What Does Art Mean to You?

What Does Art Mean to You?


For me, art really just means a safe
place for kids to express themselves and to practice expressing themselves but it
means a lot of different things to a lot of different people It gave me something
to look forward to going to school It kept me inspired every single day and it
just kept me extremely disciplined It allows kids to express themselves in
ways that they can’t in like general education classes such as math or
science or history I have a lot of myown insecurities and I feel very
self-conscious whenever I put myself out there but I feel like theatre has really
made me gain a lot of confidence and it’s nice to know that I found something
that I’m really good at Because most of my life it’s just like memorizing things
and learning things and absorbing a bunch of stuff. But then this
lets me like express myself in a unique way rather than through like facts and
sums and stuff I knew at a super early age in the art room at woodlands
elementary with Miss Henderson that art was really special for me. I went on to
get a scholarship to an art school I was always interested in teaching too and so
I decided to get certified in in art education and kind of merge those two
worlds together this is what art gave me but it can take
you anywhere now more than ever you can make a career from art, especially with Instagram, especially with YouTube as soon as you put your creativity out
there you have instant feedback from the masses so take advantage of that, seriously there’s so many opportunities that allow performers to do whatever they love to do whether it’s to teach it to do it in the community, professionally
on Broadway, the opportunities are endless I hope to be a kindergarten teacher or an elementary school teacher Even if I’m not teaching
them about theatre I feel like I’m building up that sort of confidence that
I’ll be able to pass on knowledge to younger people The thing that’ll make you money in the
future maybe that art that you want to do so I think you should just go for it
and see where it takes you

