TELUS | How to install your Outdoor Camera

TELUS | How to install your Outdoor Camera


(fun upbeat music) – [Narrator] This video will show you how to install your new outdoor camera using step-by-step instructions. You’ll need to select a location to mount your outdoor camera. There are three important considerations: WiFi strength, cable
length, and camera angle. For WiFi strength, your
camera requires a minimum of 2.5 megabits per second upload speed, but a stronger signal will
create a more reliable and higher quality video feed. To test your WiFi speed,
visit telus.com/speedtest. If you’re unable to find a location with adequate WiFi coverage, consider purchasing a TELUS Boost WiFi. Before you mount the camera to the wall, you’ll first need to connect
it to your WiFi network and add it to your
TELUS SmartHome account. To do this, start by
plugging in the camera. The status LED light
will begin flashing red for a few moments. This should done near
the mounting location. If the LED starts flashing
white, move to the next step. If it turns solid red, hold the WPS button on the
back of the camera as shown until the status LED button
flashes white, then release it. This means that the
camera is ready to connect to your WiFi network. Next, connect the camera to
your TELUS SmartHome app. Log in to your TELUS SmartHome app. Click on the menu button
on the top left corner. Select add device, choose cameras, choose the camera model you’re installing, then follow the on-screen instructions to complete your camera setup. The firmware update may
take several minutes. (fun upbeat music) For cable length, before mounting, you’ll need to plot a route and run the cable to a power outlet. In some cases, you may want
to drill through a wall or run the cable along siding. If needed, a DC extension
cable could be purchased. The third factor is camera angle. You’ll want to aim the
camera with a good view. You can view the live
feed of a connected camera in your SmartHome app. For your video analytics to work best, the camera should be eight
to 15 feet above the ground. To mount the outdoor camera, you’ll need to drill holes into the wall. Use the longer screws that
were included with the camera if you’re drilling into wood and we recommend using the anchors for stucco or brick walls. You can then mount the
camera body into the wall using the included screws. Congratulations, you’ve
successfully installed your outdoor camera. If you need help with any
part of this installation, visit telus.com/SmartHomeGuides.

Canon PowerShot S200 Digital ELPH Camera Review


Hello, my name is Scott. Today we’re
taking a look at this Canon PowerShot S200 Digital ELPH camera. It was released
in 2002. It’s a nice small compact easy to use camera. The S200 has a 1/2.7 inch CCD sensor in there. And you also
have an optical viewfinder that zooms when
you zoom the camera. The lens inside is 35 to 70 millimeter
equivalent lens in there. And also f/2.8 to f/4 through that zoom range. It is a 2
megapixel sensor. As I mentioned 1/2.7 inches, so
decent size. There is a three-point autofocus system
in the camera. You can let the camera decide which point to use.
Or use the center point. Those points are right in the middle,
so you don’t have a lot of versatility but it’s in there it’s nice auto focus.
Also has an auto focused assist lamp on the front of the camera.
