Design Challenge – designing and making a set

Design Challenge – designing and making a set


As a set designer, you will see the design from concept right through to opening night. You’re really the caretaker for that set throughout the whole process. You’re the filter, visually, for everything that happens on that stage. I don’t want people to think they need to be architects or builders or have a degree in engineering in order to be a set designer, you don’t. You need to have an awareness of space and depth and you need to be a great storyteller, you need to know how to get people to believe in a space. The process of creating a new set involves lots of collaboration and lots of discussion to begin with. I first approach a brief by talking to the director about how he wants to approach the piece. Then we do lots of research. I look at films. I look at music videos. I look at other people’s work. I look at other performances. I research past productions and themes within the piece. I research genre, period, architecture. I go to libraries I google, and then I have meetings with the director and we look at how we want to approach the piece and how we want to approach the design. Eventually, fast forwarding, we start producing a scale model. The scale model is a tool for us to work out how the performers are going to move and interact in the space. Eventually that model becomes a tool that we send to the builders in order for them to create the set in real life. A set can help to tell the story of an opera or a ballet by either being architecturally naturalistic, so it provides a recognisable backdrop, or it could be poetic and abstract, it can be providing a colour, or a mood, or a feeling. Essentially there isn’t any difference in how a set can work for opera or ballet or for straight theatre or for an installation. It’s really about supporting the art work that the director is making and hopefully the atmosphere that you create informs the character as to the world they live in and, therefore, what kind of person they are. Because if you know the world you live in, you know who you are. If you’re interested in a career in set deign, a degree is definitely useful. There are lots of great courses, I trained at Central Saint Martins. I don’t think it’s essential to have a degree, you’ve just got to have a lot of exposure to theatre, and the people that I work with on a daily basis come from all different walks of life and have had all different experiences, and it’s those different experiences that create interesting theatre, because everyone brings their own story to the table. I think as long as you have the basics, you have an understanding of scale, and shape, and space, I would say you’ve just got to volunteer in theatre and take every opportunity you can to work in theatre and tell stories. The best advice I can give to somebody designing their own set is to see as much theatre as they can, see as much of other peoples work as they can because the more you see, the more ideas you can feed upon. Ultimately, there’s no such thing as a completely original idea, all there is is an amalgamation of experiences that you’ve had, that you bring together into one cohesive final scene.

Amateur Photography Tips : How to Make a Double Exposure

Amateur Photography Tips : How to Make a Double Exposure


Hi everybody, I’m Franc Anderson, and I’d
like to tell you how to make a double exposure on a camera that uses film. A double exposure
is where two photographs are put onto the same frame of film. First of all, the first
photograph is made as normal, then the the shutter is worn down without advancing the
film and a second exposure is made, putting the second picture superimposed upon the first.
This requires a lot of experimentation, trial and error, but as a guide think very carefully
about the pictures before you begin and try to imagine the final result. So that for example,
if you want to put a cat into a glass you photograph the glass and then you photograph
the cat. The trick is to reposition the cat so it looks like it was in the glass. This
is not so easy with a live animal. It’s a lot easier with still life subjects. But it’s
fun to try, and it really is worthwhile when you get a good result. With a film camera,
normally after you take a photograph and you wind on this action cocks the shutter and
also advances the film inside. When you want to make a double exposure you want to cock
the shutter, but you don’t want to move the film so that the second picture is put on
top of the first. I can show you how to do this very simply. Let’s open the camera up.
There is no film in this camera, so let’s open the camera up. Normally, the film is
stretched across the back of the camera, and the film is driven by these sprockets here,
so that when I cock the shutter the sprockets advance the film. I can stop the film advance
happening by simply holding in the film rewind button. This disconnects the sprockets from
the wind on, and so now I watch when I cock the shutter this sprocket doesn’t move and
the film stays still. So, now I when I press the shutter again the second picture is made
on top of the first. It’s really that simple. All you have to do is make the first picture,
hold the button at the bottom, and cock the shutter. The film hasn’t moved, and when I
make the second picture it will be on top of the first, easy. All manual cameras have
a button on the bottom for rewind. All you have to do is remember to hold it in. Of course,
this is made a lot simpler if the cameras are on a tripod. Then the frame doesn’t move,
and you know exactly where the original picture was taken. This doesn’t apply to digital cameras,
because with digital cameras the same superimposition of two frames can be done in software, and
there’s no need to have a facility on a digital camera to be able to do this. It doesn’t use
film.

