what is shutter & shutter speed – photography Basics – II

what is shutter & shutter speed – photography Basics – II


Music Music Hi Guys In my last photography basic videos I explained one of major Pillar of photography Is Aperture , Now Today I will discuss another Pillar of photography is shutter And what is shutter speed & How it works Shutter speed is responsible For two particular things First changing the brightness of the subject And creating dramatic effects of freezing the action and blurring the motion This video of photography basics I will explain all about shutter & shutter speed That we need to know about it Let’s go and know more about it Before watching this video I love to like to subscribe my channel if you would like Click the SUBSCRIBE button & click on the bell You can also subscribe my channel by clicking the subscribe icon embedded on any of my video So will keep enjoying my latest video What is shutter? shutter speed exists because of something known as your camera which shutter simply put is a curtain in front of the camera sensor that stays closed until the camera fires. When the camera fires, the shutter opens and fully exposes the camera sensor to the light that has passed through your lens. After the sensor is done collecting the light, the shutter closes immediately, ,stopping the light from hitting the sensor. The button that fires the camera is also called “shutter” or “shutter button,” because it triggers the shutter to open and close. When it comes to a DSLR camera shutter there are 3 basic mechanisms: the mirrorbox, the bottom door, and the top door. When you look through a DSLR view finder you are essentially looking through a series of mirrors that get their light directly from the lens. When you click the shutter button that system of mirrors flips upwards to allow light to pass to the sensor. This is why the viewfinder goes black for a short amount of time when taking photos. Once the mirror is flipped upwards a small door will move from top to bottom exposing the sensor beneath. After that another door will fall down, covering up the entire sensor. This process can vary in time depending on the length of your shutter speed. Sometimes a shutter speed can be so fast that your camera sensor won’t be entirely exposed at any one time. After the second door closes your mirror will fall back into place. The doors will then reset to their original positions underneath. This entire process from mirror up to mirror down is known as an Actuation. It is typically very easy to find the shutter speed. On cameras that have a top panel, the shutter speed is typically located on the top left corner, as circled: If your camera does not have have a top LCD, like some entry-level DSLRs, you can look through the viewfinder, where you will see the shutter speed on the bottom Left side And if your camera has neither a top LCD nor a viewfinder, like many mirrorless cameras, you can see your shutter speed simply by looking on the back display screen. Shutter speed is a measurement of the time the shutter is open, shown in seconds or fractions of a second: 1 s, 1/2 s, 1/4 s … 1/250 s, 1/ 500 s, etc. The faster the shutter speed, shutter speed, the shorter the time the image sensor is exposed to light; the slower the shutter speed, the longer the time the image sensor is exposed to light. If you are photographing a subject that is in motion, you will get different effects at different shutter speeds. Fast shutter speeds will “freeze” motion, while slow shutter speeds introduce blur from two sources: camera movement (camera shake) and subject movement In other words, the faster the shutter speed the easier it is to photograph the subject without blur and “freeze” motion and the smaller the effects of camera shake. In contrast, slower shutter speeds are suited to suggesting the motion, such as that of flowing water or other moving subjects. Changing the shutter speed gives you control over whether to “freeze” or suggest motion. A darker picture is produced when the shutter moves very quickly and only allows light to touch the imaging sensor for a tiny fraction of a second. So a shutter speed of 1/2 of a second will allow more light light to touch the image sensor and will produce a brighter picture than a shutter speed of 1/200 of a second.

Capturing Movement With Continuous Shooting | I AM Different Tips ‘n Tricks

Capturing Movement With Continuous Shooting | I AM Different Tips ‘n Tricks


[Continuous shooting.] Hi, I’m Thomas from Nikon School. We’re here
on the set of the Blossom project and I will give you
some tips about photography. In order to capture
the moment you really want, especially when you take
some pictures of movement, the burst mode will help you to break down the movement
with many images. Especially if you have a moment
that will never happen again. You can use this burst mode
and secure your images. So about the D7200,
what makes it stand out is that there is a special burst mode
at 7 frames per second which is made by the crop mode. And then you’ll have
even more images to bring back
the right moment in your images. [Discover other inspiring ideas!
Explore more.]