The camera can focus down to 57 centimeters or 1.9 foot in normal mode,
but in macro mode… Which you can access from one of the
back buttons, can go down to 10 centimeters or 3.9 inches.
The maximum shutter speed on the camera is 1/1500. It’s a mixture of electronic and mechanical shutter in there.
When you go into the manual mode on the camera you can adjust the: exposure
compensation, the iso, and also the white balance. So
pretty versatile. Can’t do full manual, but at least doing
exposure compensation is pretty nice. Plus or minus two stops on that. There is
a built-in flash on the camera. So depending on where you’re zoomed at
at least in full wide angle you can do around 9.8 foot maximum for that flash. The main modes on the camera are
automatic, of course. We have manual as I mentioned with exposure
compensation and all of that. Also has two different stitch assist
modes. It does have a self timer, great for
taking photos of groups of people or something when
you don’t have someone to take the photo. It’s pretty nice you’ve got 10 seconds
or 2 seconds. The camera takes compact flash type 1 cards.
That means with the card that comes with it it’s 8 megabytes. Get around 8 photos
maximum quality with the camera. However I do have 128 megabyte card.
So nice decent amount of photos if you get a large enough card.
This can do video up to 640 by 480 for four seconds. You can do 320 by 240 or
a smaller resolution with a little bit more time to them.
Let’s actually test that out real quick. Do a quick video. Let’s started up… I don’t know if it’s working. Maybe it’s
working, who knows! Taking a video with the S200.
I’m not sure what resolution it’s at! It was at 320. This is at 640 by 480 selfie video. Pretty amazing! The video in here should
be about 20 frames a second. There is an accessory port on the side
of the camera. Comes with two different cables. You’ve got one for USB
and one for auto video out. So if you have a nice large CRT you can connect this to review your photos. Let’s take a look at some of
the sample photos from this camera. I’m going to go full resolution you can
check those out. Of course they’re in JPEG… Now let’s check out the simple video
clips from the camera… kkkkaaaaaaahhh mmmmmeeeehhh hhhhhaaaa mmmmeh… aaaaaaaahhhhhhhh hahahaha hahhaha Well like you said, that was the best
we’ll ever get on that elevator. Yep. Oh well! That’s really weird… Huh! Okay…. police brutality! heeoooopppee Yeeesss. Wooooaahhh! haha haha ha ha There’s water in my feet… Of course, when you turn the camera on
the lens does have to extend. So you got a little bit of time from
turning the camera on to taking a photo. On the bottom we’ve got, of course, the
battery area. And also tripod socket. Nice and metal.
It’s not in-line with the lens, which I always gripe about. But it’s good enough
that it does have that on there. You have buttons on the back:
Set, menu, display, and another one for various
functions. White balance or deleting photos
depending on what mode you’re in. What can I say besides it’s a great
little camera. Nice and compact. Nice build quality.
Solid metal on here That was a look at the Canon PowerShot
S200 Digital ELPH camera. Hope you enjoyed the video. I’m Scott from Photography Banzai. If you did enjoy the video… Please consider subscribing. That helps me out a lot. Likes and shares help out a
lot as well. Thanks again!

