Photoshop CS6/CC: How To Cut Out an Image & Remove/Delete a Background


Hello everyone this is VerticDesigns here,
and for this video I’m going to show you the best way to remove a background in Photoshop. Now there’s many different tools and ways
of doing this. But I like to use the pen tool a lot more
because it is a lot more accurate and you could tell the computer. You could get the quick select tool or the
magnet one but they have a guess so they’re not very accurate. That’s why I like to use the pen tool instead. To start cutting the image out what you want
to do is you want to go over to left side, where all the tools are. Click on the pen tool. If it’s not selected you can right click and
it should be in here, but by default it should be the top one so you should already see it. Once you’ve got it selected what you want
to do is you want to, hold alt and using the scroll wheel to go up. Then you want to zoom in. This just makes it easier for your eyes to
see what you’re cutting out. For me it just makes it easier because I can
see the parts that I’ve missed and the parts that I need to do. Now to start it off what you want to do is
pick a corner, mine is normally going to be at the bottom or at the top. What we’re going to do is, we’re going to
do a dot to dot type of situation where we’re going to connect them all up at the end and
then we’re going to duplicate the layer which will then remove the background. Now to start it off you want to go over here
and we’re going to start off in this corner right there. Make sure that you’re on the line and going
all around it. There’s two important things that you need
to know about the pen tool. The first thing is that if you normally click,
it will give you a straight line. Now if you do ctrl + alt + z to undo it, and
do the one where you hold it in. Where you hold the left side of the mouse,
it will give you this curved line which is really useful to know. I use it all the time because there is images
that I will need to do this. This is kind of a curved line if you look
at it, it’s going to be a gap there, so we want our image to look good. Now you want to click on here and drag it
in like that. Then to get rid of this you want to hold alt
and press on it until you see that little icon symbol. Now that you’ve done that you just keep going
around it and I’m going to speed up the video just to make it quicker for you because it
will take a while, and yeah… When you get to bits like this you don’t need
to really worry about it too much because you can cut it out later on, so that’s what
we’re going to do. We’re just going to leave it for now and just
carry on doing this. As you can see this is the type of situation
where you would want to do this sort of thing. Where it will save you a lot of time, and
it is quiet accurate but you need to make it a little bit smaller and there we go. Now it looks a lot better rather than having
to go around it. Now that we’re near the end what you want
to do is, to zoom out a little bit so we can see the image. Yours is going to be a little bit more different
to mine. But mine is cut in half sort of thing, so
I can’t really do anything about that but what I’m going to do is just going to do a
rough sort of selection around it. To connect it up you just go back to the first
dot and you left click on it when the icon pops up with a circle. Once it’s all connected you will see that
it is now a line, all the dots are gone. You just go over to the top here go to selection. Make sure you have everything as me. Make sure the feathering is at 0%. Unless you really do want feathering, but
without feathering it makes it sharper and whats what we’re wanting. We want a sharp outline which will look good. Anti-aliasing is going to be on and new selection. So once you done that press ok. Then we’re going to zoom out a little bit
more so we can actually see what we’re doing. Now that you’ve got it selected, this is the
easy part. All you do is, do ctrl and j. Now, what that’s doing is that it’s going
to duplicate the layer, and we have the background still on. But if we go over to the top and we hide this
one. You can see that the background is now gone. As you can see it is really good and sharp
outline. This is exactly why I prefer the pen tool. It gives you a really nice result, compared
to other tools where you might get the white outline. The one thing you want to make sure is that
the bits that you left out that was in inside the image. Let’s say that they had a piece like this,
where you could still see a bit of the background. You just want to go back to there. Use the pen tool again and just go around
it really quick. It doesn’t have to be too perfect because
the selection will make it look good. Go over to selection again. 0% and press delete. For the very last step what you want to do
is just bring in a background and have a look at your result. If you’re happy with it, if you’re not then
you could always go back. But for me I think mine looks pretty good
and you want to just stretch the image to the right place. Make sure that it is underneath. Once you got the background you can now move
over the object, where you want it to go. For me it would look a little bit better if
I moved him here and made him a little bit small. To actually make him look like he’s there. For me all I got to do is make him the right
size. So probably a little bit smaller, that would
look good. Then you want to go over to blending options. Change the colour, make it look like the theme
of where his at. So for me it’s kind of like a blueish sort
of, darker. Dark blue a little bit like that and just
go through the effects. See which one looks good. We don’t want to much. Maybe this one. Anyway this has been the best way to remove
a background in Photoshop. Right now it doesn’t look very good, my image
because it doesn’t blend in with the right colours. But I can easily edit that later on, right
now I’m going to leave it like this. But the whole point of this video was to show
you how to remove a background and get a really good result out of it. Now even if you’re accurate like me you will
get moments where, you do get a little bit of a outline. To remove that, it is really simple. All you got to do is, right click on this
go to blending options. In here go to stroke. Make sure you put this to 1. Go to inside and then once you done that you
go over here. Where it says blend mode and make this go
to screen. This will just cut it out and it is now gone. If you’re outline is more thicker you can
easily just increase this and it will get rid of more. But for me I think this will be ok. Let’s zoom out and yeah. That is pretty much it. Anyway that has been the video. If it was helpful share it around with a friend
who might also find this useful. Comment down below what you think of the video
and I will see you all in the next video. Bye.