5 EPIC Shots for Real Estate Drone Videos

5 EPIC Shots for Real Estate Drone Videos


(upbeat electronic music) – Hey, guys, what’s going on? This is Seth from the REtipster blog. In this video, I want to talk to you about 5 EPIC drone
shots that can do a great job of making just
about any property look amazing. When you’re shooting a video
or pictures of a property with a drone, it doesn’t take a genius to just take the drone,
fly back a little ways, point it at the property and shoot. I mean, anybody can do that, there’s nothing special about that, but I have discovered
as I’ve been playing with my drone for the past several months, that there are a few shots that look good on pretty much ANY property,
and it has a lot to do with being able to fly the
drone in a certain pattern, and usually moving it very slowly, and tilting the camera
in certain directions. If you shoot these shots just right, they can do an amazing job at making you look like you’re some kind of Hollywood movie producer, because they look so smooth and really show the property
in its best possible light. So in this video, I’m going to
show you five of the shots that I’ve kind of nailed
down as being standard requirements for every property. As I think you’re going to
see, they look pretty great, and it doesn’t take a professional drone pilot to do this. With just a little bit of practice, you can most likely achieve
these same kinds of results too, so stick around and I’ll show you what I’ve come up with. So this first shot, I call “The Descent” because the idea is to just
start above the property and slightly in front of it (or behind it), and then slowly lower the drone down while you’re tilting the camera up, so you can track with the property and get a nice, well-rounded view of the top and the side. Anybody can fly over a property without changing the
direction of the camera, but once you start developing
and using your skills as a cinematographer, it can
have a major and lasting effect on the final presentation of the property. A nice variation of this shot
is to do the exact same thing, but start from the
ground and then move up, tilting the camera down. Kind of gives a nice alternative view of the property that way. Both of these shots will give your footage a really nice cinematic
and professional look because it actually requires
some coordination to do. Not much, but a little bit. This next one is probably
the easiest shot in the list because all you have to do is
point the camera directly down and fly over the property, and whenever you use the
overhead shot, you can start by hovering low over the focal
point of the property, and then move the drone higher in altitude while doing a very slow rotation, and it’s very important to do this slowly if you want it to have
that nice, cinematic look. I like this shot because it
introduces new surroundings and it’s an exciting and interesting visual experience for the viewer. Another way to shoot the overhead shot is to simply start at
one end of the property and fly to the other side, as if you’re sort of traveling over it. This shot isn’t necessarily
the most informative because it only shows the
property’s roof and footprint, kind of like a survey, but it’s a nice way to add a perspective of the property that isn’t typically seen with other shots in this type of video. Probably one of my
favorite shots on this list is what I call the spotlight
or the horizontal spotlight. The objective behind this shot is to fly horizontally
around the house or the lot or the building, while
keeping the camera locked on the focal point of the property. And this kind of camera movement, it actually requires a bit of skill because you’ll have to
coordinate the timing of how fast you move around the property with how quickly you pan the camera to stay locked on the property itself. And I will say that some drones out there actually have a spotlight
tracking feature, which allows you to lock
onto any moving object like a car or a person,
and the camera will stay locked on that point
regardless of where you fly. In my experience, these
systems have a harder time locking onto objects like buildings because they don’t move, but nevertheless, if you’re able to get your drone camera to recognize a house or a building as your focal point of your shot, this could potentially make the
process much easier for you. This next shot I refer to as the reveal, and this is a great way to open or close any real estate video. In this shot, the idea is to
simply approach the property from a distance and eventually fly over it while keeping the camera on the property. And again, this is one that will take a reasonable amount of coordination, though with a little bit of practice, you’ll find it’s not terribly difficult, especially if you have the
responsiveness of your camera adjusted to be slower, which will make the camera movement much less jerky. I use this one all the time,
and every time I see it, it always makes me sit
back and just say, wow, that looks awesome. The great thing about this
shot is that in many cases, you can also reverse the clip, and it’s more of a backwards flyover, which keeps the spotlight on the property. Whenever I get this shot
right, it doesn’t really matter whether I play it forwards or backwards, it looks awesome all the time. So this is definitely a good
one to include in your videos. And the last important shot
is what I call the slider, and the idea behind this
shot is to put the camera at a level anywhere from six
to 20 feet up in the air, and just very slowly pan
the camera back and forth around the property, and the
effect that we’re going for is to give the viewer a
perspective as if they’re walking or driving around the property themselves, so it kind of gives them that on-site feel like they’re standing right there, looking at the property
with their own eyes. It’s a really nice shot, has
a really cool perspective, and I just think it’s a great one to include in your
videos whenever possible. (upbeat electronic music) All right, guys, that’s it. Those are five of my favorite drone shots. I’d say probably the
biggest challenge with this is the sensitivity of the
controls on your drone. Some drones act a little
bit differently than others, and ultimately I think what
I struggle the most with was just going slow enough so
that it really gave the camera a good opportunity to capture
every angle of the property that I was getting as I flew by. I think that’s probably
the biggest challenge, that’s probably the biggest
thing I still struggle with when I’m doing this, but
if you can pull it off, it does a pretty amazing job,
so hopefully that was helpful, thanks so much for watching,
and I wish you all the best with your next real estate drone video. See you.

Photography Tips: How dedicated to photography are you?

Photography Tips: How dedicated to photography are you?


