How to create a 3D Cube Effect in Illustrator CC 2019 – Tutorial


First, let’s open up Illustrator CC and create a new document Click the Rectangle Tool, press and hold the Shift key to make a symmetrical square Click the Stroke color, then None, so it won’t have any color Then, click the Fill color, and select a color Go to: Effect, 3D, Extrude & Bevel… Click Preview, then change Extrude Depth value until you will get a cube Click and drag the cube to change it’s position Click on More Options and adjust the light position All done!

Buying a Kid’s Camera : How to Find the Best Digital Camera for Kids

Buying a Kid’s Camera : How to Find the Best Digital Camera for Kids


Hi, I’m Frank Anderson. I’d like to talk to
you about how to buy the best digital camera for your kids. Of course, the first thing
is, it’s got to be trendy. And it’s got to be the latest design. Kids want the coolest
thing. And specially, when it’s brightly colored, is probably the best option. You should look
on TV. Try to ask the child, what they’re really interested in. It will probably be
the latest model. You should think of something which is compact, fit easily into your pocket.
You should also consider, what software is bundled with the camera. You might be able,
for example to have fun backgrounds. You might be able to attach interesting surrounds to
it. And of course, you should always be able to upgrade the camera. So start with a cheap
camera. And then you can always upgrade, later. Durability is also a big feature for kids.
So go on-line, check reviews and choose a camera which is going to stand up, to some
hard use. At the beginning of course, it’s probably best to choose a very simple point
and shoot camera. However, later on, you can always upgrade to a camera which has facilities
such as an optical or digital zoom. Which will have anti red eye facility. And perhaps
is got a built in macro attachment on it. If you really have the money, you might even
be able to afford image stabilization. Lastly, don’t worry too much about mega pixels. Try
to find a camera that’s easier to use. The easier it is to use, the better your child
will like it. And remember lastly, don’t buy a camera that you like. Because they will
probably hate it.

DIY Mural · Easily Paint Any Image, Any Size W/ Quick DIY Projector · ad · SemiSkimmedMin

DIY Mural · Easily Paint Any Image, Any Size W/ Quick DIY Projector · ad · SemiSkimmedMin


Hey you lot, hope you’re all good. So as you may know, I love a good statement
wall, especially a hand-painted mural, i love the freedom of painting on the massive canvas
of a wall creating something on a much bigger scale than usual. But sometimes it can get a bit fiddly, a bit
overwhelming, translating a small image or an original sketch into a much bigger size. So i thought i’d share with you an easy
way to create a stunning, impressive bit of decor without having to exert your creative
skills whatsoever. So first of all, you’ll want to find an
image that you want to use as your mural design. I’m really keen on sticking to royalty free
images because, as an artist myself, i hate the thought of stealing someone else’s creative
content. Not only can you get in quite a bit of trouble
for it, but it’s just not a decent thing to do. Thankfully there are tons of images and illustrations
online that are royalty free. I was recently contacted by Graphic Stock.com,
who rather than charging for each individual image like most stock image sites, they offer
a monthly or yearly subscription service where you have access to over something like 300,000
graphics, photos, vectors and illustrations which I think they said was like the largest
download library of its type online. Now if you’re not sure if you wanna sign
up, they do offer a 7 day free trial where you can download up to 140 different images
which i think is enough to get a feel of the kind of service they offer and to get your
hands on a few great bits and bobs for free. So having had a look around, I decided to
go for this pattern because i really thought it would suit the area i was painting. And I saved a couple of other images for future
reference, i thought one of these bikes would look nice in a hallway leaning up against
a wall and a motivational quote would look great blown up above my desk. Now that I’ve got my image ready, its time
to blow it up and make this projector. Ive seen a few versions of this diy floating
around youtube but this is the way that works best for me. So all you wanna do is Take a cardboard box
and cut a square or rectangle out of it. Don’t forget to take your time and mind your
fingers. Next you’ll need some clear plastic. You can use one of those clear envelopes that
you use to organise folders to separate things or like me you could use a sandwich or freezer
bag. Then you can either print out your image and
trace it from the paper onto your plastic with permanent marker or simply trace it directly
from your screen. Place your plastic sheet over the window you
cut out of your box and pop a torch or your phone inside. I’m usually fine just balancing my phone
against the back wall of the box , you could also put things inside the box to lean your
phone against. Then all that’s left to do is turn off the
lights. And there you have a super simple projector. If you don’t have permission to paint on
a wall, you could also use this for blowing up a drawing onto a large canvas or even make
a nice tapestry with it. Now just line it up with your wall or canvas,
adjusting how close and how far you are to change the size, and if you’re working outdoors
like me, you’d obviously have to wait until it’s dark. you may also need to rest your box on a chair
or a table to get it to the right height. Just experiment with positioning until you
have things how you want. Then the rest is simple, follow the lines
projected onto the wall to map out your drawing or painting and get started. I usually use acrylic paint for wall designs
because its got a bold colour and it’s water-resistant. If you’re working outside like me, you might
want to finish up the next day with a varnish or some kind of sealant to make sure your
mural is gonna be durable enough to withstand weather conditions. And there you have it. Don’t forget I’ve left a link below to the
graphic stock website if you want to try out their 7 day free trial. I hope you enjoyed this video, I hope you
found it useful, thanks for watching and i’ll see you next time! Bye!