This New Superconducting Camera Could Finally Help Us See Alien Life

This New Superconducting Camera Could Finally Help Us See Alien Life


Cameras are the foundational instruments of every space telescope. Their eyes have allowed us to see the ‘unseeable,’ shedding light on how planets are born and even the approximate age of the universe. And now, a new, groundbreakingly sensitive camera is pushing the limits of what we can detect even further… to include the chemical signatures of alien life. When the James Webb Space Telescope finally launches, its suite of next-generation imaging systems will give us views of the universe we’ve never seen before. But there’s one important instrument that James Webb doesn’t have— one that could unlock the secret recipe of extraterrestrial life. That’s where this new camera comes in. Developed by a team at NIST, it is composed of sensors so sensitive that they count single particles of light, or photons, to generate an image. And it was developed partially in the hopes of flying it on NASA’s next, next-generation telescope: Origins. I think what we can offer with our detector technology, is that because they are superconducting, they’re more sensitive and they also have lower noise. All cameras do the same thing: analyze light— but different kinds of systems can be used to see different things. Wide-field cameras look at objects in various wavelengths, and are actually what helped us take the first image ever of an exoplanet in visible light. But to find out details about an exoplanet, like its chemical makeup and potential to harbor life, a spectrograph is used. Similar to how a prism splits light into a rainbow, this instrument breaks down light within the EM spectrum into its component parts. By doing so, it allows us to study any object that absorbs light and identify its unique characteristics. An interferometer can then come in to make precise measurements of the object’s relative position and brightness. What’s important to note is that every one of these cameras is equipped with sensors, which translate their light measurements into electrical signals. And the more sensitive they are, the better. That’s why NIST’s new camera is so exciting— it has over 1,000 sensors and uses materials that can achieve superconductivity when they reach a cold enough temperature. This transition temperature is the point at which a material no longer has any resistance. With future space telescopes, NASA is always trying to figure out better ways to improve the signal and reduce the noise. Especially for things like exoplanet spectroscopy, which is the application that we’re really targeting. Remember that a spectrograph can identify the characteristics of any object that absorbs light? With more sensitive detectors, it can pick up on a broader range of wavelengths more easily. This increases its chance of spotting signs of alien life. Basically, the idea is that every molecule or chemical element has a very unique spectral signature. The signals of interest lie between wavelengths of about 2 microns out to 20 microns in wavelength. If we’re going to look at chemical signs of life on other planets or even on the Earth, all of those elements have absorption lines within that range of wavelengths. Elements like oxygen, water vapor, and gases like CO2 lie within this range, and are just some of the signs of life that we’re on the lookout for. But this range of wavelengths is extremely difficult to work in, because the photons interacting with these elements don’t have much energy and are hard to detect. To overcome this obstacle, NIST had to think small. As soon as a photon meets the detector array, it absorbs into its nanometer scale wires. This encounter generates lots of heat, disrupting the superconductivity in a tiny region of the wire for a flash of an instant, creating a pulse. Because each pulse conveys information, being able to sense the smallest amounts of light energy has the potential to yield huge rewards. By stitching together these pulses of information, we could not only gather many more clean signals potentially indicating extraterrestrial life, but perhaps even detect the interactions of elusive dark matter with other particles out in space. But before we get ahead of ourselves, the NIST team still has a way to go to realize the dreams of their high performance camera. This is basically a very first, rudimentary demonstration that we’ve done, creating this array. There’s still a lot of work to do to optimize it. If you want to learn even more about all the ways that we’re searching for alien life— and the planets that could support it— then check out our video on NASA’s exoplanet hunter here. Let us know in the comments below if you’d like us to cover more stories about how we’re searching for aliens, and make sure to subscribe to Seeker for all your space news. Thanks for watching, and I’ll see you next time.

