Easy Mini Abstract Art Inspiration PLUS A Color Challenge

Easy Mini Abstract Art Inspiration PLUS A Color Challenge


how have you been getting on with your
mini abstracts I have some more inspiration and a mini abstract
challenge for you today that I hope is gonna motivate your art for this week so
I introduces exercise in my art video last week and it’s actually one that I
talk about and give step by steps for in my get creating book and I’ve already
shared a little on why I like doing these types of exercises and why I think
they’re really useful and can really help in your art so if you missed that
video I will put a link below in the description for it as well as a link to
all the products that I’m using today now this week I thought I would share
the process of another mini abstract but let’s take this one up a little bit and
let’s go for challenge something that I hope will inspire you to do a mini
abstract – so are you up for it do you want a mini abstract challenge now the
challenge I’m gonna base it around colors so if you’re needing a bit of
color inspiration then this is a really handy trick and something you can use to
inspire your work or just get you started so the particular palette that
we’re going to use I want you to either pick a hot color palette or a cold color
palette and then pick a contrasting color from the other color family so if
you picked a hot color palette then you’re gonna pick a cold color to
contrast it and vice versa so get yourself started basically pick a couple
of colors before you get going that are either from the hot or the cold color
family so I’ve gone with cold for mine and my main color is going to be blue
then pick yourself a single color that you’re going to use sparingly but this
time pick it from the opposite temperature color family so for my piece
I’ve got my cold blues and then I’m gonna contrast it with a yellow which is
more of a hotter color now this particular exercise there’s another
version of this that you could also try out as well so here’s some more
inspiration to help you with your color combining and your mini abstracts as
well how about just for a complementary color colors that
sit opposite to each other on the color wheel so for instance my blue the
complementary color to blue is orange so instead of using the yellow as my
contrasting color for my blues I could have used orange today so that’s another
way of looking at this color combining that I hope you’ll have fun with it you
could probably do all of them and just do an abstract with all of them and see
which ones you like best now the other colors that you can use in
this are neutrals like blacks whites and grays so even though I’ve just picked
blue as my main color they are actually two very different blues so they work
quite nicely as contrasts in their own little color bubble and you can watch to
see how I work my main cold colors together and then how I add in my warm
color contrast in this mini abstract there’s just so many ways that you could
do this so don’t feel restricted and just go for it
I remember you don’t have to do the same with me you don’t have to use the same
colors you don’t have to use the same marks this mini abstract exercise is all
about discovering your own mark making your own light your own dislikes your
own color palettes so pick things that you really want to use today and you
really want to just experiment with now when I’m doing these mini abstracts I
really try hard to stay in a moment and to work more on impulse than planning
you can do this you can easily plan these if you want that’s entirely up to
you if you prefer to do that then go ahead and plan them but for me these
mini abstracts are much more about listening to what my gut is telling me
to do and you know where it wants to go next so it’s very reactive and I’m not
really sure where the abstract will go but it is so many that it doesn’t really
take that long before it feels finished to me and I enjoy the so minimalist feel
of these pieces but you know again you don’t have to stick with that yourself
even though we’re working on a very small piece of paper
you could just cover the whole thing and do whatever you liked with it you could
spend a long time on it you could spend a short amount of time on it whatever it
feels right for you now for my piece dad there’s something about the rhythm in it
that I really really like and there’s both a symmetry and an asymmetric
symmetry in this piece today and down to the sort of just the the different
elements that I’ve used the different ways I’ve added in some mark making and
then in the whole piece as well you can see some of the symmetry some of the
asymmetric symmetry that’s going on there and I think I really like that
about this piece but you’ll see that more when we get to the end and as this
piece grew my ideas about it grew too and I changed up layers as I went along
so this is part of what I was talking about being more reactive to it for
example I extended the dark blue area after adding the splatter texture so I
had already put down the dots I put down some dark blue I added the splatter and
then I was right I think actually I needed to make the darker blue a bigger
part of the dot pattern and I wasn’t worried about changing up the shapes of
those dots it was just another way that the details in this piece that have
reacted and changed and as I went along I also quite like the way that the brush
line tails off or kind of feathers on the bottom right-hand side and how that
adds another contrast to the kind of lines and the block colors that are here
in this piece and just as with last week’s piece I’m using a creep paint in
three different ways so I’ve got neat paint from – I’ve got watered down paint
but then I’ve also got the acrylic ink in my paint pens and adding more pattern
detour the neutral colour is a really great way to add texture and interest
but without having to introduce another active color because we picked our
colors at the beginning and we went with a very particular
a pallet so the white and black you know is a no-pressure way of adding more
details without having to worry about putting in a different color and just
shifting the way this color combination works and what I haven’t mentioned is
that one of my blue colors is actually an iridescent so there’s another texture
layer so we’re going on here and that adds to the peace as well so actually
doesn’t take that much to add a lot of texture and interest to many abstracts
I’ve only used a very small amount of product but there’s quite a lot to look
at so I have a real play with your shapes your brushes what kind of brush
marks you can get try feathering some of your layers try adding them as blocks
try adding the paint thickly or thinly that’s gonna change the look as well and
if you can add a lot of interest with just a few colors less than a handful of
colors and just some a few small marks imagine what you’re gonna do with a
larger color palette and on a larger surface so have lots of fun playing with
this one have loads of fun picking out your color palettes I would love to see
it also you know do share with me on Instagram I would be happy to come over
and have a look so don’t forget to play with the color challenge today and I
look forward to seeing your hot color palettes with cold contrasts or your
cold color palette with hot contrasts and if you’re looking for some more
video inspiration for other mixed media art then watch these videos next and
I’ll see you there