a couple weeks ago I was sent a
question by a lovely guy calledf peter and he asked me, hi Mike does it happen with photography like music, that you could be a professional and/or great
photographer if you start at an early age? does age matter when it comes to
becoming an excellent photographer? Well the thing is, how much do you want to become an excellent photographer, is it
something you want to do or is it something you’re going to do? But what’s the difference? well I’ve been running my photography
business for a long time and many years ago I chose to turn my
hobby which was photography into my income and that’s a whole other
story but part of that was I wanted to be able to travel and to see
some of the wrold to sort of experience some of the amazing things that go on out there in the world, but it was always something
I’d like to do and time passed and the business started to grow and i was having a good time, i didn’t have to work terribly hard to cover my expenses and i could play on my motor bike and then last year something happened, my brilliant, awesome, inspiring, funny and witty incredible mum died last september, and it was very devastating despite the
fact I knew it was coming but something in me changed then. I kinda realized how old i was, i kinda realized that hey you’re in your fifties now and you’ve always wanted to go off and see some more of the world but that’s all it was, i wanted to. When my mum died it changed from i want to, to I’m going to, you may have already
seen there’s some workshops starting to appear in other countries and many of you
wonderful people have been inviting me to come in your country, but it’s because i got committed I got dedicated to doing whatever it
takes to make that happen, now whether that’s in what sort of photo’s you’re taking or wanna take, you wanna take great amazing pictures well you need to become dedicated to
doing it and that means giving yourself the time
it means dedicating time to doing it not sort of saying ok, i’ve watched all these videos on youtube that mike does or serge does or many of the othere awesome photographers put out there into the world, or going on courses, you have to become dedictated to giving yourself time to go and put
into action the things that you’ve been taught about.
last year I was teaching at a local nights school, i was just teaching an adult education to a bunch of people who were all paying a fairly reasonable fee to come on a photography course, and it was for the college it wasn’t me doing it at the college , i was employed by the college to do it for a short time. But something which really amazed me was that i would give poeple some homework to do which was assosiated with the leson which we just done and then the following week quite a large percentage of people would say I didn’t have time this week or I could see that they had sort of
come home and they maybe had half an hour before they jump in the car because they had to go and they sort of done their homewo because mike would grizzle at them. Well i don’t mind if they do their homework or not, and i don’t mind if you guys did the homework or not, i don’t mind what you do so long as you’re happy, but here’s the key if you want to take excellent photographs well or maybe become a professional photographer you’ve gotta do the homework, you’ve gotta put in the hours, you’ve gotta dedicate some time to doing stuff you have to get out there
and practice and get experience now when I say
dedicate and put time into it you know what time you can dedicate to it I mean when I dedicated time to becoming a
professional photographer I did it in a slightly unusual way as in I went on income support I told my
local a employment services office what i was
doing because i didn’t want ant trouble i wasn’t gonna sort of like try and defraud anyone and they were amazingly helpful, they gave me access to various courses and
training so I spent a year not working and everyday i was reading books i was practising, i was going out there i was taking pictures, wondering why it didn’t work and then trying something else until eventually I got to a point where
I could take pictures that people would pay me money for, and that was an amazing feeling but it’s within the dedication so whatever that may look like for you now that could be maybe an hour a week
because I know normal people they have jobs to go to every day they have to pay
their mortgage they have to pay their rent, their electricity bills and all that
kinda stuff. They’ve possibly gots kids and they’re mega expensive things to own aren’t they. So you’ve got calls on your time already but in order to get the experience that’s needed for you to take the excellent photographs or to become a
professional photographer that any of you guys not just peter you do have to dedicate some of your time in order to do the exercises to practice
stuff so that you get the experience because
photography’s experiential learning most things in life are you have to
experience it and get experience so that you know what
to do in a given situation much as I would love to be able to put
my hand up here and a clip unplug knowledge and then insert into your head for you for a
fee of course then it would be awesome but i cant do that wouldn’t that be easy I wouldn’t
have to webmaster the site, i wouldn’t have to keep thinking up new ideas for
films and shooting stuff and having lorna stand out in the cold and rain and all that kinda stuff while
we’re making films the thing is it’s a dedication thing so what
ever that may be for you I would suggest it’s a case of go on a
training course if you know you’re going on a training course, book some time into the diary the next day so that you can go and practice whatever it was because if you put it off and think oh we’re going on holiday i a couple of weeks in a couple of weeks time you would have forgotten all about it. It would have just kinda vanished into thin air like scotched mist. if you watch a video on YouTube, one of my videos make some notes maybe? go outside and then practice that and kep practising. dedicate time to it until you have your
head around that particular technique or building block as i like to call
them, there’s a whole new course on that coming fairly soon. Because that’s where you’re gonna get the knowledge you need to be fulfilled as a photographer and
become excellent and/or professional.subscribe to our
YouTube channel to be notified each time we upload one all cool
photography videos orfor more great photo tips workshops
and training come and see us at our website photographycourses.biz

THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE UPGRADING YOUR CAMERA | PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS HINDI

