Corey Rich: Good Enough is Never Good Enough

Corey Rich: Good Enough is Never Good Enough


– Hey everyone, what’s up, it’s Chase. Welcome to the another episode of the “Chase Jarvis Live”
show here on CreativeLive. You know this show,
this is where I sit down with amazing humans and I do
everything I can to unpack their brains with the goal of
helping you live your dreams in career and hobby and in life. My guest today is a world
renowned outdoor adventure sports photographer and
filmmaker and author and we’re here to celebrate,
among many things, our friendship, his illustrious
career, and his new book, “Stories Behind the Images”. My guest today is the
inimitable Mr. Corey Rich. (upbeat music) (crowd applauds) – They love you! – Thanks Chase. – All the way from Tahoe this morning. Thank you for coming. – My pleasure, my pleasure. I love talking, I love telling stories, I love hearing stories. And that was really the
spirit of this book and I, yeah, any opportunity
to talk about the book which really means kind of
paying it forward with stories and lessons and- – Yeah, stories and lessons
and having consumed it there are so many stories
that tug on my heartstrings as a lifelong photographer. You know, we’ve come up at similar times through really similar trajectory. But it’s also so widely applicable. These are lessons about life. Not just adventure sports photography. And so, A, congratulations. – Thank you. – B, on your comment about love
talking and strange stories, we already had a one hour
conversation on the couch before we even started
rolling and we’re like, we’ve got to stop talking and
start the cameras rolling. So we’re happy to be actually live in front of the cameras now. Are we doing and Instagram thing to? What’s up Instagram? If, maybe at some point we’ll interrupt if there are some
questions we will let you chime into the episode. But without further ado,
A, welcome to Seattle, thanks for coming up. – Yeah. You know it’s the first time
I’ve flown up to Seattle, Chase, where it’s actually overcast. (Chase laughs) Because, and I almost
sent out a group text to all of my Seattle
buddies that always claim it’s blue skies every day. Because it kind of, it finally validated that okay, occasionally it is
overcast and raining as the- – Right, it’s the flip of what
everybody else thanks it is. And so we have the control over that. There’s a little switch. – Yeah, I know.
– I knew you were coming in today and I don’t
wanna make it too sweet. But it occasionally is cloudy
in Seattle, this is true. – I do, I do remember,
Chase, and it might be, I don’t know, I have no sense of time. It could’ve been 20 years ago, it could’ve been 25 years ago, but coming up to Seattle- – Wait I’m more than 25 years old? – Well let’s see, if you’re 26. – It’s true. 29 actually, perpetually 29. – You know it’s something that happened in putting this book
together is I realized I have no sense of time and
everything was a few years ago. That’s how I would reference
it, it was a few years ago. But walking into this building
and as we sat on that couch it reminded me, I came
to Seattle and I remember it was a sunny day, it was
like beautiful blue skies and I was staying at a
buddies house on a lake, I don’t remember what the lake is called, and everyone was outside
tanning in the park. – With tinfoil around them. – Yes, yes, literally. And everyone was pale but
they were laying there just getting burned in the sun. – (laughing) Sounds like
Seattle in the summer. – And then we walked into your office. You had a tiny office on this
lake or just off the lake, and I walked into the back
and you had your feet up on the table and maybe we
knew each other’s names, but I remember you had like
a glowing, humming, Red Bull cooler in the back–
– Refrigerator. – Stocked full of Red Bull,
and I just remember in my head thinking, “Oh this guy
has got it going on.” – (laughs) My Red Bull fridge sealed it. – This guy, he is destined for success if he has a fully stocked Red Bull refrigerator in his office. – It might help to orient, like what year do you think that was? Can you try? (Corey blows air out) ‘Cause I remember when I
got that Red Bull fridge and it was- – I mean, when were you in that office. That was, I bet it was 20 years ago. I’m 44 now. – ‘Kay, it was certainly before, it was right around the year 2000. – Okay, so yeah. 18ish years, that makes sense. – It could have been, no
that would’ve been somewhere between ’98 and the middle
of 2000 was when that was. – Okay, so you’re better
with time than I am. – Only because like I
know when that fridge was a piece of furniture because I didn’t have a lot of other furniture. And a funny backstory about that is the person who, I was
the first U.S. photographer to contribute to the Red Bull photo files. And that happened at
Tahoe, I met the Red Bull, a guy named Ulrich Grill – Oh yeah, yeah, yeah. Who started the Red Bull Photo Files, there was no media around Red Bull. It was just a beverage that
they had licensed from Thailand and so in that fridge,
what you didn’t know is in addition to these new
cans of Red Bull that started in the late 90s there
was also a couple bottles of the syrupy Thai– – Oh yes, of course. – The original formula. Not to date ourselves, but I
remember there was a person, there was literally a white van, and Red Bull had called me
and said that we’d like to, you know, we’re trying to
seed this product basically, and we’d like to put a fridge in your, and I was like, okay, cool. And once a week there was a white van. – Just rolled up.
– That showed up. – I love it. – And just some guy came in
with a pallet full of Red Bull and filled the thing up and disappeared. – I love it.
– Just bizarre. Okay, but we’re gonna back to that time because that was a time where
you were just figuring it out, I was just figuring it out
and this was action sports before really had any media
stories being told about it. Tell us way back, how you got your start. – Yeah I mean that was
a really special moment. Kinda in the mid to late ’90s I was a kid in college. I had fallen in love with rock climbing. I fell in love with photography kind of in the span of seven days. First rock climbing then photography. I realized my photos were awful. And these two parallel pursuits were born. And I honed the craft. I started working in the newspaper world. And really was learning
the craft of story telling. Kind of, I went down this
traditional photo journalism path. But in every free moment I was out rock climbing
and having adventures. And finally it kind of
got to this breaking point where I realized, wait a
second, I’m taking pictures of stuff that, this isn’t why I fell in love with photography. I was shooting pictures of the mayor and football games and baseball games. And eventually sat down with my boss at the newspaper and I said,
“Can you help me devise a plan, “give me some guidance. “How do I actually photograph the things “that I care most about?” Which is the outdoor adventure world. Climbing in particular. And he hired me. He’d help me devise a plan and he hired me for another six months
and I saved up $3,000 and I went home and I convinced my father that I should take six
months off from college. And my dad was an educator, but that day he drafted
a contract on a napkin that stated clearly I
would return to college after those six months on the road. And I had a Honda Civic and
I took out all the seats except the driver seat. Cut out a piece of plywood
and that’s the advantage to being a shorter guy, you
can sleep in your Honda Civic. And I was just a dirt bag. I drove around the United States for six months
photographing rock climbing. Every day I would pull into a camp ground and introduce myself and ask if I could hang out and shoot pictures. And I came back from that
first six months on the road and edited my pictures down to sort of the best action climbing photographs and the best lifestyle,
and shipped them off to “Climbing Magazine” and
Patagonia, respectively, and much to my surprise,
the next day the phone range and I was, literally
overnight I was in business. Like the phone rang and they
started licensing pictures and you know, I got the first validation that what I was doing out there, kind of applying the skill that I learned at the paper, applying it to
the adventure sports world, was working, like people actually thought it was halfway decent content. And it really feel, that
feels like yesterday. That’s the crazy part.
– Yeah. – Is it really feels, that why
I say I have no sense of time until I look and the mirror.
– Right. – And I realize–
– Who’s the old guy in that window? – Yeah, yeah, who did I, I
just said that to someone. I hadn’t seen someone,
this book tour I’ve met a lot of old friends
and I remember standing in one of the venues and guy comes up and I think, God you look familiar. Shake hands, and in my head I’m thinking, God you look like shit, you look old, and then I realized, oh wait, that’s me! (Chase laughs) Yeah, yeah, wait, we’ve
all aged in this process. But it does feel like yesterday. – Yeah.
– And it’s really, and it’s a little cliche to say, but boy, you know, everything
has fallen into place. – Yeah. – And I don’t wanna say it’s luck, it’s just a whole lot
of hard work and passion and, you know, I always,
I think I smile every day because I’m having a damn
good time along the way. And when I say damn good,
that’s even the challenges. You know when my face is,
when I’m looking into the wind and getting hammered I’m still smiling. – Well let me break something to ya. It wasn’t yesterday. – I know, I know. – And this career arc,
now that you can say this looking backwards, of yours
has just been amazing. And as a long time friend and peer I wanna acknowledge that
you’ve been doing this for so long, such an
established player in the field, and have been able to find success, not just in taking
pictures but in making a lotta videos and films. It’s been super fun to watch. Also in collaborating around CreativeLive, and your recent book, it’s like there, it’s just really fun to watch someone who you know, and I’m
speaking from my perspective, who is a true master at something. So I wanna put a dot
in this thing, mastery. And you told, what I would
say, is a pretty quick story, you pulled the seats outta your car and then six months later
you were earning money. I wanna go back and explore this part. Because there’s a lotta
people who are listening and watching right now for whom the idea of transitioning into
something new is scary as hell. Is loaded with risk. They may not be 22. – Right.
– Or whatever you were when you did that. Maybe they’re 42. So there may be more at risk
than just some college tuition. But regardless if you’re 42
or 22 there is some failure. So take us, failures, fears,
it’s a loaded equation. So take us back and I wanna
explore your mental state around getting your job as
a photographer at the paper, saving up some money, and
then actually taking the step to go out on your own. Which ostensibly was six months but turned into the rest of your life. And very easily could’ve not worked out. So add some color around your emotion and what was going through
your mind at that time. If it really was yesterday there should be no problem in your memory. – You know, and Chase,
I have to be honest, I rarely say this, I’m
still a little concerned someone’s gonna figure
out that I haven’t worked a day in my life. You know there’s still that little fear that someone’s gonna figure
out, wait a second, this guy, well how is this guy
actually making money. – Yeah.
– Doing what he loves. Doing what he loves almost every day. You know I think I’ve always
been my toughest critic. I think that’s really important. I mean you and I were talking about this on the couch and hour ago. That sort of, you know, good
enough is never good enough. – Yeah.
– I mean I think that’s a quality that those people that I admire, those who are successful
in whatever it is they do, whether it’s composing music, or science, or photography or filmmaking,
they are really critical of their own work, and I think
that’s something I learned as a kid, as a gymnast. I think it was just, I don’t
know, beat into me in the gym through just endless, endless
workouts and working hard and understanding what it meant
to hurt but work through it. And I think in the world of photography or in the storytelling world,
you have to be very realistic about at what level are you performing. And we have, every time
you depress that shutter as a photographer, you then
get to look at an image, an you can literally look at it and say, is this mediocre, is
this good, is this great? And it turns out great’s really hard. You know, that was one of the experiences in making this book, that you know, for 30 some odd years
I’ve been a photographer and I’ve got a few great pictures. And it’s hard to even say a few. It takes a lot to make great pictures. – Yeah.
– A lot. Like in a career you make
a few great pictures. Great, good is, you can
consistently make good that means you’re professional. – Yeah.
– Consistently making good is professional. Mediocre photography? That’s real easy. Like I think many folks
can get to that level but we’re striving, and I
learned this really early on, the way that you make
this into a career is you’re ultracritical of what you’re doing and you’re constantly, and
every day, and in every action, you’re striving for great. And great’s not easy.
– No. I mean that’s it. I think, I like to say that
there’s something called the collective subjective, right. Photography’s subjective,
art’s subjective. Music’s subjective. But if you ask 100 people,
“Is this a great song?” And everybody says, “It’s a great song,” it’s a great song. Because it’s subjective. It’s the collective opinion. But you still need to be the first judge of is that word good? Have you pushed yourself hard enough? How would you refine it? Even those great pictures,
even the greatest pictures of my career, I can still
look at them and say, “Oh it would’ve been so much better if.” And I think that’s a
healthy attitude to have. A healthy mental perspective which is, how do you constantly push
yourself to that next level? – Yeah.
– And how are you always critical, and I think I was, that started early in my career. I mean I think in that
first six months on the road I had magazines that I could look at and the guys that I looked
up to, the men and women, the Greg Eppersons, the Beth Walds. And I could look at their pictures and I could look at my slide film, or at least I remembered
what I saw through the lens, and I thought, is it as
good, not as good, or better than what I’m seeing in print? And I think that’s a basic
business philosophy, right? Whether you’re making widgets or you’re making photographs it’s, is your widget just as
good as all the competition or is your widget so much better that it’s gonna compel someone to walk out and stop using their old
widget and buy a new widget. And I don’t know, I’ve always
just lived by that philosophy. And– – It’s so true though, it’s so true. – It’s true, and every now
and again you fall below that, you know I’m always striving
to be, it better be good. Trying to get to great. Every now and again you fumble and it goes to mediocre. And as long as you’re honest with yourself that like, what happened,
and you do this analysis of why did that happen? How do I make sure that
doesn’t happen again? You know, I think that’s
the sustainability part. – Yeah. – Right, it’s sort of your, there’s just this
consciousness of I’m always, you know, you’ve got a north star. It’s what am I aiming,
what am I trying to do? And I also really early on realized, and you know, I’d be curious
if you feel the same way, I think storytelling,
photography, filmmaking, became a priority in my life
and I was willing to skip other things in life, right? You can’t do it all. You can’t, you know as a college student, this is an easy way to explain it, you know I fell in love with
the photography really early. I was a kid, I was 13 years old. And by the time I got to college all I wanted to do was be