Why Are Pictures of Muhammad Forbidden In Islam?

Why Are Pictures of Muhammad Forbidden In Islam?


Recently, terrorists attacked the offices of a satirical magazine in Paris called Charlie Hebdo , killing at least 12 people and injuring more. Many believe that this attack was in retaliation at the magazine’s cartoons which depicted the Islamic Prophet Muhammad [pbuh]. And this is not the first time that an incident like this has happened The question is : why are some Muslim groups so adamantly against depicting Muhammad [pbuh] ? Well, the Qu’ran condemns any idolatry – meaning the worship of a physical object or other idols. Some Muslims believe that seeing their Prophet or God in paintings will lead to people praying to or worshipping that painting or object, which is in exact contradiction to Tawhid , the Islamic monotheistic belief that God is a unique unity [entity] and not a thing. Many others cite passages in the Hadith, which is a record of teachings and sayings of Muhammad [pbuh] They believe that these teachings ban not only images of Allah and Muhammad but also images of all living creatures – this includes other Islamic Prophets (which is why movies depicting Jesus, Noah and Moses have been banned in some Islamic countries). This is also why, unlike Christianity and Buddhism, a lot of Islamic art is text and calligraphy – not portraits. But not all Muslims feel this way. These beliefs are mainly held by Sunni Muslims , who make up the largest branch of Islam. In Iran, where Shi’ite Muslims are the majority, depictions of Muhammad [pbuh] are much more common. These are usually in the form of hand-painted miniatures, which have been common for hundreds of years in Iran, Turkey and Central Asia. However, these depictions are obviously respectful and used for storytelling and historical purposes. Some images put a veil over Muhammad’s [pbuh] face or obscure it with whiteness, light or flames and these are mostly done by Muslim artists I mentioned at the top that Westerners depicting Muhammad [pbuh] has led to trouble before but it has not always resulted in violence ; sometimes, there is diplomacy and cooperation. In 1955, New York City – at the request of Indonesia, Pakistan and Egypt – agreed to take down a statue of Muhammad [pbuh] that was honouring him as one of ten lawgivers alongside Moses, Confucius, and Alfred the Great and in 1974, the New York Times published an apology for running a picture of Muhammad [pbuh] in an article about Islam after receiving numerous complaints. But as we know, not all disagreements end so peacefully … In 1977, a reporter was killed and over 100 hostages were taken in Washington DC possibly in response to how some important Islamic figures in the motion picture “Muhammad, Messenger of God”. More recently, publications in Sweden and Bangladesh were sent death threats after they depicted Muhammad in some of their periodicals. These images also caused international protest and the evacuation of some embassies. This is one debate that probably will never be resolved – on one side is people asking others to respect their beliefs ; On the other side is journalists, asking people to respect freedom of speech and of the press. But it’s important to note that most people on both sides condemn terrorists and their actions. Subscribe to TestTube for more new videos six days a week. and if you’d like to learn more about the differences between Sunni and Shi’ite Muslims, check out this video now. Initially, Muslims were all one group unified under te Prophet Muhammad [pbuh] then in the year 632 Muhammad [pbuh] died, and Muslims split off into two separate groups Thanks for watching!