THINGS TO CONSIDER BEFORE UPGRADING YOUR CAMERA | PHOTOGRAPHY TIPS HINDI


Have you ever thought that the camera that you own is probably outdated? Probably its time for a new camera I hope I had that expensive, beautiful camera but then with the budget constraint I am unable to buy that… 🙁 If you own a camera already, is it the right time to upgrade? is there a need to buy a new camera , right now? Do you feel you will improve on your work with your new camera? Lets discuss on that..! 🙂 Firstly, let me tell you I was very confused if I should make videos in English or Hindi then, I created a poll and based on the result of the poll I have planned to make videos in Hindi, but you may find me speaking in English.. here n there… Coming back to the topic, let me share with you.. until some days back…. I have been thinking about upgrading my current DSLR to something really new and expensive one.. like.. Canon 1DX M2 OR Sony A7RIII with which I could make more beautiful pictures and videos with them….!! I used to get these thoughts consistently so, i thought that I need to have very strong reasons to either BUY them OR drop my plans of upgrading….!! So, when I thought of upgrading , they were technical advantages of the new Camera…. but when I thought about it logically I felt, probably its not the time for me and then I decided NOT to… Now let me share the reasons why it was not necessary for me to upgrade and I feel these reasons are going to help you as well to decide for yourself if you indeed need an upgrade..and eventually you may cancel your plans …. Why I thought about this….. I figured out there were so many things in my own Camera that I did not know very well… the reason could be that, I have not yet completely exploited my Camera..!! and even before I exploit my camera to the fullest, i am falling for new and expensive ones… So, the thought of going for a new camera is not great… My 2nd question was have I applied all possible techniques and skills in my genre of photography and then decide that the only thing to pending is to buy a new advanced camera? there are many things actually that I can do with this camera..! 3rd important question was … its a general tendency to think about a new camera for getting good quality photos…. but is there anything SPECIFIC that I am missing out on this camera, related to my interest/ work which I see in the new one? I had a 500D canon DSLR camera I had upgraded it to 5D M3 5D M3 was so important for me because I was into wedding photography…. I desperately needed a full frame camera specially to exploit my wide angle lens. I also needed a Camera with 2 card slots obviously because I did not want to change cards during an event and miss out on any important moments.. 5D was the only camera that was having 2 card slots those days… I rented 5D for around 10 weddings I really liked it ad I thought I should buy… So, even you need to think if there are any SPECIFIC TRIGGER POINTS which is compelling you to upgrade If the answers to all the 3 questions are ‘YES’ then you can go ahead and get a new/ expensive Camera If not..! its high time that you start exploiting your current camera.. Let me tell you… when a beginner photographer looks at a picture clicked by me and asks me ..” which camera? actually the question is wrong the question is irritating and invalid if the questions would have been could you let me know the settings…. which time of the day you did this shoot? whats lens did you use to get these result? All these are important questions…! In fact DSLR body’s contribution is negligible… except for clicking the picture and saving it to your memory card..! this can be done by any DSLR…. Yes, we can differences in ISO sensitivity, colour range and dynamic range… but its very negligible…. Potato jet- is a youtube channel, this guy is a film maker… he has compared Canon 80D , a mid range DSLR with ARRI ALEXA a Hollywood film making camera… If we look for differences we don’t find much.. Of course, we see differences … but nothing that can make a difference to you creativity …. the link for the video is in description, look for yourself….. One more important information…. Photographers find it difficult to handle flash after watching a lot of youtube videos, after a lot of trial and error, after experimenting in a lot of different lighting conditions…. I learnt how to use and so will you…. you will slowly understand the relationship between the flash power and shutter speed…. but without understanding the concept , if you just go for a high end flash for a better light… I can assure that you will not have it… the result will not be good…. So… expensive flash, expensive cameras, expensive accessories won’t help you… Then… What will? Its always about techniques, knowledge, skill and experience …. you need to develop this.. if you develop a skill today or understand a technique no better investment than that…… By using your knowledge and skills, you can even make beautiful photos out of a 7 year old camera… And … keep on thing in mind… Best camera is the one … on which you have maximum expertise.. And even big budget Hollywood films have used cameras like 5D M2 and 5D M3 in many of their sequences If a 1 – 1.5Lkh camera can replace 5+ lakh body…. then we can definitely use our old, existing heap cameras to make very beautiful pictures.. Parker walbek – one of my fav youtuber he shows in his video how a simple room can look cinematic when recorded with a mid range simple camera.. this happens with experience and understanding of light….! the full video link is in the description… do have a look.. Today, I have shared enough instances/ examples, given you some reasons.. to give a second thought on buying a new camera body…. Do expensive cameras really make a difference well, we will see a difference… but very little…. Major difference is made by your knowledge, technique, skill and experience … rather than thinking I wish I had an expensive camera…. Please give a thumbs up and let me know if you have liked this video… 🙂

Auto Exposure Bracketing : Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace : Adorama Photography TV

Auto Exposure Bracketing : Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace : Adorama Photography TV