InDesign Tutorial: Wrap Text Around Images, Shapes, and Objects -HD-

InDesign Tutorial: Wrap Text Around Images, Shapes, and Objects -HD-


Today in InDesign we are going to be taking
a look at how to wrap text around objects and images to make more interesting compositions. The first thing to do is grab your text tool
and drag out a text box. Then place in your body copy. I will be placing in gibberish lorem ipsum
text. After that, we need to create an object to
wrap our text around. So you can either create this shape with one
of the default tools, or create a custom shape with the pen tool. I will just be dragging out a simple ellipse. Now if we drag our shape over our text, we
can see that nothing happens. To make the text wrap around our object, we
need to first go up to “Window” and then go down to “Text Wrap.” And also, make sure that you have your shape
selected. In this window you will see that the first
option, called “No text wrap” is checked by default. Now if you select the next option over, the
text will then wrap around the bounding box of the shape. This is again, the blue box that goes around
our circle. Now to get it to wrap around the shape of
the object itself, select the next option over that says “Wrap around object shape.” Now the next two options will only be acceptable
if you have two text boxes linked together. Now if I grab my selection tool and click
the red plus on my text box, which indicates that I have more text that is not shown, and
then drag out another box, I can then use those options. Now the first of the two options will split
the text and cause it to jump over the object. The second will cut off all of the text below
the object and push it into the start of the next column. Now if we switch back to our shape wrap, we
also have options for adjusting the offset around the shape on each side. You can also select different wrap options
for various results. Lastly, you can also use text wrap with images. So first, go up to “File,” and then down to
“Place” and select your image. Then drag out the size you would like your
image to be. Now keep in mind that png formats work best
because they contain transparency data and can allow for wrapping around the contents
of the image instead of just the border. Now once you have your image on top of the
text, go ahead and select the shape wrap option and then adjust the contour options to affect
how the text wraps around the image. For this png, I recommend using the alpha
channel option so that it takes advantage of the png file type. So there you have it. Now you can wrap text around anything you
want in InDesign. So as always, if you enjoyed this InDesign
tutorial, be sure to subscribe, rate, comment, and share it with your friends.