Art Sherpa Buying Guide and Art studio Supply List

Art Sherpa Buying Guide and Art studio Supply List


[opening music] Hi! I’m Cinnamon Cooney. I am your Art Sherpa, and I am really excited to be sharing this with you today. This is about how to set up a studio as a beginner. I get asked a lot what my recommendations are for what brushes to I need to buy? What paint do I need to buy? What do I need to have in my studio? Now, when I started on YouTube, I did actually make one of these videos, but having been here for a little bit, I’ve come to understand from answering your questions and constantly being in a conversation with you that you might need some more information on things. And honestly, we’ve expanded the project set in the conversation from the beginning. So I am really happy to be doing this update. I think it’s gonna help you out a lot. In the description below, if you click the little “more” button, there’ll be some links. There’s a link to The Art Sherpa dot com, where this is all gonna be written out so that you can have it, and print it out, and look at it, and have it anytime you wanna see it. I’m also probably gonna stick it on blogger and I’m gonna throw it up on Facebook. Cause I want to make sure you guys have the information you need and that art store experience, instead of being frustrating and overwhelming, is a lot of fun. It’s like Woohooo! I’m going to the art store and I’m gonna get a big ol’ haul! That’s what I really want for you, and I want you guys to have an easy time and I want you guys to be relaxed and mellow about your art experience, even though right now I’m not that mellow. It’s kind of strange but, ba da be da. Kinda owly mood. Alright. The number one question that you guys have been asking me is, what is my basic palette? And this is an interesting kind of question for an artist because I have a base palette that’s a limited palette, that I use here on YouTube, and I did this so that you guys could save some money. So that I wasn’t constantly painting with crazy paints. I kind of try to go to the same colors again and again for projects, and on occasion add a new color for fun and interest. So my base palette is this. If you come to the table you’re gonna see this here. Alright, so I’m gonna push these forward a little bit. My basic palette is Titanium White. Mars Black. Dioxazine Purple. Quinacridone Magenta. Burnt Sienna. That is not in it. Phthalo Blue. Cadmium Yellow Hue. Cadmium Red Hue. Yellow Oxide. So that’s what I really started out with when I was on YouTube. But there was a couple things that came up with that base palette, I would like to talk to you about real quick, which is these which is these two fabulous, delicious, yummy, wonderful Cadmium colors. Now listen. The reason I recommend hue for people, a lot of times, is that real cadmium pigment is super expensive. Kind of only necessary if you’re a professional. There is a difference between hue and true cadmium pigment that’s why we all paint with it. But also there’s controversy. That’s right. There’s so much controversy around these two pigments. In fact, when I’m taking a break from politics, I just get into the cadmium controversy to just kind of keep myself up on that energy. So, these are hue. Hue is perfectly safe. Hue doesn’t have any cadmium in it, and if I was painting with kids or I had any kind of a metal allergy, I’d be kind of inclined to use hue. But honestly, you should always be checking your paints and materials to make sure what the safety guidelines are. Because just cause it’s acrylic painting and it says non-toxic on the bottle, doesn’t mean you can drink or eat any of it. I really say this all the time on my show. Don’t eat paint. Now, real cadmium pigment, though, dun-dun-dun. Look. This has been studied a lot. And the paint companies have looked into this. There was a European study done about this. In fact I’ve included a link to a really important article about this. Awesome. You know what else? There is… Where did it go? I don’t know where- Oh! Pyrrole Red. Now, this is actually comparable to pure cadmium pigment to the eye. It is also comparable to cadmium pigment to the pocket book. So you know, I’m gonna say for just the purposes of being a student, you know, stick with hue. Enjoy that. If you find yourself a professional artist, and you really know what you’re talking about you’re gonna know that cadmium has already been really investigated and short of guzzling it down, and we’re back to don’t eat paint. You’re all good. Alright. Base palette, controversy, addressed it. Those are the colors. The list is down there. Other things I like to have in my studio is palete paper. You guys are always asking me, what are you painting on? I paint on this kind of wax paper called palette paper. This is not the ony solution in the universe. Not at all. There’s lot of solutions. There’s plates. There’s kind of glass palettes. I just really like this one. I like the Gray Matters because it shows up better on camera. And I also like the Strathmore. It’s a really good palette paper. So. That’s what I’m painting on. That’s what I’m painting with. Guess what else I have. I have an expanded color palette. That’s my complex palette, and those are a whole bunch of other colors. I’m gonna pull them over here. I’ve got Ultramarine Blue. I’m got Burnt Umber. I’ve got Phthalo Green. I’ve got Quinacridone Red. I’ve got the Aqua, or Southern Ocean Blue. The Prussian (blue). The Hooker’s Green, no they’re not kidding. The Naphthol Crimson. The Australian Sienna. The Cad Yellow Light. The Cad Red Light. Zinc White. Or Mixing White. Those are just my toys. You don’t have to have to have all those paints to enjoy your art experience. I’m just telling you what I have going on because you ask. But you know what? The truth is, this is your art journey. This is your studio. You don’t have to paint with any of these brands. And you don’t have to have all these colors. All of the projects have a materials list and most of the creators out there that do lessons or have workshops or teach things, they have one of those. And, you know, it’s all good. It’s all viable. There is not one way to do a painting. There is an infinite number of ways of doing paintings, which I like a lot. I like that it doesn’t have a simple, whatever answer. I think it’s important to be able to wash your brushes. There’s been a lot of discussion about this lately. In my previous video I talked about you could just use Dawn soap. And that’s true for synthetic fibers. I don’t really recommend that for a four hundred dollar Kolinsky sable brush. But for, you know, synthetic brushes, Dawn is great, but I really like “The Master’s Brush Cleaner.” And then I really have fallen in love with “Jack’s Linseed Soap.” There are about fifty other brush cleaners on the planet. I’m just telling you the two that I enjoy. I also always keep in my studio ninety-one percent rubbing alcohol. Now, seventy-one also works, but this sucker takes dried paint out of stuff. If you have a stick, that you’ve just left your brush, and it’s just a stick now, this will recover it. It’s really incredible. Got a video in the i-Card, all about it. Painter’s tape. This is not what’s at Home Depot. It’s an artist’s tape. It’s by Scotch 3M. You know, I get this for an inexpensive amount of money where I’m at, but it’s cost to cost. Just some sort of tape that really helps you make a straight line. I talk a lot about having chalk. Or watercolor pencils. But what I’m really talking about is, you need a way to make marks on a canvas, that doesn’t bleed into your paint. That’s all it is. I got these Artist Loft really inexpensively. I got this chalk from my kids. Mm-hmm. Took it right away from them. Ok. Canvases. I have these packs of canvases. And let’s be honest. Some of the canvases have some crazy coatings on them lately that can resist paint. I’ve gotten some really good reports from you guys. There’s some people who just lightly rinse them off and allow them to dry and that seems to be fixing the coating um, applying a coat of gesso seems to be fixing the coating. I like to use like a flow agent and then just brush it on and that fixes the coating. But you’re looking for a pre-stretched canvas. These are all kind of stapled on the back, and I get them in economy. You can paint on canvas paper. Yes, you can. You could paint on Bristol paper. There’s a lot of stuff that you can paint on. This is just what I’m painting on. You might paint on masonite board, and that is completely ok. Brushes. You guys ask me a lot about brushes. Where to get ’em. What to get ’em. And everybody’s out of Goldilocks. Alright. I did not know I was gonna be starting such a rigmarole when I discovered, and this is her, the original Goldilocks. Which is a number ten bright by Simply Simmons, extra firm filament. Isn’t she cool? Isn’t she fun? So, here’s the deal. Brushes are an interesting thing, in the life of everybody. Right. Brushes are really fun. But, when I started out, I was like, Hey, just get an economy pack of brushes. If you check the i-Card, if you watch the video, I’m like, Economy pack of brushes. The issue with off brand economy paints, or off brand economy brushes, there really isn’t an oversight for any of these companies and so some of them will make a good brush, but some of them will make a brush where all the bristles will fall out. And I don’t feel like it’s very economical to go buy a cheap brush if all the bristles fall out. I think what’s great is to know what you’re looking for in a brush, and it doesn’t really matter where you buy it as long as you know what you’re looking for. So when I got Goldilocks, she was pretty fantastic. She was three dollars, which, I guess, what she costs most places, and that’s not her official name from the company. By the way. That’s been messing with everybody and I’m really sorry for that. In fact, uh, if you go to The Brush Guys dot com, they actually added the word “Goldilocks” to the listing cause nobody, everyone kept calling them up. I didn’t know them at the time. Going, “I need the Goldilocks brush!” And they were like “I don’t- I don’t know what that brush is.” So, this is her. Number ten. Simply Simmons. Extra firm filament. You know what was messing with you guys, though? I’ll tell you. So, at Michael’s they don’t have this one. They have these two. This is not that brush. This is a fabulous, nice multi-media brush. And this is a great natural bristle for oil. Not the same brush. See how this is the dark filament? And this is white? And this is kind of a sable brown? These are both great brushes but they are not this brush. I like this brush. I like this brush because the filaments are very firm. Too firm for makeup. Again, if you did the Big Art Quest and you watched the brush one, I’ll talk about that. Now this is actually their long handle. When I say in videos that I don’t like long handle, I’m talking