in this episode we learn about auto exposure bracketing – Adorama TV
presents exploring photography with Mark Wallace where you learn
innovative techniques on shooting a wide range of photography
here’s your host hi everybody welcome to another episode of Exploring Photography right here on Adorama TV brought to you by Adorama it is the camera store that has
everything for photographers you can check them out at Adorama.com well a few weeks ago I talking
to some of my photographer friends about auto exposure bracketing and where my
friend said he was having issues when shooting in shutter priority mode
specifically said sometimes exposure bracketing just
didn’t work well before getting to that I just wanna remind you that Adorama has some terrific contests and if
you enter you can win some great prizes Well first lets talk about what exposure
bracketing is bracketing is simply taking a series of
photos at the same scene usually 3 photos one that’s exposed
correctly one that is underexposed and one that is overexposed normally you under and overexposed by
the same amount so if you had an under Exposed shot there was uderexposed by
one-stop your overexposed shot would be overexposed
by one-stop as well well almost all cameras have an auto
exposure bracketing feature now this is normally referred to as AEB as stands for auto exposure
bracketing and it normally has a symbol that looks
something like this: so if you see that on your camera’s menu that is the I auto exposure bracketing
symbol. Before getting to how auto exposure bracketing works let’s talk
about why you might want to use it traditionally AEB is use in one of 2 scenarios the first is when you’re not
quite certain of your exposure what you wanna make absolutely certain you get the shot this
is something that landscape photographers have been using for years AEB is also
used to create HDR images HDR stands for high dynamic range and its when you take three or more photos and you combine
them to create an image that has a photo realistic effect in
fact I created in HDR image and used auto exposure bracketing in all
the last episode exploring photography to create this image the Basilica of the
National Val almost all cameras with auto exposure
bracketing have the same basic settings – now for the specific have your
camera make sure you check your camera user manual but generally all cameras work something
like this the first thing you need to do is turn on auto exposure bracketing next some cameras allow you to set how many
shots you’d like to take in your auto exposure bracketing series
the third thing you need to do is tell your camera how much to over and
underexpose each image this usually ranges from
one-third to 3 stops finally set your drive mode to
continuous or self-timer mode once this is all set
up you just press the shutter release once
to take all the shots in the series now some cameras you can
set the drive mode to single to allow you to take each in the shot
individually using a separate shutter Press for each up the shots it’s important to
understand that auto exposure bracketing works
differently in different modes and this is why my friend was having
issues when on exposure bracketing using shutter priority mode and understand this lets first take a
look at how auto exposure bracketing works in aperture priority mode – in aperture
priority mode you set the camera aperture now let’s
say we’ve set our aperture to F 8 now the camera will use its built-in light meter to set the shutter for a
proper exposure now for argument sake let’s say our shutter speed is one two
hundred and fiftieth a second for a proper exposure if we’ve
set our auto exposure bracketing to under and
overexposed by one stop here’s what will happen the
first correctly exposed photo will be made at
F 8 and 1/250 of a second the second
underexposed shot will be made at F 8 and 1/500 a second and the third overexposed shot will be made it F 8 and 1/125 of a second Our aperture is staying the
same but our shutter is changing to create
those under and overexposed images because our shutter can slow all
the way down to thirty seconds and speed up to 4,000th of a second and even on some cameras go all the way up to 8000th of a second we
have a lot of latitude when we’re exposure bracketing using aperture priority mode now in
shutter priority mode the exact opposite is happening our shutter is
staying the same but our aperture is opening and closing to
create the over and underexposed images and this is where we can run into
a lot of issues let’s say that we have and image where we
had a proper exposure up 160 of a second at f2.8 and we want to bracket by
one-stop that’s one image overexposed by one stop
and one image underexposed by one stop let’s also assume our lens
has a maximum aperture opening a F2.8 our first properly
exposed image will be made at 160th of a second at
f2.8 our second underexposed image will be
made at 160th of a second at F4 but will run into issues on our third overexposed image to over exposed by a full stop our
aperture would need to open to F2 but our lens isn’t able to do this so we just end up with an additional
properly exposed image shot f2.8 fix the issue you need to
increase your ISO by one stop so your aperture would have some room to breathe or you can adjust your shutter my
one-stop as well doesn’t matter which way you choose the
important thing to remember is that when you’re in shutter priority mode using
auto exposure bracketing you run into issues when the aperture is
fully open for the properly exposed image now what
about manual mode well in manuel mode there is no auto exposure
bracketing you do it everything manually you can either adjust the aperture to
over an underexposed or and change the shutter to do the trick
so in manual mode you just have to do it yourself now two additional notes about auto
exposure bracketing the first is when I’m using auto exposure
bracketing I most always use aperture priority mode
because in shutter priority mode when the aperture changes your dept of
field changes away as well and so that’s something I try to avoid
the second thing is bracketing isn’t just for exposure you can also bracket you’re white
balance you can bracket your ISO and you can even bracket your focus that these are topics
that will cover in future episodes exploring photography right here on
Adorama TV so don’t forget to subscribe to Adorama TV so you don’t miss a single
episode with all kinds of stuff that I’m doing but there’s all kinds of contributors as
well and you can check out the Adorama
Learning Center for all kinds of articles about the stuff that we’re
talking about today and you can see all in the past episodes
as well thanks again for joining me and I will
see you again in the next episode few great-looking print low-cost be sure
to visit our easy to use online printing service at
around the pics has professionals to treat your images with the utmost care that you can count
on for quick turnaround on photos cards or albums use Adorama dot com

Model Testing | How To Build A Fashion Portfolio With Talent Agencies | PRO EDU Photography Tutorial

Model Testing | How To Build A Fashion Portfolio With Talent Agencies | PRO EDU Photography Tutorial


(upbeat music) – A model test is an
opportunity for a photographer and a model to build
their portfolios together. If you start in model testing, it’s gonna open doors in the
fashion photography field. The end result that needs to
happen in a great model test is that that model looks
their absolute best. When photographers fail at this, it’s not because they’re
bad photographers. It’s because they just don’t know what agencies and agency
represented models really need. In this tutorial, you’re gonna learn who to shoot and how to shoot them. I think we might do a hair and
makeup change at this point. Exactly. That arm can even like, yes. One foot bent that way, and
turn this foot this way. You’re gonna learn about
working with modeling agencies to shoot quality models. I love that ’cause that
lengthens your lengths, which your agents will love,
so bring that back out. Kick that foot. Good. You’re gonna see me shoot two
different types of models. We’re gonna take one model
that’s considered editorial. Go for it. Yes. And another model that’s
considered commercial. So let’s do that hand. Wrap it around your neck and then we’re gonna lean
in and gimme a little laugh. Perfect. Love that. We’re gonna use simple lighting, some natural light, some strobe. And then you’re gonna
open up your body to me as you come in here. Let’s try it. Perfect. Yes, perfect, good. And simple camera techniques. I love when I come lower with the model and they look like above me. It just exaggerates that. To get the quality that you want in as fast as possible time. Good. I think we’ve got that. With this tutorial, you’re gonna get my
Comprehensive Posing Guide. This is a great resource
to see what types of poses agencies are going to wanna see from a successful model test. Oh gosh, I love that! I’m gonna give you an
email template to send to modeling agencies. It’s gonna have the right
tone and the right language that’s gonna increase your success rate. My favorite thing that you’re gonna get from this tutorial is my
top secret packing list. It’s gonna make your
process so much easier, and it’s gonna give agencies
exactly what they want. Whether your goals are
to build a new portfolio, monetize model testing
or take that next step in your fashion photography career, these resources are foundational so that those things are easy,
seamless and quick for you.