How to Make 2D image to 3D in 3 MINUTES ! – After Effects & Volumax TUTORIAL

How to Make 2D image to 3D in 3 MINUTES ! – After Effects & Volumax TUTORIAL


Hello! In this video I’m going to show you how to achieve these nice 3d animations in After Effects especially on portraits in this video and for this I’m using a template called Volumax photo animator. You can find it on Videohive or on the link at the bottom of this video in the description. Ok so I’m going to open my template VoluMax Pro in After Effects and I’m going to import a picture and start watching how long it
takes to animate it and you’re going to see it’s gonna be super fast. I’m going
to drag and drop it in the comp and make it match here and then I’m going to go
in the other comp called displacement map and using the new 3d portrait tool
in VoluMax. Here I’m going to match a wireframe of a face you can choose
almost any angle for a portrait going from side views, bottom and almost top
views okay so now I’m going to use the distortion tool You can see this is quite simple and fun to achieve. We are pushing the 3d mesh to match on the 3d portrait on the picture. So I’m moving
the ears the eyes the nose, mouth everything… You don’t need to be super
precise in this process because volumax is going to to work nicely even with maps not super sharp. So I’m going to take a smaller brush now to do a bit of details on the mouth. So once again this is not the complete tutorial you can find in the package. This is a fast overview of the 3d portrait tool included in VoluMax. Okay so we’re going to finish with the shoulders with some large brush here I’m going to do this super fast because it’s not very important, VoluMax is going to just know that there is a volume here okay so I’m going to finish this wire
distortion and I’m going to show you the black and white depth map. I am taking off the wire mode and the depth map is showing the black and whites volume of the
object. I’m going in the main comp of VoluMax and I’m simply going to move the null object here and I’m going to see that the 3d effect is
working really nicely ! I’m gonna add some dirt so you can see some dirt here. Small adjustments on the relax and boost Once again you can see all this in the full tutorials included. I’m going to put a keyframe at the beginning and a keyframe at the end on a left right camera pan. And that’s it ! We did this in 3 minutes.
I’m going to take a look to the preview. Okay this is nice ! So it took 3 minutes to do this and you can see the final result with some text. Thank you for watching this very fast tutorial of the 3D Portrait Tool. You can take a look to my channel to see some other templates and some tutorials. Thank you, bye !

How to create a 3D Cube Effect in Illustrator CC 2019 – Tutorial


First, let’s open up Illustrator CC and create a new document Click the Rectangle Tool, press and hold the Shift key to make a symmetrical square Click the Stroke color, then None, so it won’t have any color Then, click the Fill color, and select a color Go to: Effect, 3D, Extrude & Bevel… Click Preview, then change Extrude Depth value until you will get a cube Click and drag the cube to change it’s position Click on More Options and adjust the light position All done!

InDesign How-To: Insert Photos and Images (Video Tutorial)

InDesign How-To: Insert Photos and Images (Video Tutorial)


Hi, I’m Erica Gamet with InDesign Secrets.
In this video, I’m going to show you how to place an image into your InDesign
document. When you place anything into InDesign you use the same command and that’s
the Place command. It’s up here, under the File menu, under Place. You can also use
the keyboard shortcuts Command- or Control-D. I’ll click Place and it brings up
the Place dialog box. You can navigate to wherever your images are sitting. A
couple of options I want to look at before we import anything is down at the
bottom, we have a Replace Selected Item already selected.
I want to deselect that because what that does is, it will put the image that
we choose into whatever we have selected on our page. And if you’re like me, you
may have forgotten you’ve got something selected on another page. Also, we can
click Show Import Options. Selecting this option will bring up a second dialog box
where we get to choose options. Now we won’t have many available to us in this
case, but depending on what you’re importing, you may want to have that
turned on. So I’ve selected that. I’m going to go ahead and just select an image…and click Open. And because we have those options selected, it came up with a
second dialog box, and as you can see most of my options are grayed out.
I’m gonna leave everything as is and just click OK. Now we have our loaded
place cursor. And this is just the image ready to be placed. We have a couple
different options for actually placing this image onto our document. I can
simply just click and let it place the image to size on my page. And as I can
see, that runs off the right and the bottom of my page. I can’t even see the
edges of the photo, so that’s probably not the best option. I’m gonna undo that—
Command- or Control-Z—and get back to my loaded place cursor. A better option is
to click and drag while holding down the mouse button…and it will drag out a
frame to the size that it needs. It will also maintain the orientation and the
proportions of your original image. When you’ve got it to size, simply let go and
the image is placed inside that frame. I’m going to take another step backwards (Command- or Control-Z to undo) and get back to my loaded place cursor. Because sometimes you want a frame that’s a different orientation than your original image. To
do that, I need to use the Shift key. I’m going to click and start
to drag and then hit the Shift key and now I can play with the proportions of
that frame that I’m drawing out. When I have the size I want in the shape I want,
I’m going to just let go of the mouse key. I’m still holding down the Shift key
while I’m doing this at the moment. As you can see, the frame is the size I
wanted it to be but the image doesn’t fill up the frame like I had hoped. A
quick fix for this is to go up to the Object menu, down to the Fitting menu, and choose Fill Frame Proportionally. Now the image completely fills the frame that I
created. From here you’ll probably have to make more adjustments to the image
and the frame, but we’ll cover that in more detail in a future video. Now when
you go to place your image you may already have a frame on your page and
have it selected and you want the image to go directly into that. With that image
selected we’re going to go back to the Place menu (File>Place), choose that same
image…but we’re going to make sure that we click Replace Selected Item. I’m also
going to turn off Show Import Options. If this is de-selected, it will automatically
use the options you chose last time. So I’m going to de-select that and click
Open, and it automatically dropped that image into that particular frame. I’m
going to step backwards again, hit Undo, Command- or Control-Z, and hit Escape so I
get my loaded place cursor gone. I just want to go back to the point where I had
this frame selected. I have it selected. Go up to the File menu, choose Place and
maybe we have that Replace Selected Item turned off. Because again, that’s a good
safety feature to not have that on. So I have that off, select my image, and start
to place it and I realized I really did want to put that image inside that frame. It’s no big deal. I can just roll over that image—and it’s
really hard to see, I know—but when you do that, the little brackets around that
place cursor icon become these rounded brackets. And when I do that, it says, “Oh,
you must want to put that image inside that frame.” So simply roll over it and
click and the image goes inside that frame. And lastly let’s say you already
have an empty frame and you don’t intend to put that image inside there. We do the
same Place command (File>Place)…I’m gonna choose that same image and click Open. And we drag it out and we think that’s good. Then we realize we
really wanted it inside this existing frame. I can do that as well without having to
replace it. I just need to select the image that I’ve placed, copy it (Command-
or Control-C) or I can cut it (Command- or Control-X), select the empty frame, go up
under the Edit menu, and choose Paste Into. Now that image is sitting inside
that frame. Well I certainly hope you found this tip helpful. Be sure to check out InDesignSecrets.com for thousands of InDesign articles and tutorials and to subscribe to our monthly publication, “InDesign Magazine.” Thanks for learning with us!