How Joan E. Biren Inspired a Movement by Photographing the Lesbian Community | Legendary | NowThis

How Joan E. Biren Inspired a Movement by Photographing the Lesbian Community | Legendary | NowThis


– They saw perversion where we see love. My camera was sort of a
barometer of what was happening. Black people or gay
people or disabled people, you want to be reflected. You want to see that you’re not alone. The more of us who are
out, the more safe it is. – This is Joan E. Biren. People strive to see
people like themselves. Representation in art and
media makes us feel real, less alone, seen, and like our feelings, are not something otherworldly or wrong. Joan E. Biren, known as JEB wasn’t seeing lesbians like
herself in any of the images of women circulating in the early ’70s, the height of the feminist movement. So, she decided to take
matters into her own hands. At a time when just the act of being out meant risking losing
your job and your family or even your children, JEB and her muses fearlessly documented authentic images of
lesbians showing the world the true story of the lesbian community. Now, decades after beginning this project that inspired a movement, JEB is installing
versions of her portraits in the windows of the Leslie-Lohman
Museum in New York City, reminding everyone who
might be feeling invisible, that they are never alone. I’m Javier Muñoz, and this
isn’t just our history, this is Legendary. – There were very, very few
images of lesbians at all, and most of them were what
I called faux lesbians. They were people
pretending to be lesbians. Most of those people were young, slim, blonde women, white women. The other kind of image was
that instead of romanticizing and making beautiful in exactly
the same way all lesbians, were the ones that turned them
into vampires and monsters, and were really kind of scary. I decided to make my own images of what I considered real lesbians and I didn’t know that many at the time. So, I borrowed a camera ’cause
I didn’t even have a camera. And I asked my lover to kiss me ’cause I really wanted
to see a kissing picture. And I held the camera out
and took a picture of us, and made an early selfie, before I even knew that
was going to be a thing. And here’s a larger version
of that very picture, my lover Sharon and I kissing. A large part of what I had to do was earn people’s trust because people did not want to be disowned by their families. They did not want to lose their jobs. They did not want to lose
custody of their children. They did not want to be
forced out of the country if they were here on
certain kinds of visas. So, there were all kinds of things that could happen to people if their photographs were
identified as them being lesbian. They were very brave and courageous. And, you know, you can’t do it if people aren’t willing to be out. It was a privilege for me to be able to make these
images of these brave women. My camera was sort of a
barometer of what was happening. As more people came out, more people were willing to
come in front of my camera. And as more of my images
went out into the community, more people saw that it
was safe to come out. Well, one of the things
that happened very early on in my making lesbian images was nobody wanted to buy them. So the way that I supported
myself as a lesbian photographer was to travel around the
country with a slide show, and everybody called it the dyke show. I liked this so I made a postcard of it that I made of myself in Dyke, Virginia. And people would buy the postcard and you know, people put
things up on their fridges, so one of the ways that
people came out to each other was they would go in someone’s house and see this on the fridge, and then they’d know they
found another lesbian. And then, suddenly, a right-winged, bigoted, anti-gay group, the Moral Majority wanted to buy them. So of course, I wasn’t
going to sell them my images so that they could fight
against our having our rights. I think they saw perversion
where we see love. (upbeat music) I’m very excited that in this year of the 50th anniversary of Stonewall, I’ve been invited to be
part of many other exhibits as well as the one at the Leslie-Lohman. One of the great things about
this windows installation is that it’s not just lesbians. It’s lesbians and gay
men, and trans people, and bisexuals and drag
queens, and everything. And I hope what it will do is inspire other people to be active because there are lots of threats to our liberties and our freedoms. And there are people that
would actually like to push us back in the closet. I may not be the one to get us there but I hope we reach the
goal of having all of us, including the most vulnerable
and most marginalized, represented in authentic
ways in mainstream media. One of the things that kept me going then, and that fills my heart now, are the people who write me or tell me how much my images meant to them. People tell me sometimes
that they saved their lives. People tell me that they made them feel like they could be creative. People tell me that they
were just somehow empowered by seeing these images, and it is the reason I made them, and it’s the best part.

