Camera RAW Processing in Photoshop CC

Camera RAW Processing in Photoshop CC


In this video, we’re going to go over how to process a file in Camera RAW 9.1. The first step is to neutralize it by
using your White Balance tool, which is the third from the left (in the toolbar) and right now
I’m going to zoom in. Normally I would have you shoot a Color Checker or a grey
card which is something that we know to be neutral. Because we didn’t do that, in this case
I’m going to take a look at the image and I have the side of the knife, I also have this specular highlight (where light reflects on metal or glass) and that should be neutral. I’m going to click on that, and over on the right sidebar you’ll see that White Balance is now changed from “As Shot” to
“Custom.” I’m going to zoom out. The next thing you’re going to do is
actually taking readings of the image. I’m going to click on the Color Sample tool. I like to go from
the darkest to lightest points (in the image) to place a sample in the darkest. You can see the
readings (above the image). Remember that 10 is pure black and 255 is pure white. We need to place one on
a transition, the next one the second transition between the highlights and
shadows. I’ll place a third in the front, place a fourth here in the fruit. So, that’s four (samples) in the shadow areas. I’m now going to the mid-tones and you get 8 altogether, my last one will be on the highlight area. Now evaluate all those numbers. I can see that my brightest ones are still at a medium tone (125). So, that means because I want both my shadows and highlights to be
brighter I’m going to use the Exposure Slider. In this case, because it’s a fairly moody image
I’m not going to bring the highlight area much higher than about 220. My shadow
areas are pretty low, so I’m going to go down to shadows moving that (slider) to the right, you’ll see those numbers increase. You’ll notice that it looks brighter on the screen than it’s going to print. So, down here I now have some detail on number 4. It’s still pretty dark but that is a shadow
if I want to move it, I can just press and drag. Over here there’s a bit more of an open shadow. overall that looks pretty good. Next I’m going to go to Lens Correction.
This is an older image and Camera RAW 9.1 does not contain it’s Lens profiles but I will have your profile. You can click on it to see if it’s making the kind of changes you need.
gonna go into profile and to Remove Chromatic Aberration. Then for Fringing, you would look at the specular highlights. So, I’m going to zoom in and really seen any Fringing. If
I did which would be a purple line along this highlight. Now, I zoom out (command 0) use the Manual tab, and this is where if I was hadn’t shot straight, if I had some distortions this is where every change it. I’m going back to the Basic Tab. it if there’s an area that I would like to be darker, one of the tools we have is the gradient. We have three tools where we can change specific areas. Using the Gradient, press and drag. Here’s my Exposure, you’ll notice the panel has changed. If I had very specific areas (to change) I could do it
with the brush and at this point I’m happy with how it’s looking. Now on this
bottom line we need to click on the workflow line. We’re going to go with ProPhoto
which is the largest color space. I’m using 8 bit (depth). If I had a very smooth
gradations in the background I might do 16 bit but it doubles the file size. and I don’t wanna do that. I’m
not going to resize and am going with the default size and resolution is 300. You
can do some sharpening if you know whether you’re going to be working in Matt or Glossy, I would keep it at Low. Then click OK If you want to get out of the specialized radiant options panel, just click
on one of the other tools to get back to the basic panels. At this point I would
then click on Open Image it’s going to take a little bit to open up in Photoshop and I recommend that you save it as a Tiff file with LZW compression. Make sure you name it alpha-numeric only.

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Make a Basket-Weave Effect from a Photo

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Make a Basket-Weave Effect from a Photo