like this long. Not everybody’s got a short handle. I’m gonna have to start over again. If that’s causing anybody any grief, I’m really sorry. This is what they’re calling their long handle. This is a number ten. I just like her because she’s functional and she’s inexpensive. However, she’s not the only brush that does this exact job. This is a Richeson 7530. Number ten bright. Just as good. Right. I just found this. Number ten The Silver Grand Prix. I really actually like this brush quite a lot. I’m really excited about this. And it has a copper ferrule. Which, I think, is super cool. Also is fantastic. And what these three brushes have in common and how I pick, like- I think I didn’t grab my bright again. I’m so silly. Here she is. What I really really like in a bright, what I want in a bright, is these filaments will be short. So when I’m in an art store and I think I’ve got a good flick. In other words, too firm for makeup, but won’t take paint off my car, then I line them up and I actually look to see who has the very shortest filaments. Guess what. This one wins. And then I look to see if they’ve done a real sharp edge on it. That’s what you’re looking for. It doesn’t matter where you find that brush, you’re just gonna want to make sure those filaments don’t come out of it. Right. And you’re gonna want to make sure that they’re short. See, this is what’s called a flat. Look how much longer that is. See the difference between the bright and the flat? We talk about that in the brush quest. Well, that is not gonna be as firm for pushing paint- I love doing this on my face- as these are. So that’s what’s happening there. And I really hope that clears it up. But listen, I’m here. I’m here for questions. I’m here. Now, I have the list of brushes that I think you should start out with. I think everybody needs a number ten bright. Just not because that’s actually true, but that’s my feeling. [chuckles] And that’s my best recommendation to you based on my experience. That’s how I formulate these ideas, is I look back and I go, what would really really help people? What’s really effective? What wouldn’t mess them up? And then I say to myself my number ten bright is my go to brush and so then I recommend that to you. And then I’m like, you need a number six. And you need a number four. This is like a number eight right here. But here’s a number two. I have pulled out, where I put them, I don’t kn- Oh! I put them places. Alright. So here’s like a number four bright. Right. And that’s what a number eight looks- See you need a number four, and you need a number six, and ideally it would be great if you add in an eight and a two to that. Is that in the list? Yes, it is. Well, actually, here’s the list. Then I feel like you need some of these filberts, which were in the list. Right. And a filbert, we’ve learned, through the internet, means cat’s tongue. So basically I’m licking a cat’s tongue on my face. You don’t want to do this with everything because sometimes brushes are made of goat and squirrel. Um. Horrible moment in my life about that recently. But these are just made out of synthetic fibers and they wash easily. We talk a lot about cloud brushes, and you need one. Hard to find a good cloud brush. Hard to find one. Here’s my thoughts on cloud brushes, but I think everyone should have one. This is my favorite cloud brush. I don’t even know what the brand is anymore but I can find it whenever I’m out. The- It’s very thick and stiff and the bristles are shorter. Everyone wants to make thses have really long bristles, but you want shorter for this kind of stiff thing. But the other great cloud brush. This actually came from a sip and paint. Right. Because whenever their brushes get real bad they get rid of them, but this angle, man, that is the idea cloud. And, if you can’t find any of that, this is a deerfoot stippler. See him? Deerfoot stippler. That’s the whole mystery there. A lot of them are soft, cause they’re for watercolor, so you gotta feel them. You need them to be like a thistle. That’s all I’m saying. That’s all I’m saying. Wide brush. Yes! You can use one for painting the house. Yes. Yeah. They have them for paint, and they’re cut for that, and they’re manufactured for it and that’s fantastic, and that’s what I have here. I’m gonna actually do a live on Facebook where I’ll go and show you buying at Home Depot, cause that’s fine. If you want to do happy little trees, you need a fan brush. In acrylic painting, needs to be a stiff filament on this. This is the issue with almost all fan brushes. Is they’re not firm enough. Are you getting kind of a trend? Because I’m painting in heavy bodied paints. I’m not painting in soft bodied paints. When people paint with soft bodied paints, guess what they like. The like the softer filaments. But we’re not. We’re painting with heavy bodied paints, so we like the firmer filaments. So you need the detail rounds, and I have that listed as a six, a four, and a two. Right. But also I keep talking about the micro mini’s. This is what I’m talking about. They’re miniature brushes. You can find them in the miniature painting section. You’re just talking about teeny tiny, teeny tiny little brush. What are those for? That’s for branches. When you’re like, “I can’t paint branches!” That’s about having a fluid paint. This is in the recommended list. Fluid soft body paints. Branches!!! Solved. All those branch problems, right here. Totally solved. Gesso. Cause stuff happens, and then you don’t like it. And then you want to paint over it. Or the coating sucks. Gesso. Gotta have it. Yes, you have to varnish. Spray varnish. Have to do it outside. I’m allergic to this stuff. My husband has to use it because I can’t do the propellants in it. This is my point about art supplies. Why we don’t need to be hysterical about what’s in our art supplies. Read everything. Always read the safety on every single art supply. Right? This is not edible stuff. This is not food coloring. So, it may be non-toxic. It may not have the OC’s, but it might have stuff going on with it. The paint manufacturer’s really like you. They want you to keep painting. They’re gonna wrote a whole bunch of information on the bottle. Always read everything. I don’t know your allergies. I don’t know what you’ve got going on at home. So if you read what’s on the bottles, or on the website, then you know. And there’s always, always, and I’m even here to help with that. There’s always an exchange. If you’re like, “Man, I’m allergic to this thing,” I might know a product. Some artist in the aisle next to you might know a product. We’re a helpful community. That is just how we are. We like to help each other out. So, I like to have that there. Glazing liquid. And I have retarders. So, this is my favorite of the glazings. I like this one because it slows down the drying time. However, that’s relevant to me cause I’m in the studio and it’s really really hot and it dries out my paint real fast. You might want a glazing liquid that dries fast. That would be the Liquitex glazing, but this one dries slower and does glazes. And then this is a retarder. So when they say the words open or retarder, and I think it’s a good thing to have in your studio, this is what they’re talking about. I can’t- Oh, hairdryer! Doesn’t have to be a good one. I got one of those. And easels. This is an easel by a company called Jack Richeson. This is a Best Easel. This is a Best Easel. This is the European. I have it in the description. I have it in this list. I’m not trying to hide it from you. But here’s the thing on easels. There’s a lot of brands. I’ve just always painted on this. This is like seriously, from the time I was in the crib, I been wanting one of these easels. My mom has just always had them in the house. Do you have traditions like this in your family? I do, definitely. This table easel I have here. This is my favorite style of table easel. I love this, cause it goes like this, and it sits very nicely on the table, and it holds a lot of different size canvases, and it’s so stable. But here’s what you need out of an easel. Needs to be stable. Shake ’em. Go to the art store and shake ’em. Mine’s like a rock. I love my easel. I’ve had a bunch from this company, other companies, I just know this company. I am not sponsored at all. This is just what’s happening in my studio, and this is just my way of saying, hey, this is what I’m experiencing. I want you to experience a good time and hopefully together and in an ongoing conversation that we’re having you can have a great time stocking up your studio. I have the list set up in the order that you might want to add to it because, look. At the end of the day this is just art, and people do great art with a number two pencil, and lined paper. You’ve gotta do what is best for you and you’ve got to- My general recommendation is this. Get the best materials that your budget allows for. And buy from a company that cares that you did. You know, and those are generally companies that have websites. Have social media. Have more information about their products. You know I- If you’re in Australia, you know, the two brands I know from Australia are Mont Marte and Matisse. Right. But you want somebody who has laid their boots on the ground that wants your business that cares. So if you get a tube of paint your tube of paint should never be clumpy. If you get a tube of paint that isn’t right you want them to care about that experience. You want to have somebody to write to say hey, this is what happened to me. If you have a question about a product, you want that. If a company isn’t willing to provide that to you I don’t really think they should get your business. That’s my opinion. Right. So, that’s what I recommend to people. That’s what I do in my own life. If a company is willing to take care of me then that makes me feel really good about buying from them. So it’s not that you have to have my brand of paint. You don’t. I just, I like these. These make me happy. This is a personal choice. And I don’t mind telling you want my personal choice is, but your personal choice is valid too, and I support that. And I hope this is a good, updated, um… materials list video for you to help you, you know, set up your studio, and I hope that blog, The Art Sherpa dot com helps out. Check the i-Card for the quest cause we go deep. You think this was deep? We actually go deeper. We go on for a really long time talking about all this stuff. But this is the most updated stuff, and you know what? I’ll probably be making another one of these. Later! Because, when it needs to change, it needs to change. I hope you guys are great. I hope you feel validated and loved in your lives. And I want to see you at the easel really really soon. [Come join us live. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday at eleven a.m. central] [Or enjoy one of the hundreds of paintings available on replay anytime.]