Adding 3D Video Effects: Adobe Premiere Elements

Adding 3D Video Effects: Adobe Premiere Elements


in this video we’re going to learn how
to add 3d effects using Adobe Premiere Elements version 13 here’s an example of
what I’d like to show you how to do just as a disclaimer if you ever see a spider
with red spots on its butt now leave it alone its sting could kill you let’s get
started we’ve got a blank session in Adobe Premiere Elements let’s go ahead
and add some videos how about a my little spider and a hummingbird the
effect that you’re going to be using here is a 3d effect and let’s just go
ahead and get started and add one of those effects so let’s go to our effects
tab and find the basic 3d it’s in my frequently used I’m not sure where it is
in your palette just search for basic 3d and drop that on to your video 1
timeline now it’s going to come in with a very goofy orientation don’t worry
about that we’re going to change all these effects to get something a little
bit better and animate it alright so the step number 1 let’s just turn this into
a normal kind of use we’re looking straight at it so let’s change the
swivel to 0 the tilt to 0 and the distance to image 0 as well now we’re
looking at this in sort of the default size all right now let’s go ahead and
add some neat effects to this thing so let’s just say we want to start about
here and I want the video to go to a slightly different orientation if you
don’t have your applied effects tab show this little palette of commands when you
pick the applied effects you’ll see motion opacity and the newly added 3d
one that we just added there’s a little I here that you can toggle on or off if
you want to just temporarily shut it off you can do that we’re gonna play with
the animation in just a second you can reset all of your settings if you want
to no of course that’s how you delete your effect if you don’t have this cute
little timeline down here chances are your little stopwatch up here or your
show/hide keyframes is off just make sure that is on that way you can control
settings over time so right about here I want all these settings to be preserved
remember swivel remember tilt remember distance to image and knows how puts
this little dot here and that remembers that keyframe so if we pan over just a
little bit and I don’t know how far you want to go a few seconds or so let’s
change the settings to maybe minus 45 for the swivel and how about distance
say 40 now I’ve played around with these so I kind of know what these settings
are so you’re going to have to kind of mess with them yourself now if you
notice the image isn’t in the sort of in the center of the screen or its centered
but I don’t want it there I want it to the left right hand side we’re going to
go to our motion tab and same thing for the position I just want to change this
to somewhere around oh I don’t know maybe the very beginning and we’ll leave
that 960 and somewhere around here we’re gonna change this to 1600 and you’ll see
now the video sort of does this 3d effect and it pans itself over now I
don’t like how it sort of keeps moving over after the effect is done in the 3d
effects so what we’re going to do expand our 3d and this little keyframe button
you can go to the next or go to the back keyframe we’ll just go to the very next
one go back to our motion and drag this little dot here right on top of that red
line to sort of snap it to that location doesn’t actually snap but you get the
idea of moving it around now we can see how this video rotates and it sort of
slides over to the to the right hand side of screen now this is obviously way
too slow I don’t like the lag in here we’re just does nothing for a few
seconds but you get the idea on on being able to control that so let’s go ahead
and fix that actually it really kind of is bothering me so we’re going to go
back to our basic 3d go to this first keyframe and turn off that swivel turn
off that key frame for tilt and the last one for the distance to image now it’s
going to have its own you remember these here 0 and 0 to add those keyframes in
every time you type in a value that remembers
that’s settings so for example if I want to remember the tilt here just change it
to whatever and it does some very very goofy kind of a kind of a setting so if
you don’t like it hover over to it or snap to it and delete that keyframe now
we should see this thing tilt and pan all at the same time now again this is
way way too slow for me but you get the idea on how to add this alright right
about here I want this other video to come in of my
cute little spider so let’s bring in that video no where is he