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV. I’m going to show you how to create a cool-looking, interlocking, basket-weave effect of your photos. This effect works especially well on closely-cropped portraits. Open a photo you’d like to use. Open your Crop Tool and type in 870 pixels for the Width and the Height. Type in a 150 pixels per inch for the Resolution and check “Delete Cropped Pixels”. This will delete everything around the cropped area. Go to a corner and when you see a diagonal, double-arrow, hold down Shift + Alt on Windows or Shift + Option on a Mac as you drag it in until most of the head is inside the box. To reposition it, click inside and drag it so it’s centered. Then, press Enter or Return. It immediately crops to the Width, Height and Resolution that you typed in. To see your image at 100%, press Ctrl or Cmd + 1. If your foreground and background colors aren’t black and white respectively, press “d” on your keyboard. Make two copies of it by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + J, twice. Click the thumbnail of the bottom layer to make it active and press Alt or Option + Delete to fill it with black. Make the top layer active and go to Edit, Preferences and “Guides, Grids & Slices” In the Grid section, click the color box and pick a bright color for the grid. Then, click OK or press Enter or Return. Make the Grid Line every 217 pixels and divide it into 6 subdivisions. Then, click OK or press Enter or Return. Go to View and make sure “Snap” is checked. If it isn’t, just click on it. To see the grid, Go to “Show” and click “Grid”. Open your Rectangular Marquee Tool, go to the top, left corner and drag down a rectangular selection across 3 columns of boxes to the bottom. It’ll snap to the grid because we have “Snap” checked. Skip 1 column and hold down Shift as you drag down another rectangular selection across 3 columns. Continue to skip 1 column and drag over 3. Click the Layer Mask icon to make a layer mask of the selection next to the active layer. Go to the top, left corner and drag to the right across 3 rows. Continue to skip 1 row and drag over 3. Make Layer 1 active
and click the layer mask icon to make a layer mask of the selection. We can hide the grid now. Press Ctrl or Cmd + H to hide it. Ctrl-click or Cmd-click on the layer mask of the horizontal rows to make a selection of it. Go to the layer mask of the vertical columns and hold down
Ctrl + Shift + Alt on WIndows or Cmd + Shift + Option on a Mac to make a selection that overlaps the vertical columns with the horizontal rows. Go to Select and “Save Selection”. When you see this window, click OK. Press “Q” to make the selection into a Quickmask. Open your Paint Bucket Tool and left-click inside the second empty box at the top to fill it in. Skip a box and left-click on the one after it. Continue this pattern on every other row. Then, go to the first empty box on the second row and fill it in. Continue to fill in every other empty box in every other row, so your final Quickmask looks like this. Press Q to revert it back into a selection and press Ctrl or Cmd + J to cut the
shape of the selection from the active layer. Click the thumbnail of the top layer to make it active. Click the “Channel” tab to open the Channels panel and Ctrl-click or Cmd-click on “Alpha 1” to make a selection of its shape. Click back on the Layers panel and press “Q” to make it into a Quickmask. This time, left-click inside the first empty box at the top, left and fill in every other empty box on every other row. Then, left-click on the second empty box of the second row and continue this pattern, so your Quick mask looks like this. Press “Q” to make it into a selection and press Ctrl or Cmd + J
to cut the shape of the selection from the active layer. The basket weave effect comes to life
once we add shadows to these shapes. We need to clip the shapes to the
layers directly below each one in order to restrict their shadows to
their respective layers. To do this, go to layer and “Create Clipping Mask”. Notice the active layer moved to the right,
which indicates that it’s now clipping to the one layer below it. We’ll clip these shapes, as well. Make it active and this time, we’lluse the shortcut: Ctrl + Alt + G on Windows or Cmd + Option + G on a Mac. Click the “fx” icon and choose: Outer Glow. Click the color box and pick Black. Then, click OK. Change the Blend Mode to Multiply and make the Opacity 50%. Make the Size: 40 pixels and click OK. To copy the outer glow shadows to the other shapes, go to the “fx” icon to the right of the layer and hold down Alt or Option as you drag it up to the top layer. Next, we’ll add a texture, but first make a
“composite snapshot” of your image. To do this, make the top layer active and press Ctrl +Shift + Alt + E on Windows or Cmd + Shift + Option + E on a Mac. Go to Filter and Filter Gallery. Open the “Texture” folder and click “Texturizer”. Choose “Burlap” and make the Scaling 100%, the Relief is 1 and the Light is from the Top. Then, click OK or press Enter or Return. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
Thanks for watching!