The Cinematographer: Crash Course Film Production #8

The Cinematographer: Crash Course Film Production #8


Movies are made up of series of images. Some are beautiful, some are harsh, and some
stick in our minds forever. Like the gently rolling spaceships in 2001
A Space Odyssey. Or Peter O’Toole riding out of the desert
in Lawrence of Arabia. Or Darth Vader emerging from the smoke in
Star Wars. But who actually takes these pictures? If the director is the one who sets the vision
for the film, whose job is it to bring that vision to life? That’s the person who puts the pictures
in motion pictures. The cinematographer. [Intro Music Plays] Cinematographers must be artists, engineers,
photographers, and storytellers, all at once. Sometimes you’ll hear the cinematographer
referred to as the director of photography or “DP.” But don’t be confused, it’s the same job. In some parts of the world, they prefer one
title to the other, but generally speaking, the two titles are interchangeable. And no matter what they call themselves, their
basic job is to translate the director’s vision into things like framing, lighting,
and camera movement, so that the film’s story, emotions, and themes are conveyed visually. A cinematographer must not only possess great
technical skills, but also understand the fundamental narrative beats of the film, the
arc of the characters, and how the shots might cut together in the editing room. And the job begins long before the cameras
start to roll. During pre-production, the cinematographer
assembles the camera department, plans shots with the director, and determines any special
equipment that might be necessary for the shoot – from cranes and dollies to steadicams
and special lenses. They also help the director decide what kind
of film stock or digital cameras to use and what the overall look of the film will be. During production itself, the cinematographer
oversees the lighting and shooting of the film, shot by shot. This includes supervising the camera department
and working very closely with the lighting department — the head of which, you’ll
recall, is the gaffer. Since pictures are technically just a record
of light bouncing off objects, the gaffer is fundamental to achieving the images that
make up the film. And when it comes to the lights themselves,
the cinematographer has a lot to choose from. For example, there are Fresnel lights, which
use special lenses called … Fresnel lenses … to produce a wide, hard light that softens
at the edges. Commonly used for stage lighting, these lights
can get very hot very quickly. Fluorescent lights are much cooler and softer,
but they’re quite fragile, which matters on a film set when the lights are being moved
around so frequently. LED lights create very little heat and are
favored by a lot of independent and DIY cinematographers because they’re cheap and use less power. However, the colors and shadows they cast
can be unreliable and difficult to match, bulb to bulb. Incandescent lights, meanwhile, generate a
lot of heat, but they generally give a warm, yellow light that can be very appealing. And then we have HMIs, or… this… These are massive lights that give off an
enormous amount of heat. They’re so bright that they’re often used
to simulate daylight. As in, the sun. So, that’s the hardware, but in addition
to choosing which of these lights should be used, the cinematographer also has a say in
how they’re arranged. The most basic style of lighting, used in
everything from formal interviews to fiction films, is 3-point lighting. You start with a key light, which is the brightest
light, often positioned so that it shines most directly on the subject of the shot. Then you add some fill light, which is a dimmer
and more diffuse light used to fill in the shadows created by the key light. Finally, back light, which is usually brighter
than the fill light, shines from behind the subject of the shot. This creates a “halo” or “edge” of
light that outlines the subject and separates it from the background. One of the questions the cinematographer grapples
with is figuring out where the light is coming from in the world of the film. This will determine the direction, color,
intensity, and quality of light that illuminates the shot. Sometimes cinematographers will use practical
lights, which are light sources you can actually see in the shot, like desk lamps or windows. Other times they’ll deliberately use artificial
lights, or even turn to a more radical strategy to light their films. Cinematographers Néstor Almendros and Haskell
Wexler famously shot Terrence Malick’s Days of Heaven using natural sunlight, mostly that
brief period of the day immediately before sunset, often called magic hour. While working on Catch-22, David Watkin said,
“I’m going to do something rather daring. I’m going to light the actors with only
explosions.” And he did! Cinematographer Ellen Kuras relied on a unique
combination of practical and artificial lights to create the unusual transitions and effects
of Jim Carrey’s memory loss in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Malik Hassan Sayeed is a master of style,
shooting everything from Spike Lee’s He Got Game to Beyoncé’s Lemonade. When Gordon Willis decided to light The Godfather
in such a way that Marlon Brando’s eyes would often be in shadow, it was seen as a
risky and daring strategy. Cinematographers were supposed to light
a character’s eyes. That’s just how it was done! Instead, Willis chose to use this lighting
“mistake” to illustrate the dark and unknowable soul of Don Corleone. Now, the cinematographer also works closely
with the production designer, who’s the head of the art department. The production designer is in charge of carrying
out the whole look of the film, particularly the physical elements like sets, costumes,
props, hair and makeup, but also non-physical elements like computer-generated images and
how they interact with the physical objects on camera. The cinematographer and production designer
work closely on everything from the color scheme of a set to how reflective its walls
should be. And for sure, in addition to the lighting,
cinematographers have to consider all kinds of factors when setting up their shots. Not only do the shots need to cut together
to tell the story, but they’re often constructed to have a beginning, middle, and end all their
own. The director and cinematographer must decide
how much of the frame should be in focus, using lens choice, film
stock, and aperture. Related to that, the cinematographer has to
think about what’s featured in the foreground, middle ground, and background of the shot. The arrangement of these features within the
frame can have a profound impact on the audience. Color and contrast also fall within the cinematographer’s
aesthetic toolkit. Color can be used to draw our eye to or away
from one part of the frame, make narrative or thematic links, or – as in The Wizard
of Oz – transport us to an entirely new place! Contrast, which refers to the ratio of the
darkest parts of the image to the lightest parts, can perform many of the same functions. Before there was color in film, contrast was
a particularly powerful tool for cinematographers. Noir classics like Carol Reed’s The Third
Man use deep, dark shadows cut by bright shafts of light to convey a sense of mystery and
menace . Cinematographers might also decide to move the camera to evoke a particular feeling or psychological effect. This movement might be as simple as a pan
or a tilt to follow the action, or as involved as Citizen Kane’s dramatic crane shot in
through the top of a nightclub. Moving the camera in toward a character can
convey a variety of emotions, from fear closing in on them, to some kind of internal revelation. There are some pretty entertaining supercuts
of push-in shots on YouTube. It makes you realize this technique is used
everywhere. Now, what happens after the film is in the
can? The job’s over, right? Of course not. The cinematographer is heavily involved in
a film’s post-production, too, because the editing process offers a lots of opportunities
to manipulate the images that have been captured. If a movie’s been shot on film, there are
all kinds of options to change color or exposure by altering chemicals and timing, as the exposed
negative is developed and processed. But whether the film was shot using traditional
film stock or a digital process, most feature films are digitized at some point, to make
the editing easier. And once the images have been converted into
digital information, even more options open up for manipulating the footage. Filters on photo apps like Instagram give
you some idea of how drastically you can change a digital image after it’s been shot. In order to maintain the look of the film,
the cinematographer is almost always deeply engaged in this process, working hand in hand
with the director, the editor, the post-production supervisor who’s overseeing this phase of
the process, and the special effects department. So, yeah, it’s kind of a big job! There’s a fantastic documentary called Visions
of Light that traces this history and art of cinematography. It’s out of print, but if you can find a
copy of it, you can hear some of the original masters of the medium share their stories
and see examples of their work. As with much of film production, there are
guidelines and customs when it comes to cinematography, but no actual rules. The right style of lighting or camera movement
for one film will be completely wrong for another. It’s up to the cinematographer to work with
the director to realize their vision for the film, translating int into images that will
cut together to tell the story. Today we learned about the multi-faceted job
of the cinematographer. We covered the various roles of the camera
and lighting departments and how they work together to realize a director’s vision. And we considered some of the tools and strategies
available to the cinematographer. Next time we’ll look at the fascinating
on-set work of set designers, costume designers, and special effects make-up! Crash Course Film Production is produced in
association with PBS Digital Studios. You can head over to their channel to check
out a playlist of their latest amazing shows, like It’s Okay to be Smart, Physics Girl,
and The Art Assignment. This episode of Crash Course was filmed in
the Doctor Cheryl C. Kinney Crash Course Studio with the help of these nice people and our
amazing graphics team is Thought Cafe.