Photography Tips : Photography Framing Techniques

Photography Tips : Photography Framing Techniques


This is Anthony, and we’re going to talk about
framing in photography, framing your shot. When you look at an image, when you’re photographing.
This is what I love doing, is I like looking through my viewfinder, and thinking about,
Well, how do I want this to look? How is this going to look interesting? Well, I just want
to put the subject matter, or whatever I’m photographing, smack in the middle. No, I
don’t think I want to do that. I want to make it look interesting, so for framing my image,
there’s a couple of different ways I like to do it. I like to just put it a little bit
off center. Not right in the center, but just a little bit. If you really think about the
math and the science behind that, it’s kind of interesting, and I like looking at things
differently. I really play around with perspective, and I move. I physically move my big body,
and how I want something to look, and that’s how I frame something up. There are a few
different descriptions I’ve made for myself, about how I do it. One, I like to call it
cornering, or I like to just like, put my subject in one of the corners, and kind of
put other things in the rest of the corners, and give the image a little bit more weight
on one side, and a little bit more air on the other side, and that’s something that
really interests me, in all kinds of art, is I look at, well how is this framed? I’ll
go and look at classical painting, renaissance painting, and see how did they frame this
painting? so when I’m actually photographing, I refer to that in my head. It’s just one
of these ways, that makes photography really, really, interesting to me. The other thing
about framing, is that I find, people don’t often turn their camera around enough. We’re
so used to being able to edit digitally, that actually I’ll get really close to somebody.
I’ll back off, or I’ll switch my camera around, a lot, because I know that, I’m not really
a lazy person by nature, but I would much rather edit it, than actually do it, but when
I’m actually out there photographing, I think sometimes, I would rather just do it that
way, when I’m really looking at something, because after all, photography, that’s really
what it’s all about, because how am I looking at something? It’s the physical act of taking
that picture. To me, that’s what real photography is, and the framing, sometimes is actually
the most fun, so that’s how you frame a picture.