outside taking pictures. And well, what did that mean? What’s the compromise? I didn’t go to football
games, and I didn’t, you know, I just wasn’t interested. I wanted to be hanging on a rope in Yosemite waiting for
opportunities that you know, it’s sort of that’s all, it’s all I could, I had blinders on. – Yeah. – I mean to some degree I
think I still have blinders on. There’s a lot of life that
I just (blows raspberry) like block that out because
it’s not that it’s not great for other people.
– Sure. – It’s just–
– It’s not bad or boring or any of those things.
– Yeah. – But yeah.
– Yeah. – I liken it to, well first of all I
agree with your statement as you sort of prefaced it. Second of all, I liken it to sacrifice. Now I was just talkin’
to mutual friend of ours, Chris Burkhart about,
like, the sacrifices. And when I think back, I can say that I, for different periods in my career have not been a good husband. Or not been a good friend. Or not been a good business partner. Or not been a good fill in the blank. Because I’ve been–
– Mm-hmm. So obsessed, like freakishly obsessed with the work that not
enough room for everything. – Right, right. – And I made some very hard choices and I think that whether
you’re thinking about it in terms of mediocre,
good or great buckets that you were using, I
found that I couldn’t do, – Of course.
– you know tap into the occasional greatness
and be consistently good. By consistent I’m talkin’ about like a professional
athlete quality consistent, or a professional
photographer in this case. That it wasn’t possible to
do it the other way around. And for the people who have
told me that it’s possible, I have yet to meet a person
who’s actually done it who’s the person who’s
telling me that it’s possible. To have balance. – Yeah.
– Or you know whatever in order to truly hit
that level of greatness. And that, it’s very, what I’m trying to, just to be really crystal clear, like I’m not advocating that
everyone who picks up a camera should try and be a world
class or world-renowned, or a professional, even, photographer. I think, on the contrary,
there’s a lotta room to be a really good
photographer and love it and have none of the downside and be able to be a good father.
– Sure, sure. – And husband and friend and
business partner, mentor, and blah, blah, blah. But all that being said, long question, what have you sacrificed
in order to make those handful of great pictures and have the career that you’ve had? What have you sacrificed? – You know, I mean a few things. I just had some really close friends over for dinner the other night and, you know, one of my dear friends, I mean I’ve missed a lot of weddings, that’s a great example. Some of my best friends, you know, I have missed their weddings, and it’s, you know, at one level you
can write that off as like ah, you know, that happens. But not when you have a normal, you know when you work
for a Fortune 500 company and you have vacation time and you can schedule your time off, maybe short of being the
CEO, you make weddings. Like that’s it. Like when your friend gets
married you make the wedding. But I was in Pakistan. You know, it’s one of those. And I- – Doing a trip of a lifetime.
– That’s right. – That led to the development and possibility of your career. – Absolutely, that’s right. And I think, but my
friends, I mean the people that I’m really close to also know that. – Yeah.
– Like they understand, we talk about it. They’ve known that from the beginning. You know, I’m 44 now and my
wife is 10 years younger. Kind of by design. And we had a child much, well I have a six-year-old girl now. There’s no way that I was
ready to have that child at 30, or you know in my early
30, couldn’t, impossible. But those are, I think
there’s just a lot of time with friends, a lot of
time with our community, it’s the missing weddings, it’s the, you know, those are real sacrifices. But I don’t look back
and regret any of that. I mean I think it’s, I am who I am. You know I think I’m gonna be, I’m trying to be an incredible dad. What I wanna show my daughter is passion. You know, what does passion look like? And some of that is with her by my side as we do things together, and some of that is from a distance as I’m sitting in a wild place FaceTiming, explaining why I’m doing it. But you know, I think that comes with whatever you care deeply about. You get X amount of time on this planet, you get X amount of time per day. And it’s how do you partition it, how do you dole that out? And I’m very particular about my time. I’m, I don’t wanna say
selfish about my time ’cause I’m very giving with my time, I wanna share, I’m always
trying to help folks, not just family and friends,
but the community as a whole. But I’m very deliberate
about where my time goes. Because it’s, the older you get the more you realize it’s pretty finite. – Yeah. – It’s a pretty finite amount of time. And how much of it goes to the craft, how much of it goes to, I always say that if I weren’t
a photographer/filmmaker, if I weren’t running a
business, I would be a teacher. And the beauty of our career is that within the filmmaking world
and the photography world I think it’s one of our responsibilities is to pay it forward,
to share, to kind of, there’s no secret sauce in this game. – Yeah.
– I learned a long time ago. You know, the secret sauce is just, you work damn hard all the time. – You better love what
you do ’cause your– – That’s it
– About to like grind your nose off.
– Yeah, yeah. That’s right. I don’t know if that’s the
answer that you’re looking for. – No that’s, no I mean just
the concept of weddings and us being able to justify missing your best friend’s
wedding when you’re 20 is, you know, 25 or whatever. And you start to be able
to look back a little bit with a little bit more
time under your back and you’re like wow, that
was kind of a big deal. And I think of the holidays,
the family experiences, the weddings, the births,
the deaths, the funerals. Like I missed– – The holidays are a good one.
– Hundreds. – That didn’t even occur to me. – Yeah, hundreds and hundreds. And I’m not exaggerating there, I missed hundreds of those events. – Yeah.
– And holidays, and time with family. And as you said, not
regretting, but the awareness. – Sure. – Is part of what I’m asking for. I say that not to dissuade anyone who’s thinking of going for it. More to understand that
the people who are, if you aspire to be a Corey Rich, like this concept of being
around for everything I would say is not possible. But that’s were I would
immediately fall back and say, but the goal isn’t to try
and be another Corey Rich, the goal is to be the best you, and if you understand
where your values are and if you can create
a life that’s aligned with those values, then
you’re gonna be just fine whether you wanna be
world class or hobbyist. But to tap into what
you’ve done to be able to make a book like this, the films like you’ve made, is next level. – Well thanks. I think what’s interesting about this idea of sacrifice is along
the way, very rarely, did I consciously feel like,
oh, I’m giving up something that I am sacrificing. – Not really a choice, right? – Yeah, I mean there
was just never a choice. – Yeah.
– I mean there was never a choice. It was a no, I mean when you said holidays I realized, I mean I’d blocked it out. Because I–
– Yeah, it was like– – Yeah, just for 20 years
missed all the holidays. (Chase laughs)
Yeah, 100%. We just, now with a little
girl and I’ve designed me life, I’m designing it slightly different because I wanna be there. I wanna be a dad and she travels with me and my wife and I are really
conscientious of our life. But we just, probably for the first time in 15 or 20 years, went to the big family Thanksgiving gathering in Washington D.C. And you know my cousins
and aunts and uncles. And you know, it still felt
like I remember it as a kid. But I haven’t been, I’ve just been MIA. – 20, 25 years.
– And everyone was shocked. Like, you’re here? And it was, it’s exactly what you said. You know, I don’t remember
ever making the decision to not be there, it’s
just I was never there. – Yeah.
– Because I was doing this. – Yeah it felt like it wasn’t, I think that’s interesting acknowledgment. I can say the same thing. I felt like, I never felt like I, certainly I felt sad. Like, oh, I’m gonna miss your wedding. But it was never like,
hm, should I not do– – Right. – And I don’t wanna
paint it as a dichotomy. I just, I’m trying to help
folks who are listening understand if they wanna
operate at that level. And I think the same is, we’re talking about photography, and in your case, Corey,
action sports photography, but I have yet to find in entrepreneurship or the cello, or the nonprofit world or fill in the blank, anyone
who is truly operating on that level that hasn’t
made insane sacrifices. – You know, I also think
when you talk about the person that wants
to pursue photography, you know, I started when I was a kid. But there’s someone
listening that’s 42 years old and they wanna go down this road. And I think, the other part
that I think is flawed, I oftentimes, I get a lot of email and people asking questions,
and when someone in essence sends me their business plan before they send me
their photos, you know, I’m a firm believer, and it
goes back to the quality, if you have the great content the business side falls into place. It’s I think going at it
back, like the other way. Which is, so here’s my strategy
over the next 24 months and then I’m gonna learn
how to make photos, but here’s how I’m gonna sell them and how I’m gonna get assignments and why are art buyers
not calling me back? I’ve just, I always came
at it from the other side which is I love, I’m like a
guy about the journey, right? To travel, hopefully, is
better than to arrive. I love the journey. I love being in the
experience, on the trip, making the pictures, trying
to make the picture better, you know working hard. It’s fun when I see it
on the magazine cover or the billboard or on television. But I don’t get as much joy at of that. Kind of the final, the final delivery. – Yeah.
– The publication, the airing. That’s not the great joy. The great joy for me
comes out of the process. And I think when people come at it more from the, how do I get jobs, and how do I make money at this, I always like, timeout. Wait that’s, at least
for me that’s never been. That all falls into place
if what you’re doing, and it goes back to that
mediocre, good, great. If what you’re doing is great, everything else falls into line. I mean it really, it just,
I mean assuming you’re not– – But the opportunity for
it to fall in line is there. – That’s right.
– But if you don’t have the work there’s no opportunity. – Zero, that’s right. Well that not true, I
think I’ve met a few people where you scratch your head and you think, damn you are just an amazing entrepreneur. – Yeah. – Your work is awful. It’s pretty rare though.
– Yeah. – That’s the exception to the rule. Usually it’s someone has exceptional work because they’ve worked really hard. Usually they have some raw talent. And you can cultivate talent. I don’t think that’s just
something that you’re born with. Their willingness to
work really, really hard, and they’re a good person. You know those three things.
– Those things combined can make anything, right? – Yeah, yeah. – I don’t know if there are some questions for those folks at home who are listening. We did have Instagram live. All right, I’m going
to repeat that question for the folks at home since
I’ve got a mic and you don’t. When you first started shooting did you start off by getting releases from the climbers you were photographing when you talked about
being at the campground? I mean to me it’s almost
like, to preface the answer, it’s almost like your
business plan before the work question that you just sort of answered. Like you’re already planning
the viability of your images without, yeah don’t even know
if it’s freaking good or not. But– – And this probably a
question coming from someone that’s making great pictures
and now they’re trying to figure out the business side. You know climbing is an
amazing, like any actions sport, any adventure sport, you don’t show up at the tennis courts down
the start in Seattle, and Andre, I guess he’s
out there whacking balls, it just doesn’t happen. The pros play on one field and
the amateurs play on another. And the beauty of adventure sports, they ski on the same hills. They go to the same cliffs. And 20 years ago I figured out
that I would go to Yosemite and 50 yards to the left were the best climbers in the world. They were climbing with
steeper and with fewer holds. And I’ve always been a believer
in you’re just completely transparent about what
you’re trying to do. What I’m trying to do. Which first and foremost
I’m just driven by, you know, I introduce myself and then, do you mind, I love taking pictures. You love rock climbing. Do you mind if I spend time
with you taking pictures. And 99.9% of the time
the answer is absolutely. It’s this perfect marriage
between what I love to do and what they love to do. You know, this is a
long-winded way of saying, no I don’t worry about the model release until I’ve actually done something. You know, it’s really– – Especially early on.
– The model, of course. – If you’re a pro and your goal
is to take pictures at the, first of all, most working
pros, they’re goal is not to like make money working at the local crag. – Right, right. – Right, you’re sort of like, that’s where your honing your skills and then money is made on adventures when a bunch of conditions line up. It’s a route a little more intentional. That being said. – Yeah, I think as a young
person shooting pictures, it starts with make amazing pictures of that climber first,
that you’re gonna wow them. Whether that’s the climber,
the mountain biker, the skier, and then ask
for this model release. It’s really what you alluded to Chase. It’s don’t let the business
side of it get in front of, don’t let it, don’ get
the cart before the horse. – Tail wag the dog. There’s a million of those. Yeah, and I do also, a piece of color if I may, is that I found
that 99% of the images that I was proud of or that
I felt like had viability in the market were just
powerful storytelling images. They were intentionally
made and they weren’t made where I was documenting something. It was a collaboration
where I know at this moment you’re gonna hit this mark and the turn, or this hold, or this element. And sure there’s some
documentarian approach that works occasionally,
but 99 times out of 100 it’s a collaboration.
– Right. – So it’s I’m gonna be here,
I’m focused on this moment, or this hold, or this move,
or this fill in the blank. And where our skills come together is that I’m gonna be there,
I’m gonna nail my part. And as the athlete or climber or whatever, so it’s more collaborative
for the people who are at home going like, how are pro photos made? – Mm-hmm. Yeah, I almost feel like
there’s different phases in my career, and maybe it’s
because it’s so deeply rooted in climbing, definitely
early on for me it was truly, because I didn’t know any different, I just knew what it meant to
be a documentary photographer. A photojournalist in the adventure world. And so for a big chunk of my early career I was really just along for the ride. – Yeah. – And kind of waiting for
these fleeting moments to unfold in front of me. And you know, of course, the athletes totally
knew that I was there, but I think for five or
10 years it was truly kind of mostly found
moments on expeditions. And then this kind of
interesting thing happens, which is then it was in the print world and my photo credit was
appearing everywhere and then the phone starts ringing and it’s the ad agency world calling. And they’re saying,
“We loved this picture, “now can you make it happen on demand?” And I think that’s what you’re describing. You know, the way that
I graduated into the, can you do it in a commercial
capacity or for an ad? It was first I did it sort
of in that documentary authentic way, and then once I knew how to do it authentically,
then I knew how to kind of orchestrate it to happen