N’Doul: The Art of Foreshadowing

N’Doul: The Art of Foreshadowing


Stardust Crusaders is one of the few parts
that gets a good amount of flak for the minor villains you see. Which I can see in some cases. While I’m not as interested with those villains,
I like what they were used for and what energy was given for the fights they were in. That goes with fights like Wheel of Fortune
and The Sun. While Part 3 had its fair share of serious
moments, it also had a lot of comical moments with them. Which was fine, but this was before Dio’s
elite. While we had a moment or two where it seemed
like we lost a member, we got that member back. Once the 9 Glory Gods of Egypt were introduced,
it was a game changer. Or well, in my opinion you only have about
of the four posing a ridiculous threat in my opinion. You can try to figure who I’m not taking
as seriously. But, I think that having N’Doul as the first
Glory God was probably Araki’s best foot forward. With how much power, and effect he’s had,
he’s one of the best Glory Gods. The portrayal of the 9 Glory Gods is shown
off as if every stand user they will encounter in the volumes or episodes after are going
to be on the same calibre of N’Doul. Some of them are made for impactful mental
fights, and some are there to define specific characters. N’Doul has all the important aspects we
get from the other Gods, and he does this as natural as possible. He’s not only the one God to have all these
notable traits, but he’s also the one God to fight the whole Stardust Crusaders. Jotaro, Kakyoin, Polnareff, Joseph, Abdul,
and Iggy were all present and he could’ve taken four of the 6 mentioned. The two he couldn’t take out were the two
that defeated him. N’Doul and Geb are shown to be this powerful
force during the fight, but we were able to get that even before the Crusaders known exactly
what’s going on. This one small scene where you see N’Doul
against a fly. He almost catches it on his own, which by
itself seems crazy since he’s blind. The fly gets away, and he talks about how
he needs more practice maybe. But, instead of trying to catch it again,
he bounces a rock off the ground to exactly strike where the Fly would be. How he’s able to be so vigilant and precise
without requiring vision foreshadows that he’s not like any of the other stand users
they’ve encountered. He’s also one of the very few villains to
have damaged and impact on the Stardust Crusaders. Along the lines of Stand users like Vanilla
Ice, Midler, the Darby’s, and a very few others. Now, getting down into the fight itself. This battle while being an engaged physical
fight, is an intense taxing mind battle. Even before seeing Geb attack anyone, you
can see Jotaro and Joseph being overwhelmingly confused on how a member of the Speedwagon
foundation could drown in the desert. I still don’t understand how the fish got
involved, but I think it was probably done to make the scene even more bizarre. With what happens once Geb attacks, it immediately
puts everyone into defense mode where they’re all trying to figure what should they do. It’s a fast stand that’s strong enough
to rip someone’s head off and put it into a canteen, so you know why they’d be on
such high alert. There’s not much they can do while being
cautious because they don’t know if that Stand would be able to combat their stand. They’re also extremely weary since they
know that this stand user doesn’t care about who they’re going for, and confused because
by process of elimination there should’ve only been one enemy left. There wasn’t a single clue about the 9 Gods
since they had no reason to think there would be more than the tarot card stand users. So, while staying on high alert they try to
think of ways to approach or find the user, and that was the probably one of the most
logical things to do with all the information they’ve compiled over the time of the journey. Yet, this is something that went completely
past what they know. In the midst of talking about Kakyoin being
hypocritical, Geb forming right under their noses. Taking Kakyoin out of the picture was a huge
power move for the plot, but also a huge move from N’Doul to show what they’re against. Polnareff running instead of trying to defend
Kakyoin had shows a feeling that we’ve seen from Polnareff a couple of times, and that’s
him being afraid of the unknown. Since he doesn’t understand how the stand
works or where it’s coming from, the only thing he could do is run. He almost loses his foot, but everyone gets
into the buggy. For what happens after, it’s N’Doul showing
the gap of intelligence and power between him and the Crusaders, but it also shows how
N’Doul can lose focus at times if he’s making light of a situation or he’s too
focused on one thing. Once everyone else is incapacitated and Joseph
is being as useful as he can, it’s a fight between Jotaro and N’Doul. Iggy is also there, but not willingly. One thing that I will continuously think of
in this fight is the range. N’Doul was 4kilometers away from the Crusaders,
rounding it down that’s 13 thousand feet. He was destroying the Crusaders and he was
nowhere near them. If N’Doul was on kill mode the whole time,
it would’ve been game over for everyone. Now, on Jotaro and N’Doul. There were three things that majorly defined
the fight, and two those were out of the box tactics. N’Doul had made Geb kick up sand high enough
so it would fall on Iggy and Jotaro. By doing that, he was able to hear the sand
raining down on them, and could sense them through the sound. That’s one of the smartest tactics I’ve
seen in Part 3, and I am happy that it happened. For a good amount of the fight, I was on N’Doul
said because of how intelligent he’s being presented to be. With being able to combat the entire team,
and taking out 3 of the members, you have to give him credit. Now, what combats N’Doul is how unorthodox
Jotaro can be. In the next fights against the other Glory
Gods, Jotaro has shining moments. These shining moments happen because of Jotaro
doing things that no other person would do. Most of these things can either put himself
in danger or others, but if there’s a chance of Jotaro and others prospering for it, then
he’s down to take that chance. Since Jotaro was being given up by Iggy, and
N’Doul was coming after him, he solved two issues with one tactic. And that tactic? HE THREW IGGY. With how hard he threw Iggy, he’s forcing
N’Doul to recall Geb to defend himself, and Iggy must try to get a grip and use his
stand against N’Doul to stay alive. It’s genius, and something that not everyone
would think of to do since it’s so unconventional. To be honest, I stopped everything once he
threw Iggy had to sit down for a bit because it seemed comical, but it was a smart decision
the whole time. Once N’Doul and Iggy defend themselves from
each other, N’Doul notices that Jotaro is gone. He gets overwhelmed trying to search from
him, but then we all see where he is. This is the third and final thing that defined
the fight, was the silent stand off between Jotaro and N’Doul. Looking at the manga, you can see the tension
purely off of the sound symbols alone, adding on to that you have Iggy who’s on the edge
look at the stand off happen. This is what we finally built up to, and now
we’re ending it off with not only a signature stand off, but a battle of the mind too. Jotaro goes without saying anything for 13
pages, and N’Doul is the only one talking because he realized that Jotaro got the drop
on him. Now, it’s a western draw, and the walking
stick is the counter. This is something that I credit the anime
for, but still believe that the manga had done this better due to the tone that Araki
set being formulated and executed better. When there’s major moments in the manga,
you know it’s important due to how space is taken up. The attack almost took up two whole pages,
but the draw itself took up four pages. The ease in tone after the draw is an extreme
calm tone. In a fight like this, you would think that
the fighters would have a sort of Joseph and Wamuu tone going with how good the fight was,
but it’s completely shifted once N’Doul attacks himself. Once that happens, N’Doul sheds light on
everything that’s been going on and what led up to him coming for the Crusaders. N’Doul was a man who had never feared death. There was never anyone that wasn’t a stand
user that could combat him. He was even above the law since he could do
everything under their nose. But the one time he had he wished to not meet
his fate, was when he was under Dio. Dio was the first person to acknowledge the
value of N’Doul, and he praises Dio for being the God of the forsaken ones. He says that evil needs a saviour as well. Jotaro sees it as Dio making people into fanatics,
but N’Doul isn’t technically wrong. While Dio is using the stand users for his
own personal gain, he’s only using them because he sees potential in what they do. He comforts them for what they are, and needs
them because of who they are. He wants to them to embrace their evil and
build upon it. While he is manipulating them, it wouldn’t
be a surprise to them. They’re evil, and he’s evil, so it only
makes sense that it would happen. Though, that’s something that I’ve never
thought of really. You don’t associate a term like God for
someone like Dio, you think of the other guy. But to think of an evil counter part that’s
exactly equal in the eyes of his followers, it’s new and interesting. The arc is finished up with Iggy showing his
companionship with Jotaro, and doing Iggy things with it. It’s possible that he now respects Jotaro
for defeating someone that made him cower in fear, but he’s still Iggy so he’s still
going to do what he does. This arc was one of the most eventful ones
you’ll see in Part 3, and what it did held weight. He set a tone that made the reader or watcher
think that there was going to be enemies like N’Doul that would possibly have the same
amount of impact. While that isn’t the case, it did a great
job for what it was going for. I appreciate N’Doul and everything he did. Well, except for what he did to Kakyoin, but
at the same time he gave him some cool scars so we’re good. Thank you N’Doul. Thank you all for watching, I hope you enjoyed. If you like character or arc analysis, I have
a playlist with few of my others. Follow my media in the description to stay
updated, and join my discord to met others with the same interests. Hope I
see you all in the next one. Until then, peace out and God speed.