spider right about here and what we’d like him to do is start sort of vertical
if you will so you’re looking at the you can’t see anything we wanted to kind of
fold out so again process is generally the same
let’s go to our effects add a 3d and you can notice how the spider there is
always in that that orientation so here’s we wanted to want to change it so
let’s go ahead to the very beginning how do you get to the beginning just hit the
page up to get the very beginning of the of any of these video clips that you
have so the swivel here let’s just change it to say 90 so I’m looking at
actually at the end of it now you might not be able to see it but right there at
90 in fact it might even be minus 90 but close enough for right now we’ll change
it to 90 and the tilt we want that to be zero let’s just type it in and the
distance to image let’s just do it say 50 cuz I don’t want it to be full size
when it starts off so now that you see what this tilt does or the swivel now we
can change it to 90 now you can see exactly what why I tilt it a little bit
the swivel see you see what the other settings we’re going to do now at that
point in time let’s remember everything tilt swivel and distance and it adds
this small little dot here remember that that keyframe somewhere about here for
example I don’t know exactly where that school
end up being a little bit further out let’s change our swivel to 45 and our
distanced stay 40 now I know what all these settings are because I’ve been
playing around with this thing so I just am typing them in but you’re gonna have
to kind of experiment on your own to see what that looks like now that after the
hummingbird is set you’ll see the video the spider sort of rotate around and get
in the right position now what I want to do is change it its location so let’s go
to the emotion tab and it is going to start off at 960 by 540 so let’s
remember that and then somewhere around here when it’s all done moving around we
want to change this to somewhere around 300 to 540 again I know what these
values are not 3d 3300 and to get that in the right position I’m going to go to
my basic 3d align myself to that keyframe now when I go to the motion I
know exactly where to drag that small keyframe to now you can’t get it exactly
on there but if you zoom in you can get it close enough so now when I play my
video clips here it’s gonna be very slow of course but you get the idea that
first the hummingbird video rotates over using that 3d effect and it slides over
as well with the motion and then the spider sort of fans out if you will and
it gets in the right location so that’s it a quick short video on how to UM
change the angle of videos with your your 3d effect I hope you learn
something thanks for watching

Tutorial: Create Light Trails/Streaks Effect with any DSLR Camera | NO VFX!!

Tutorial: Create Light Trails/Streaks Effect with any DSLR Camera | NO VFX!!


Okay guys! Its me
Dwaipayan Ray Its me Aru Raghuwanshi
and me unknown He’s a Black N***a
We are not racist (N***A’s are black N****A) He’s Indian but he’s kinda black but its okay
Taksh by the way His name is Taksh
and so this video is all about how we clicked those amazing photographs of light streaks
with the help of a torch and a simple DSLR Well DSLRs aren’t simple but still
(Come one dude) So You people have been….
(Shut up man) You people have been asking me about how we
clicked those photographs so this video is all about it
we gonna go grab our camera and a good torch and just gonna show you all the settings and
setup of how we did it Make sure you enjoy So the things we need
A DSLR camera And a tri-pod stand
and a torch okay so we’ve set up the camera on the tripod
now and ill just go through the settings first of all make sure your this knob is on
M M stands for manual control so it gives you complete control of your camera
then change the shutter speed to as low as possible
Im gonna do this with this knob over here So im gonna make as low as possible
this goes down to 30 seconds so that means the camera would click a picture
in 30 seconds then press this button and change the f value
make it go higher up to 13 14 ill set that at 14
that’s it now our guy Aru is gonna torch and go over there and we’ll show the rest
okay so make sure that the surrounding is absolutely dark
just pull all the curtains and stuff and make sure you’ve set the ISO at 100
so our friend aru is over there standing with the torch
theres too much of noise Ipad 4 apple so okay just now we’ll go ahead and click
a picture so we’ll click a picture now
Make sure you subscribe and like and and have fun
(Achaa thaa) (Screeen)