on demand on a certain day with a bunch of people
standing behind me telling me what they want or what they don’t like. And so for me, everyone gets to that point in a different way. For me it was coming really from that photojournalism background – Yeah. – You know my two things I understood which was being outside and being dirty and suffering, and photojournalism. And now I think those two skills, oftentimes if I’m hired it’s
not for a super polished image, it’s something that still has a little bit of a gritty, raw feel to it. But, you know, nine times out of 10 now I’m being asked to do it
like, on a Thursday at noon. (both laugh) – And that’s the difference between a pro and an amateur, right?
– Right, right. – Like the pro golfer. Like, I can only hit it straight if it’s not windy and it’s not
rainy and no one is watching, and that doesn’t equal a pro. A pro is like, you can literally create that stuff on demand. – Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah. – All right, I wanna go back just a second to that time we met at one of my, that was my first photo studio
that was out of my house. Do you remember the
conversations that we had at all? – Gosh, I don’t. – I’m wondering how they compare to the ones we’re having right now. – Yeah. I think it was more of like a passing. I don’t remember a long conversation. – Just for what it’s worth,
I walked by that this morning ’cause I still live two blocks, different house, but I live
two blocks from that location and it’s right nextdoor to my coffee shop where I go every morning
if I’m in Seattle. – Oh that’s really funny. – So I know the spot super well. I can picture it in my mind. It’s now a restaurant that my
wife and I with another friend but the space is till there
and that’s why I was curious if you remember what we
talked about relative to say, what we’re talking about now. – I mean I think what’s so
fascinating now to look back, you know, kind of look
in the rear view mirror, you know it’s still short
careers, we’re young guys. It’s that there’s an amazing camaraderie amongst professionals in this industry. Whether it’s you and I sitting down, or whether you just talked about Christ. I think there’s just this open door. I think we’re living in the golden age of just free flowing sharing information and I think CreativeLive is
right at the pinnacle of that. It’s that idea of just
sharing and paying it forward. And I love that no matter,
you know, the colleagues that I have, the friends
that I have in this industry, that we can pick up the
telephone and just have deep, sincere, real
conversations about the trials, the tribulations, we
can celebrate together over the phone or in person. – Yup. – And that, I think we’re
lucky that we were born into this industry kind of at the tail end of where folks were a lot
more tight lipped early on. I think there really was
this sort of philosophy when I was maybe younger
that there’s just secrets, and you don’t share those secrets. And now it’s, come on, there’s no secrets. It’s all about how do we
collectively raise the bar. – Yeah. – And you know, I get so
excited when I see a new name. And I see incredible
work that they’re doing. It energizes me. I love seeing new
talented folks out there. You know, men and women
just doing cool stuff. And I wanna believe that it’s because everyone shares these days, I mean that’s part of why
the bar is being raised. – Well speaking of sharing,
I wanna visit your book here. Because, thank you, A, for sharing with me and sending me an advance copy. Signed, no less, right there. But speaking of sharing and stories, your new book here,
stories behind the images, lessons from a life in
adventure photography. This is 30 years in the making, right? – Yeah, it sure is. – It’s like a whole lifetime worth of spending time outdoors and what compelled you to create it? What’s the why behind this book? – You know, I think
from the very first time that I went rock climbing,
I won a pull-up contest, I did 35 pull-ups hen I was 13 years old and one of my junior high school teachers took notice of the short strong kid and invited me to go rock climbing. And my father agreed to let me go, but he sent my older brother. And one morning at five
a.m. he dropped us off in the parking lot and we
loaded into Bob Porter’s truck and my math teacher was
in the passenger seat. And I remember distinctly,
he had a 40-pack of powdered donuts that he opened up and this aroma of powdered
donuts blew through the car. And he had a 7-11 coffee which
also had a distinct smell. And as we zipped out of the parking lot he cracked open a Budweiser. And there was this mix of
Budweiser, 7-11 coffee, and powdered donuts, and
I immediately thought, “God this is just so different than going “on a road trip with mom and dad.” (Chase laughs) This was like, it
already had blown my mind and then we drove for two hours into the Sierra Nevada Mountains and Bob and George immediately went into story telling mode. They just did awesome
story after awesome story of adventure, and comedy,
and trials and tribulations. And then we went climbing
and I fell in love with every aspect of the
physical and the mental and the cultural aspects. Just the culture of climbing. And I think on that day I fell in love with the art of storytelling. I realized I was sitting
with two Jedi masters of storytelling, and they didn’t know it. They were two school
teachers who loved climbing. But they had this gift. We got back in the car and
they told more stories. And I think that day,
I didn’t realized it, but I wanted stories of my own. I wanted to learn. I intuitively began to learn
that craft of storytelling. And I can honestly say that today, one of my favorite things to
do is sit around the campfire and listen to stories and tell stories. And that’s really what this book is. I almost, I wrote the book
in a way I envision sitting at a campfire with the readier, with you and I’m sharing these tales
that hopefully are entertaining. Hopefully there’s something educational. Oftentimes they’re
caricatures of amazing people. I mean that’s the greatest
gift I’ve had in my career is to spend time around people who totally inspire me and wow me. With the way they think and the way that they’ve mastered what they do. And oftentimes they’re self deprecating. You know, they’re thee lessons, you know, I kind of put my ego in check when I wrote this book. Because I think that
the mistakes I’ve made are some of the great lessons in the book. But that’s it. It’s really about, I wanted to, I wanted to preserve the
stories first of all. – Mm-hmm. Yeah.
– You know, I’ve found these are a lot of the
stories that I tell. They’re 56 of the stories that I tell, you know, sitting around the campfire. The hardest part about this book was which 50 some odd stories of the now, the greater part of my life of stories, what do you tell? And which ones are meaningful? – Yeah. – You know, this is definitely
not a traditional photo book. That one of the things I
wanna be really clear on from the outsider
perspective, this is a book about photography, but to me it’s a story, it’s a book about being a creator
and creating these moments and creating these stories. – Yeah.
– And with intention and then capturing and then
being able to craft them and it’s about life. This like the Trojan horse of this book is not the photography aspect,
it’s the other way around. It’s the life lessons and the
humanity and the connection. That’s why it’s just, it’s
so universal it feels like. But it’s living life through your lens. – I was pretty adamant that
this was a book that you read and then you look at the pictures, because the stories
are about the pictures. But I was pretty adamant
that it shouldn’t be a hardcover oversized book. And I’m a guy that, I’m a
connoisseur of photo books. You know we have shelves of photo books. But I can honestly say I’m
not sure I’ve ever read a hardcover photo book cover to cover. – Yeah.
– It’s just not designed for that, it’s designed to sit on your coffee table.
– Yup. And this book, I wanted it to be small and I wanted it to be something that if someone’s going backpacking
they could tear it in half and bring a few chapters into the woods. I keep on waiting to show
up at someone’s house and see it on the back of the toilet. Because that’s, you know it’s designed to actually be consumed. – Yeah. – And it also, you don’t
need to read it in order. I mean these chapters, really
you could pick it up anywhere. Jump to the middle of the
book and it doesn’t have to be chronological the way that you, you know, you don’t read it start to finish. But that was really
the spirit of the book. I wanted it to be lessons that folks could, that last forever. And I also was very conscientious of, these stories, I wanted to preserve them while they still are meaningful to me. I don’t want this to
come off the wrong way, but if tomorrow I got hit by a bus I wanted my daughter to
have a really good sense of who her dad was. And I’m not planning to get hit by a bus or fall off a rope, or get
buried in an avalanche, but there is, there has been
this reality in my world of, I used to say when people would ask, “Is what you do dangerous?” And always my go to answer, Chase, was “Ah you know, driving to work in Seattle, “commuting in traffic
is far more dangerous “than what I do.” but now 30 years later I
don’t know anyone that’s died commuting to work.
– Yeah. – I don’t know anyone that’s died but I can’t count all the friends that I’ve lost on my fingers and toes. An so there’s that, that was
the other small motivation behind this was preserve these stories. And one day, you know, my
daughter’s barely interested in the book right now, but
she loves storytelling. Because I think it’s so
much a part of our home. When friends come over
we sit around our fire which is really the island in our kitchen and we tell stories and
Leila’s totally embraced this idea of communicating
and she’s even learning at six years old how to tee up a story where you describe some
detail and then you set up so there’s some mystery
around what’s going to happen and then you get to the punch line. And I realized that’s what this is about. I want her to have that gift. – We talked earlier about sacrifice. And you’ve already said that
some of the stories made it in the book and some didn’t. Did you have a criteria
on which to decide? Or was it pure intuition, this is a go and this is a no go. – Yeah, well maybe it’s
worth describing the process for making this book. It was, I think I’m a solid photographer. I’ve made a couple, we talked about that, made a few great pictures in my life, a lot of good pictures. I think I’m a pretty good storyteller. I think I love storytelling
as much I do photography but I’m not a great writer. Like writing is painful for me. I can do it, but it really hurts. (Chase laughs)
And you know, we talked about this in writing your book. – Yeah, whew. – And so I really, in
putting this book together, the way that it would start
is I find I’m most creative when I’m actually moving. You know I can sit at a
desk and I can force myself to do something, but
I enter the flow state when my heart’s beating
at 150 beats per second, some sweats dripping in my eye and there’s sort of endorphins. And most of this book
was written while walking or riding a bike and
I would ride up a hill for an hour or two and the
first ride was just thinking, I had a couple pictures in my head and I would think through,
what is the story? What would the message be? What would I actually
write in this chapter? And I’d, I think photographers,
many photographers have this gift, we can see
things, we can visually, I can tee up lots of visuals in my head and remember those little details. And I’d go through a checklist oftentimes of nah, that photo doesn’t really work because the story’s not strong enough. And I’d be writing each
one of them in my head. And then I would finally
after a few bike rides or hikes, I would hone in
on, you this is an image, this is a worthy image. And you know, the iPhone
has changed our world. I’m taking notes just in the notes app. And then I would spend
another ride thinking about what would the lesson be,
how would I tell this story. And then eventually, whether
it was riding up a hill or sitting on a plane or
sitting in a hotel bar I would just do a voice
memo into the phone as though I’m sitting at a fire. I would tell my five or ten
or 15 or 20 minute story into my phone and then
that would get transcribed. And then I worked with
an incredible writer, Andrew Bisharat, and
we as a team would take that 20 minute transcription
and cut it down and cut it down, and Andrew would add some of his wordsmithing and oftentimes we’d go through a few revisions. But it started as doing blog posts. I mean over five years ago. It was probably inspired by your blog. I mean you were like the
guy that showed us all how to create a photography blog. And I started writing essays and 70 some odd essays later realized, dang I think we’ve got a book here. – I found so much joy in
all of the little moments. I remember seeing pictures in your book, the first time I saw them say, in a Patagonia catalog.
– Mm-hmm. – Or there’s a guy named Justin Bastien. – Right, right. – And I ended up meeting
Justin through doing my iPhone book, he randomly wrote me, he’s, “I’m a developer in silicon valley “and then I’m like,
only years later piecing all this stuff together,
like wait a minute, Justin who introduced me to Catarina Fake who started flickr who
is in this photograph of Cory’s that was in the, it
was in the Patagonia catalog that I saw in 2004 or whatever. It was very nostalgic for me. And perhaps I think on the
obvious superficial answer might be able to say because
we were in the same industry and pursuing a similar path,
but go back to that point that I mentioned earlier about, like there’s just a
universality to this material about adventure, whether
you’re climbing El Cap or you’re trying to figure out what school to get your kid into, or you’ve
decided to change careers. There is adventure in all of those things. And that’s part of what
I can say indisputably that I love about the book
is there’s this fabric and I think it’s you as a storyteller. So do you feel like that
method that you used, this combination of
visualization and transcription, would you have changed
anything in making the book? – No, I don’t think I know of any– – You said it was joyful earlier. – Yeah.
– Which to me was amazing. Like writing my book was not joyful. It was joyful, there were moments of joy, but a lot of pain. – You know, this might be,
I hadn’t thought about this until you just asked the question. This might be the only thing in my life that I actually did slowly
and methodically over time in bite-sized pieces,
like I was never the guy– – Congratulations like, on achieving– – I mean the funny thing is
I think it was by mistake. I wish I can say that was intentionally. Because I’ve always
been the guy that waited until the 11th hour to cram for an exam. In fact once I did a TEDx talk and I don’t know why in my head, I just convinced myself
everybody must wait until like a few days before and then they put talk together. And this is just to kind of illustrate how I’m always that guy that
does it at the last minute except for this book, and I
remember sitting in my basement, my office was still in my house and one morning I got up and
the TEDx talk is a couple of days out and I called
one of my dear friends, Tommy Caldwell, a rock climber
and Tommy had just done a big TEDx talk in D.C. And I called, I think
I planned to call Tommy just to get validation that yeah, I’m doing it just like everyone else. You wait until the 11th
our and then you just cram. – Pull some slides together.
– Yeah, yeah, you go deep. You just dig deep and just make it happen. And you know it’s six in the morning and I called Tommy, I
say, “Hey can I just, “so how did you prepare
for that TEDx talk? “I mean, what did you do, tell me.” And he said, “When’s your talk?” And I said, “Oh, it’s on Saturday.” He said, “This Saturday?” I said, yeah, yeah, this Saturday. And he said, “Oh dude,” he said, “Oh man, “I’ve never prepared