How The U.S. Used Jazz, Art & Orwell To Fight The Soviets

How The U.S. Used Jazz, Art & Orwell To Fight The Soviets


Why are some of the biggest names
in the culture of the West during the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s –
why are they linked to the CIA? – How do you fight a war? You may fight it with guns,
bullets, tanks, missiles, drones or maybe even soldiers. There’s strategy.
There’s bloodshed. Homes are demolished.
Entire populations might vanish. But, how do you win a war? With poetry. ♪♪ In his book, “The Master and Margarita,”
Russian writer Mikhail Bulgakov infamously wrote,
“Manuscripts do not burn.” The line was a reference to Soviet
censorship of books, about how ideas ultimately cannot be destroyed,
even if the books that hold them are. It’s a powerful statement
about the immortality of ideas. But while Bulgakov was right, ideas
still can be replaced or made obsolete. And that’s actually the outlook
the United States unwittingly adopted during the Cold War to fight the Soviets. – President Truman officially announces
the end of German resistance. When Nazi Germany fell in 1945,
the U.S. and the Soviet Union rose as the two major world powers. And naturally, they rose in
direct opposition to one another. The Cold War was, at its root,
partly about competing ideas on how to govern,
how to build economies. The Americans knew that
weapons and proxy wars wouldn’t be enough to fight the war. They had to fight the ideas that were
foundational to Soviet ideology. And so came the art and the music. ♪♪ The CIA, for 20 years,
until their program was discovered, were secretly promoting certain artists
and intellectuals and musicians and historians and
philosophers and writers, in a covert way, it was the kind of
collective, cultural NATO. The Soviets, early in the Cold War years
as well as Communists in other countries, mocked the United States
as a cultural wasteland. They would point to Soviet art,
cinema, literature and dance as evidence of the cultural
depth of the Communist state. What, they asked, did the
bastion of capitalism and individual freedom have to offer? ♪♪ In 1947, the Central Intelligence Agency
was established. One of its main tasks was, in fact,
to use culture and art as a means of spreading
American influence, or, at the very least, thwart the
influence of enemies, and those who were part of the Western
intellectual and cultural elite, who were critical of
American foreign policy, who wanted peace and a
nuclear weapon-free world. But the CIA couldn’t be seen
as forcing it. Americans wanted to stand for freedom. That was very much the cause,
the slogan, of the U.S. Cold War effort. The U.S. government didn’t want to
be seen to be controlling American artists and intellectuals. Three years later, in 1950, the CIA launched
the Congress for Cultural Freedom in West Berlin as a near-direct
response to a series of Soviet-organized workshops and meetings
around the world for Communists and those who were seen
to be sympathizers. The enemy wasn’t actually
really Moscow. The real enemy for the States,
I think, were the people who
were not yet convinced that this was the American Century, that Pax Americana was the
best way to go forward. The purpose of the Congress for
Cultural Freedom was to tap into and exploit any seeds of anti-Communist,
anti-Stalinist thoughts that may have been swimming
around among American and Western European intelligentsia. The very first meeting attracted
several notable writers and intellectuals, like Arthur Koestler, Tennessee Williams,
Bertrand Russell, John Dewey and Irving Brown. The CIA plowed millions of dollars into the
Congress for Cultural Freedom via fake foundations. Within a few years, Congress for Cultural
Freedom was running arts festivals, and publishing literary magazines,
and staging conferences around the world. It also established national affiliates
in nearly 40 countries. There was no other organization at
the time that was comparable, except perhaps for the funding that
the Soviet Union were giving to their own propaganda
and psychological warfare outfits. Publications in particular were told
not to publish anything that could be seen as critical of
American foreign policy. Famously, the CCF promoted this:
abstract expressionism, a style of art that emerged in New York City
following World War II. It was the first American-born
style of art that gained international prominence –
and that was by design. Abstract expressionism
didn’t have structure. It was spontaneous. It was seen as just pure, carnal
expression of human instinct. This provided an incredible visual
challenge to Soviet realist art which, in comparison, was deemed
as controlled and contrived. It wasn’t natural human expression,
but an authoritarian one. Jackson Pollock, known for his
paint-dripping technique, was one of the handful of artists
whose work was promoted throughout the world
through CIA-funded exhibitions. It was difficult art.
It was impressive art. It gave the impression
that the United States had this very successful
high culture, which is something that many
Communists claimed it didn’t. This is something that artists wouldn’t
have been doing in the Soviet Union, where socialist realism was the
dominant cultural aesthetic, and artists seemed very sort of
controlled, very regimented. But, here was the catch: The world –
including many, if not most of the American and Western European
writers, artists and thinkers who were involved – had no idea that the CIA
was behind the CCF, allegedly anyway. I think many more had a pretty good idea
that money was coming from the CIA. There were actual CIA officers
sort of working undercover helping run the Congress for
Cultural Freedom. There was a small unit of people who
knew — and that included some of the intellectuals who were
brought in on the secret — and they were the ones who were then
getting their other intellectuals and artists and everybody
conjoined to this, but without telling them the truth. The program was exposed in 1966 –
16 years after being founded – through a series of articles published
by the New York Times and an exposé in 1967 by the
far-left magazine Ramparts. It was revealed that the reach of the CCF,
of the CIA’s cultural Cold War front, was in fact pretty far and wide. Some of the 20th century’s
most influential personalities, from feminist Gloria Steinem to
philosopher Isaiah Berlin, had been, sometimes knowingly, involved
in projects that served as CIA fronts. Throughout this period,
from 1950 to 1966, the CIA’s involvement in the arts
also creeped into film. They saw an opportunity in
George Orwell, in particular. Orwell, who wrote such middle school
classics as 1984 and Animal Farm, described himself as a
Democratic Socialist, and was actually pretty anti-Stalinist
and anti-Soviet-style socialism, something which was unusual among
leftist circles at the time. The British government started this
trend of translating Orwell’s novels, like 1984 and Animal Farm, and distributing them
to foreign audiences. It was such good work.
It was so readable. It was so accessible
to foreign audiences. And the CIA, I think noticed this
and followed the British example. His books “Animal Farm” and “1984”
explored themes of totalitarianism, government control,
repression of free speech and even individual identity
and human relationships. And that’s where the CIA
turned to Hollywood. When the animated film, “Animal Farm,”
was released in 1954, there was one major difference between
the book and the film: the ending. In the book, the oppressed farm animals
look at both the human farmers and the pigs, and they’re unable
to differentiate between the two. It was a metaphor for the tyranny
of both capitalism and communism. The farmers were the capitalists
and the pigs were the communists. But that didn’t fly with the CIA. The CIA covertly provided funding
for the film, and produced an ending that only included the pigs –
meaning no equivocation. When the book, “1984,”
was made into a movie, the CIA again altered the ending. Instead of the protagonist succumbing
to the authoritarian regime, they had him let out
one last gasp of defiance. It’s small, but it mattered. But the CIA’s involvement in Hollywood
during the Cold War didn’t stop there. One of the biggest propaganda talking
points of the Soviet Union was to point out the treatment
of Black Americans. Jim Crow was, after all, alive
and well for much of the Cold War. So the CIA hired a guy,
more or less. In Hollywood, the CIA had a very
secret sort of organization that was scouting films, looking around
at the films that were in production, and trying to insert positive
racial stereotypes. But that wasn’t the only way the U.S.
tried to counter the narrative of racism. Enter the jazz ambassadors. Much in the same way that abstract
expressionism was seen to represent American individual freedom through
its spontaneity, so too was jazz. In 1956, the U.S. State Department started
a jazz ambassadorship project. The idea was simple: Take some
of the most notable and talented American jazz musicians,
and send them around the world. In particular, the idea was to send
them to decolonizing countries, which were seen as ripe for influence —
whether Soviet or American. Jazz was very interesting because,
like abstract expressionism, it was a kind of thing that
confused the Soviets. There were cultural orthodoxies in the
Soviet Union and in its satellites, which, if they were
broken by artists, there was immediate reaction
from the Soviet authorities. Dizzy Gillespie was the first ambassador. He toured the Middle East,
South Asia and the Balkans. ♪♪ Gillespie’s success translated to
more tours from American musicians, such as Louis Armstrong,
Dave Brubeck and Duke Ellington. ♪♪ While the program was, for the U.S.
government, pretty straightforward, it wasn’t for the musicians
who were involved in it. Remember, this is happening in the late
’50s and throughout the ’60s. There’s a Civil Rights Movement
in the United States, there’s Jim Crow and
there is a lot of violence. How could they tour the world boasting
the homestead of tolerance and harmony the United States was,
while their kin couldn’t even sit at the same lunch counters as some
of their fellow Americans because of the color of their skin? They went on the tours,
but they had their own protests. Gillepsie refused to be briefed by the
State Department before his first tour. He said he had 300 years
of all the briefing he needed. Louis Armstrong actually backed out
of a Soviet Union tour in 1957 in response to the events in
Little Rock, Arkansas, when nine black students were prevented
by the National Guard from integrating into
a local high school. ♪♪ OK, so I started off by saying that
you win a war with poetry. So, how much of a victory
was the program for the Americans
against the Soviets? I think the CIA probably would have been
very pleased with the results of its efforts in terms of how many
Western intellectuals the Congress was able to
rope into its activities, and all of the conferences, and festivals
and literary magazines that came out of it. But long-term, this always had the potential
to sort of blow up in the CIA’s face. It wasn’t a victory for culture,
for literature, or for art, or for jazz or for any other form of
cultural or artistic expression. Because, in my view, that needs to exist,
and can only really breathe if it’s not locked in some kind of embrace
of the political institutions in which it finds itself. It’s about
reacting to and against those things. It’s hard to know this history,
coupled with all the other clandestine CIA efforts to, you know, undermine
movements and governments, and not feel like you can’t trust
anyone or anything. Especially these days when social media
in particular makes it almost impossible to know how much you’re
experiencing is organic versus how much,
well, isn’t. If it’s being done properly,
you’re not going to know about it. But you kind of, there is an
acoustic sometimes that’s wrong. Things emerge and they seem to
be very well-funded. And it’s like, where did
all this come from? Those are the things that I always
look at and sort of wonder a bit. But be careful because it can
make you a bit paranoid. Yeah, just a bit paranoid. Fair warning by the way, the
CIA did not approve this script before we started filming. Although I’m expecting a
call sometime soon. If you guys like this video,
and you want to see more of Pop Americana, make sure
to like, share and subscribe, and we’ll see you next week.

It got WORSE!! THE ART BOXES I FORGOT To Cancel.

It got WORSE!! THE ART BOXES I FORGOT To Cancel.