I PAINTED OVER One of My OLD Paintings…?? | 12 Days of Giving

I PAINTED OVER One of My OLD Paintings…?? | 12 Days of Giving


Hello there! So I am very excited for today’s video for a number of different reasons. First of all, I am gonna be repainting over the top of one of my pieces from a couple of years ago, and I know some of you are gonna love this idea and some of you are gonna hate this idea, but it’s okay. I have my reasons and I’ll explain them later on. However, one of the reasons why I’m so excited for today’s video is because one of my favorite stores approached me, BoxLunch, *Christmas music* *Rae laughing* and asked if I wanted to be one of 12 YouTubers who are part of their 12 Days of Giving event, and what this means is for every view that this video gets, over the next week they are gonna be donating one meal to feeding America, so we have the potential to donate thousands and thousands of meals! So thank you for watching right now. Please give this video a thumbs up too, because it’ll really help to get it out into the algorithm to help get as many views as we can, but thank you so much to BoxLunch for this amazing opportunity. Thank you so much for sponsoring this video today. *Christmas music* *Rae laughing* The painting that I decided to paint over today was very very fitting and it was actually inspired by this particular store and the items they sell, and it’s always been kind of a dream of mine to be able to make merch for them. It’s just a little bit of a dream of mine. In fact, I think I owe it to you to show you exactly what BoxLunch is, why I love it so much and how I get when I’m in my, my element, so… yeah. Hello there! I am currently in the BoxLunch store. BoxLunch is actually donating one meal for every $10 that you spend in their store to feeding America. I’m currently in the Florida Mall and in Florida, one in seven people struggle with hunger and the fact that BoxLunch are going to be giving back is so important. So this is my personal favorite corner of the BoxLunch store. As you can see, it has… I love Wall-E. I don’t know what to say because Americans call it a fanny pack and in the UK, that’s… *Awkward silence* So every $10 that you spend in BoxLunch donates one meal to feeding America. This sweater, for example, if you purchase this, you’d be donating 4 meals. BoxLunch is a heaven for adults who love pop culture, they have everything that you can possibly imagine, and it’s one of my favorite stores because it has everything that I love in it and I can celebrate being an adult who loves everything nerdy. Another one of my favorite items is the Winnie the Pooh soup mug. I love soup and I love Pooh – Winnie the Pooh. And there will be a link to some of the curated items that I have found in the shop if you would like to purchase them, so check out the link in the description as well. This soup bowl would donate one meal. So as you can see they have tons and tons of nerdy T-shirts, all for grownups, they have a HUGE, huge selection of Harry Potter-related stuff. This Hedwig backpack! *Gasps* How cute is that? And he would donate 4 meals. Tell me in the comments which house you are in, I am personally a Hufflepuff. They have a huge selection of different Christmas sweaters as well for different fandoms, I personally really like this Home Alone sweater with Kevin on the front. “Merry Christmas, ya filthy animal!” Friends! I was going to make a “I don’t have friends” joke, but I think I’ve overused that one. *Music* No, that was wrong! (Rae): YMCA! *Laughs* No! *Chloe laughs* (Chloe): Thank you! Hi. This is the lovely store manager here. She’s so lovely for letting me do this. (Rae and Chloe laughing) That’s me in the morning when I wake up. How cute is that? A boot, sketch, boot – handbag. Look, it’s a little sketch! BoxLunch’s mission this year is to donate another 1 million meals so let’s try and make this happen. There are so many ways you can give back this holiday season, whether it be to shop in your local BoxLunch store or on BoxLunch.com. Remember to check out my curated list online, it is in the description down below at BoxLunch.com. Another way that you can give back to the community is to donate food to different food drives. If you’re like me and you have a bunch of unused art supplies, you can also donate those as well. So just do your best to try and give back this holiday season because every person can make a difference. *Price checker beeps* So we just donated 35 meals. -These are yours. -Thank you very much. -You’re welcome. Thank you so much for your time! I really appreciate it. Thank you for coming! I appreciate you being here. So thank you so much again to BoxLunch for asking me to be a big part of this, thank you so much to the Florida Mall BoxLunch store, all the employees and the general manager who helped make this possible, and back to me in the studio… art space! *Music* Okay, so as I mentioned I decided to repaint over this particular piece because it’s one of my favorite scenes from Tangled and with all the fandom related stuff I was around in BoxLunch, I decided it was time to fix this. So take a good look at it because this is gonna look a lot different by the time I am done with it. Okay, so let me guess what you’re thinking. So your options are: A, Chloe, this is your best idea yet; B, Chloe, this is a stupid idea, what