San Diego City College – Photography Program

San Diego City College – Photography Program


>>DAVID KING: We have an incredibly extensive program. We have 40 some odd courses, ranging from the beginning of the film classes up through very advanced studio-based commercial classes.>>DAVE EICHINGER: We try to provide a really wide
variety of fine art classes and commercial classes. Most of the students that
come in as a photo major obviously need the commercial classes and need to understand digital fully and Lightroom and Photoshop. When they leave here, primarily
you’re a freelancer. And if you’re a freelancer you need to wear all lot of different hats.>>Jason Reimer: A student can come in here and learn the in’s and out’s of how to run a photography
business; giving them really good grounding in the fundamentals but also
trying to stay on top of latest trends in the industry so that when they
leave here they’re prepared to be able to hit the ground running in an industry
that’s constantly changing.>>DAVE: We have one of the few programs still
around that have a pretty strong analog darkroom program. We do have one of the
best facilities – maybe the best that I’ve ever seen or one of the very best
that pretty much anybody has ever seen. So we do have a great facility; we have
great studios, great equipment, and great people here.>>MONICA: I’m from Brazil, I came here 15 years ago. I noticed that I needed to improve my English and I went to the Continuing Education. After Continuing Education, I came to City College. The experience that I have
is amazing. Photography is my passion and then with the program the instructors,
they helped me a lot. I’m really happy with the result.>>DAVID: We want them to be the best because if
the students come out being the best and somebody says, “hey where did you learn it” and
they say City College – man, that’s what we need!>>DAVE: For the past 15 years or so I’ve been taking
groups to Europe. They’re getting units – there’s a travel photography class. They’re out doing their own portfolios again, some are digital, some are film, some
are people photographers. I typically do a different itinerary each year. Last year was Barcelona and then northern Italy.>>DAVID: We would like to make City College, here, the
place you come to because that’s where the education is. We have a one-of-a-kind
program here and it would be wonderful if we could get that word out and let the world know about it.