All About Picture Framing : Determine What Size Frame You’ll Need for Your Picture

All About Picture Framing : Determine What Size Frame You’ll Need for Your Picture


On behalf of Expert Village, I am Debbie Reeves
at John’s Design Center and I am here to tell you about custom picture framing. Now, the
next thing we need to do is measure the picture to find out what size frame that we need to
cut. Some people will tell you that you need to use a wooden ruler like this to measure
your picture. But, I’m telling you to never use a wooden ruler like this to measure your
picture. What you want to use is a tape measure just like this. You can find them anywhere.
What we are going to do is measure this oil painting right here. So, all you do is you
bring it here and I see that this picture is twenty inches by twenty four. So, that
tells me that a twenty by twenty four is a standard size. So, as you saw before, we were
able to find a standard size frame to fit this. But, the next one we are going to measure
is this watercolor right here. Now, this watercolor needs to have a matting on it. So, we have
the matting here that we are going to used for this picture. But, as you see, this is
four inches. We might not quite want four inches. We may only want three inches. So,
let’s decide we are going to use three inches on this. So, what you do is, you add three
inches and three inches, and that comes to six. So, put your finger on the six, and you’ll
see my picture is going to be twenty seven inches by twenty two inches. You never, ever
measure when you are using a mat, you never measure the image. You do not ever want to
know that because you’ll end up cutting the mat and the frame all wrong. So, first determine
what size margin that I want. That size margin is going to be three inches. So remember,
you add the two together which makes six. And your picture is twenty two inches by twenty
seven inches which gives you a three inch margin all the way around this picture.

Mona Lisa may be First 3D Image! Stereoscopy


So the Mona Lisa might be the first 3D Image! German researchers Claus-Christian Carbon
and Vera Hesslinger studied the famous Leonardo da Vinci portrait alongside a very similar
copy known as the “Prado Mona Lisa” in Spain. They conclude that the pair might be the world’s
first stereoscopic image. But wait! What is a stereoscopic image? How
can two images be 3D image? Stereoscopy is a technique where you create
the illusion of depth by using two similar, but slightly shifted images. Basically, it
mimics what our eyes see. Your left eye and right eye can look at the
same object, the vision is slightly different because of the distance between your pupils.
Your body sends these two flat images to the brain, and your brain smooshes the two images
together, and voila, you have depth perception! Amazing! However, since you’re looking at a flat
image, rather than a 3 dimensional object, tricking your eye into thinking it’s 3 dimensional
is a little trickier. You might see something if you full screen this video, cross your
eyes, and adjust your head closer or farther from the screen. But that might be a bit uncomfortable,
and still not produce the desired result. So thats why we have a stereoscope to comfortably
view the images. The first one was invented by Sir Charles Wheatstone in 1838, but if
da Vinci were to have made one to accompany these two paintings, he would have predated
this by more than 300 years. The Prado version was introduced to the public
in 2012 as a possible work of deVinci or one of his students. It’s thoerized that the
paintings were painted side by side, which would explain the slight difference in perspective. Intrigued, Carbon and Hesslinger decided to
calculate the positions between the painters (or painter) and they concluded that the horizontal
shift between the two paintings were 2.7 inches, which happens to be very close to the average
distance between a person’s eyes. Turns out, among all his other studies, DaVinci
also researched monocular and binocular vision, aspects of optics, eye anatomy, and light
reflections. So it could’ve been that he intentionally tried to create a stereoscopic
art. It’s impossible to know whether Carbon and
Hesslinger’s observations are just a coincidence, or if if was intentionally made to be stereoscopic.
What do you guys think? Do you buy it? Or do you just think it’s a result of how the
two were produced side by side. If you liked this video, please subscribe
and share with you friends. And Thank so much for watching! As always
if you have any comments or questions, let me know down below. Or shoot me a question
on Tumblr, or Tweet me @LittleArtTalks. I’ll see you guys next time. Bye!