are you thinking; or C, why don’t you just paint on a different canvas? Well, I shall tell you. First things first, I actually painted this a couple of years ago. Look at the, uh, heh heh, “blend”. Yeah, there isn’t much of that there. You can kind of see a lot of the canvas poking through. So I realized while editing this that it actually looks better on camera than it did in person, it’s actually blurring a lot of the imperfections. Basically, you know when you paint on a canvas and you don’t put enough layers on, you don’t blend it well enough, a lot of the white pops through from the canvas? That was COVERING this painting. It was very, very half-done and kind of quick slapdash finished. So I wanted to just say, I’m not like, “Ooh, my work’s terrible!”, it does look better on camera than it does in person. So just take my word for it. It wasn’t as, um, clean-looking as it kind of looks on camera, I guess, so I’m just putting that in there as a disclaimer. And I used a lot of really cheap paint for that particular video and you know, I’m a total advocate for cheap paint but this particular paint was very watery and needed a lot of buildup and I just did not build it up like I should have done. And I basically decided to actually use my favorite paint, which is the Liquitex heavy body paint, all over this canvas so that I really gave it my best go to make it how I knew that I was capable of making it. I also did not spend very much time on it, it was kind of a rushed piece. So I thought it would be a really fun challenge to try my hand at painting over it and kind of, maybe more so actually fixing it and completing it because as you can see, I really didn’t finish it. I never classed this painting as fini- as finished. So you might be able to tell that by my half-assed attempt at not painting the edges. So I won’t lie, it was kind of cool to see how much I’ve progressed over the last couple of years with acrylic painting. If you didn’t know, I’ve done digital painting now for close to 10 years, but I actually did not start doing any form of traditional or acrylic painting until I basically started doing art on YouTube. I kind of had to adopt traditional work so I still quite knew when I made this at knowing how to work with acrylic paint, and I definitely feel that my style and choices have definitely changed. And while I wouldn’t normally choose to paint over a piece, I thought this was a great way to avoid wasting paint, wasting another canvas and also just get to finish/fix a piece that I never really liked that much. *Relaxing music* Something I definitely noticed was I really rushed the details on the original piece, I found I had to really reshape a lot of the actual structure of a lot of it and just blend it a lot better than I did before. The river was a mess! And apparently the two trees that were supposed to be there were actually just a large single blobby bush. I’m not sure why I decided to do that but blending is definitely something that comes with practice. I know my friend Rae says she doesn’t particularly like acrylic because they don’t blend as well as oils do. I found that myself when I was still learning to use it, but I definitely feel with time I’ve learned to blend a lot better than I used to be able to, and I’m still learning to master it but I think I could definitely tell, painting over my old strokes, I was definitely much better than I used to be. Now, I’m actually curious, if any of you notice a style for me with acrylic painting in regards to how I paint or blend or make strokes, I do tend to use a lot of blues and greens, but I feel like I’m having more of a distinctive style with my paintings now which I’m really excited about because it’s taken me a while to find my groove a little bit. But I feel like this year I’ve really taken more strides maybe, in making that happen, I don’t know. Let me know in the comments, I’m very, very curious, but for now I just want to say thank you so much again to BoxLunch for sponsoring this video today and for giving me the amazing opportunity to check out their store. Thank you again to the amazing store employees for letting me – to let me bug them! And – film in their store and they were just so, they were so wonderful, they were like, moving displays and allowing me to just have all this room. So they were really really cool. And again, thank you for watching this video because you’ve donated one meal just by clicking on it today, and make sure that you check out BoxLunch, BoxLunch.com if you want to help to donate a meal for every $10 you spend. Again, check out the link in the description because I have my curated gift guide list down there and yes, thank you so much for watching this video. I really hope that you enjoyed it. This is how it turned out, I’m really really happy, I think that I worked with the details a lot better than I did before. I had to fix up that tower a LOT, because I just, I did not do a good job on that tower whatsoever. I don’t know what I was doing with the windows, the weird triangle thing on the side that was also a room, didn’t do a good job with that so I did my best to fix it. But yeah, this is how it looks. Thank you for watching this video, let me know in the comments what you think of how it turned out, take care of yourselves and I will see you in the next video. *End music*

