even on auto. But I haven’t found it to be
enough to switch it to manual. You don’t want to disable
your audio, obviously. Also really important is if
you have the autofocus method on the tracking one. Remember we went through
these just a second. But if you have it on tracking–
if you want to have it automatically– you
can enable this. It will automatically
keep focusing on the faces that it detects– which it
actually does a really good job at keeping the faces. But as it says, “Using
an external microphone will reduce the amount of
lens noise that is recorded.” And I have found that even
with the external lens on top with the road, it
still picks it up. So if I switch back to this,
you can turn it on and off just by tapping this
while you’re recording, which makes it kind of nice. So you can use it when you want. But I have decided not to use
that because it does get to be a little bit too much noise. So I just keep this disabled. And I just keep
this on FlexiZone. The cool part about
using the FlexiZone though is that if you hold
and you hit this button right here– this AF focus on–
while you’re doing it, you can hold it while
you’re recording. And it doesn’t
give enough noise. See how it’s focusing in
these spots right here, now. So if I was to put my hand
right here and then pull this– see how it’ll all focus
over here on my hand. You couldn’t hear
it, but I could hear the lens make this noise. And the other thing
about this lens, you can see how wide it is
when you zoom out on this one. So you can see how
much of the room this lens is actually
picking up– this 10 to 22 millimeter– that’s on this one. So this is at 10. And if I was to zoom in,
it gives you just enough. You can go in about that far. That’s at 22 millimeters now. And I like it because I
have found for vlogging, wide is really good. And this is a crop
sensor, which means it zoomed in a little bit
more than you normally would have on a full sensor one. But it’s still really good. Just enough range where you
could zoom in, focus the eye on something that you
want to draw attention to, but then zoom back
and then have just yourself in the whole room. And you have lots of
empty space around you to pick up a lot
of the environment. Another thing to
consider with this is that it does weigh
maybe four pounds or so– which doesn’t
sound like a lot. But if you’re
holding it out trying to talk to it for
any period of time, it does start to
get pretty heavy. And the other
comment I would make is that vlogging with
this– although you have a lot of flexibility,
you get great sound quality, great image– you really
do you need to know how to use a DSLR camera. It’s not something
you can just pick up like a point-and-shoot,
or a GoPro, or your phone, or something like that. I’m not Casey. I can’t wear those
when I’m on video. So you do need to know
how to actually use a camera– a lot of
manual settings– in order to know how to use
it to its full potential when you’re vlogging with it. If you want to see
the vlogs that I’ve shot on this camera, and this
lens, and this microphone– to hear how it all sounds
and see a little bit more about it– I’ll put
a link to a playlist in the description
of this video that will contain all
the vlogs that I’ve shot using this exact setup. So you can get a
little bit more idea what it looks and sounds like. So while I do like
vlogging on the GoPro HERO4 Black– which is what
I’ve been using– because you can do 2K, 4K. It’s got time-lapsed
stuff built in. I can mount it anywhere. It’s much less inconspicuous. The audio on here– a problem. I did a full review on
vlogging with this one which I’ll make up around here. There are some problems with it. This definitely overcomes
almost all those problems. But it has other
problems of its own. It’s big. It’s far more
expensive than a GoPro. And you can’t just
throw it in your bag when you’re traveling
like you can with a GoPro. If you’ve been vlogging
with a rig like this, I’d love to hear from you
in the comments below. What you’ve learned, works best,
and what doesn’t, and any tips. Share those down there. And I will definitely
look forward to learning from you guys. And the rest of you
who are thinking about vlogging with
this, read the tips other people are saying
and other recommendations that you guys have
found work really well for your vlogging setup. And if this is your
first time here, I’d love to have you subscribe. Every week, we give you
guys YouTube tips just to help you with your YouTube
channels, grow your audience, and sometimes give you equipment
reviews like this, as well. So thanks for hanging out. And I will see you guys again
tomorrow for some YouTube Q&A. See you then. Bye.