(Chloe, VO): Which without a doubt, by the way, is my favorite art supply box to date. Whoa! Whoa, whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa whoa! Whoa! Okay. She has opened a lot of art boxes. A LOT of art boxes. “Chloe Rose’s favorite art box to date.” Look at this! Look at the art boxes! I think I’m becoming an art subscription box unboxing channel. I’m sorry. And I didn’t mean it this way, it was just I keep forgetting to cancel the boxes. Even the ones I didn’t like, I just keep forgetting to cancel them and they keep arriving. Like, I’m sure I canceled this. So hello there, my name is Chloe Rose and I am slowly becoming an art subscription box unboxing channel. So I’m gonna open both of these today to see what’s inside. Now, if you watched my OTHER Crayola box unboxing video, you’ll know that I was not that impressed. That is literally the box! Is that really the box? That’s the box. Awwww, okay. So today I have two Crayola CIY boxes that I did not cancel. So I’ve just opened up the second box for this video and I wanted to just put this in there that I cannot believe what I’ve just opened. I’m in so much shock right now. Also, disclaimer, I do realize these boxes are made for kids. People on the other video didn’t seem to pick up on the fact that I was saying I knew it was for kids. But, the reason why I’m opening these and criticizing them is because parents pay a lot of money for these and they want their kids to get a good value of money. So inside this – ooh, okay! Okay. I’m actually more excited about this vid, this one already. Let’s see. So we’ve got some yarn, we have some string, we have some… oh these are probably pins. Okay. This is, this – yeah, I’m gonna hurt myself today. We have some of their washable watercolors, which I’ve actually never used. We have – ooh! Okay, we’ve got a bunch of lollipops in here, too. I mean, already I’m more impressed with this box than I was the last one so that’s the good thing. So we’ve got one of those earrings some women wear and you kind of look at it and think, “ooh, that would make quite a nice, uh… quite a nice necklace.” We’ve got a galaxy-like sheet thing. We have a – oh, okay you’re on the floor. We have a cork board which is quite neat. Oh, and we’ve got a string art template for beginners. Oh, you fell on the floor as well. It’s fall on the floor day today apparently. So we’ve got Expert Level. Um, I’m gonna be doing the expert level today because I like to make things difficult for myself. So inside our little goodie bag here, so I’ve got a $5 off $20 or more at Crayola.com so I can buy some crayons if I want. I also have a golden ticket to get a free bag of Zollipops. Is this a keyring? It looks like what you have in a car wash to clean your car. Oh! It probably goes on the, it probably goes on the hoop earring necklace thing. Okay, that makes sense. I’m not gonna lie, I’m actually quite excited about this box. I feel like this already is slightly better value than the one I had before which was $40. So even though I still don’t think this is worth $40, I still feel that you’re getting a better value of money for this box than I did in the other one. So apparently you also need a cookie sheet or wax paper, two to three bowls, warm water, tape, a cutting board and scissors. Crayola could have easily included some scissors with this. Tape as well, why couldn’t they include a small roll of tape? Two to three bowls? Again, they probably could have included some sort of bowlage. Okay. So the first thing we’re gonna do is the “wrapped string” art. I’m a bit confused why they’ve got a big cork board here and then a small one when they’ve only included one for me. Okay, so the first thing we’re gonna do is start with the wrapped string art, which I’m very excited for because I’ve seen this so many times, but I’ve never actually done it myself. So it says “you may choose a decorative paper as your background, place on the tile, and pin it down.” So I am gonna use – This, it’s – it’s too big. It’s too big! So they’ve also got templates online that you can download cause I was actually gonna say they’ve got a really cute heart here that they didn’t include, but I guess I could download it if I wanted to. I can’t help but feel this is quite dangerous for young children. But then again, I am pretty clumsy. Ow! Ow! *Grimaces in pain* Ow! I would like to reiterate to people that I am actually not a crafty person at all, like crafting in general is an art in itself but it’s an art that I am not very good at because I’ve never really done it and for – oh, these are glued together. These ones are soul mates. Oh, I’m using way too many pins! They’ve hardly used any pins on this one. So apparently you just gotta gently rip it. Okay, so we’ve got this, which kinda looks messy, but I hope that I’m able to fix it. “Start weaving in a back-and-forth technique. Let it flow. If you don’t like how it looks, unwind and do it again.” I’m just gonna, I guess, do the outline. *Music* No! Stop! STOP! I WILL do a craft well for once in my life. *Continues* Really? Really though? Why have you done this? How am I supposed to know which the eyes are? Obviously I’m quite a noob at this so I don’t really know what I’m doing but, I do kinda wish they’d put holes where the pins should go. I mean, he kind of looks a bit like a wolf. Right? I’m not necessarily saying the craft is bad because clearly, it works for some people. I am just completely incompetent at doing crafts. This next one, you just cover the hoop with the, the yarn. Let’s tie it. I just do not enjoy crafting. I just find it so much hassle. What is it actually doing? Somehow I’ve now got three different ropes. I really don’t know how spiders do it. I think I’m just being too adventurous. I think that’s my problem. Going to BURN IT WITH FIRE! It doesn’t look anything like a cobweb but that was what I was going for. *Music* You know what? It’s not half bad, for my first attempt at threading a web, it’s not too bad. Right? Does it look okay? Um, now we have to make a dangly thing for it. So I used to do this as a kid, but I’ve kind of forgotten how to do it. So I’m gonna cut this, one end. I’m just gonna tie it like that. Okay, so this is our little, um, cobweb thing that doesn’t really look much like a cobweb but it’s gonna do, I suppose. How do you get the paint tablets out? They’re not supposed to come out! “Dissolve one paint tablet.” But how do you get it out? *Loud banging* Okay, so – water! So we’re gonna stick this broken tablet in there. Right, are we ready? I mean, it looks pink. I wanted red but – I wanted it to have like, a Spider-Man type of look. Okay, blue worked! Okay, so here is our second craft. It is a Spider-Man spiderweb. Pink and blue. Oh, I’ve just realized that side’s completely stained, brilliant. Okay, let’s look at this side. I found it quite stressful but I think it would be something fun for kids, if they didn’t sort of try to make a cobweb like I did. But yeah, the whole putting the tablet into the water thing, stupid idea. Do I feel that was worth $40? I mean, I wouldn’t be overly disappointed, but I definitely don’t think it, again, that it’s worth the $40 mark, probably more like $30, I would be okay with but, you know, whatever. It was a good box, I’ll give it that. And in our second box we have – Ooh! We’ve got a little circle, wooden circle. We have TWO wooden circles! We’re gonna have some fun today, ladies and gentlemen! Another organza bag with – Oh that’s cute! Sorry, hang on, this is cute. This is cute. It’s like a little pipsqueak marker! Oh! This smells like – it smells like strawberries! I would far rather have something like that than the candy they’ve been giving. And okay, already this is SO much better! Um, I, I did say in the first box they made, they needed better paintbrushes than what they provided. These are more decent paintbrushes. Then we have a couple of paints, so we’ve got a blue and a yellow. Ooh, okay, we’ve got a little canvas pouch with a zip. So you’ve got a nice canvas bag with a pin, whatever you call this thing, enclosure, you know, that goes – like that. Smells like a canvas bag. Then we have some Okay. So the box is empty. I actually thought there was gonna be more but there’s not. So we have a template thing, which I’m guessing we’ll use to paint on the canvas bag and a bit of foam for something, I’m not sure what. So I absolutely love this idea, don’t get me wrong, but again, for a like, a 40 dollar price point, like, you could probably get one of these say, for 5 dollars. Okay, let’s just say $5 for this. This is a dollar at most, 6 dollars. 7 dollars for these two because these are really cheap paints. Um, 8, 9, 10… 11 dollars. Stencils like this you could probably get for a couple of dollars, 13 dollars. And then you’ve got like, the pipsqueak thing. Which smells good to be fair. But this, this is genuinely not worth any more than $15. I love Crayola, don’t get me wrong, I love Crayola products, I think they’re wonderful, but if you go into Target, they actually have craft kits there you can buy for about 15 dollars. Like, for example, the first box I ever did with like, the, the dough stuff and making the bowls, you can actually buy that exact kit in Target for like $15. And you can basically make everything they put into this box for about 15 to 20, 30 dollars in the kits they provide at places like Target and yet they’ve got a subscription box here with the same stuff inside for 40 dollars. Like, I personally love Crayola, I think they’re a wonderful brand. I think they’re absolutely fantastic. But whoever’s putting together these subscription boxes, I kind of just don’t really understand why they’re OK with putting this little amount of product in. I don’t want to complain too much because Crayola is a great brand, and it’s not the brand overall that’s doing this. It’s just the, the subscription box people. This is such a cute idea. I really love it. I really genuinely love the ideas that they’ve got here. So apparently once you’ve used this paint and it’s dried, you can stick it in the dryer for 30 minutes on high heat and that will help to set the paint onto the material which is good because this is like, washable paint. You have two wooden stamp bases like this, which you use with the stamp foam so basically, this is sticky here. And you make your own shapes, you cut out some, like, whatever you wanna do and you stick it on here and use it as a stamp. I’m gonna make a little, uh… TARDIS. Part palette shape. A doughnut! Let’s do a doughnut even though we’ve only got two colors. Okay, so there’s my art stamp. Looking good! Yeah, that’s more so for the second craft, so we’re gonna leave that for now. And the first craft basically shows how you can, um, basically cut out the stencils and then paint on whatever you want to paint on. Okay, so we are going to stick the cardboard into the tote bag like they mention. And actually, you know what else annoys me? On the picture, you can clearly see that the cardboard they’ve got is perfectly big enough for the tote bag, but this – this is way too small and they tell you to use the cardboard from the box. Look at the difference! Look at the difference! So they are also very very tight with the colors they give you, like, there’s not much you can do with yellow and blue. You can make blue, you can make yellow, and you can make green, and that’s literally it. *Trumpet music* Okay, that’s a bit of a messy little lemon but he will do. They didn’t even include like a, a little palette or anything. Which is kind of stupid because it wouldn’t have been pretty much anything for them to include a little palette. Like, basic things that you want in this craft kit, they don’t provide that they could have provided. I’m gonna try and get some variations in color actually, which I think might look quite cool. Okay. That looks quite cool! I actually like that. I’m happy with how that came out. *Music continues* So yeah, is it a cute idea? Absolutely! It’s really cute even though, kind of, the stencils are very thin so they kind of go smudgy and weird, but overall it’s a cute idea. You can have a lot of fun with it. I really do love the craft idea. I love how they’ve put the box together, but again, 40 DOLLARS! FORTY DOLLARS! And now we are going to move on to the little pouch. You are supposed to use like, the stencil to make your own. And I think what I’m gonna do is paint the stencil yellow. so let’s just sort of do that and then hope for the best. Ooh! Okay, that didn’t turn out that great but that’s okay, we can fix it. Make – literally look at the mess I’m making! What is a child like? I mean all jokes aside about the price, this is for sure my favorite box that I’ve… used. *Music* So it kinda looks weird, but I’m quite happy with it. In a weird, grungy-like way, it looks quite good. So that is… That’s literally it. So I would love to hear your opinion on what you thought of how these boxes arrived, what was inside, do you think it’s worth the money? Do you think that it’s not worth the money? Definitely let me know in the comments down below what your thoughts are, um, but yes, thank you so much for watching this video. I really hope that you enjoyed it. I have made a mess as per usual. These are the four crafts that we made today. I’m especially fond of my strange-looking mummy-looking fox and my Spider-Man-looking… thing. So that’s everything for today, thank you so much for watching this video I really hope that you enjoyed it. If there’s any crafting boxes or art boxes that I’ve not tried in the past, do let me know in the comments down below and I will definitely see what I can do. But yes. Thanks so much for watching this video, give it a like if you liked it, take care of yourselves and I will see in the next video. *End music*