6 Pixel Art Drawing Techniques

6 Pixel Art Drawing Techniques


Today, we are going to explore an art that
was born with old-school videogames. An art that will challenge your patience and your
meticulousness. Yes, I am talking of pixel art.
If pixel art has a unique look, the drawing process is still pretty close to regular drawing
and painting. Your knowledge of the principles of design, color, light but also shapes all
apply to this medium. The workflow to produce a character or any scene will still be the
same as with painting: We start with a sketch, or a blocking.
We then add shadows and lights. And we refine the piece with more strokes
and using compositing techniques. Pixel art does have some particularities.
As we draw using those small squares that make up our screens, the pixels, we face some
constraints. How can we draw curves using squares? Here’s the first issue we are going
to face. Another difficulty resides in the low resolution of pixel art assets. How can
we create the illusion of volume on a tiny canvas?
A good mastery of silhouettes and the ability to come up with subtle color nuances is essential
in order to make quality pixel art. You’ll also need to be very patient! Yet, there are
some useful techniques that are going to facilitate our discovery of the world of pixel art. We
are going to see some of them in this video. Number one: Contours.
Coming up with great silhouettes is hard in pixel art. Most notably, it is no easy task
to keep track of the big picture when we draw little squares one by one. Because of that,
it is critical to always keep a copy of our canvas at a 100% zoom level. That way, even
when we zoom in, we can still keep an eye on the final result. Most image-editing software
possess a navigator that can play this role. Others also allow us to duplicate the active
document. In order to get clean outlines, and to create
the illusion of curves, we have to use patterns. We could almost talk about routines here.
We move 2 pixels to the right, one up, we repeat that, then one to the right, one up,
etc. If we reuse these patterns throughout our
pixel art, we breathe some unity in it in terms of form. And if you recall, that is
actually an application of one of our fundamental principles of design: repetition. There is
no math formula that will cover all your needs in terms of drawing patterns. You will have
to experiment and practice pixel art to find the schemes that are going to fit your needs.
  Number 2: alpha lock.
Once we have established our base shapes, just as with painting, we can lock our layers’
alpha. Aseprite has an option to paint in such a way that transparent pixels are not
affected. On Photoshop, as we have seen in one of the first how to game art, it is possible
to freeze a layer’s alpha using the / key. We can also proceed in another way: using
the magic wand tool. We first select a color or a set of colors, and we can then paint
inside the selection. Number 3: antialiasing.
With pixel art, the shapes that we initially draw are going to be crenellated. If we want
to refine our final sprites’ shading, we can use transition colors. We have to apply
them to a few carefully picked pixels to emulate some form of antialiasing. We use this technique
whenever the transition between 2 color zones is too abrupt. I personally prefer to work
inside the darkest color of the 2. As you can see, if we use antialiasing on the brighter
color, this tends to blur the edge and make the transition zone look heavier.
The simplest way to use this technique is to place one transition pixel at the end of
every straight-line that makes up our entire shape.
Number 4: using filters. Pixel art requires a great time investment.
Traditionally, it is all done by hand. Just as with painting, there is effectively no
secret to polish a piece: it has to be done by hand. However, it is possible to use filters
and even some other tools to work faster. Aseprite possesses 2 interesting types of
filters: the first one produces a contour around an existing shape. It is very handy
if we want to stroke our character once it’s done. This can give it an interesting style.
The 2nd filter I want to talk about is the sharpen filter. It generates lighter or darker
colors along the edges of a color island. It offers a quick way to accentuate the separation
between 2 colors and to pop its edges. This filter also works well with selection tools.
Number 5: tinting shadows. Whenever I work on a new set of graphic elements
for a game, I often design them as if they were lit by a white light. In other words,
I use local colors in order to do my assets’ blocking. Once a graphic element is close
to being done, I can always unify its shadows by tinting them with blue, purple, orange…
all that thanks to gradient mapping. On Photoshop, gradient mapping is accessible
as an adjustment layer. You just have to add the effect as a layer, to open this layer’s
properties and to make sure that it only affects the shadows of underlying elements. If we
put the gradient map at the top of our layer stack, we can globally affect the shadow colors
of our whole creation. Number 6: some general tips.
It is always hard to see the mistakes we make when we are drawing. We have seen that it’s
interesting to always keep a copy of our document at a 100% zoom level. But there is more! There
are some other tricks we can use to bring our piece’s issues out.
For example, we can change the document’s background color from time to time. This alters
the relationship between our characters colors and, obviously, the canvas’ hue. That way,
we can both better see how our colors work in a general context and how our colors relate
to one another. This also affects our perception of the silhouette of our drawing.
There’s another essential trick for every visual artists: symmetry. It is easier to
see if we haven’t drawn something straight or if some parts of our creations are deformed
if we turn our painting around. It is a simple technique, but a very efficient one.
That’s it for this video! In the past How to Game Art, we focused on general techniques,
so I thought that pixel art could make some fresh content for you. It is an art that requires
a bit of patience, a lot of patience… But also some patience! We’ll get back to it
in the future. Pixel art is very interesting for those of you who don’t have a graphic
tablet. You can do pixel art just with a mouse and a cheap computer.
If you like the tutorials, please consider becoming a subscriber. That way, you’ll
be notified whenever I release new content. That said, I want to thank you kindly for
watching. Be creative, have fun… until next time!