How To Use Nikon lens on Canon camera

How To Use Nikon lens on Canon camera


In this video I will show you how to use
some nikon lens on a Canon camera so let’s have a look
we have fotodiox pro Nikon or Nikon to EOS so what you’re gonna need is this
adapter right here so this is what you’re gonna use to attach your Nikon
lens to your Canon camera so let’s dive right in and see how to do it see the
contacts on the Nikon lens then you find the red dot on the adapter then you want
to match those up so once you have a matched up so you can see now you’re
gonna turn counterclockwise until it clicks, now it’s on there and that’s
the first step now if you want to take it off what you get what you want to do
is see this little lover here you want to push this down and then go
clockwise then it comes off alright so again match up
the contacts with this red dot and turn counterclockwise and it’s on there
so now let’s see how to attach it to the camera see here’s a canon camera this is
the lens that when you buy the camera this is the ones that comes with so now
for step two is you want to remove this lens make sure that your camera is off
okay now what you want to do is you want to
push this button right here push that in then release the lens now once that’s released you want to
take your Nikon lens it has the adapter already on it and I find a red dot see
the right dot now you just want to match up with the red dot on the camera so now
that you guys match up with the camera now you’re gonna turn clockwise until
you hear a click that’s how you attach it so now if we step three so you turn
the camera on it’s going to give you this alert to asure
insure lens is attached you can just bypass that just skip it hitting that
and you’ll be ready to go and take the cap off and you’re ready to go okay so a
few notes the nikon lens this particular one is 50 millimeter and even the
adapter itself there’s no electronic contact so everything you’re gonna do is
manual so there’s no autofocus even though it says auto focus on the lens
itself there’s no auto focus so you do that manually okay make sure that when
you purchase the adapter that it’s gonna be like or f-mount to canon eos mount if
you’re wondering what the price is you can get it on Amazon on the link below
for around $59 so check in the description and so much you can get it
for Amazon or you can check on eBay – so stay tuned at the end of this video I’m
gonna have some footage that I shot with this camera with this lens plus some
pictures as well thanks again for watching I hope you find this useful if
you own this camera and you have any more questions on the setup feel free to
leave me some comments I look forward to hearing from you and please subscribe it
will help me out a lot bye you

Vlogging with Sanne

Vlogging with Sanne


Hoi, I’m Sanne from Books and Quills. Originally from the Netherlands, I moved to the UK six years ago. I make videos about books, language, culture and the publishing industry. Everyone’s got something that they’re passionate about and vlogging is a great way of sharing it with the world. Today, with the help of Canon, I’ll be giving you a look behind the scenes and sharing with you how I make my videos. Alright, let’s get started. First of all, and probably the most important, is, of course, my camera, the Canon EOS 250D. The image quality is really beautiful and is definitely one of my favourite things about the camera. It makes it really easy to edit, and I don’t need to do much to the footage after filming to get it looking the way I want. It has a screen that you can adjust to different angles. You can see yourself while you’re setting up and filming and get the shot just right. The 250D has incredible autofocus, you just look straight into the lens and it pinpoints your eye. So that’s one less thing for me to worry about. I also love that you can swap out the lenses to get the exact look you want. All the functions and settings can be a bit overwhelming to start with, but all you need to do is try them out and see what works for you. If you’re a complete beginner, auto mode takes care of everything, and the Canon Photo Companion App is also available if you want to learn as you go. A lot of vloggers use softboxes and reflectors, but I don’t usually need them. Luckily the light from my window is good enough for me to achieve the look I want. I can set my camera to automatically even out any contrast between light and shade, so my face stays well-lit. My tip would be to find somewhere with the most natural light to film in and take advantage of bright days. I’ll also use my favourite lenses to help get the clear and bright footage you see in my videos. This camera works with a huge range of lenses, and I pick mine with a wide aperture to make the most of the light. Anything between F/1.4 and F/2.8 works really well for me. I have a standard set up in my room, as it’s nice to have a consistent backdrop. But also because that way I can set up to film really quickly, since I know where everything should be. I use a tripod and often film while standing because I feel like it gives me more energy. And I use different lenses, depending on whether it’s just me talking to camera or doing something a bit different. I’ll probably use a wider angle lens if I’m filming with a guest, and switch to lens with a beautiful depth of field if I’m shooting close up shots. Let’s talk about sound. Audio is a really important part of the viewing experience, so make sure you don’t forget about it when you’re figuring out your set up. I’m usually quite close to my camera when filming, so for ages I used the built-in microphone, which is really good. If you’ve got more background noise, or want to step up your audio quality like I did, then you can use an external shotgun microphone. You just pop it on top of the camera, plug it in, and the sound and footage will sync up automatically. That’s my process, but there’s no right or wrong. I think a lot of people get hung up on all the prep and equipment trying to make their first video absolutely perfect. My best advice is to find a spot you’re comfortable in and just start shooting. No one’s first video is going to be their best one, so as long as you just start and have something you’re passionate about, you’ll learn everything you need to know along the way. I hope this has inspired you to start shooting and sharing, whatever it is you’re passionate about. If you’d like to know a bit more about how other vloggers create their videos, check out the rest of the content on the Canon Vlogging page. Doei!