Photography Tips: Meet my PA Melissa Fox

Photography Tips: Meet my PA Melissa Fox


hi guys I’m down in Asia again I’ve just
been running the Cambodia workshop with my partner Simon Taplin most here we did
a bit of wrecking along the vietnam Chinese border in some of astonishing
locations which people just don’t get to see and we’re hoping to have bring that
online next year so watch this space but whilst in Asia I wanted to come down to
the Philippines and meet up with my awesome P A Melissa Fox and introduce
her to you guys her photography is awesome and she’s got a
pretty interesting stories have she learned her photography so hello Melissa
hi Mike and he’s the first time we met in reality you working three years or
more and it’s all been via Skype in the internet and this is roles is grown in
grown why dont you tell the guys how we met in the first place yeah absolutely I was doing photography
and studying photography and I was watching Mike’s video most of the time it
all the time actually so I just came to point that you know I want to give
thanks to him and sent him a message on facebook telling him you know what thank you for all of your tutorial and
that’s how it started thank you and it kind of grew on from
there really because we kind of converse about photography she sent
me some pictures and etc and then one day I remember you send me a message
saying I don’t want to interfere but I noticed a lot of the questions that are
asked about your tutorials on the Facebook page he said I know the answer
do you mind if I step in and I thought that was really quite sweet yes
absolutely but it was again because of you all the knowledge all the things and
thing that you put into your videos that’s what I always apply to those
questions so I think that’s how it started now
that I’m working but you because there’s a lot of people have asked questions and
most of the time you are not there so why not answer it for you very kindly and said that’s how
Melissa started to become involved with our Facebook page the person who used to help me at that
time then left and we had a unanimous decision who should we ask we both said
Melissa and you post some awesome posts on there you put some really beautiful
warm human stories you really have shared of your own experience what leads
you to do that I i guess its because every photographer and yeah I just
wanted to basically share what I’ve had before and you know who knows maybe some
people can relate to it I think a lot of people relate to it because when you
posted things on the Facebook page where
somebody said I really lacking confidence that was one i remember you
wrote his brilliant post about how your work had been completely slammed on line
someone said mr. Fox’s pictures are dreadful she doesn’t know what she’s
doing and it’s about how you rise above that it was I thought that was an
awesome post and you continue to do it absolutely I just believe that you know
you can’t be stopped by anyone telling you what to do you know you have a
passion you have a love for photography just go for it and you know you don’t
have to really think about what we what people what other people think about
your photography as long as you love it go for it absolutely and this is why we work
together I think that was pretty obvious this is a common ethos that runs through
both of us it’s about the person behind the camera is not about the camera it’s
you guys who take the pictures now besides looking after the Facebook page Melissa started helping me keep up with
all the wonderful comments that you guys post on YouTube there are so many of you
now and I’m totally blown away by that but also what you don’t see is behind
the scenes Melissa does masses of work to keep the website running smoothly
making sure that it’s always easy to find on Google etc making sure all the
links work it’s a lot of stuff them in this does behind the scenes she’s also looks after my emails and
says brown answer that, keeping him in line yeah you do have to do that from time to
time I really have to do what’s your kind of photography what is it that
you’re into shooting into portrait photography wedding photography and my
own weird stuff which is the surreal portraits I
think those are amazing it’s something i’ve never which I’ve never sort of
done it’s a completely unique looks to be seems to be to you there’s lots of power in
action and moody drama going on there.My attack would be the emotions for me think more of an
emotional images versus for emotional and artistic images at the same time so that
I created this you know surreal portraits that again doing the past about but
also when it comes to business part I do the wedding photography because you
get money from it’s a lovely lovely lovely area of photography is great fun
isn’t it was stressful fun challenging all of it is all of those things
is also a privilege to be part of a milestone event in somebody’s life of the pictures
in it its high-pressure shooting two weddings think it’s easy and cheesy and it isnt
and absolutely so where do you think we did you evolve from with your
photography what was your beginning point what was your first thought that
said I wanna do photography since i was a kid was doing photography but you know I don’t know
what I’m doing but my mother passed away and that she left me camera and it
didn’t know what to do with that have no idea what a controlled and stuff I watched youtube I watch your channel I’ve seen most of your video and stuff and
that’s how we started you know basically you help me dissect the biology or and you know technicology or
whatever the terms is you were the one who’ve inspired me to go back to that I love
photography seeing some of the Melissa’s early work to the stuff you’re producing
now like the surreal portrait this is why I do what I do because it’s
such a privilege to know that I’m helping people like Melissa and others
and now it’s really great that Melissa and I working together and also Melissa and I
working together that is the team and now it looks like there’s a huge team
there but please believe me the whole thing is run by Melissa myself and
occasionally we have guests camera people come on to help out sometimes I
have to do it on my own whatever but we are the team and certainly thank you to all you guys
that we’re able to do what we’re doing and I had the opportunity to come and
run workshops in Asia and have a brilliant PA like Melissa she does RULE me yes
well I think we both inspire each other in some point yeah we take but Melissa
does brown answer this going to that check this out I’m without her I would
probably miss a lot of things but really I just wanted to introduce you guys to
Melissa want to see some of her photography Melissa knows her way around
my training products probably better than I do in many ways because there are
so many YouTube videos but Melissa watched and studied all of them so she really can
help look after you guys when I’m not available and I apologize that I’m not
available all the time because I would love to be able to interact with every
last one of you on a one-on-one basis to also i want to tell everyone that I’m so honored every
time that you will ask me questions or asked him question and please do let me
answer those questions because sometimes he is not really around and and yeah I would like
to help it’s an honor for me to be a part of this entire business that you’re
running it’s great having you on board because
you do so much with so many people don’t see say you guys if you want to check out
some more of Melissa’s photography find out more about melissa is in the text
below this video go check out her blog check our website you can really see one
awesome photographer she is also a very warm and brilliant human being she
really does care thank you thanks Melissa thank you Mike
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