[ps4mi] Fill type with an image-Type effects

[ps4mi] Fill type with an image-Type effects


Fill type with an image You can fill type with an image by applying a clipping mask to an image layer placed above a type layer in the Layers panel. layers panel one open the file
containing the image you want to use 1. Open the file containing the image you want to use inside the text. 2. Select the Horizontal Type tool or the Vertical Type tool in the toolbox. In the Documents window, click Insert Point and enter the desired text. 3. Click the Character tab to bring the Character panel to the front or, if the panel isn’t open, choose Window>Character. 4. In the Character panel, select the font and other type attributes for the text. Large, bold, thick letters work best. 5. (Optional) If the image layer is the background layer, double-click the image layer in the Layers panel to convert it from a background layer into a regular layer. 6. (Optional) In the New Layer dialog box, you can rename the layer. Click OK to close the dialog box and convert the image layer. 7. In the Layers panel, drag the image layer so that it is immediately above the type layer. 8. With the image layer selected, choose Layer>Create Clipping Mask. The image appears inside the text. 9. Select the Move tool , and then drag the image to adjust its placement within the text 10. Select a text layer and an image layer together, choose Layer>Convert to Smart Object. This allows you to move text and images together. Thank you. This was Pomy.

Match Image Size in Photoshop – Two Powerful Techniques That You (Probably) Don’t Know


In this tutorial I’m going to show you two
methods that you probably don’t know to match document sizes. Hey everyone, welcome to The Photoshop Training
Channel. My name is Jesus Ramirez and you can find
me on Instagram @JRfromPTC. In this Photoshop tutorial I’m going to show
you two methods that you probably don’t know to match document sizes. We’re going to use a method that uses the
Image Size and Canvas Size window, and the second method uses a Crop Tool. Don’t forget to tell me in the comments
down below if you knew these methods already. Okay, let’s get started. So we’re going to work with two documents. I have this document here and it’s a PSD
called large. And this document here is a PSD called small. This document is 1280×720. And this one here is 1920×1080. To make a document the same size as another
open document, go to the Image size or Canvas size dialogue boxes. So go into Image + Canvas Size, with the Canvas
size window open, go into Window, and at the very button of the drop down, you will see
the filenames of your currently open documents. I have two psd’s, large.psd and small.psd. Notice what happens when I select small.psd. The Width and Height will match this document,
1280×720. The same thing will happen if I go into Image
+ Image Size, with the Image Size window open, I’m going to go into Window and also select
small and you’ll see that the Width and Height will change to match the small.psd. I can press OK and the image will be resized
to match the size of the other open document. In the second method, I’m going to show
you how to use a Crop Tools Front Image feature so that you can take the dimensions of one
image and crop a second image to those same dimensions. And let me show you how it works. I’m going to go into this image and first,
I just want to make a selection so that you can see that this image is 1800 pixels wide
x 582 pixels tall. Then I’m going to go into a Crop Tool. And from this drop down, on the Options bar,
going to select Front Image. Then, I’m going to go into my first image
and notice that the crop tool is active and it has the dimensions of the previous image
up here in the Options bar. So if I adjust the crop and hit Enter / Return
on the Mac, I’m going to crop the image into those dimensions. If I make a selection, you’ll see that that
image is 1800 x 582 pixels. So no matter what I crop it will always be
that size. I’m going to undo that crop. I’m going to select the Crop Tool again
and the Front Image is still active, we can see the dimensions up here. And I’m just going to make a really small
crop, and you’ll see that the dimensions are about 300 pixels. But when I hit Enter / Return on the Mac to
commit the changes, Photoshop enlarges that crop to 1800 x 582 pixels. So no matter what we crop, it will always
be the same size as the Front Image that we set. And, again, let me know if these methods were
new to you. If you enjoyed this tutorial and you’re
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and also click on the bell to get notifications when new tutorials are published. If you’re already subscribed, you can also
click on that notification bell. And that’s it for this tutorial. I hope that these methods were new to you. If you have any comments or questions, leave
them down below. Thank you so much for watching and I will
talk to you again soon.