Samsung Galaxy S10 vs. Galaxy S20 Camera Comparison

Samsung Galaxy S10 vs. Galaxy S20 Camera Comparison


Interestingly, it appears that in opposite
to usual trend of increasing the HDR strength with each new generation, this time – we
got decrease! In the result the S20’s picture certainly
does look more natural but definitely less spectacular compared to the S10. In this one the Galaxy S20 was also able to
capture colors of this ground area in a more true-to-reality fashion. …and here, the same picture shot from the
ultra-wide-angle lens on both, again with the same difference in exposure and HDR department. I have to say that when I got my Galaxy S10
I had some doubts in terms of that HDR strength but now comparing both of those phones side
by side gives an insight why someone may prefer that more processed look. It’s also worth to mention another difference
related to the image processing – levels of exposure. The newer Galaxy S20 tends to produce darker
pictures. In case you wonder which one was more accurate
in this picture, I would probably say the S20, but honestly something between the two
would probably be ideal. That’s said some of you may like the results
from the S10’s more. Although it’s worth to mention that the
extra brightness in the older Galaxy sometimes can cause little sacrifice in from of elevated
levels of noise, as in this example. I must say I didn’t expect Samsung would
pacify HDR mode in this new Galaxy. Other than that they’re practically identical. I don’t really see much improvements, even
in the crop. Just to clarify HDR is still relatively solid
on both but the difference is there and it is worth emphasizing. Now let’s jump to some close-ups – it’s
good opportunity to talk about subtle differences in color tones. Of course this is still pretty much the same
color science – so, no night and day difference, but you can notice the Galaxy S20’s pictures
are a bit more saturated and vibrant compared to the old model. When it comes to the level of detail – I
don’t see any major difference besides more shallow depth of field in the new Galaxy. It also means less things are in sharpness/focus. That’s because of the new, slightly larger
sensor and lack of variable aperture which was present in the S10. Again, same little difference in saturation
and exposure. The S20 does feel more natural most of the
time. …and I have to say I am super happy that
manufacturers realize that not just software but the sensor size is one of the most important
factors in building a good camera. This time, though, the increase in the sensor
size is so small that I am unfortunately not able to see those improvements. Anyway thumbs up for that increase; who knows? maybe someday we will get the proper 1-inch
sensor on deck! The Michelin Tyre Man also confirms no major
difference in the level of detail. Both are pretty crispy. Otherwise it’s worth to know about, I suspect,
the limitations of optics in the S20. The bottom is line the distortion is there,
sometimes but I don’t think it will always be that disturbing. Another two things I have to mention – macro
and autofocus. I don’t know if it has worse focusing distance
or if it’s related strictly to the autofocus system but the S10 just seems much more predictable
in macro photography. As you see I couldn’t get S20 to focus on
this emblem. Same here, I tapped to focus on both and as
you see I didn’t have any issues with the S10, just with the new S20. Now let’s have a look at the ultra-wide
angle module on both. There seem to be improvement in a corner sharpness. The S10’s picture looks a bit more warped
in this area compared to the new model. As for the field of view, The ultra wide angle
lens in the S10 is wider by about 3 degree in comparison with the S20. Not that I see any real difference. In regards to the telephoto – I was very
disappointed when I’ve heard the S20’s zoom is no longer optical but instead it uses
pixel binding from it’s high resolution 64MP sensor. Having said that I am happy to report that
the final results doesn’t differ much from the optical zoom found in the previous phone…
and it now has quote on quote native 3x instead of 2x abilities to zoom. Now, let’s check the videography aspect! So, in my mind both have pretty much the same
video quality. Once again – the S10 has less optical distortions
in the edges and seem to be tad sharper. Although the level of detail, I would say,
is comparable… …until we use the 8K resolution in the S20. Then it’s in a whole different galaxy. If you have good lightning conditions it truly
shines and shows it’s potential. Sadly it comes with huge drawbacks like poor
framerate, worse stabilization, worse autofocus. and limited field of view, in case of the
standard S20. All of those things makes it pretty unusable
and unnecessary… …In the end I would prefer if they would’ve
done for example oversampling of 6K to 4K but it is what is and 8K sounds much more
impressive on paper I guess. As for low light, it seems like the new Galaxy
handles noise in a slightly better manner. There are less artifacts compared to the previous
generation. We’ve also got an animation, just like in
the iPhone, which shows how long you have to hold the phone still to get the best results
possible. That’s nice! Additionally in some circumstances the S20’s
lower level of exposure obviously mean you will end up having less noise. …and even in those poor lightning condition
digital zoom on the S20 does a fairly good job, actually looks better than the S10 here. So probably it’s biggest advantage in low-light
performance is slightly lower level of noise. It seems like night-mode also got little improvement. It handles bright parts of the scene better,
or should I say more fancy compared to the S10. Just pay attention to those lanterns in the
background. I believe now it also lets for slightly longer
exposures because the S20’s night mode pictures are often brighter. In conclusion, without a doubt both phones
provide with solid cameras but if you already have the Samsung Galaxy S10 – I would for
sure skip the S20. Don’t get me wrong, there are improvements
like better behavior in low-light, slight upgrade in the ultra-wide-angle lens and more
zoom. That’s said those changes are rather small
and not worth the extra money, in my opinion. I know there is the 8K mode but in current
form, at least for me – it is unusable. I would advise waiting for the next generation
which will probably solve all of it’s current flaws. …and there are some noticeable downgrades
from the S10 like optical distortions and autofocus issues which prevent me from recommending
this new phone as an upgrade even more. So there you go! That’s all for this video Tell me which one you think is better in the
comments! This video was probably one of the most time-consuming
I’ve ever made. So I’ll be very grateful if you comment,
rate and share it. Also consider watching my other videos and
subscribing if you want to see more of those smartphone camera comparisons and reviews. Thank you very much for watching and See you
in the next one! Peace!