Why Modern Art Is So Expensive | So Expensive

Why Modern Art Is So Expensive | So Expensive


Modern art is expensive. From completely white canvases to simple, abstract colors, these seemingly basic works
can cost you millions. So what makes their price so high, and how can they possibly
be worth this much money? Modern art is a wide field, covering everything from
around 1870 to 1970. But say “modern art” to
someone on the street, and chances are they possibly
picture something like this. At the turn of the century, art changed. From the birth of abstract impressionism to the minimalists and
even performance art, art was no longer just about representing the world with skill. Susie Hodge: That skill faded away after photography was invented. Once photography was invented, that was a skill the camera could do, so artists no longer felt that that was their primary
reason for making art. Art isn’t about beauty. That’s…it never was, really. Narrator: Art generally
became more conceptual and more challenging. But this change wasn’t
popular with everyone. In a 2016 study of the British public, 28% of people don’t consider this art. 65% of people don’t think this is art. And 83% of the public definitely don’t consider this to be art. Over 100 years after its creation, the work is still somehow as divisive and controversial as ever with the public, but that hasn’t stopped
record prices being set. Hodge: I think most people think that modern or contemporary artists are having a laugh at their expense, and nobody wants to feel a fool. Narrator: For many who
are immediately dismissive of these pieces, frustration also often comes
when they see the price. Ana Maria Celis: Most of us,
I think, tend to be cynics, and we, I think, a lot of times associate art with value, and I think that triggers
the question of, well, why is it that much? Or, why such a high value if, you know, I could probably do this? I think, unless you’re in the market and actively buying art, there’s no need to look at art and think about price tag. It shouldn’t be the way you look at art. Narrator: For the artists involved, what looks simple can be the culmination of a lifetime’s work. Take the “Black Square,” for example, painted by turn-of-the-century avant-garde artist Kazimir Malevich. This simple black painting
didn’t come out of nowhere. It’s the result of 20 years of simplification and development. When it was shown, the “Black Square” was
a revolutionary symbol, exhibited at the top corner of the room, a spot reserved for
orthodox religious icons. Making this work wasn’t exactly
an easy decision either, and in 1930, Stalin’s regime confiscated Malevich’s artworks and manuscripts, and he was jailed for two months. Hodge: Yes, the white
canvases or the black canvases are very rarely all they’ve done. They haven’t just come out of school and said, “I could paint a black canvas.” I mean, as much as we might
think we could do that, yes, we could do that, but the artist has thought of it and probably had a journey, quite a long journey, and
a process to get there. Narrator: The works aren’t
just made for profit. It’s often only after the artist is dead that the art can fetch
the incredible price that it’s reached today. In 2008, one of Malevich’s abstract works sold for $60 million, and the demand for these
important modern works is only going to increase. Celis: The natural trend is for
you to see a rise in prices, but that’s because it’s, these true masterpieces are rare to find because they’re really all in museums. Narrator: But setting an
actual price can be tough. In the end, the value is only going to be what people are willing to pay. Celis: As long as there’s
going to be artists producing, there’s always going to be sort of shifts in tendencies and
tastes, I would say also, in tastes in the market. Narrator: It seems like every year there’s a new record price, and as extreme wealth
inequality increases, so do the number of millionaires willing to pay the fortune
required for these works. No matter what the artist intended, art is now seen as an
easy investment by many, and companies have appeared
to treat art purely as an asset for financial gain. But despite the ever-increasing prices of the modernist masterpieces, for 99% of the artists out there, their work has always
been a labor of love. Josef Neet: There are
obviously people out there with a lot of money who view art just to be a commodity and nothing else, but there’s gonna be people who purchase or engage with it because they take genuine pleasure from it or it stimulates them or
they feel it enriches them. I’m an abstract painter. Not really dealing much with form. I became quite obsessed; I was painting all day and all night, and it was just something that really, that kind of took ahold of me, so. It’s not easy being an artist in London. There’s a lot of really
good talent out there. I think you’ve really gotta be good to actually make any money. You don’t have the, I
suppose, network, initially. Yeah, it’s a really expensive habit, to be honest. I suppose that everybody’s
got their vices, but it’s my kind of passion and hobby, so that’s where all my time, effort, and kind of spare finances go. Narrator: Trends in the market may change, and prices will shift, but the popularity of modern and contemporary art isn’t going anywhere.