How Pastors Can Support Artists in Their Church

How Pastors Can Support Artists in Their Church


– [Thomas Terry] I think the first thing
that a pastor can do to support an artist is help to instill the right things
concerning their identity. I think the artists in their church,
the creatives in their church have a really difficult time concerning identity. Their identity is deeply woven
into what they create, what they produce, how they perform. It’s embedded with their
performance on the stage. And so when they come
into the church, oftentimes that performance-based
mentality or that affirmation that is dependent on how good
they perform just rocks them. And so what we have to do as pastors is
help them to see that you are accepted by God, not because of your works,
not because of your performance, not because of how good you are,
not because of the critique or the acclaim that you’ve received as an artist,
but because Christ has died for you. Christ has purchased you. And so you
have to move them from their image being inextricably
connected to their artistry to the person and work of Jesus Christ. And so that’s the first starting point to
help mature the creative in your congregation and support the creative. The second thing I would suggest is to not
exploit the creative gifts of the artist. I think in a lot of ways many creatives
feel a tension with the church because they feel like “I’m only useful because I
contribute gifts to the congregation.” Of course, this just reaffirms that
performance-based mentality which is giving you a very anti-gospel perspective. So what you need to help them do is say,
“We find value in you because you are made in the image of God. And we love you and we
care for you holistically. We don’t just like you because you’re
gifted, we love you because you are a member of our congregation and
so we won’t exploit your gifts. We will help you to cultivate your gifts. We will help you submit your gifts under
the lordship of Christ. We will help you to learn what it means to
use your gifts for the benefit of other people but we will not exploit them for
our own advancement to make our churches look cool and hip and,
you know, beautiful. We will love you for the person that you
are and we will disciple you. We will mentor you. We will give you an appropriate
theological framework to think about your gifts and we will not exploit you.” So yeah. – [Brett McCracken] Do you think some
pastors might think, like, “In order for me to relate to the artist
in my church, I need to, like, become cooler or like learn the music they
like and kind of dialogue on that level.” Is that something that they need to do? Do artists want that from them? Like what are kind of the misconceptions
that pastors might think like, “Man, I have a hard time relating to that
artist, so I need to do this.” Then what should they do? – [Ryan Lister] Yeah. I think, in reality, artists are the first
people to recognize when someone isn’t being genuine. So trying to be something that you aren’t
in front of an artist is already kind of sort of keeping them at arm’s length. So really there’s already something
establishing a relationship between the two of you, if they’re in the church, and
that’s where I would push the relationship between pastor and a creative or a pastor
and an artist. I would center it around the work of
Christ and the gospel in both of your lives. That’s where I would approach them. Yeah. – [Thomas Terry] I think it’s important to
recognize that for the creative, relevance is not as important as
the pastor thinks it is. Authenticity is the thing that
really connects with them. They want honesty. They want you to be you. They want you to embrace
them for who they are. So to be relevant, to somehow
engage with them would actually do a disservice to you. Yeah. – [Ryan Lister] Yeah, and on that point
also, being a pastor doesn’t mean that you have to self-identify as a creative but it
does mean that you should be trying to pursue excellence in
all your pastoral work. So one of the things that will attract a
creative to seeing you as an ally or someone that they can talk to or someone
who will accept your pastoral work is the fact that you are demonstrating,
through the work that you do, creativity, wisdom, that you are applying
beauty to everything that you’re doing in the church. – [Brett McCracken] Yeah,
I think and maybe pastors don’t think of themselves as creatives but really,
like, a pastor is a creative. They are communicating complex, you know,
realities, theology, through formats that are communication and art and creativity. So that’s a good point relating on the
level of wanting to be excellent and how you go about that. – [Thomas Terry] Pastors are storytellers
telling the most important story, the message of the Gospel. – [Ryan Lister] Yeah,
and showing you how to enter in. That’s a creative reality. How do you come into this particular story
that the Lord has told us? – [Brett McCracken] What do you think
about discipleship? How does that look uniquely, kind of,
with the artist, because there’s some unique challenges. Artists are maybe traveling a lot. If they’re musicians, they’re on the road. Sometimes artists just have different
things kind of vying for their attention. What are some unique ways to disciple
those folks in your church? – [Thomas Terry] Well, I think you have to
start with a foundation in terms of your discipleship that says
“You are not your art.” And if you help them to find more value
in who they are in Jesus and who they are in the church, then you’re going to create
a tie between the artist and the church that is really hard to cut off. And so then the artist is going to want to
use his gifts and be in the marketplace using his gifts, but he’s not
going to want to do that autonomously or independent
of the local church. He’s going to feel this tension. I love using my creative gifts to engage
with culture but I love my local church and I feel it when I’m gone. That’s a foundation that has to be
established where you have to help them, you have to cultivate in the heart of an
artist an affection for the local church, an affection for community under God’s
Word so that they long for it, so that they anticipate it and want it
when they’re gone. Because if they don’t have that, then it’s
really going to be insignificant for them. They’re going to find satisfaction in the
pursuit of using their gifts and putting it on display for other people. – [Ryan Lister] Yeah. And just creating practical accountability
structures, accountability structures that aren’t built out of legalism and keeping
you from using your gifts inappropriately but built out of love and pastoral care
for the artist in your church and not only just doing that at a pastoral level but
teaching them to find people in the church that can also come alongside them that can
hold them accountable, that can even go with them from time to
time and those who are still home with the families of the artists,
supporting them too. – [All] Yeah.

Common Ground Between Art and Science: The HEMI/MICA Extreme Arts Program

Common Ground Between Art and Science: The HEMI/MICA Extreme Arts Program


Visualization is a real challenge for us being typical engineers and scientists we would build charts that have material classes and the types of experiments people do and quickly the audience would get completely lost. how do you explain what you are doing to an audience who does not do what you do? We have huge data sets. You have so much information that it’s hard to decide how to show it The design folks at MICA are naturally inclined to conveying complex information in very concise ways. When HEMI came to MICA, it was somewhat of a surprise. Once I learned more about the commitment to interdisciplinary research and the imagination of that leadership it seemed like a natural fit. I never heard about our connection being made in between an art school and an engineering school in the past. To be honest I was a little skeptical and I think Jay was my first real interaction with an artist to be honest. Collaborations like this are always interesting. With HEMI they didn’t really have any preconceived idea on what exactly I would do. For them to even be open to that opportunities is really a rare treat. In Hemi we look at problems that are really complicated in fact the reason we look at them is because they’re complex they’re difficult problems to solve and there are things that you can’t see we spend time trying to see them but then a problem after we see that is how do we explain that and that was really the goal on the end was for me to tell stories. Extreme materials it’s such an unusual name to a lab You picture big explosions and these enormous incidents but what the lab really is and its extremity is very small. In the end what it turned into was needing to build things that are for the beyond into the absurd so making a 90-foot accordion book to talk about something that happens in a fraction of a fraction of a fraction of a second. The brilliance of that idea was you take the smallest level of time which is insignificant in our lives and turn it to something that you can see is significant. And it gives you a sense of how there’s this sort of long scale for this very short time period. Just that way of translating the scales to something physical as well is very useful. And that book is really impressive I think the engineering side and the artistic side they complement each other if you don’t have ideas, if you don’t have imagination, you’re probably going to be a bad scientist. In the lab we do scientific photography. We look at things at high speed we look at things at high resolutions and so I realize that the photographic can actually give us a lot more input about how we can do art photography. I started being a little skeptic but then I got really excited about it later on. The world is set up of disciplines and so the kind of questions about the world and materials in the world don’t necessarily fall within disciplinary boundaries. When you put the scientists and the engineer and the artist together, you can understand the problem, you can convey that understanding, and you can design a solution

The Secret World of LA Street Artist ‘Plastic Jesus’

The Secret World of LA Street Artist ‘Plastic Jesus’