for anything in my life “more than that TEDx talk.” He said, “I hired a
coach, I like,” and then he went through this
process of rounds of writing and then he would go for
hikes in the woods with– – This is a guy who climbed
never-before-climbed routes on the dawn wall. – Oh yeah, yeah, yeah.
(Chase laughs) And of course in that moment, sort of my heart stopped and I realized, Okay I have to drop everything
that I’m doing right now. Like I stopped picking up the phone. Like I had to put a talk together. And for the next 72 hours I just worked on putting that talk together. But that’s my standard MO. – Yeah. – That’s my, even though
I don’t like to admit it. – Yeah. – This was like the exception to the rule. Where slow, like I
trickled these stories out. And enjoyed, there was
almost a lesson in this that now I’m realizing. I should do more things like that in life. I should do more things
that are actually just like every day and slowly that
kind of accumulate over time. That’s my take away from this talk. – Awesome.
– That I need to do. I need to do more of the
slow trickle accumulation over time and getting maximum
joy out of the experience. – Well congratulations on the book. It’s really stunning and I
had a couple of questions if we can on a couple
of different stories. So why did you start with, I don’t know what
the actual title is, not the Preface, the “Doing
What You Love” is chapter one. And I think a lot of people
listening and watching understand superficially the value of doing what you love. Because as you mentioned earlier at one point during our conversations that it was kind of cliche
to say this or think this. Clearly if you’re gonna start a book that you’ve been working 30
years to tell and the title of the first chapter is
“Doing What You Love”, there’s something more
there than superficial. – Yeah. I mean to me it’s still just
the pillar of my career. If there’s one thing,
it’s not just the pillar of my career, I think it’s who I am. It all comes down to passion, right. It all comes down to, you
can’t put as much time and energy into something
as we do into photography or filmmaking or whatever
it is you’re doing unless your really, really deeply love it and are passionate about it. And I thinking that first chapter is about taking six months off from college. And I probably tell the story
of convincing my parents to take a semester off. – And the seats out of your car. – Yeah, the seats.
– It’s classic, that’s the, I remember the first time you told me before the book and
before the conversation, I think even before
your CreativeLive class you told me that story and I
thought I was really moving. – But that’s born out of passion, right. – Yeah.
– I mean that’s born out of doing what you love. And that picture of Kevin
Gallagher ascending a rope over the northern Mexico desert. You know, that was the
byproduct of going out and doing what you love for six months with zero plan for was this
gonna turn into a career, could I ever pay for the
100 rolls of film that shot. It was just born sheerly out of, you know I talk about,
I still have blinders that are like this. I think then I had blinders
that were like this. You know, all I could see
was this just narrow field of view, but that field
of view was being outside, having adventures, being around
people that were amazing, and trying to make really
compelling pictures. And those are sort of the
tenants of my life and career that they kind of
haven’t changed actually. – I was just gonna say, have they changed? – I mean it’s still, you
know I’ve spend less time hanging on ropes today. And I think my, as I’ve grown up I’ve also had this
realization, you know I talked about having a daughter and I realized I don’t wanna always be taking risks. You know I really love being alive and I want to have a sustainable career and lifestyle, I wanted to buy a house. And I realized that
there was a part of brain that I also, I like running a business, I like those, I just like challenge. I guess is the–
– Yeah. – So my world looks a
little different now. I’m a business partner
in production company and we have 15 full-time
employees and we work with contractors all over the globe and not everything that we
shoot is adventure sports. – Mm-hmm. – But I always say that
everything that I learned shooting adventure sports,
like look if you can do it hanging off a rope 2,000
feet off the ground I can definitely do it
with my feet on concrete with lots of people talking into my ears. – And a coffee cup and
your name on your chair. – Absolutely, absolutely, yeah absolutely. In fact then I get, in the adventure world you spend so much time and energy just physically getting there
and you’re managing risk and you know the
psychology of the athletes and then you switch gears
into, okay, I’m finally in this spot, now I’m gonna
look through this rectangle and be creative and it’s like
you’re shifting constantly from creative to safety to
athleticism to get yourself there but those are the greatest lessons. Like learning it, I’m so
thankful that I learned the craft in the adventure world and now in the kind of
commercial advertising world you’re still shifting gears but it’s a different
style of shifting gears. It’s not, is this serac going to crush me or is the rope getting frayed on an edge. It’s, okay, that client
over there really wants me to try something else, but
I need to get this shot, let’s get him another
latte while I humor him and then I’m gonna tell some stories and them I’m gonna–
– Yeah. And so it’s, I mean
it’s all just challenge. And I guess that’s what I love. It’s the, I love the process of making a great final product. That’s I think where I get all the joy. – I’m gonna let you
choose, I have two stories that I wanna touch on, one
is, I’ll just go there first because I’m choosing to. And you talk a little bit about shooting Alex on, free soloing. – Ah right.
– And I mention this in part because it’s relatable because of the success Free Solo, you know our mutual friends made the film. Jimmy, Jen, one of the
co-directors with his wife Chai. You were photographing those
same places and moments with the same people and
because it’s relatable to anyone you don’t have to be an
action supports photographer or lover because the film has
seen such widespread success. But earlier you talked
about losing friends and you can’t count them
on fingers and toes. What’s it like in that moment? You do a nice job of talking
about it in the book, but share it with us here. – You know, I mean Alex– – What is a guy doing without ropes. Your mind takes a second to recognize that your just like
something is wrong here. Very, very, wrong – I mean Alex is a, I mean
I think I can say this about many of the people in this book. Everyone in this book actually. They’re all extraordinary human beings. I mean in their own right. And I think that’s one of the
gifts of being a photographer is that we, that camera
is the golden ticket. It lets us into their lives. We get a backstage pass to life which is pretty extraordinary. I mean literally we can open any door. We photographer storytellers
with that camera. And Alex is one of those,
he is the one in 10 billion. You know, Alex is one of smartest guys that you will ever meet. You know he’s rely intelligent. He’s also an incredible athlete. – Yeah. – You know we–
– Physically so gifted. – I mean he’s a specimen. – Yeah.
– I mean he’s a specimen. But he’s a specimen in kind
of two different realms. He has a brain, he has the mental aptitude and capacity to process the world in a way that literally nobody else can. The way that he has mental control that no one else has. But he also, we view Alex,
most folks, as they should, they know Alex as like the
boldest climber of all time climbing El Capitan without a rope But it’s when you see
those gifts together, the mental capacity with
the physical capacity is really remarkable. Alex was, this past summer he came to town and a couple of us went
for a mountain bike ride. And Alex is not a mountain bike ride, you know I ride a lot. I’m not a great mountain bike rider but I love riding for the exercise and what it does to my brain and kind of getting into that flow state. I’m the most creative. And Alex, you know he was riding
like a heavy mountain bike and it’s my dear friend
Chris McNamara and Alex and then my buddy Chad and
the four of us are out there. And Alex, you know, by climbing standards, Alex is a 5.9 mountain biker. That’s kind of a–
– Sure (laughs). – You know he’s a kind of, I don’t even wanna say
intermediate mountain biker, he’s like a beginner mountain biker. And we take him on
probably like a bigger ride than we should, but he’s an animal. Like we know that aerobically
he can handle this. And it was fascinating to watch Alex. Chad was the slowest in
the group and I was kind of between Chad and Alex. And Chris was leading the way. And so for an hour plus I could watch Alex sort of figure out how to ride this kind of technical Tahoe granite terrain and 30 minutes in he was walking his bike and kind of falling over
and getting back on. And then finally he blurts out to me, he says, “I kinda get it now. “It’s kinda like on-siting
a boulder problem. “You have to like look at the holds, “but now I’m looking at the terrain “and then I just have to on-site it. “I’m calc,” and then he did it. Like he just for the rest of the ride he went from lik 5.9 to 5.12 in the span of like 30 minutes because he had that mental capacity to sort of analyze the situation, to physically take control of the bike and he could send, they were connected. – The message of his brain with his body. – Yeah, and he could execute. Because he’s one of the most highly tuned athletes on the planet. But it doesn’t change, to
your original question, watching Alex without a rope, it’s hard. Because you’re watching a friend. I mean you sort of, even though Alex will tell you and I’ve interviewed Alex on this topic. It’s about free soloing and being close to the edge and death. And he will at the end of the interview you will feel like, well this guy, I mean he’ll never fall. Because he is so confident
and so calculated. But there’s always the possibility. And it is, I’ve always, I
haven’t worked with Alex as much as Jimmy and
Chai did for the film. But those times that I’ve
shot Alex without a rope I always have that conversation up front. ‘Cause I just feel like I have to, which is, “Never, ever do something “because I’m asking you to.” And Alex has always had that confidence and sort of that sensibility to back down when he doesn’t feel it. And I think you saw that
in Jimmy and Chai’s film. – Yeah. That he backed down several times and– – From different aspects– – Absolutely, yeah, I mean we did a shoot that’s in the book years ago. It was for a Nikon camera launch. And Alex was one of the characters. And it was really impressive. We shot him free soloing
a root in Joshua Tree. We probably shot it three times on day one and on day two it was a little hot. He did it one time,
started up the second time and he was kind of like,
sweaty, and that’s it. He backed down and he
said I think I’m done. And it was huge relief at some level. – Yeah. – I mean it was sort of,
gah, okay, God we’re done. It’s over.
– Yeah. ‘Cause it’s painful to be
you and I in those moments. For sure.
– Yeah. Yeah, that’s, but it’s also,
if anyone really has processed the kind of the upside and the downside and sort of, it’s Alex. You know, maybe no other
free soloist in history has really kind of
processed what they’re doing at the level, and internalized
it, and rationalized it and thought, given it the level of intellect that Alex has. And it doesn’t mean when someone falls, it’s still the same consequence. – Yeah. – But yeah, it is pretty tough. I can say this as one of Alex’s friends, and I think many friends would say we all hope that that was the grand achievement in free soloing. I think it’s one of the greatest sports feats of all time. – Yeah, for sure. – And I don’t know, maybe that’s the last of the big free solos. It would be great if it were. – (laughs) I’m kinda thinkin’
for everybody’s sanity. – Yeah, yeah. – Tell me one story, this is
when I was trying to decide where to go, I was curious about how you’d answer that last one, but now since this is about stories, a story you didn’t tell that’s in the book that you can share with us. – Mm, that’s a really good one. – Because there’s certainly a lot of them on the cutting room floor or
on the bike ride somewhere that you decided to chuck. – Sure, sure. – And if it was because you
had an image without the story or was there a story without an image. – I think there’s even, in
any one of these chapters, I don’t know how many
words each chapter is but let’s call it 1,000 words, still a lot hits the cutting room floor. The beauty of sitting
around a campfire is that you can tell long stories.
– Yeah (laughs). – You can add lots of color and texture. And I was just reminded,
like I was giving a talk a couple weeks ago and
one of my dear friends, Todd Offenbacher stands up,
and he’s a Tahoe legend, kind of one of the most
passionate people about life and being outside, and Todd
stood up to introduce me before I gave my book talk and he reminded me, he was
part of one of the stories. We went to the Arregetch Peaks
in Alaska to do a new route with Tommy Caldwell and Hayden Kennedy and a great group of guys,
Tommy Thompson and Dane Henry and we were doing it for Discovery Channel so we were the subjects of the show. It was a show called “Flying Wild Alaska” about bush pilots in Alaska. And so the film crew followed us up until the bush plane dropped us
off and then we skied in, you know 20 miles into
these, maybe as remote as you can get in Alaska
during the winter. It was minus 20 and it was–
– Brutal. – Crazy, really wild real adventure. And there’s grizzly bears
all over and so we brought, I was reminded, Todd
introduced me and he told this funny piece of the
story that never made it into the book, but we
brought for our protection, we brought this giant
handgun and we brought 50 rds of ammunition, but
everything was human powered so once we got dropped
off we were towing sleds and we had these heavy sleds. And the last night that
we were in our base camp we had to skin out another
20 miles with heavy sleds and so anything that was extra
weight, we wanted to lose it. And so a lot of whiskey got consumed. – ‘Cause you didn’t wanna carry it out. – Yeah, we didn’t wanna carry it out. That’s right, we didn’t
even wanna carry it out. And so we had 50 rounds of ammo. And we saw bear tracks but
we never were confronted by a bear and so we decided after a little whiskey was consumed that we could definitely
shoot 44 of the rounds and have six remaining in the gun. And so for an hour or so we
stood in this remote campground, started this trying to hit stuff and then we’re shooting behind our heads and we shoot 44 rounds of ammo
because it’s pretty heavy. You know.
– Yeah. – That’s our rationale. And the next morning, and
we’re feeling pretty good about our decision, a little
hungover the next morning, and we start skinning out and it’s gonna hurt no matter
what, like when you skin 20 plus miles–
– Yeah that far, oof. It’s pulling sleds, it’s brutal. And we’re skinning out and
we’re eight ours into our day. And everyone has their head down, you know it huts everyone the same amount. Everyone’s fit. And Tommy Caldwell is up ahead of us, he’s leading the group
and the guy in front is working the hardest because
they’re putting in the track and Tommy’s an animal, he’s in beat mode as he’s doing this. And all the sudden we hear
like, he screams like a girl, you know this shriek like
“aah”, and we see him unclip from his sled and he’s
kind of far enough out that we don’t know what’s
happening and he comes skinning back to us really fast and he says, “There’s a huge grizzly bear!” And we’re in this narrow
slot canyon, you know, we have to get out because there’s gonna be a plane the next day. And all of the sudden, this
idea of shooting 44 rounds, you know we’re looking for this pistol and all of a sudden