Art in Embassies Director Ellen Susman remarks at 2015 Medal of Arts Ceremony

Art in Embassies Director Ellen Susman remarks at 2015 Medal of Arts Ceremony


SUSMAN: Hello everybody, welcome, I’m Ellen
Susman, the Director of Art in Embassies, and it’s my pleasure to welcome the Secretary
of State and all of you to the second Art in Embassies Medal of Arts awards. Today we honor 7 artists whose talent and
dedication to their work and the mission of cultivating dialogue and exchange through
the of visual arts has enriched our program for many many years. But first a warm welcome
to the ambassador from China to the United States, his Excellency Cui Tiankai, and to
the executive director of the Mexican Institute, Laura Ramírez-Rasgado. I would also like
to acknowledge our own State Department luminaries, Tony Blinken the Deputy Secretary of State,
and the Director of the Overseas Buildings Operations, Lydia Muniz who administers the
United States effort around the world to build both sustainable and secure new embassies. Heartfelt thanks and gratitude to the sponsors
of our luncheon, Jill and Jay Bernstein, Blake Bern, Gail and Al Engleberg, Jeanie and Mickey
Klein, Joe Karolwater, Sarah Morgan, Shelly Ruben, Laurie Tish, and Sarah and Gary Walkowitz.
I’m also immensely grateful to Dick and Sue Wallick, former ambassador Cathy Hall
and her husband Craig of Hall Wines for so graciously donating the delicious wine on
your tables. And finally to Art in Embassies amazing staff.
You will meet somebody from our office at every table. Without them there would be no
curated temporary or permanent exhibitions for ambassadors or embassies. No web presence,
no cultural outreach, and no publications like the beautiful booklets at every seat
which is a perfect example of the more than 70 we produce every year. Now that the acknowledgements are done, I’d
like to say a few quick words about why we’re here, about what matters, and it is this.
We are all in this room because at the core of our being we believe that art can and does
change lives. It can create meaning and bridge a divide, show us something new, show us something
old in a new way. Enliven, and help us to question ourselves and the world around us. As art classes and funding are cut from schools
and public programs, Art in Embassies is proof that the visual arts matter on a huge and
global scale. I recently received a fortune cookie that read, “Be brave enough to live
creatively” and looking at the artists today receiving the award there can be no doubt
that this is their mantra. All of you are driven to create. Your works will forever
grace the walls of our embassies around the world. Your art is often the first and only
vision of America that people in another country see. And as they walk into an annex or stand
in line for a visa, your art welcomes them in to the home of democracy. Art in Embassies works with young emerging
artists, older established artists, American artists, international artists and when we
go in to a foreign country, the work of the artists of that host country hangs on the
walls alongside yours. That is power, that is conversation and that is diplomacy. Artists
themselves are often the most well-spoken about the place art has in our lives. Bill
Viola, the master of contemporary video art, said this last summer: “The hallmarks of
all human beings is creativity and all of us in this room are creative in one way or
another. But before creativity can manifest, there must be inspiration which starts as
a tiny spark in the human heart, a recognition of something that touches us or catches us
off guard. And then finally, there’s mystery, the most important of all. Today we live in
a world of reflections and mirrors. The mirror reflects only what is shown, to learn something
new one must break the mirror to discover what is beyond.” I thank you for your contribution, for helping
us around the world, and Art in Embassies is counting on everybody in this room to continue
expanding our mission. And now, the Secretary. Sometimes you meet someone, and you know that
they’re destined for greatness. I first met Secretary Kerry in New Hampshire in 1972
when I was 21 at his friend George Butler’s true farm. We were all working to help elect
George McGovern that cold winter and John had his own dreams and a plan for life dedicated
to public service. The synchronicity of life never ceases to amaze me and it is my honor
to serve our Secretary of State, a man who has worked tirelessly his entire life to make
this country and our world a better place to live. Ladies and gentlemen, Secretary of
State John Kerry. APPLAUSE

The Joy of Wood Carving

The Joy of Wood Carving


Once you take up carving you’re never
gonna want to stop Today I’m going to carve a simple
project just for the fun of it. It’s going to be a birch themed wooden spoon I’ve heard a lot of people say they’d
like to start carving but just don’t think they have the talent for it. Well
Bob Ross once said “Talent is a pursuit interest. Anything you’re willing toWell
Bob Ross once said “Talent is a pursuit
practice you can do.” Some of the first things started carving was wooden spoons, cups, and little twig roosters. I had a lot of fun making them and giving them away as gifts. Pearl wasn’t sure what to think of her
reflection. The only way to experience the joy of
carving is to get yourself a good set of carving knives and start whittling. Thanks for watching I’ll see y’all on
the next one!