PLASTIC JESUS: You never know when you go out if tonight’s the night that you are
going get busted and you are going to spend the rest of the night in the jail cell. PLASTIC JESUS: The thing about street art that attracts me is firstly that there is
no editing, there is no editor, you can put any message you like on the streets. And second,
the fact that street art is illegal and it is put out without any legitimate authorisation.
That in it self is a statement and I feel that kind of subversive nature of it really
works into the kind of person I am. COMM: Originally from London, Plastic Jesus is an LA-based street artist. After 20 years
working as a photojournalist, he got into street art around four years ago. PLASTIC JESUS: Melrose is one of the busiest streets of LA. You get between 30 and 50,000
people go down there a day. So, it is great spot to get a piece of street art and also
it has kind of become the centre of LA street art as well. Most of the stuff down there
is done illegally. I am not saying the building owners turn a blind eye to it, but it is kind
of almost accepted that street art is part of the culture. PLASTIC JESUS: Now, I’ve always admired Banksy and the way in which he conveys a quite
often political message or a current affairs message within quite a simple street art stencilled image. So really that’s where my start up came. PLASTIC JESUS: This is probably the piece I am most famous for – Stop Making Stupid
People Famous. Black wall, yellow works pretty well, it’s just quite a striking piece and
I can guarantee that in a day or two people will be posing up next to it, taking selfies
and tagging, tagging themselves and tagging, hopefully, tagging me in it as well. I think
it says a lot to Hollywood as well, this piece, like, stop f*cking making stupid people famous,
you dumbasses. PLASTIC JESUS: It’s re-posted a millions of times on social media and it always gets tagged
underneath various celebrity, you know, reality show stars like Kanye West, Kim Kardashian
etc. etc. But the piece has actually a double message, ‘stop making stupid people famous’
is really also a criticism of us. We are the consumer, we are watching the TV shows, we
are buying the tabloids, we are looking at the websites, we are the people making these
people famous. So, it is also very critical of us and that’s the way I like pieces to be. COMM: He made international news recently when he built a wall around Donald Trump’s
star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. PLASTIC JESUS: Most of my pieces are current affairs, news or political commentary. I think
having spent 20 years as a photojournalist, a lot of my background there comes into play.
I did some No Kardashian Parking signs. Recently, leading up to the election, I’ve done some
No Trump Parking signs as well. So what I do is that I think of a few ideas, maybe jot
them down and sketch them, come back to them a few days later, if there is one outstanding
idea that I still think works, I will go with it. That was the case with certainly the Trump
wall that I put on the Hollywood boulevard. PLASTIC JESUS: These are Trump $100 bills, and if we look here we’ve got the, we have
got crossed assault rifles, we’ve got the wall between us and Mexico, Trump’s signature. PLASTIC JESUS: The whole message behind my art is really not to tell people what their
opinion should be or how they should think. PLASTIC JESUS: I did another piece called Liberty, which is the Statue of Liberty holding
a police riot shield with a riot helmet on. Now that can carry two messages, is it ‘are
the police protecting our liberty” or ‘are we becoming a police state’. Well, I leave
that for the viewers to make their own mind up. PLASTIC JESUS: Where my pieces are, I often go back and just hang out there and take a
few selfies, just to gaze at the reaction, I mean, that’s the important thing with
what I do. I want to see how the public interact with them and their reaction and their comments. COMM: He conceals his identity, but that’s not just to avoid fines or possible imprisonment. PLASTIC JESUS: I don’t want my persona, me to become the focus of a piece of art that
I do. I want the message in the piece of art to convey it’s own importance. My brothers
both know I’m Plastic Jesus. I think they think that it’s pretty cool that they got
a brother who does this stuff, which is getting so much attention, and slightly subversive, and a bit of an unusual job. COMM: Finally, how did he choose his pseudonym? PLASTIC JESUS: I first moved to LA about 9 years ago and whilst just driving around,
I saw all these cars with these little plastic Jesus figures sitting on the back dashboard.
These little plastic Jesus figures are there to remind these people about their morals,
their beliefs and their ethics. And I felt really by doing street art, that’s really
what I hoped to set out to achieve, to get people to question their beliefs and ethics.

BROMA A SANDRA CIRES ART CON MI DIBUJO DE CUCARACHA REALISTA| HaroldArtist

BROMA A SANDRA CIRES ART CON MI DIBUJO DE CUCARACHA REALISTA| HaroldArtist


waiting for the moment when she moves the cards and gets a little surprise I think Sandra is going to fall into this one Welcome once a again to this channel and to a new video Today I have a video and is going to be amazing While ago I made a prank video to my mom with a realistic drawing by me. Do you remember? and I drew a broken egg If you haven’t seen it I’ll leave it in the corner and is a video you guys loved so much So due to reason that you like it, I thought we have to make a second part to this video and this time we are going to be very very bad. And the prank is going to be on Sandra Cires Art. Is going to be amazing If you know her, you’ll know she’s afraid of bugs specially to cockroaches. She cannot even here their name. She’s very afraid of them So I said “Harold lets draw a realistic cockroach” we’re going to sneak into Sandra’s house and hid it anywhere to see what happens Lets start you guys!! the first thing we have to do before drawing is finding a good picture where you can actually see every detail of the bug a disgusting one. But yes, we have to be friends with the cockroach for a bit until we’re done drawing. Lets look up a good photo *searching* cockroach as you can see here, all the details that the wings have all the hairs, the feet, I never thought I was going to say this, but this cockroach is spectacular I cannot believe I’m going to draw a cockroach Is gonna be worth it, because is going to be an awesome prank Everthing is ready so lets start with the sketch. The first one I did, the cockroach was little bit too big I would love to draw it bigger so it can be seen to make more details but it doesn’t going to be realistic for the prank I erased it and started to make a cockroach with a smaller size, a more credible one but still big I like the form, is really easy now the good part starts! the coloring part I just want to finish to make the prank with this drawing Lets start painting. For that we need to put a base color with markers. That’s what I’m going to do here I have the copy markers and I have to choose the ones that match with the real colors I made a swatch tested in the paper to be sure. So I chose this red color for that top part and this light brown for the fairest parts this part of the process doesn’t take to long you have to colored with the idea to cover all the drawing with a color that’s why is a base color. You know that I like making this because makes everything later way easier you only have to worry about details Here comes the difficult part the part where you do the details. For this part I would use pencil colors I’m going to use the Caran Ache if I want an amazing result and using a gel pen for making the highlights in the cockroach is very important because gives it a realistic air to it. Something that I did and now I know the difference is the texture that has the wings is a bit nasty to talk about details in the cockroach but guys we have to make this good the cockroach has intersecting lines I drew that and gave the drawing a realistic air that it was missing it looks like is there I think we’re going to make it Also I would draw all the hairs that the feet has on them that gross hairs but we have to make every detail of this beautiful cockroach So the drawing was very small and I had work with the pencil colors using a sharp point to have more precision where I was going to make a line or a shadow I late a few hours in this part because it has a lot of details. I think it looks very realistic but it was missing a detail to make this cockroach more real. And is the shadow When a light hits at it, it makes a shadow so I create that to make seem like the bug is on the paper. I create this using a pastel color and blending smoothly. After that I have to touch up the hairs and at the end, I think the result looks like a real one. If you look super closely you immediately notice is a drawing. But if you look from a far, jumm You can possibly fall for it and more if you’re scare of them I think Sandra is going to fall for it You’re going to see her with a HD camera and a zoom so you could see all the details but if you look it like this looks like a real one. Look at this thing all the highlights and shadows make a difference for me the drawing is really good. If I had to give it a negative point would be for the size of it Because is very big for a cockroach. Even tho exist cockroaches like this. But still I was going to say another design of cockroach but is a diffent type one Sandra hates them, so I’m sure when she sees it she’s going to get scared Lets take the camera to Sandra’s and see how are we going to do the prank I’m going to Sandra’s home and of course with my beautiful cockroach we have to put it a security belt We have arrived and casually Titi is picking the mail so I can talk to him about it Titi: is looking good Titi: she’s afraid of them He’s telling me that is a great option I’m taliking low because Sandra is upstairs putting it here near all the daily mail there it is We have to wait until she moves the mail to see the cockroach We’re hiding the camera We’re thinking something to make her go downstairs I don’t know, tell her that she have received a mail from youtube Come here and say Hi to the visit What are yo guys hiding there you have a mail from youtube you have a mail from youtube Sandra: From youtube? Sandra: Is it a prank? you put a dead cockroach there? I don’t know if is dead or alive I just don’t want to see it it disgusted me so much Sandra: I can’t believe is a drawing Sandra: They know what I’m scared of I now tonight I’m going to dream with that. Harold: Lets take some pictures She’s just going to lick it take out your foot! look a that! take out your foot! now has a mark we’re going to give away this drawing I want harold to let go this drawing the comment with more likes is the one you’re giving it away Like if you want me put it a corner of the room. Now i like the cockroach we have to name it comment down below a name for the cockroach Martina Cockroach the cockroach of this sizes bite the have like a i can’t even look at it one time a cockroach walk in my eye while I was sleeping, I thought was my hair and when I open my eye the hairs they have in the feet hurt my eyes Take it, I just don’t want it Well guys! this is everything for this video I hope you like it! and if you did give a huge thumbs up. Remember you haven’t seen my best and my worst drawing so subscribe if you aren’t and see you in the next one