(Chase laughs) you know, we have this huge revolver. And you also realize like what do you do with this revolver now? You know you have like your ski pants and it’s like tucked in
but falling down your leg and all of the sudden we get
as close as we possibly can and Todd is the, he’s
like our, he’s the guy that actually knows
how to operate a pistol in our group, the rest of us are clueless. And all of the sudden we just
wanna be right next to Todd. It’s sort of anyone falling behind, I remember Hayden Kennedy’s
skin was falling off one of his skis and he screamed,
“Wait for me you guys!” – Hopping on one leg.
– He’s shuffling. (both laugh) And we skied up to where
Tommy left his sled and a grizzly bear had
literally just killed, I believe it’s a caribou. Had killed a caribou and had
panicked when Tommy skied up. And so the bear had mostly
covered the caribou with snow. But was clearly in the bushes some place. And it was, now it’s
getting late in the day. And it was the most terrifying ski out. Because we have this six rounds of ammo, five or six of us in a line, and we just skied past this fresh kill.
– A carcass, yeah. – Yeah and so, I don’t know
why that story comes to mind. Because there’s a great essay in the book about that trip and about Hayden Kennedy and what an incredible person he is and like lessons learned on the wall. But that’s the beauty of adventure. Really adventure where
the outcome’s uncertain is that there’s layers to stories. And I think that’s what
I get so much joy out of is long form story telling. You can tell the bullet story,
you can tell the bear story, you can tell the, and the
story that’s in the book. – Well it was truly remarkable. I also wanna say thank you so much for page two, six, nine, chapter 54. A little shout out to
your experiences here at CreativeLive, thanks
so much for including us in your magically crafted book, so I appreciate that. And for the folks who
pick it up, read that, but think you very much for that man, that was a great nod. – No I meant it. I mean I think what you’ve
done with CreativeLive is really special and I really took pride in writing that chapter because I, in the most complimentary way,
and for those of you at home that read that chapter, I think it’s a pretty accurate
description of this guy that’s sitting next to me who’s a genius and who is passionate. And I hope it makes you laugh actually. I hope so. – It does. And you’ve done some really magical stuff with CreativeLive, a couple of classes, one with Red Bull where
we were live streaming some of the world’s best action sports, or snowboarders, and
you’re photographing them on the summit of Northstar. Live on the internet.
– Right. – And that was like five years
ago or something like that. That was crazy. You’ve made so many great, you’ve taught so many great
lessons on CreativeLive in your mainstay, in the hallway here I mentioned that you were
coming today for this and people started scurrying
around and cleaning the place like is it gonna be good enough for Corey? We gotta make sure he’s happy here but just thank you so much
for sayin’ kind things. And yeah, a ton of respect
for you and your work. And this book is a huge, huge win. So many stories, not
just about photography, but about life and about being a creator and you just have this
really, it’s so consumable. It really is so relatable. And for that you have accomplished that 99.99% of books don’t accomplish. – Well thanks Chase, I appreciate it. – Shout out. And then as a sort of closing here I wanted to ask you, with everything that you’ve accomplished,
you’ve hinted in this, in our conversation
today about diversifying. You talked about wanting do things where you weren’t risking
your life and still wanting to push the boundaries because that’s part of your personality. You talked about expanding your footprint with your production company. What part of this are you doing for growth in and of itself? I think so many people,
they just get on a path and that’s what they do. But there’s this insatiable
sort of hunger for exploration and new horizons, and you just said, like it’s only an adventure if you truly don’t know the outcome. And none of us know the
outcome of our lives. But what is next for you as
you expand your footprint? Is it more books? Are you gonna teach more? Because you basically have this, one of the many things I admire about you, you’ve mastered still photography, you’ve mastered storytelling, you’ve mastered making short films. Now clearly you’ve
mastered capturing stories in the form of a book Your new company is doing well. 15 employees, like you can
go a hundred directions. How do you decide what to do. So many people wanna follow you and they also wanna take a cue because they’re at a
crossroads in their life. How in the hell, what would Corey do? WWCD? – Yeah, I mean, that’s, I can’t take credit for that line. You know, adventure is where
the outcome’s uncertain. I had a mentor, one of the
great climbing pioneers, Tom Frost, Tom was the
co-founder of Patagonia with Yvon Chouinard and– – He’s got your blurb
on the back of the book. – Yeah, and Tom is no longer with us. Tom is passed away late in his life. But he was a genius. I mean he was really
a gifted photographer, but also a pioneer and an entrepreneur. And that’s always stuck
with me, that line from Tom that adventure’s where
the outcomes uncertain. And I guess that’s something
where I’m the least creative and when I’m the least happy is when it feels like Groundhog Day. – Yeah. – You know and I’ve done it and I’m doing it again
and it’s repetition. I’ve learned that about
myself that I just need, I need fresh experiences. Because I’m the best version of myself when they’re fresh experiences. If I’m getting pushed
and I’m having to learn and I’m sort of, I don’t have
the answer at the outset, at the onset, that’s
kind of the key for me. And so what’s next? I know what it won’t be. It won’t be something
that I’ve already done. It will be trying to, I
think I’m pretty excited about doing more feature style doc work. But I’m also a realist in
that I know I can’t drop everything else that I’m doing
and focus wholeheartedly– – But do you love pain? Because doing things
for the first time is, I love doing things for
the second and third times. Fourth and fifth starts to get tired. First super painful, it’s like–
– Yeah. – It’s like how we’ll
kinda break in trail. – Yeah that’s a good, you
know I’ve never thought about it that way. You know, I guess I think you’re right. It’s probably the sweet spot. It’s like three our four times in. The first time hurts. – Yeah. – This was an anomaly. – It was–
– having the joy in creating the book?
– Yeah the joy. I did the book 20 years
ago and it was painful. It was really painful. So maybe I should own that.
(Chase laughs) That was really painful 20 years ago and I learned a ton. So yeah, I think I do like the
pain of the first experience. – Yeah.
– Because it’s just, you’re so alive in that experience. The second time you’re smarter. The third time you’ve kinda got it down and now it’s about excellence. I always say that’s why we
get hired as professionals. It’s not, I man I’m conscious
of this all the time. I can point at a hundred
photographers and filmmakers that are way more gifted than me. I just see their raw talent oozing out. But that’s only one part
of why you get hired. You get hired also because we’ve made all of the mistakes and they’re hiring you to not make mistake. And so yeah, I think the
answer to the question is I just love doing stuff that’s new. And I think you might’ve
identified something. I should pay you for some therapy. – That’s right.
– I think I do like suffering a little bit.
– Yeah. – I think I really like the
misery of the first experience. And once it’s too comfortable I need to find some new misery or new suffering. – But that’s about testing yourself. That’s like the passion of
engaging all of your skills. And explorers, they have that. I think of Mike Horn crossing
the Arctic in winter. Like bro, you’ve got it good,
you’re sponsored by Mercedes. – Right. – Like he could probably just tool around the South China Sea as have
with you on your sailboat in the name of adventure and
find a way to get plastic out of the ocean and, but 70
days in the dark 40 below. – Right. – Really? Is that like you’re choosing to do that? To lose the tip of your nose
and half of your fingers and? – I mean the more we do this stuff the more you do what you love, the more it takes to surprise you. I mean I like being surprised. That’s part of it. It’s sort of, you know
just, I love the unknown. And I’m just gonna bring it back to photography for a second. I love when I go on a job and
something doesn’t go right or as planned and you have
to adapt and it’s sort of, that’s like my favorite thing in the world is sort of the spontaneity
and the adapting and it’s pressure, but performing under that pressure is really fun. And I think that’s why,
kind of intuitively I’m always looking for that next thing. Because it forces, it just forces me into the best version of me. – Yeah, there’s something
that’s coming to mind as you say that, is the lens that I’ve learned to live through is it’s not about avoiding mistakes. If you can comfortable, like
my wife will lose her mind if I’m gonna speak in front
of 10 or 15,000 people. She’s backstage with me like, I’ve got noise canceling headphones on, I’m literally dancing back
there, bobbin’ and weavin’ and she’s pasty white
staring at the backside of that curtain just
going like, oh my gosh. And there’s a belief,
and I don’t always know, I’m nervous, but it’s
the belief that you can, it’s not about avoiding mistakes, it’s about recovering from errors. – Right. – And that, like what can you rely on in a previous experience where when this happened you did this. Where whether it’s the bear
or the climbing incident or managing the client. I wonder if that
resonates with you at all. Like this ability to trust yourself. – I feel like a version of that has come out of this book tour. I’ve always enjoyed sharing and teaching it’s why I’ve been involved
with creative live. And in a book tour you
have good book tour stops and you have bad book tour stops. And maybe the greatest
gift us this book tour was like the bad book tour stop. Because it was really uncomfortable. It was really uncomfortable and I bombed and I got nervous, and that’s unlike me. Like I’m comfortable speaking. But I walked way from, it
was in Boulder, Colorado. It was like the publisher warned me. They said, “Don’t commit
to doing bookstores.” That was their number, they
said bookstores are like, they’re just tough, like
bookstores are tough. But I was dead set on
let’s fill this one day in the middle of the calendar because I was already
traveling and I knew as soon as I walked into this bookstore, you know everyone’s heart
was in the right place but I walked in and I
realized they want an author. There was a wooden chair
like a rocking chair, the classic wooden chair. – (laughs) Oh my God! – And it was up on the stage. And I said, “Oh, but
I’m gonna show pictures, like I’m gonna to talk to pictures.” And they said, “Oh no
problem, we have a screen.” And out came a screen that was
twice the size of this table. You know it was sort of– – (laughs) This is like
an episode of the office what’s happening here. – Oh, and the projector wasn’t working. But 150 people showed up, or 100 people. And I got so nervous that
I’m like, this is just, it’s a recipe for failure right now. Like it’s, these folks
want me to sit in a chair and read chapters out of my book with a pipe in my mouth. And I’m ready to stand up and show slides and entertain people. And you know I was telling my stories, it was still early in the book tour and I was still kind of
getting my story down and then partway through the
talk, the woman in the back is saying wrap it up
and I’m thinking like– – I’m just gettin’ started! – Like I’m just getting
started, right, yeah, didn’t you get the memo,
this is gonna be an hour. And I wrapped it up early and I remember I’m just sweating and feeling awkard. But the great lesson was I realized no, I just own it. Moving forward that was the low point. But the lesson was no, I
know what I’m talking about. It doesn’t matter how big the screen is. I don’t even need the pictures. I can stand there and tell stories. It’s me and the people
sitting in this audience and I’m here to tell stories, they’re here to listen to stories. The other thing I learned is it helps if everyone has alcohol.
(Chase laughs) The bookstore didn’t have alcohol and I realized–
– Steak night. – That might have been
Seattle REI the next night. And that was like the opposite. It was a packed venue and
people were psyched and– – I remember I was so bummed
I was out of town for it. I knew you were gonna crush it. – And it was, but you know
it was just that lesson in, but you’ve gotta fail occasionally. Like you’ve gotta kind of bomb it. And I don’t know in the
eyes of the folks sitting in that audience, it
probably wasn’t a bomb. It was just sort of lackluster
what I did up there. But that’s kind of why I crave, people crave doing new things is you kinda wanna get as close to that edge so that occasionally you bomb and then– – Keeps you straight. – Yeah and then you have
that experience, right? It’s like okay, that won’t happen again. I was just sitting on a plane, Chase, you’ll appreciate this, I
was flying home to Reno. And flying into Reno usually
I have one connection from L.A. or San Francisco. And the guy sitting next to me was, he works for one of these
huge event planning companies where you know, when they
wanna get together 100 CEOs they’re the company that
builds out these events. And they’ve put ’em, and you know we got to talking in the last 20 minutes of the flight and I said, “So you must bring in “pretty amazing presenters.” We got on the presenter,
motivational speaker talk. And they’re hiring the
biggest players in the world. And he’s explaining Seinfeld, and we just bring everybody in. And he said Obama’s now on the market. Like you can get Obama, like
he’s freshly on the market. And I asked, because I think I’m still, this Boulder event was
in my head of bombing, and I said so you know these
are getting paid huge money, and he shared the numbers. And it’s for 40 minutes and they fly in and do their shtick and get back in the plane and fly back out. And I said, do these guys ever bomb? And he said no. He said, “No at this
level you don’t bomb.” And it hit me all at once. It’s because they already
did 20 years ago, right? Somewhere along the line. It’s the same way you
talk about photography. It takes a lot to surprise you. You’ve been there, you’ve done that. You know that’s how it works for Seinfeld. Like he’s stood on enough stages, you know Obama did it for his presidency. And it was a good lesson
for me to hear this guy say, “No, at that level you don’t bomb.” It’s always, it might be better one night. But you don’t bomb at that level. And it’s kind of, you know that’s the goal in a craft like photography or filmmaking. You don’t bomb at a certain level. It’s just sometimes you’re good and sometimes you’re great. You’re always striving for great. – Well thank you so much for being great on this show tonight, and so grateful that you made the journey. We always love you having
you here on the show and on the CreativeLive stage anywhere. Always welcome, 100%, no questions asked. You get the itch, we’re
happy to collaborate. And congratulations on
the book for those, again, “Stories Behind the Images”. Corey Rich, it’s about photography, but it’s about so much more. What’s the best, any coordinates you wanna steer people towards? – You know the easiest
is to just go to Amazon. – Yeah.
– We also have a website, storiesbehindtheimages.com,
and I’m happy to sign any books in the lead up to the holidays. So if you want it signed go
to storiesbehindtheimages.com. If you just want it to get to
your house go to amazon.com. – (laughs) You’re not Amazon, no? – No. – Appreciate you being on the show, bud, thanks so much and look forward
to the next one already. Appreciate you. – Thanks Chase. (upbeat music)