CGI 3D Animated Short: “Runaway” – by Susan Yung, Emily Buchanan & Esther Parobek | TheCGBros

CGI 3D Animated Short: “Runaway” – by Susan Yung, Emily Buchanan & Esther Parobek | TheCGBros


(soft orchestra music plays) (clicking squeak) Hey! Good morning Chillie. (creaky thump) (clicking squeak) (squeaky clack) (repeated thumping) (snap) (slow motion) Boy: Noooooo!!!!! (clang clang) (ominous violin music) Boy: Ugh, crud…I knew this day was coming. (scribbling) (putting lid on marker) See you later Chillie. I…I gotta go…umm…I gotta go run an errand. (climatic violin music) (door opening and closing) (piccolos and flutes playing) (paper rustling) (magnetic click) (clarinet plays) (sigh) (mechanical noise) (mechanical steps) (door opening)
(bottles rattle) (thumping) (rubber stretching) (whoosh) (door opening) (thud)
(bottles rattling) (thud)
(bottles rattling) (traffic) (car zooming)
(car passenger: yee-haaw!) (steps)
(orchestra music continues) (dub step music) (slow deep voice) Narrator: Yeah! (whoosh) (sad orchestra music resumes) (door opening)
(rattling bottles) (laughing)
(rapid steps) (more sad music) (door squeaks open) (door shuts) (gasp) (thump) No!!! Chillie!!! (crying) (panicky breathing) Excuse me. Have…have you seen my fridge? (musical indignation) (knocking on glass) (shhh) (whispered) Thanks. (sad music) (steps) (thud) (slight inhale) (oboe playing meloncholy) (paper flapping in wind) (magnetic click) Chillie. (quietly) What are you… (louder) What are you doing? What this?
(paper rustling) What about this? Oh. (lovingly) No, no. I was never gonna replace you. See? (bottles rattle) You can’t jump to conclusions like that. (door clicks open)
(happy oboe music plays) (door clicking close) (gasp)
(patting) (happier exit music)

All About Picture Framing : How to Fit Your Canvas Into a Picture Frame

All About Picture Framing : How to Fit Your Canvas Into a Picture Frame


On behalf of Expert Village, I’m Debbie Reeves
at John’s Design Center and I’m here to tell you about custom picture framing. Now we are
going to fit this canvas that we built the frame for. So what we do is, we put the canvas
inside. We do not use glass whenever you are using a canvas. And what we are going to use
is offset clips (they are these little tiny clips here). We just need to put four of them,
it doesn’t take very many. I put little bumpers on them because these don’t fit just right,
so we have to make it fit. Okay, now we take our drill and we want to drill these into
the frame. This is going to hold the canvas in without damaging the frame, the wood or
anything. It is nice and safe. Be very careful with the frame because it is face down and
you don’t want to scratch it. So, we put all four on, okay. Now, you find the top and you
want to have that next to you. So, here’s the top. Now what we want to do is put paper
on the back. You can either use brown paper, or I’m going to use black paper. So I’m going
to tear a piece of paper off, and I’m going to set it right here. Now because this is
a canvas and it’s higher here than here, I’m going to use that double stick tape like we
used when we were putting the mats together. So, what I do is I just put it all the way
around the frame, and press it down nice and tight. You don’t want to go right up against
the frame because otherwise, then you are trying to peel off the paper because it sticks.
So I put it about an eighth of an inch away from the edge of the frame. Then, I take the
little paper off. Again, try to keep your table clean. Now I take my paper and I just
put it right on the edge. Then I get to this edge. It’s a little tricky because it has
some height up here. So I start in the middle and work myself to each end (each corner)
with a little crease.
This makes…what it does is it’s called a “dust cover.” If you didn’t put this on this
oil painting, you’d get spiders and dust and all kinds of things in the back of your picture.
Take a regular razor blade and I use my finger as my guide and I cut all the way around.
Now, I’m going to use my thumb as my guide and the paper should just peel right off.
See how nice and clean the back looks?