How self-taught photographer Gordon Parks became a master storyteller

How self-taught photographer Gordon Parks became a master storyteller


JUDY WOODRUFF: And finally tonight: the world
through his lens. Jeffrey Brown has a look at the extraordinary
journey of photographer Gordon Parks. JEFFREY BROWN: Two children with a doll, who
are they, and what are their lives like? A young man walking away from us, where is
he coming from and where is he going? Armed with his camera, Gordon Parks told stories
of individuals and, through them, of the larger world. PHILIP BROOKMAN, National Gallery of Art:
He had a fantastic ability to, you know, compose a series of elements within a picture to convey
a sense of — of a story. JEFFREY BROWN: Philip Brookman is curator
of Gordon Parks: The New Tide, an exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington. Spanning the first 10 years of his career,
from 1940 to 1950, it’s a chance to see how a young man, self-taught and without a high
school diploma, became one of the 20th century’s master artists. PHILIP BROOKMAN: Parks came to an understanding,
I think, really before he ever picked up a camera, that it could be a tool for him to
use to be able to express his own feelings about his life. JEFFREY BROWN: Gordon Parks was born in Fort
Scott, Kansas, in 1912, the youngest of 15 children. He credited his mother, Sarah, who died when
he was 16, with giving him confidence and strength, even growing up amid poverty and
prejudice. Parks spoke of his childhood in a 1997 “NewsHour”
interview. GORDON PARKS, Photographer: That disadvantage
sometimes pushes you, you know, if you use it right, because you want to rid yourself
of those things that hurt you emotionally when you’re coming up. JEFFREY BROWN: Inspired by the work of Dorothea
Lange, Walker Evans, and other Depression era photographers he saw in magazines, Parks
first picked up a camera at the age of 25. In St. Paul and then Chicago, he took portraits,
including Marva Trotter Louis, a performer, model and wife of boxer Joe Louis. He befriended and photographed leading African-American
artists and scholars, including Langston Hughes, Charles White, Alain Locke. And he did his first journalism, covering
Eleanor Roosevelt’s visit to a South Side community center. Parks called the camera his choice of weapons. PHILIP BROOKMAN: Gordon Parks always had a
sense that media, that the camera and photography and writing and media, could be a very important
tool in helping the world understand the image of African-American people. And it was through that understanding that
you could make the world a better place. JEFFREY BROWN: In 1942, Parks was awarded
a prestigious fellowship, allowing him to work as a photographer for the Farm Security
Administration. His first assignment? Documenting African-American life in Washington,
D.C., then a deeply segregated city. Among his early works, this photo of a young
boy who lost his leg in a streetcar accident. PHILIP BROOKMAN: I was really struck by, you
know, how intense the relationships are in the picture. JEFFREY BROWN: The relationships between the
photographer… (CROSSTALK) PHILIP BROOKMAN: Relationships between the
photographer and the boy, but also the relationship between the boy and the two girls sitting
across the street. These are things that Parks put them there
for us to find. And he knew he was doing that. JEFFREY BROWN: It was here Parks created one
of his most famous photos, a portrait of Ella Watson, a cleaning lady in a government building. GORDON PARKS: I first asked her about her
life, what it was like. And it was so disastrous that I just felt
that I must photograph this woman, and in a way that would make me feel, make the public
feel about what Washington, D.C., was in 1942. JEFFREY BROWN: The now iconic image, called
“American Gothic” after the famed painting by Grant Wood, was part of a larger series
on Watson, her family and community, an extended photo essay style that Parks would go on to
use throughout his career. PHILIP BROOKMAN: Parks, often, he would meet
people, and he would talk to them. He would learn their stories. He would understand who they were, you know,
long before he would ever bring along a camera. He was able to use his own experiences and
his own struggles to understand and empathize with others. JEFFREY BROWN: In 1944, Standard Oil hired
Parks as a photographer. He would continue to hone his craft, and earn
his first real paycheck, traveling around the country shooting scenes and portraits
like this one of an oil worker at the Penola grease plant in Pittsburgh. PHILIP BROOKMAN: What he’s done is, he’s created
a portrait of a heroic African-American worker working for Standard Oil. This is an amazingly, you know, technical
photograph to produce. And, you know, in a very short time, Parks
has learned, you know, the skills, and mastered those skills. JEFFREY BROWN: He photographed white fisherman
and farmers, black pilots training for war, and he continued to break barriers. In 1949, he was hired as the first black staff
photographer at “LIFE” magazine, where his photo essays included one on a Harlem gang
member named Red Jackson. He also traveled internationally, shooting
high fashion spreads in Paris, and celebrities like Ingrid Bergman in Italy. In 1950, he returned to his childhood home
in Fort Scott to shoot a series for the magazine. And all of this was just the beginning. Parks would go on to write several memoirs
and novels, to direct films, including “Shaft” and an adaptation of his book “The Learning
Tree,” and to compose music, while continuing to work as a photographer. PHILIP BROOKMAN: He never understood that
he wasn’t supposed to do it. He just did it. JEFFREY BROWN: Gordon Parks died in 2006 at
the age of 93. The exhibition Gordon Parks: The New Tide
is on through February 18. For the “PBS NewsHour,” I’m Jeffrey Brown
at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Photography Tips : Start-Up Costs for Photography