Vantage Point – “Take a Picture with a Real Indian” (James Luna performance)

Vantage Point – “Take a Picture with a Real Indian” (James Luna performance)


Take a picture with a real Indian. Take a picture with a real Indian here in the middle of America. Anyone else? Next person come on up. Take your picture. Take a picture with a real Indian here on this February night. You can to take two and leave one and you take one home. America likes to name cars and trucks after our tribes. America like to name film festivals after our sacred dances. Take a picture with a real Indian. Take a picture with a real Indian. America like romance more than they like the truth. Take a picture with a real Indian in Pine Ridge, South Dakota. Take a picture with a real Indian in [xx] Pueblo in New Mexico. Take a picture on Skid Row in Oklahoma City with [xx]. Take a picture with a real Indian.

How to Draw a 3D Optical Illusion with Pencil – Fine Art-Tips

How to Draw a 3D Optical Illusion with Pencil – Fine Art-Tips


Hello my friends and welcome
to another Tuesday of tutorial! Today I will do a drawing in 3D. I start by sketching what will be a deep hole. To get the 3D effect make sure all the lines
inside the hole converge at the point you are looking from. For this I hold the ruler fixed at the base
of the camera, while the other end swings to get the lines
in the right direction. To draw a pole which is going to be coming
out of the whole, I do the same but with a longer tool. And for a sphere I use a small ball and I
mark some dots at the base, the sides and the top. The top will come all the way over here,
looking from the other viewpoint. Uniting the dots I get a sphere which if viewed
from the right viewpoint it will look like a circle. And I draw a fictitious piece of paper. Inside of this thing I am going to make a
spying eye. All the time I keep checking through the camera
to see how is it looking. In fact to get the 3D effect, make sure you look through the
camera, or otherwise close one eye. I start shadowing. I will say the light is
coming from the top left. I do a middle tone for the background, and
then I smudge it with the brush, also going over the piece of paper so that
it gets some color. I give some shadow to the paper and with an
eraser, I erase the the tone on the corner, so that it looks like it is lifting. Then with a brush I darken just by it, so
as to give more the effect. I repeat the same technique on the other edge. I draw a shadow to the post and then I smudge
it with the brush so that it is a soft shadow. Lets give some volume to this eye. I use a black prismacolor for the pupil because
I want it REALLY dark. And with some blue I do the iris. This is how it is looking if you look at it
from the wrong viewpoint. But from the right one it starts showing the
volume of the 3D. I am going to erase this part to open the
eye a little bit more because I think it would look better. Like this. I go over the sides of the post so that it
stands out more. I give some reflections and some red capillaries. Ok, the final touches to the alien eye. Please let me know what
do you think about it. If you enjoyed it, please give it a LIKE and
subscribe to my channel. You know where to follow me and where the
links are. And Ill see you on Tuesday.

Transformer une image 2D en 3D facilement ? : Shop time #19

Transformer une image 2D en 3D facilement ? : Shop time #19


It is the return of shop time welcome it’s been a while since we did not meet i started a print but of what ? there was an update of simplify 3d a great software to manage 3d print and i started a test print to see what i can do with it the first layer holds well i shop time i’m used to do utility object or rather practical things with the 3dprinter but this time i will just try something visual i’m back into my printing software i will show you how it will look once we lauch the print you can see here the 3d model all the layers the print layers by layers he start with this raft this 0.4mm flat surface and continue i have defined a pretty high density so all the details remain in place and for this rather gentle slope to not print in the air while I speak to you, it’s printing it’s at around 1h of printing so lets go to see how it looks and after i show you a little bit more I’ll take off that Spatula ! it sticks well ho it’s so satisfying There you go, the monster we are in Simplify 3d i will make the shortest tutorial of the world you go into complementary modules on the 4th version of Symplify 3d convert into 3d image here you select your picture i use a black and white one this picture is a year of typhoon superposed the black part will be high and the white will be low /flat / nothing here there is some settings that we can tweak to modify the form the picture is scare so it suggest a width of 100mm I will leave 100mm the final print will be 10cm wide and long and the depth means, at what maximum height it will stretch what you want to print here i set 2cm 20mm and the white parts of the picture will also be printed it will create a base plastic layer you can define the height of the “white” base here it’s 0.4mm and create he create the stl file he say save your stl so here we go it will be my V3 do you want to import this 3d file, yes because i want to print it and here you can see the black and white picture transformed into a 3d model here is the print who look like a sort of i don’t know, a twisted blob strange full of reliefs some grams around 20 gr of PLA plastic a bottom layer which is which is very clean but there is a lot of impurities from the previous filament but otherwise it’s very smooth and shiny iwas not bad on my settings at the begining i had some filling problems but it’s not to bad i’m very happy about this 3d print it was a good test of this new module of simplify 3d you can leave comments if you have any question down here like share and subscribe to the channel you can take a look to my Tipeee page that i just opened and to check the counterparties see you very soon in