how a camera obscura works

how a camera obscura works


Camera obscura Camera is the latin word for room, or chamber. Obscura is the Latin word for dark or darkened. So the camera obscura is basically just a darkened room. Any kind of room can become a camera obscura. Even a small box. First we have to make sure our box is completely
dark inside. Then we’ll cut a small opening to allow light
to come in. We can put out camera obscura in the landscape. Rays of light reflect of objects in the landscape and bounce off in all directions. Most of the light will be scattered, but some will make it though the opening in our camera
obscura. The reflected light will be the same color as the object in the landscape. Light reflects off other objects too. All of the spots of light combine to form an image on the back of the camera obscura. If the opening in the camera is large, the
rays of light are large. This makes a bright projection because a lot of light is allowed in. But, it also makes a blurry picture because the projections are large and overlap quite
a lot. If the opening in the camera is small, the
rays of light are small. It makes a darker picture because less light
is allowed into the camera. It also makes a sharper picture because the
projections are smaller and do not overlap as much. You’ll notice that the projection is always
upside-down and backwards. This is because light travels in a straight line. Now it’s your turn. Try making a camera obscura at home. You can use a cardboard box, or you can darken
a room in your house. Simply cut an opening to allow light to come
in and enjoy the projection. That’s how you do it.

Paralenz – World’s Greatest Underwater Camera for Diving

Paralenz – World’s Greatest Underwater Camera for Diving


Recording your dive should be simple We want high quality recordings, but still be able to be present in the dive. And not fumble with filters and buttons So we sat out to make, the world’s best action camera, for diving. PARALENZ, is the first camera, that is able to log your dive. It’s also the first to automatically correct the white balance to match your depth. It records in high quality, and is intuitive to use It has a long battery life. Even in cold water! We have designed everything, to be operated while using gloves. And it can be mounted fast and easy The PARALENZ camera is made for divers. You feel when it starts recording. And sharing you videos, is easy! All you have to do, is enjoy the dive. With the T-rail click mount, you can mount an de-mount, in a matter of seconds. It’s rock solid. There’s also an adapter mount So you can use other accessories, you may already have. With the third-person-viewer you can put yourself in the shot. A great learning tool for all new divers. The ergonomic mask mount , fits almost any mask. And records everything you see. The third-person-viewer, is it’s first of it’s kind. It’s so compact it fits in a pocket, on your BC. And can give you a whole new perspective, on your dive. The PARALENZ camera knows exactly, how deep down you are. And makes sure your recordings and pictures. Are not tainted green or blue. It’s the first camera in the world, that automatically corrects the white balance, to match the depth you’re at. It also has electronic image stabilization, This removes shakes, and creates a steady and smooth video. To avoid endless GB’s of data, and make sharing easy. We invented Snap-record Press once to take a picture. And hold to record. Easy! Connect to the PARALENZ camera by wifi, or Bluetooth, and immediately review videos, pictures, or snaps. Depth, temperature and time, can be displayed in the video. The clips are ready to share. Or, you can chose to edit. We need your help to make this happen. Back us on Indiegogo Become part of the A-team. To test and develop this camera, and future products. Let’s make it easy for everyone, to share the deep

Camera Settings for Virtual Meetings on your ThinkPad | Lenovo PC

Camera Settings for Virtual Meetings on your ThinkPad | Lenovo PC


As virtual meetings are becoming more common
in the workplace, you may be wondering how to enable your camera for video conferencing. In this video, we will show you how to enable
and adjust your ThinkPad’s camera in your Windows Settings and Lenovo Vantage. Certain ThinkPads and monitors have a physical
shutter. Make sure to flip this to uncover your camera. First, you will need to enable your camera
in Windows. Open your Windows Settings and Navigate to
Privacy. Under App Permissions, click on camera
Different apps have different privacy settings. You will need to enable the camera on any
apps that you wish to use for video chats. You will first need to toggle the on switch
to allow apps to access your camera Further down, you will see a list of apps
that are available and can use your camera. Toggle the apps you wish to give access to
on and off. Now let’s go over how to adjust your camera’s
settings in Lenovo Vantage. If you do not already have it, you can download
it for free from the Microsoft Store. If you’re running the app full screen, you
will see My DEVICE SETTINGS under the device option at the top. If not, you will need to toggle the menu button
to select MY DEVICE SETTINGS. You can also use the MY DEVICE SETTINGS button
in your QUICK SETTINGS. The Camera Icon will turn your camera on and
off as well. On the My Device Settings Page, click the
tab DISPLAY & CAMERA. Scroll down to the Camera section. You have a tab to turn your camera’s privacy
on and off. Below you will find camera settings to control
the brightness and contrast. For more information on your Lenovo Devices,
visit support.lenovo.com.