Photography Tips : Start-Up Costs for Photography


This is Anthony and today we are going to
talk about start up costs in photography. Now photography is very complex business and
the fact that technology is changing all the time and it is probably changing as I am speaking
to you right now. So what I buy today six months from now really has the potential of
not really being worth anything, an extremely frustrating part of photography so you want
to think when I buy this piece of equipment is it going to suit my needs five years from
now, two years from now, a year from now and you can do that by just doing some basic research
talking to other photographers. I like to keep this as simple as possible meaning that
well if I decide I want to do pet photography I want to keep it as simple as possible. There
is no reason for me to buy strobes. There is no reason for me to have a studio. I can
go to peoples’ houses, I can photograph them with their pets in the park. How much will
that cost me, enough for an on camera strobe, enough for an off camera strobe, a tripod,
a camera, a couple digital cards, a laptop and those are the things I would write down
in my business plan as to how much they would cost. Then I think about how much am I going
to charge. I want to make the money I spend on that equipment back as rapidly as I can
and these are just little simple things and it is really not that simple, it is actually
quite complicated and the other important factor that I like to see is where am I going
to get this money, is it going to be from my savings account? Am I going to have an
investor? Am I going to have a family member help me out with this? It is very murky tricky
water to get into so I always tell people to really try to think these start up costs
through. As far as the bottom line how much money you would really have to spend to start
up a simple photography business, personally I believe you could probably start one from
about $3,000 to $5,000 and that is a lot of money for me but if you want to do it I mean
that is really, unless you are running on a complete shoestring budget which some photographers
do you know, that is going to give you the confidence that your equipment is going to
be fine, you are going to have a place to work, you are going to have the ability to
deliver clients a job well done. I would say in my opinion, 3 to 5 thousand dollars is
basic start up cost for a photography business.

Why people believe they can’t draw – and how to prove they can | Graham Shaw | TEDxHull

Why people believe they can’t draw – and how to prove they can | Graham Shaw | TEDxHull