I Attempted BULLET JOURNALING For The FIRST Time…

I Attempted BULLET JOURNALING For The FIRST Time…


Hello there! So I am officially, officially gonna try and get organized! I’ve had the flu for the last two weeks and I pretty much was unable to do much whatsoever – *Fake crying* Look at all my, my, the – crap on the side. *Groan* So I have lost all organization that I had in the first place. I’ve still got energy like *blows raspberry* at the moment, which is very fun. But it’s fine. I’m going to be trying a bullet journal for 2020 and I’m very excited. I’ve never officially officially done one properly before, I did one from an art box once but I didn’t do it properly. So I’m excited, it should be good. If you’ve never heard of a bullet journal before, basically they are ways that you can customize your very own journals, schedules, to-do lists, they’re just amazing and if you’ve not heard of one or seen one, your mind will be blown to all of the amazing opportunities that these things can give you. I mean business. I’ve got all of the markers, I’ve got the bullet journal, I also watch classes on Skillshare who just so happen to be sponsoring this video, so thank you for sponsoring today’s video Skillshare and I think it’s about time that we got started so let’s go. Okay! Here is the – *stammers* *BEEP* This is the journal that I decided to go with. As you can see, it’s just a standard dotted journal, it cost about twenty dollars so it’s pretty expensive. I got it from Staples, I’m just really really hoping that it won’t ghost through to the other side with the pens that I’m using. So I’ve got some Tombow markers, I’ve got some Staedtler fine-liners, which I actually really don’t like very much. I also did buy some Paper Mate Flair pens, because they looked kind of, I don’t know, I just enjoyed the look of the nib. So I think they might be quite fun to – that one actually looks like it’s been used. That’s great. I also got one in black! I also have this zebra marker, which is my favorite ink pen of all time that I normally buy from Amazon. I actually used this for all of my Inktober drawings. And I saw these in Target! These are ZEEBRA, ZEBBRA (sic), mid-liner markers, so I thought that they looked quite cool because they’re highlighters so we’re gonna try those out as well. I’m gonna go to the last page here and just marker up the entire page to see if they kind of bleed – OHH look at those colors! And then I’ll try like, a darker color as well. That’s not darker, it’s just a different shade. That’s fine. These are the Paper Mate pens. This is my Zebra, Zebra – oh damn! This is one that’s been used. This is a, this is a dud one. DAMN! One of my Staedtler fine-liners. Let’s try these highlighters – oh, they’re so pretty! I’m gonna go with a very pastel vibe I think, in this particular journal. Oh, these are pretty. Okay! Time for the moment of truth. It’s not perfect, the highlighter definitely bled through a little bit more than the other things did but, it’s okay, it’s not the best but it’s also not bled through all the way so I can live with that. So this is what a bullet journal looks like, basically it’s just a whole bunch of little dotted squares on the page and you can format the pages however that you just sat – that made no sense. You can basically format the pages however you want and it’s just a really fun idea. It’s a very very good way to be creative and have fun. There we go. So if ever I lose this, someone can see that I am Chloe Rose and they can steal all of my video ideas since I’m gonna put those in here. I’m thinking that I want to paint on the cover, um… I think I’m gonna paint on the cover. I’m not gonna do anything fancy, I think I’m just gonna stick a little bit of paint on the cover. *Record scratch* *Chloe clears throat* Twas several nights before Christmas when all through the house, not a creature was stirring, except Chloe Rose clicking her computer mouse. The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, filled with two months of free Skillshare and a link down there. The children were nestled all snug in their beds, while visions of THOUSANDS of free classes danced in their heads. And Mama in her kerchief and I in my cap, just filled our brains with new skills like photography, art, business and how to make an app. *Record scratch* Okay, you know what? This is great, but not as great as Skillshare. Basically, I was just totally clueless how to start a bullet journal in the first place, but you know what? I looked it up on Skillshare and found tons and tons of classes about it, so you can pretty much learn everything you need to know on Skillshare about art, business, design, photography, even stuff like interior design, and I’m currently obsessed with a class called Style Your Space: Bringing Creativity to Interior Design. Just, really fun and tells you how to like, style your space, which I really like. You can also learn about entrepreneurialship and much more. Skillshare costs less than $10 a month with an annual subscription, but as I mentioned before, if you check your stockings, aka my description box, you can join a community of creative and curious people to get two months of free unlimited classes like this, and this! I’ve used Skillshare for several years now and it just gets better every year so 2020, it’s gonna be better than ever. Thank you so much to Skillshare for sponsoring today’s video and let’s get back to the bullet journaling. There we go, it’s just a little splodge of green and blue paint on the front. So the first page is one of those annoying pages that’s like, stuck to this bit, so it doesn’t really lie flat. So I’m just gonna skip that first page out and begin here. *Music* I’m gonna have this first page as an index to tell me where each specific thing that I need in the book is actually located. Gonna add a nice little… wonky green line there for decoration cause that looks nice. Maybe a blue one on the other side. Snazzy! A lot of people freehand this which I don’t understand. Oh that looks, that looks terrible. That’s great. I don’t understand how so many people like, freehand this stuff. That is beautiful. Well done Chloe. I think I’m just gonna add some little doodles. Okay, there we go with some weird doodles, that’s fine. We’ll do like a little… that was supposed to be a straight line, but it’s not so let’s pretend it’s supposed to be wonky. Oh, I feel so fancy right now! I feel so fancy! Okay, so Video Ideas, and then I’m gonna give it a little, uh, line. Give it a little drop shadow. That looks kind of cool! I’m quite happy with that. So, you know, I think what I’m gonna do is have two full pages for video ideas because this is gonna be like a year’s worth of video ideas that I want in here, so I’m definitely gonna need to leave a lot more room. Page number 2-3. There we go! So we got our first index there. Even though it’s kind of pretty obvious where it’s located cause it’s the first page in the book but… we’ll move on. Okay, so on this page, I think I’m gonna do a monthly income, purely because I work for myself and every single month can change how much I’ve earned based on Adsense, artwork that I sell, royalties from my Skillshare classes that I teach, a bunch of different things, sponsorships. It all depends on so many different factors so I never fully know exactly how much I’m gonna get each month. So I think it’d be cool to track over the year. And then each month I can write out exactly where my revenue is coming from. A for Adsense from Goo- from Google and YouTube. Then I can do S for sponsorship, T for teaching for my Skillshare classes, and then I can do A for art. And then I can do M for miscellaneous. *Music* Down here, I’m gonna put a key just to remind myself exactly what these letters actually mean because I think it’d be a good idea if I did that. *Music continues* So I’m just gonna kinda just do that and then leave it at that. “Monthly”… “Pages 4-5.” So this one is going to be monthly outgoings. So the first one would be car insurance. Health insurance. Being an adult is really fun. My phone bill. Disney Plus. That’s a very, very important one. I’m gonna fill out the rest later on cause you don’t need to know all the boring stuff I pay out every month, but I’m gonna leave this all blank so that I can put it all in. *Music continues* Okay, this side I’m gonna have my savings, maybe? I don’t like this page. I’ve mucked it up. I’m gonna start again. Okay, so I think I’ve figured out exactly how I’m going to have it now, and basically what I’m gonna do is have this over a couple of different pages and just basically say how much I’ve put into my savings account and how much is in my savings account at the end of the month. And I’m just gonna do this through till obviously, December of next year but I’m gonna fill this in off-camera cause I feel like that’s a little bit, private information, so I’m just gonna kinda just keep these two pages blank for now. So the thing about me is I’m very disorganized as a person, so I’m really hoping this is gonna help me, in some manner, stay organized. So one of my favorite things that people do with bullet journals are mood trackers. So basically, what a mood tracker is is, every single day, you fill out a square with a certain color based on your mood that day. So once all 365 days have passed in the next year, you can kind of see where your mood was at each month and over the year. I just think that’s a kind of fun, different idea, and I’d like to do it. So we’ve got amazing, great, good, bad and really crap. So really crap can be this reddish color, bad can be orangey, good/average can be yellow, That looks exactly the same. Great. Fantastic! I should probably put numbers on there, shouldn’t I? That would help. Crap! I’ve missed the day at the bottom! So that’s the mood tracker, that is now page 10. Oh, great! That’s bloody bled through. *Groans* Okay, I’m not using these highlighters because that’s just gonna ruin everything. I’m gonna have a goals page. And I’m not sure what I’m gonna put on it yet. *Music* I think I’m gonna add my first goal in because I really, really want to try and get my work licensed one day and if I don’t make more stuff like that, I’m not gonna have really, a big portfolio, I guess, so that’s one of my goals this year. “Make…more…Skill…share…classes.” On this page is gonna be my Skillshare class page because I definitely want to make more. *Music continues* So what I’m gonna do is put in the total students that I have. I currently have taught a total of 7,951 students. So this time next year, we’re gonna see how many more students I’ve taught. But for now, I’m just gonna make a list of classes that I want to make so I think I’m definitely gonna do, um, an acrylic class. I’m gonna do a digital painting, and I’m not sure what else I’m gonna do just yet but I’m gonna keep this open and then again, I can come back to it when I have more ideas. But I’m gonna leave one more blank page and then start on this side, just a single month. *Continues* Okay, so this is basically the month of January so I can see the days of the week to the months, this is something that a lot of people tend to do, which is really really cool as well. I also want to have a habit tracker. So each day basically, I will tick off a box every time I do something like this, so if I take my vitamins on Saturday, Sunday, Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, I’ll basically just tick all the boxes like that. Another thing I’m gonna do as well throughout the month of January is whenever I have something on a specific day, I’m gonna take like a little highlighter, and then just highlight that number so that I know that I have something on that day. *Music* Cool! Okay. Page 14… I’ve spelled “Art Ideas” wrong. I’ve spelt it “Art Ides.” “Ides.” Okay, great. Okay! So, here’s the front of my little bullet journal as you can see. I just did a quick splodge on the front. On the first page, we have… nothing. First page! We have an index which tells us exactly what pages each thing is on and I can keep continuing to fill this up. We have a video ideas spread so I can just fill out ideas throughout the year for videos that I would like to put on my channel. On the next page I have a monthly income page, so I really like this page. I think it’s nice and colorful. Next up, I have my monthly outgoing. My savings page which again, I’ve not filled out because I want to do this obviously in privacy, and I’ve given myself three pages for that and this BLOODY BLED THROUGH! Not happy. But I have a mood tracker which was almost too big to fit on the page but I managed to do it, and next have a goals for 2020 which doesn’t have a lot on it just yet, but I’m gonna sit and think about it, see what goals I have for next year. I have Skillshare classes that I would like to make because I actually really enjoy making Skillshare classes. I have a page for art ideas, but I think I’m probably gonna split this up into something else as well, I’m not too sure yet. And then lastly I have my January, 1st week of January page, which – it’s a bit plain, I’m certainly not a fancy bullet journal person. I’ve got some beautiful wonky lines there and yeah, that’s 15 pages of my bullet journal that I’ve just filled in. So thank you Skillshare again for sponsoring today’s video. Thank you all so much for watching, I hope that you all have a wonderful, wonderful Christmas if you celebrate it or holiday season, this is gonna be my last video for 2019. So yeah, I really really hope that you all have a wonderful new year, thank you again for watching and supporting my channel throughout the year, this year, it means so much to me, and I’m so excited for what 2020 is going to bring because I’ve got so many fun ideas when I’m not ILL! I’m sick of being ill! So thank you for watching this video, take care of yourselves and I will see you in the next video. *End music*

This 12-Year-Old Has Taken the Art World by Storm

This 12-Year-Old Has Taken the Art World by Storm


(enchanting music) – [Aelita] Sometimes they say, “Oh, a kid did it, it’s
not worth anything.” Lots of people say that 12 year olds are such an annoying age. Critics say that I’m like Jackson Pollock. And they say it as a compliment, but I want to be known for my own style, not being compared to someone else. – [Narrator] This Great Big
Story was made possible by Lego, play her way. (upbeat string music) My name is Aelita Andre.
I’m an abstract painter. And I’m from Melbourne, Australia. – [Narrator] At only 12 years old, Aelita has been in the
industry for over a decade. – [Aelita] I started painting
when I was nine months old. My dad put a canvas down on the floor because he used to paint a little bit. I just started crawling on the canvas and started painting before him (laughs). That’s how everything started,
that was my first painting. (charming music) My first show was at the
age of two years old. – [Narrator] Without telling
the gallery owner her age, her mother presented the work and Aelita was booked for her first show. Since then, she has taken
her art across the globe and has sold paintings for
around $35,000 U.S. dollars. I’ve been to London,
Russia, Japan, New York, Italy, China, mom, where else? – [Mom] Hong Kong. Hong Kong, but–
Four times. Four times (laughs). I paint every few days, but
mainly when I’m inspired. When I paint, I usually
think about the universe, I think about animals, pretty much everything
that has to do with nature. With the violins on the canvas, I want to show that the
whole universe is singing. – [Narrator] Although Aelita’s young, she understands the harsh
critics in the art world. – [Aelita] When people question my talent, usually I don’t mind because I think that everyone should
have their own opinion. – [Narrator] But there is one critic whose opinion does matter. So Fluffy is our little pet art critic. He usually starts biting me or biting the painting
if he doesn’t like it. But it will be great. – [Aelita] My mom and
dad encouraged my art and I’m so happy. (Aelita and dad laughing) So I definitely think that I’m going to be doing painting for the rest of my life. It’s something that I love so much. (electronic chiming)