Canon EOS 1300D : Rebel T6 DSLR camera video review and manual – youtube

Canon EOS 1300D : Rebel T6 DSLR camera video review and manual – youtube


Hello, are you interested in the Canon 1300D or Rebel T6? Well you should take a look at a superb Manual which has been specially written for this DSLR camera. With over a hundred pages, it covers everything from setting up with the basic functions to understanding all the menus and navigating through all the tabs and settings. It tells you about the Dial Modes, the Flash and the Autofocus, how to shoot great Portraits and Landscapes and Action photography and it also shows you how to shoot great video with the 1300D. As well as the Manual you also get four hours of over-the-shoulder training videos which gives you great detailed instruction on how to setup the Wi-Fi connectivity, how to use Flash how to use the Creative Filters and much much more. It has been written by photography professionals and both the Manual and the video captions are in English. If you want to take a look at our Manual then why don’t you click on the link here or the one below in the description, and you can download a free sample with two of our exclusive videos ABSOLUTELY FREE and you’ll also get a Discount Code which will give you twenty percent off our digital manual. Just click on the link and you can download our free sample straightaway!

What does DSLR mean? A simple explanation of how your camera works

What does DSLR mean? A simple explanation of how your camera works


Today we want to give you the easiest explanation
of what DSLR means so you will never forget. Hi Photographers , Welcome to Easy Camera
Lessons. The best photographs evoke emotion and tell real stories. We’ve designed these
lessons to help you to feel more confident to get out there and tell your stories with
your photographs. The letters DSLR actually tell us a lot about
our cameras’s design, the D is really obvious because it’s a digital camera but what about
the rest? Okay so let’s get on to the S in DSLR. The
S stands for single and it means single lens because before the SLR design cameras had
one lens on the top to look through and one lens to shoot through. When they invented
the the SLR they came up with this amazing technology that meant that the light that
came into the camera and the image is the same image that you see through your view
finder. The L in DSLR stands for lens, so know we
have D for Digital, S for Single and L for Lens. What does the R stand for? The R in DSLR stands for Reflex and it’s a
shortened version of reflection. The reason why is some amazing technology that’s here
inside your camera. When your image comes into your camera it
hits a little mirror and then it bounces up and goes into a prism that sends it out into
your eye exactly the same as you see it through the lens. When you hear a real clunk when you photograph
part of that is actually your mirror . It stops R for Reflecting for a minute and it
bounces up and the image goes straight into your sensor, so instead of coming in and hitting
the mirror and going up , the image is going straight through to your sensor to record
your photograph. So there you go DSLR, you’ve learnt something
easy one more thing to keep up there for when you
need it.

Ilvy Njiokiktjien at Visa pour l’Image

Ilvy Njiokiktjien at Visa pour l’Image


It’s important to explain to Editors
what the importance of the story is, so also the current importance. Try to
find a news angle or some angle that your story fits into. I think you
have to sometimes try to think as an Editor, so try in a way to to think; okay,
these Editors get so many stories sent to them every day, how do I stand out?
How do I find the news angle, which picture should I include in my email or in my
pitch PDF to make it stand out? And I think that’s the way to get a ‘yes’ ,you
have to look at the newspaper you are pitching to and really try to see
what is the stuff they usually publish and try to fit in
with what they’re looking for. I think that’s the best way to get a ‘yes’.
I think the storytelling part of your documentary work in the beginning is
actually more important than the technical quality, and the technical
quality will grow as you grow. I would say being very technical is lovely once
you’re in this business but when you’re starting out, forget the technical stuff,
it will only freak you out. I think that’s what it did to me at least. In
2011 I thought, okay, let’s try video as well and I never thought it would
become such a big part of me and my daily work because I feel more as a
photojournalist than a videographer, but clients just keep asking for video and I
just finished an hour-long documentary on Dutch television. Filmed it all by
myself and I think it gives a total different perspective to my job
and I really like it. Social media is hugely important, clients are even
picking by looking at your social profiles, stories are being more easily
shared. When I share a picture on Instagram, everyone
anywhere can see it. They can ask questions. I try to reply as good
I can, but I think on the other hand it’s also important to give images time.
When I see people looking through Instagram profiles it’s very
quickly it’s just ‘Oh a story’, tick tick tick and you look through it. I really
like it when people take their time to look at images, when you kind of
sit down to look at an online told story or in a magazine, and I think social
media sometimes can be too quick and that’s the good part
and the bad part in a way. I think exhibitions are hugely important and
they have to be right in that mix between social media, media and
exhibitions. I think when it all comes together in a good way, that’s the
perfect mix. I just finished my own exhibition about my South Africa work – my
‘Born Free’ exhibition and to see your work printed on large format it just
gives such a different vibe to your work. To see the details that you usually
don’t see because as a photojournalist you see your
work in magazines, newspapers, online, social media and it’s small – so when you
see your pictures being printed so big, you see your pictures in a different way,
and I think it’s a very important way to to show work to the world, and that’s why
Perpignan is such a perfect place to look at images and be inspired. So the thing that I look forward to the most this week is to meet with friends,
colleagues and Editors. I just finished a long term project about South Africa and
I’m really looking forward to show it to Editors and also to meet with colleagues
that you hardly ever see because we’re all traveling a lot. This is kind of the
place to meet.