Translator: Tijana Mihajlović
Reviewer: Mile Živković Hi. I’ve got a question for you: how many people here
would say they can draw? (Laughter) I think we’ve got about one or two percent
of the hands going up, and it’s interesting, isn’t it? It’s a little bit like people think
of spelling or singing. They think,”You can either
do it, or you can’t.” But I think you can. Because when people say they can’t draw, I think it’s more to do with beliefs
rather than talent and ability. So I think when you say you can’t draw,
that’s just an illusion, and today I’d like to prove that to you. When I say “draw”, I’m not saying we’re all going
to draw like Michelangelo. We are not going to be painting
the Sistine Chapel’s ceiling. But would you be happy if,
by the end of this session, you could draw pictures
a little bit like this? (Audience murmuring) Oh, yes! (Laughter) Or even a little bit like this? (Laughter) Actually, there are only two things
you need to do to be able to achieve this. One is have an open mind.
Are you up for that? (Audience) Yes! And two, just be prepared to have a go. So grab a pen and a piece of paper. OK, so here’s how it’s going to work: I’ll show you the first cartoon
we’re going to do, so just watch to begin with. Here we go. Just watching. That’s going to be our first cartoon. It’s a character called Spike. I’d like you to draw along with me. I’ll draw the first line, you draw,
and when you’ve done that, look up, and I’ll know you’re ready
for the next line. Okay, here we go. Start with the nose. Now the eyes. They’re like 66s or speech marks. That’s it. Next, the mouth. Nice, big smile. Now, over here, the ear. Next, some spiky hair. Next, put the pen to the left
to the mouth, little line like that. Pen under the ear, drop a line like that. Pen to the left of the neck,
top of the T-shirt. Line to the left, line to the right. Just hold your drawings up
and show everyone. (Laughter) How are we all doing? (Laughter) OK. OK, fantastic. So, it looks like you’ve just learned
to draw one cartoon, but you’ve actually learned
more than that; you’ve learned a sequence
that would enable you to draw hundreds and thousands
of different cartoons, because we’re just going to do
little variations on that sequence. Have a go at this. Draw along with me. Nose. Eyes. Smile. That’s it. Now some hair. Pen to the left of the mouth, under the hair, little V-shape for the top, line to the left, line to the right. So we’ve got another character.
Let’s call her Thelma. (Laughter) So, we’ve got Spike and Thelma. Let’s try another one. Here we go. Another little variation.
You’re getting the idea. Starting with the nose. But this time we’ll change
the eyes slightly. Look, two circles together like that. That’s it. Then, two little dots in for the eyes. And this time we’ll change
the mouth slightly. Watch. Little circle colored in there. Have a go at that. Next, the ear. Now, we’ll have some fun
with the hair, watch. Nice curly hair. Then same thing: pen to the left
to the mouth, little line like that. Under the ear, drop a line. Top of the T-shirt. Line to the left, line to the right. I think we’ll call him Jeff. (Laughter) We’ll do one more. One more go. Here we go. You’re getting the idea. (Laughter) So we’ll start with a nose again. Notice we’re doing little variations. Now we’ll change the eyes,
so we’ve got them apart. We’ll put some little dots in like that. Next, the mouth slightly different. Let’s put a little V-shape like that. Triangle. And a little line across,
and we’ll just color this a little bit in. Now, watch this bit carefully;
some hair, watch. Here we go, little line like that. Next, a bit more there. And watch, a couple of triangles
to make a little bow. Triangle at the bottom, rest of the hair. Pen to the left of the mouth again.
You get the idea. Drop a line for the neck. Now the V-shape. Line to the left, line to the right. There we go. Let’s call her Pam. (Laughter) So you’ve done… (Laughter) So you’ve done four cartoons.
You can have a little rest now. (Laughter) Take a rest. You’re getting the idea.
All we’re doing is little variations. I’ll just demonstrate a couple to you. We could go on all day, couldn’t we? You could do someone
looking unhappy, a bit like that, or you could experiment with,
perhaps, someone who is… just draw a straight line,
someone looking a bit fed up. Or perhaps, you could do anything
you like, really, just try things out. Look at this. Little squiggle.
There we are. So, all sorts of things we could do. Actually, one more I’ll let you do,
one more idea. This is a great little technique. Have a go at this: people with glasses on. Just draw a nose a bit like Spike’s. Next, draw some frames, so two circles like that
with a little bit in between. Now, just put some dots
inside for the eyes like that. Next, the ear. So it’s little bit like we did before,
but this time we’ll join up the frames. That’s it. Watch this bit. (Laughter) And this bit I really like. Watch. (Laughter) And then, little bit there. Pencil under the mustache, line down, top of the shirt, left and right. So there we have it.
We could carry on, couldn’t we? Hopefully, we’ve done enough
to convince you that in fact we can all draw. And not just people here.
I’ve worked with… I’m going to give you three examples
of other people who’ve learned to draw, and that actually surprised them, too. I’m going to save
what I think is my favorite, most surprising example until last. The first example is: I’ve worked a lot with children
and students in schools. Actually the little ones,
they just draw fine, but when they get to about 15 or 16,
most of them think they can’t draw. But I worked with them. I worked this week in a school where I was coaching them
on using pictures for memory. A girl was trying to remember
what red blood cells do, and she drew this little picture of a red blood cell
carrying a handbag with O2 on it to remind her that the red blood cells
carry oxygen to all parts of the body. That was a great one. The other people I worked with
are many adults in all walks of life, and particularly in business, and they often will want
to make presentations memorable. So again, a quick cartoon or sketch
could be really good for that. And again, most people think
they can’t draw, but take this example. Couple of wavy lines, little boat could be a metaphor
to represent we’re all in this together. So that, if that was just drawn
in the presentation, would really stay
in the memory, wouldn’t it? Yeah. But the third example is –
you shouldn’t have favorites, should you? This is my favorite. Have you ever been at the party
when someone asks you what you do? It gets a little bit skeptical
when people ask me that. This lady said to me, well – I said, “I do a little bit of training,
and I teach people to draw,” and she said, “Would you come along
and do some for our group?” She said, “I work with some people”
– she was a volunteer – a group of people
who have suffered strokes. So I said, “Sure, I could spare
some time for that.” So I said I would,
and I booked the time in. Have you ever done that? You get near of that time and you think,
“What have I let myself in for here?” “Will I be able to do it?” I thought, “What could I
do with them?” you see. “I know. I’ll do my cartoon drawing.
They’ll like that.” But then, as I got near of the time,
I got more apprehensive, because then I was thinking, “I’ve worked with children,
with all sorts of adults; I’ve never worked with a group like this.” It turns out it was all part
of a charity called TALK. This TALK charity is a wonderful charity
that helps people who’ve suffered strokes, but have a particular condition
known as aphasia. You might have heard of aphasia,
sometimes called dysphasia. The key thing is it affects
their ability to communicate. So, for example, they might have trouble reading, writing, speaking,
or understanding. It can be quite an isolating condition; it can be very, very frustrating
and can lead to a loss of confidence. Anyway, so I prepared all this stuff,
what to do for this session – for a couple of hours,
tea break in the middle – and I got more apprehensive. But actually, I needn’t have worried, because I’m going to show you now
the work that they did. It was one of the best things
I’ve ever done. I’m going to show you the first slide. I taught them Spike,
just like I did for you, and I want you to see the reaction
on their faces when they did this. (Audience) Oh. What you can see here
are two of the stroke recoverers on the left and right, and one of the volunteer
helpers in the center. Each stroke recoverer, there are about 36
in the room with volunteers as well, there’s one-to-one helpers. You can just see the delight
on their faces, can’t you? Let’s look at another picture. This is a gentleman called David,
and he’s holding up his picture, and you can tell it was the picture
of Spike, can’t you? In fact, I think he’s drawn Spike
even better there. But what I didn’t realize
until even after the session was that the number of the people
in this session, including David, were drawing with their wrong hand. David’s stroke meant that it affected
the right side of his body, and he drew with his left hand,
as many did. Nobody mentioned it to me,
nobody complained. They just got on with it. It was an inspirational session for me. It was quite a humbling session, one of the best things
I felt I’ve ever done. At the end of it, I had a lovely email
from doctor Mike Jordan, and he’s the chair of the TALK group; happens to be a medical doctor,
but he’s the chair of the group. He wrote to me, and I’m quoting, he said, “Our recoverers learned today
that they can draw. It’s a bit more than that; this sort of activity
really builds their confidence.” So I was happy, he was happy,
everyone was happy, they’ve invited me back again, and I go in there now
about every three or four months. So it’s great. I thought
that was a lovely example to share. Fancy one more drawing? (Audience) Yes. Here we go. Grab your pens. Here we go. Right. I’m going to get you to draw someone
that you would recognize. So start with a big nose,
a bit like Spike’s. Next, we’ll do some eyes,
and you might be thinking, “This is also a bit like Spike.” Watch the next bit. You’re getting warm. There you go. Little line down there. Down here. Little V-shape,
line to the left, line to the right. And you’ve got Albert Einstein. (Laughter) So you’ve got the pens with you, you’ve proved that you can draw. You’re very welcome
to take the pens with you and have a practice at home, even show somebody else. But actually, I’d like to leave you
with a final thought. When you walked in here today, many of you didn’t believe
you could draw. I’ve got a question for you about that. How many other beliefs
and limiting thoughts do we all carry around with us every day? Beliefs that we could perhaps
potentially challenge and think differently about. If we did challenge those beliefs
and think differently about them, apart from drawing, what else
would be possible for us all? Thank you very much. (Applause)