Arthur Jafa: APEX | ARTIST STORIES

Arthur Jafa: APEX | ARTIST STORIES


Arthur Jafa, Artist: I lived in New York for about fifteen years, and it was the heyday of newsstands, and magazines, and bookstores. We went to Central Park West. Sunday nights there would be bundles of magazines like in the streets. For a person that obsessively collected images, it was like a lightbulb went off in my head. So I spent a lot of time flipping through magazines, buying magazines, and cutting out the images. Just like designers have mood boards. That’s what they are, they’re mood boards. And like, most people who work on commercials and stuff, they do some version of this. It’s just, for me, from the beginning I used them to corral ideas around specific film projects, but at some point, it was just like anything
that I was interested in. The pictures moved from just being in between the pages of a sketchbook to being in a proper book, where they could be displayed or shared with people. I’ve long since stopped making books. As soon as I got my first laptop and stumbled onto Bridge and Adobe Creative Suite, There was the internet, all of a sudden, there was Google, and you could just search images, APEX is a file, foremost, and you get to see it as a grid. With APEX in particular, it was a bunch of
images that I had gathered in relationship to a narrative. Like there’s a script, and all this other kind of stuff to go with it. If, like, you look at it globally, you can see there’s a certain almost tonal thing that’s happening. It’s in the blues and the blacks. Occasionally, you’ll have these bursts of
red. APEX, as much as anything, is the most advanced implementation of these things that I had discovered or read about or stumbled on. I think it’s fairly human to recoil from things that are disturbing. I’ve definitely trained myself to push towards things that disturbed me. If something disturbs me, first and foremost, I’m just fascinated by why I’m disturbed by it. I mean, I’m interested in how a picture,
which is not real, can affect you. Showing pain is hard. I’ve had a cut-out of this since I was seventeen years old. It is a back which is marked in a very complicated kind of way. It’s the most beautiful image I’ve ever
seen. I was forced to articulate the complexity of an image that’s both horrifying and attractive. Why is it that I think that particular image
is the emblem of the black experience in the Americas? Ex-Slave Gordon, which by and large pops up in almost everything that I do, is as much as anything, an emblem of how the black experience is this complex of majesty and misery that are, like, inextricably bound up. There’s something more powerful about taking the thing that is the most abject thing, And making it the most valuable thing. It’s all associative. It’s all about relation. What is the relationship between the thing
that’s in front of you, the thing that preceded, and the thing that’s following. The whole idea was always, if you took this thing and that thing, and you overlap them, like, the place in which they overlapped was you.

Photography degree at Texas A&M University-Commerce

Photography degree at Texas A&M University-Commerce


Texas A&M University Commerce has a great art department and
especially photography I’v been able to take commercial classes
basic digital photography classes and this pinhole class kinda just rounded
it off I got the whole every side of photography
and so it’s been really a really good experience getting
my photography degree here and getting a taste of basically every piece of photography so I can really make a a good decision about what I want to do
and I want to become

CC) How to make BEACH WAVE Acrylic pouring fluid art – Swipe technique with Decoart Metallic color!

CC) How to make BEACH WAVE Acrylic pouring fluid art – Swipe technique with Decoart Metallic color!


Hi guys! This is a short video so please don’t skip it! I bought Decoart Metallic color from Amazon
and used international shipping to Korea. Korea has almost no metallic color acrylic paint. I purchased a variety of metallic acrylic paints. Today I used only sapphire color. I also used Pebeo iridescent color. Blue green and Turquise / Indigo and Blue black Decoart Sapphire. Sapphire color was used alone. The color is so pretty !! I’m angry that no such metallic paints exist in Korea. We also prepare white. The concentration of the paint is a little thin. not thin. Floetrol 15g + Liquitex pouring 5g + Water 3g
+ Color 20g Put the paints in the cup one by one. Add a little white to the cup. Because it will express waves. But the white paint didn’t work much. Pour the paint zigzag on the canvas. Pour over the paint layer. The remaining paint is poured into the corners. Stretch the paint. Pour white paint on top of the canvas. Swipe white paint. Swipe the paint off the canvas slightly. Doesn’t it look like a wave? Looks like bubbles on beach waves. The work came out as I wanted. I am so happy. Today I did not use silicone oil. Does something seem wrong? No Stretch the paint. Stretch the wave to give the feeling of the wave. Move the paint while looking at the shape. Doesn’t it look like a wave? The work came out as I wanted. Today’s picture is totally successful. Turquoise color is hard to see. Success! I did Dutch pour with the remaining paint.
Failed.