Blackmagic Design Ursa Mini Pro Review – With footage

Blackmagic Design Ursa Mini Pro Review – With footage


The Ursa Mini packed a 4.6K punch in a relatively compact package, but not without imperfections. Which is fine, because now we have this: the Ursa Mini Pro. What am I looking at today? Blackmagic Ursa Mini Pro Ooh yes. And we’re here at the Southbank Centre to video some skateboarding. Sight problem though… I don’t know about their skateboarding skills but they’ve forgotten their skateboard. All right, off we go to film something else with the UMP which has been blessed with some new buttons on its facade. So yes, it’s changed. This bit is new, that’s for sure, it’s got a little black and white LCD Screen. But this is actually smaller. It’s a four inch screen, one inch smaller than its predecessor, not a huge problem. And one thing worth noting is that the startup time is quicker than before. It’s still not really quick but let’s count it in Potatoes One Potato. Two Potato. Three Potato. Four Potato. Five Potato. Six Potato. Seven Potato. Eight Potato. Nine Potato. It takes nine potatoes to switch on, from flicking that switch to actually being on. Nine potatoes: They should actually put that on the spec sheet. But there is one thing about this… I mean ergonomically in terms of putting this on the shoulder everything seems a little bit claustrophobic. I feel like this. The rather basic hand grip and extension arm can’t be extended that far. But apart from that in terms of usability it’s good, with the addition of useful buttons on the near side of the camera useful for ENG work. And this is really useful: it’s got an HFR button so you can flick between… Slo-mo 50p, 25p… But it remembers, like if you set it to 24… It changes between 50 and 24. But if you set it to 25 it remembers that. 25, 50. 25, 50. Brilliant. Love that. But one of the big things with this update is the quick access to framing guides, zebra, peaking functions, and false colour. Anyway, let’s film something. [MUSIC] Why would Chinese tourists come to Chinatown though? It’s like “come to a not very authentic version of your hometown”. I mean imagine that if you go to China, yeah, as a British person, and you go to a British town… It’d be weird, isn’t it? Sometimes I have to kind of like fumble my way to find the buttons because they do sometimes feel pretty similar, but you kind of get used to after a while… …Just if you remember the layout, and thankfully they put the ND filter dial on the front so you can’t get that confused with this one. Yeah so that’s the built-in ND filters. You’ve got one, two, three, four; one is clear. But it’s good that now it has an IR filter so, you know, magenta-green casts are not a problem any more. Well, only one way to find out. Here’s a straight-up skin tone comparison test featuring a subject with skin, between the Ursa Mini with external ND and Ursa Mini Pro with internal ND. [MUSIC] So you’ve got an F1, F2 button, you can assign different things to it. These switches are pretty beautiful, how they feel like some kind of 1980s Hi-Fi: they work. You can just know where they are for ISO, shutter speed, and auto white balance: white balance seems a bit… … It doesn’t seem you need to really push it. Whereas the shutter speed, yeah it does change quite easily. 180: bam, there we are. You guys want to see some footage from the Blackmagic? Well, here you go. The files looked great, grades beautifully, skin colors look nice. You can shoot up to 120fps too, in windowed mode, which is a little fiddly to set. [MUSIC] This thing only goes up to ISO 1,600:
not that high. It’s not abnormal but it’s not C300 mkii and I’m kind of spoiled by that. Also new is the interchangeable mount: you have EF, PL, B4, and even Nikon, oddly. Wow, I mean how many cameras do you need? Just look at that: she’s vlogging; she can’t decide which camera to vlog with. You know what, I think you should vlog with this one. This this one is a much better camera, all you have to do that. Yeah? It’s a bit unfortunate that the screen doesn’t flip all the way round, it kind of does that. You can kind of… Nah, can’t really do that. There we are.
-You are so huge. That’s really, actually what she just said… So that’s what she said. Okay, do you want to swap? There we are.
-Wow, nice, how can I hold it? There we are, hold it under there. I mean look at that. I mean it’s technically possible to vlog with it, it doesn’t autofocus like the C300 mkii but it’s good for building up muscles too. But you’ve just got to love Blackmagic colour science. It looks beautiful once graded. And that’s the 1080 high speed. But it can shoot, of course, 4.6K. RAW! 16-bit! Have that, and then cook it later. That’s a beautiful steak. Don’t know what I’m talking about but there you go. Having an ability to RAW is always a meaty plus: you get that extra information and thus more flexibility when handing that footage in post. Juicy! But look, if you don’t want to shoot RAW, you have the option of ProRes or DNxHR. This works pretty well as a shoulder mounted camera It’s why they’ve got all these fancy new buttons. So, you need that new EVF. And then it works rather nicely. However, the thing with the UMP is that’s not really about the improvements in the files that you get out of it but rather how you use it: it now has AES audio input and an option to add an external SSD, but let’s face it a big thing with this is mainly the buttons and the new dials. What urked a lot of people about the Ursa Mini was how it was in terms of actual use. So it’s good that Blackmagic have actually listened and made refinements with this model. I mean, say that weight. And it’s called a Mini: it’s not exactly mini by a lot of people’s standards. But for that image quality, in this sized package, it kind of is. So there we are and that’s the Blackmagic Ursa Mini Pro. Just enough improvements to make this a really good camera. and got. It’s got big camera performance in a mini package. “Mini” Package. It just shows that Blackmagic Design are kinda listening. …Probably.