‘Waste Land’ Explores Artist’s Use of Garbage to Transform Lives in Brazil

‘Waste Land’ Explores Artist’s Use of Garbage to Transform Lives in Brazil


bjbjLULU JEFFREY BROWN: And finally tonight,
another in our Economist Film Project series. Tonight’s film, “Waste Land,” follows artist
Vik Muniz from his studio in New York to the world’s largest garbage dump in his native
Brazil. There, Muniz examines the lives of garbage pickers who sift Rio de Janeiro’s
refuse in search of recyclables. He then creates portraits of the workers using the very materials
they have collected, and, ultimately, photographs of those portraits are exhibited in galleries.
The directors are Lucy Walker, Joao Jardim and Karen Harley. Here’s an excerpt. VIK MUNIZ,
artist: Right now, I’m at this point in my career that I’m trying to step a little bit
away from the realm of fine arts, because I think it’s a very exclusive, very restrictive
place to be. What I really want to do is to be able to change the lives of a group of
people with the same material that they deal with every day, and not just any material.
The idea I have for my next series is to work with garbage. When you talk about transformation,
you know, this being the stuff of art, transforming material and idea, I don’t know. This is the
beginning of an idea. I just have the material, and I have to go after an image. Hey, Fabio
(ph). MAN: Yes? Hey. VIK MUNIZ: So, did you have a chance to look at that garbage thing?
MAN: Yes. Check the link I just sent you. On YouTube, there’s a video that was shot
at this place. It’s called Gramacho, Jardim Gramacho. It’s the biggest landfill in Rio.
And they receive the trash from all the Rio area. VIK MUNIZ: What are the dangers working
in a place like this? MAN: Well, first of all, the place is surrounded by favelas owned
by the drug traffic. And I think the stability of the people themselves, they are all excluded
from society. Some stay there overnight or the whole week. It’s going to be hard. VIK
MUNIZ: So do you think it is too hard? MAN: No, no, because I think it would be much harder
to think that we are not able to change the life of these people. And I think we are.
So I think it’s worth a try. VIK MUNIZ: My experience with mixing art with social projects
is that that is the main thing, is just taking people away for — even if it is for a few
minutes, away from where they are, and showing them another world, another place, even if
it’s a place from which they can look at where they are. You know, it just changes everything.
I want this to be an experience of how art could change people, but also, can it change
people? Can it — can this be done? And what would be the effect of this? MAN (through
translator): What’s really impressive is that it’s the largest landfill in the world. MAN
(through translator): Yes, it’s the largest landfill in terms of the volume of trash received
daily. MAN (through translator): The pickers take out 200 tons of recycled material per
day from the landfill. That’s equivalent to garbage produced by a city of 400,000 people.
MAN (through translator): Amazing. MAN (through translator): Yes. That’s why the pickers are
really important to the landfill, because they help increase its capacity. MAN (through
translator): Does all of Rio’s trash end up here? MAN (through translator): Seventy percent
of Rio’s trash ends up here and 100 percent of the closest suburbs. MAN (through translator):
So the garbage from the millionaire’s mansion mixes with the garbage from the poorest favela?
MAN (through translator): For sure. MAGNA DE FRANCA SANTOS, Rio de Janeiro (through
translator): Don’t put this on TV. I will die. (LAUGHTER) MAGNA DE FRANCA SANTOS (through
translator): I first came here almost a year ago. My husband became unemployed. And we
had to pay the bills, keep the household going, support my son. We would get on the bus, and
people would go like this. (SNIFFING) (LAUGHTER) MAGNA DE FRANCA SANTOS (through translator):
It got to the point where I would say, excuse me, madam, but do I stink? Do you smell something
bad? It’s because I was working over there in the dump. It’s better than turning tricks
in Copacabana. I find it to more interesting and more honest. It’s more dignified. I may
stink now, but when I get home, I will take a shower, and it’ll be fine. But it’s disgusting.
It’s easy for you to be sitting there at home in front of your television consuming whatever
you want and tossing everything in the trash, and leaving it out on the street for the garbage
truck to take it away. But where does that garbage go? MAN: So good. MAN: Yes, I love
it, too. MAN: This is super strong. This is super strong. I think this is very nice, too.
VIK MUNIZ (through translator): Everyone who goes to a museum, goes up to a painting, and
then they stop and start to go like this. Have you seen this? Everyone does it. They
go like this, and then they go back, maybe take a little step back. And they see the
image. Let’s imagine it’s a beautiful landscape with a lake and a man fishing. They look and
see the man fishing, and then they lean in an everything vanishes and becomes paint.
They see the material. They move away and see the image. Then they get closer and see
the material. They move away and see the idea. They get closer and see just the material.
MAN (through translator): Since we’re pickers, we just see recyclable materials. (LAUGHTER)
MAN (through translator): I bet you get people to stay much longer at your exhibits than
anyone does. They spend so much time looking at the image, because then they’ll see the
ladder, the piano. They’ll look at everything. They’ll spend hours looking at the same picture.
VIK MUNIZ (through translator): The moment when one thing turns into another is the most
beautiful moment. A combination of sounds transforms into music. And that applies to
everything. That moment is really magical. Try and make it gradually darker from here
to here. Does that make sense? Good work, everyone. JEFFREY BROWN: The photos that Muniz
made were sold at auction, and Muniz donated the proceeds, $250,000, to the garbage pickers.
“Waste Land” is being screened at film festivals. You can find a link on our website for a list
of dates and cities. And to learn more about the Economist Film Project and to submit your
own film, head to film.economist.com. hbf urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags
country-region urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags PlaceName urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags
PlaceType urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags City urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags
State urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags place JEFFREY BROWN: And finally tonight:
another in our Economist Film Project series Normal Microsoft Office Word JEFFREY BROWN:
And finally tonight: another in our Economist Film Project series Title `~jq Microsoft Office
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Art Visit: İstanbul | Sia Moore


Hi, I’m not architect Banu Altay obviously, I’m Gencay from Sia Moore. And don’t worry she will be coming back next week! And today I’m here to take you to one of the most enchanting and historical mansions of İstanbul which in the early 20th century use to home to the last caliph of Ottoman Dynasty: Abdülmecid. And the glory of this iconic mansion continues to this day by
hosting the much-loved contemporary art exhibitions of Turkey. Walking inside the historical mansion, you’ll see a huge giraffe, a gigantic pair of feet a wooly bicycle, headless children and sketches from beloved classic ‘The Little Prince in an hectic yet colorful space assembled together for this exhibition “The Child Within Me”. Since its’s openning on late September, the show’s been greeted with an intense visitor interest, and naturally it’s extended till December 29. So, for those who wish to visit İstanbul make sure to stop by this gorgeous mansion besides Bosphorus and the intriguing exhibition inside. A century ago, lived here an Ottoman caliph, who was born in 1868 as the Son of Sultan and cousin of Abdulhamid; raised as a well-educated and cultured young man, Abdülmecid was known with his interest for arts and culture. He was taking painting classes from the acclaimed 19th century orientalist painters Salvatore Valeri and Fausto Zonaro. You can visit Abdülmecid’s paintings at the famous Dolmabahçe Palace today.The palace here presumed to be designed and built between 1880-5 by Alexender Vallaury the architect of many gorgeous palacaes, hotels and banks of late 19th century İstanbul architecture. Firstly owned by Enver Pasha, the mansion was bought later by by the last Sultan of Ottoman Dynasty, Abdülhamid the Second. He, then bestowed this colorful palace to his cousin Abdülmecid, for him to practice his passion for painting and music.However, Abdülmecid could only spent two brief years at this mansion.
Upon the foundation of Turkish Republic the caliphate system was abolished, which led Abdülmecid and his family to exile Turkey and moved to France; where he died in 1944. The mansion however, was transferred to government. Following a change of several owners, the mansion is currently owned by a family, whom opens this gorgeous mansion to public by sponsoring exhibitions inside.
So, made out of wood, this three-floored mansion is a nineteenth-century reinterpretation of traditional Ottoman architecture. You see, the external facade of the building is painted and decorated with flower motifs that actually provides a joyful look. On the impressive gateway which is designed by Abdülmecid is inscripted “There is no victor but God”.
Which actually highlights the humble persona of a believer. The interiors of this wooden mansion represents the characteristics of the typical late Ottoman Architecture.
We immediately come across with a decorative style that borrows both from the East and West. Hanging down the atrium a splendid arabesque-style chandelier welcomes visitors inside. Curated by Károly Aliotti, the exhibition hosts to more than 100 works by 60 artists that remind visitors of the things that usually exists in childhood and fades away with adulthood; the artworks invites us all to listen to the child within us. As fantastic and playful the artworks here seem, they still carry the grotesque feel that reminds us death and the innocence we’re losing over time. Bye for now! And don’t forget to subscribe to Sia Moore and comment below if you like this video! Stay tuned!

The Caricature Artist Who Sketched the Man Who Robbed Him | The Daily Show

The Caricature Artist Who Sketched the Man Who Robbed Him | The Daily Show


We have a major story
that is shaking California. And, actually, you know what,
for this story, can we… I’m gonna need…
I’m gonna need some help. Can we get, um… Let me think. Can we get Roy? Roy? Can we get Roy to come and join me at the desk? Yeah, I just… No, ’cause Roy’s got
a great perspective. I just wanted to chat to you. Roy Wood Jr. (cheering and applause) What’s up, man?
What’s-what’s happening? -I just, um…
-Going on? I just need… I need some help
with this next story. Mean, that’s weird.
You never needed help during the headlines. -No, but this one’s…
this one’s different. -I… Um, it’s a very big story, and I just need you
to stay here. And, uh, let’s roll the tape.
Let’s roll the tape. Police in southern California
say an artist appears to have sketched
the man who stole his money. Detectives say
this is a caricature of the suspect in a robbery at Riverside’s
Festival of Lights this month. The guy asked the artist
to make the drawing. When it was done,
the suspect grabbed a bag with about $500 in it
and ran off, but he left the picture behind. Police posted it on Facebook
with the message, “Do you recognize
this caricature?” The message went on to say
that the caricature is… is one of the suspects,
but, of course, there are exaggerated
characteristics and features. (laughter and applause) So… Okay. -I don’t know…
-Okay. So you gonna do me like that. That’s fine. So, so,
let me ask you something. When you asked me
to wear a red hat to work today, it wasn’t ’cause you thought
a red hat would look good on me and the holidays and whatever.
You… It was a joke. I also… I also like the hat. I also like your hat,
but also for the joke. Are we done? Are we done?
Can I go back? Yeah, no, we’re done.
I just wanted to, um… -Okay, good. If we’re done…
-Can we take a selfie -real quick?
-Oh, my God. Look, I’m done. -I got work to do, man.
-It’s funny. -(laughing): You look
like the guy. -No. -It’s not me. -Roy Wood Jr.,
everybody. Don’t be mad. -It’s not me.
-Don’t be… (laughing)

WANT STRONGER ART? HERE IS HOW.

WANT STRONGER ART? HERE IS HOW.


– Hey everyone, it’s
Nicholas Wilton at Art2life, and I wanted to share with
you this little, cool idea that I shared with the folks that did the Mexico workshop with me. And this is it, that if
you want to show something in your work more clearly,
you can diminish the things in your work that are really strong. And really strong means
contrast, value difference. If you want color, for
example, to stand out more, if that’s what you’re
interested in showing, then you can reduce this value contrast and that difference diminishes
and lets the more quieter, less powerful contrast of color show up. So that right there, I
might lose a lot of people. Because if you don’t, and a
lot of people don’t get this, that the value differences,
difference between light and dark, is the
most visually potent difference you can have. Far stronger than just whether the color is saturated or not, or it’s
a blue or it’s a yellow. It’s the lightness and darkness of things that we notice first. So I just wanted to just
share this with you, ’cause I think it’s really cool. So if I have for example, a high contrast, and I have a color, I’m
doing this in oil paint which is kind of crazy, and I
have a beautiful color here. If I want to, and right now this painting, let’s say that’s my painting,
this is about that contrast. This is about the, we’re
noticing that contrast, totally. And so this painting
is about that contrast. But if I wanna make it
about that color more, if I lessen this contrast, so for example, if I come in and I lessen it, suddenly now we can see the color better. So there’s this choice you get to make, and that’s basically what
I wanna share with you. That you can diminish one to
let something else come out. What we do a lot of times
is we have both being equal. Both of them are kind of the same and we get this confusion in our work. Like, it’s cooler to choose something that you wanna uplift, that one thing. Okay, so this is how it shows up. You know, it’s not as
clear as this, right? So this is a picture, this is a painting that kind of went wrong and
I’ve been scraping it off. And there’s all these layers on here, so it’s kind of like a
painting I’ll be working on. But right now, what we have
is we have high contrast down here, and because of that, the color in a way, especially in this area,
not so much up here, but especially in this
area becomes secondary to this darkness here. And so because of this high contrast, so if I want to make
this color look stronger, I can reduce that contrast of that black. I can take some of that away. It can still be dark, I’ll just try and just kind of fake it on here, and suddenly you see what
happens with the color. We start to see it better. There’s still black on
here, there’s still darks, but as this gets less, now
we really start seeing all, we start seeing this color better. And the same thing goes for, if I take, this is a high contrast here,
if I reduce that contrast down a little bit, a little bit, and take
out some of that contrast, we’ll really start to
see the color better. Because the biggest difference now becomes the difference of color, not the difference of light and dark. So it depends on where I
wanna go with this picture. If I can reduce this down and take those contrasts away, it changes the work. But a lot of times we’re
just kind of flying blind and we don’t know what’s happening. And it’s helpful to know what
we want to have the outcome, and understand where
we’re letting things come and letting things go, and
making something stand out more than another thing. This has tons of color in it and if I, still if I take that away, if I reduce this down, you’ll see it. You’ll notice these colors in here. Just leaving some black. It’s about color. And look in here, this
is all the same value. You notice, you can really see the differences of color there. If we come in and we start doing this, now it becomes about that mark and about the contrast of that, and this is secondary to it. So anyway, that’s just
a really cool idea that, I don’t know, I explained it this way and it was really helpful for people so I thought I’d share it today. Anyway, let me know in the comments what you think about this. Do you think about,
when you make your work, choosing one thing to elevate
and keeping everything kind of secondary behind it? It makes really powerful work. It makes it really powerful to work on it ’cause you’re getting this
potent thing coming out, but also it resonates with people, people connect to that. So anyway, let me know in the comments. February 14th, don’t forget, that’s when our free workshop starts. It’s the beginning of the CVP and all the Art2life season of teaching. We’re gearing up for this, it’s gonna be really, really awesome. So save that date, I’ll be
doing a whole bunch of teaching that week, February 14th,
that’s Valentine’s Day. For those of you who are new here, free download the color PDFs. It kind of talks about this a little bit. It sets up some of the
principles of color. Not exactly in this way, but
if you haven’t gotten that, do download that. Listen, thanks for being here. I hope you have an awesome Sunday. Okay, bye. Hey everyone, if you found this helpful, I’ve a whole lot more to teach,
share and inspire you with every single week. So please join the
Art2life YouTube channel by clicking the subscribe button below. Okay, great, let’s do this.