Photography Tips : How to Become a Photographer

Photography Tips : How to Become a Photographer


This is Anthony, and we’re going to talk about
how to become a photographer. I think one of the best and simplest ways to become a
photographer, or just to see whether you want to become a photographer, is to spend a day
with a professional photographer, or spend a few hours and see what this photographer
does, or she does. And, you know, see if you like it. See if you can actually see yourself
doing that. And if you see, “Hey, I want to become a photographer,” you might want to
check out local classes. There are a lot of affordable classes and communities around
that you can maybe pay 50 to 100 dollars for an informal class or a workshop — something
where you’re not going to spend a lot of money, and you can spend a little bit of money to
maybe take a photography class. Talk to other people who are interested in photography,
too, and then see, “Okay. Do I…do I want to become a photographer? Do I want to do
this?” The other really great thing you want to see is: “Do I have the time to become a
photographer?” Photography is one of those things where you’re going to spend more time
doing it than you possibly thought was possible. So that is one of the ways that you can become
a photographer. You can also go to your local bookstore or the Internet and look at tons
of photography, and if it really floats your boat, gets you going, I would say that’s probably
the first sign that you want to become a photographer. And I would just, from there, you could take
a class, you can apprentice. Apprenticeship is a great way to learn any industry. You
could find a photographer in town who just needs someone to lug their equipment. It will
not be glamorous, but if you have a good eye and you can take direction well, and more
importantly, you can listen to people, you’ll find out and you’ll become a photographer.

I’m Gay – Eugene Lee Yang

I’m Gay – Eugene Lee Yang


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