InDesign How-To: Crop Photos and Images (Video Tutorial)

InDesign How-To: Crop Photos and Images (Video Tutorial)


Hi, I’m Erica Gamet with InDesign Secrets.
In this video, we’re going to look at cropping images in InDesign. If I place
an image in InDesign using the File menu, Place, and choosing my image and dragging that image out to size, it automatically creates the frame to the proportions and
the orientation of my image. But maybe I want to show just one part of an image…or I want to fit a wide photo into a tall frame. I can do that as well. I’m
gonna hit Undo, just steps me backwards, back to my place cursor. And I’m going to
hold down the Shift key while I draw out my frame. Now I have more control over
the size and the orientation and the proportions of my frame. Let’s just make this tall…and let go. Now by default this is how the image fits inside the frame and
I need to fix that really quickly. I’m gonna go up to the Object menu, go under
Fitting, and choose to Fill Frame Proportionally. Now it fits in that size
frame but it doesn’t exactly fit the way I want it to inside this frame. I want to
show the whole ferris wheel. And there’s a couple ways to do that. When you place
an image in InDesign, you’re actually creating a frame and then placing the
image inside it, so there are actually two components to this image here. We can manipulate each one of those components individually. Let’s start with the frame
first. I’m going to use the Selection tool for both of these. I’m going to go
ahead and grab the frame and I’m just gonna move it off to the left a little
so I have room to pull out the frame to fit the image that I want to show. With
my Selection tool selected, I’m just going to go ahead and grab one of the
grab handles on the frame itself. And I’m gonna click and pause for just a second
so that I can see sort of a ghosting of the image back behind. I’m gonna grab
this left handle as well and move that in a little bit. And now we have a nice
tall frame, but now the image fits in the frame the way I’d like it to. But
sometimes the frame needs to stay where it is and we need to move the image
instead. I’m just going to Undo, get back to where we were when we first placed that image and it was off to the side. And what I really want to do, is leave the frame
where it is and move the image to the left a little bit. To do that, I’m going
take advantage of a little guy that doesn’t show up until we roll over the
image. We get this circle in the middle, this translucent circle. This is the
Content Grabber. And what that does is allow us to switch back and forth
between manipulating the frame and the content of the frame. If it’s not on, you
can go up to the View menu, under Extras, and choose Show Content Grabber. It’s
already on so it says Hide Content Grabber for me. So we’ve placed our image inside our tall frame and told it to fill frame proportionally, but now we
need to move the image over, leaving the frame where it is. I’m going to roll over
the image to that Content Grabber, ’til I get that little hand.
I’m going to click and again hold for a second and start dragging. Now I can see
the image back behind. Now one thing I don’t want to do is move the image too
far up or down, because I end up with whitespace inside my frame. So I can hold down my Shift key, which kind of keeps the movement only going in one direction.
So I’m gonna move that exactly where I want it, holding down the Shift key. And I
let go and now I’ve left the frame where it is, but I’ve moved the image to crop
it how I’d like. One last trick when it comes to manipulating and cropping
images, is that sometimes you like the relationship between the frame and the
image itself. I like the way this is cropped, but I realize I want the entire
image to be smaller. And maybe we’re gonna move it into the upper left-hand
corner. When I use the Selection tool and I grab on the frame and move it, the
frame and the image move as one thing. But now I want to size this down as one
thing as well. But if I just grab that handle and size it down, it just crops
the image. That’s not what we want. I’m gonna hit Undo. I need to hold down a
couple more keys for this. I’m gonna roll over the corner handle, hold down the
Command or the Control key, and I’m also going to hold down the Shift key to
constrain my proportions. Then I’m gonna click and wait for a second just so I
get this nice image, so I can see what’s actually happening as I size this down.
By holding down the Command or the Control key, the image and the frame work together as one unit. So I can constantly change the size, let go, grab just a
handle, that changes the size of the frame, roll over the middle, grab the
Content Grabber and move just the image itself. And that’s just a couple ways that you can crop and manipulate images in your InDesign document. Well, I certainly hope you found this tip helpful. Be sure to check out InDesignSecrets.com for thousands of InDesign articles and
tutorials and to subscribe to our monthly publication, “InDesign Magazine.”
Thanks for learning with us!