Business Portrait On-location Photo Shoot (behind-the-scenes & Photoshop)

Business Portrait On-location Photo Shoot (behind-the-scenes & Photoshop)


So we’re on our way to a shoot at a car
dealership. I was hired to take pictures of all of the employees there for their
website. So I’m bringing my 5D Mark III, and what do you have there, Tony? -this is the backup camera it’s a 5d mark
II and you have the 70-200 which is perfect for
headshots. This is a 24-105 the nice Sigma f/4 and
again it’s just a back up, we shouldn’t ever need this. We also don’t plan to use the flash, but
if everything else fails if that Cyber Commander fails to trigger the strobes.
we can use the optical slaves from the flash here. -It’s always good to have a back-up, plan
on something failing. So we’re going to load up our car here
and just tell you what here we’re bringing as we load it up. This is our large Paul C. Buff
collapsible soft box so that will give a nice diffused light if there isn’t
adequate lighting in the dealership. -This is the Paul C. Buff Einstein E-640
which will attach to that soft boxe, this will be our main light. Here I have just a
bracket on the stand, it’s just useful to have one of these, you can attach
anything to it. -These are our Vagbond Mini by Paul
C. Buff and they’re batteries to hook our strobes up to/ -That way we don’t have to attach or have power
cords running everywhere where people might trip over it, it’s a little easier
outside of the studio. This is a reflector and we have
diffusers inside as well. Getting pretty crowded in there. -And this
is going to be a hair light or background light as we need it, just a
second light. It will be triggered by the Cyber Commander just like that Einstein
light and will run it from the other Vagabond. -I was told there would be a nice
background there but you’re never sure, we didn’t scope out the place yet so I
was going to use the white side of this backdrop in case their background wasn’t
very appealing. Throw that in there. I also brought a
lint brush just to make sure everyone is nice and clean. I have some painters tape to mark the
spot where everyone can stand so that everyone’s in the same location. And… some tape to hold the backdrop against the wall. -And this is a Panasonic
GH2 on a tripod, this is just going to be a b-roll camera for the
behind-the-scenes. The GH2 is a micro four thirds camera and it’s a little bit
old now but records great 1080p video and it runs forever, it doesn’t shut off
after 30 minutes like most DSLRs do. -I think that’s it. We just have to grab our coats and head
out. -Let’s go. -Alright. You might be able to find an angle where
we could get this line of cars in it, we have to stand up a little bit to look
down but we might be able to do that. -I was thinking this is a little too
colorful. -Yeah it is. You want to do it in my office then? -I have that, the other side is white. -yeah
the wall might be easier, I don’t know how much room there is in there. -yeah -The one other thing for this Tony, is that
we don’t have the nice natural light. -Yeah the lightning is, uh… rough. -We’ll have to use this.. -it’s a little tight to bring
lighting in. And I think we’ll just have one of us
stand behind him with the reflector -Yeah, I think it’ll be easy, so let’s get one more,
I’ll get my settings I’ll put a mark on the floor and we’ll get it done. You guys ready? Yeah will you be my model one more time? So I’m really glad that we picked a spot
that has natural light because a lot of the people here are different heights
and I would have had to adjust the softbox with every different person, it
would have been a lot more set up. So my recommendation for you would be to look
for natural light and bring a flash for fill light. -But be prepared in case it
doesn’t work out and you have to have artificial light. One of the reasons we
picked the 5D Mark III for this job is it takes two memory card slots and it can
write to both cards simultaneously. That way if one of the cards has a
problem we have another copy and we don’t have to go back and reshoot
everything. Yeah there you go. I didn’t think that it was the best I
could have done, I would have preferred if they came into the studio. I mean I know that that wasn’t possible. So now I’m back in my office and i’ve uploaded my pictures. I’m going to show you how to sort
through them, rate them and even edit them. Now that I have my photo in
Photoshop, I’m going to start by cleaning up my subject’s skin. So I have a filter
called portraiture and I love it and it does a really good job. It smooths out the
skin without taking away all the pores, which can kind of leave people looking a
bit lifeless and doll-like. So i’ll zoom in a bit more on his face so I can see
exactly what Portraiture is doing. I don’t want to lose any of these fine
lines or anything like that because it would make him look unnatural. So you can see, I can up the threshold
here and it smooths them out way too much. Looks like a boudoir shot or something
and this is a professional photo so he’s definitely not going for that. These
sliders here control the details. So this would control the large details and
smooth it out less if you were to bring them down and I actually think that looks
pretty good. Let me turn down the fine details a bit so
play around with it, it’s definitely to taste. And my only suggestion would be to
not smooth out people skin too much. Not even women. If you notice any residual marks, you can see there are a few just little
pores you can leave them in and use other tools in Photoshop to take care
of that. So i’m satisfied with this for now and then i’ll zoom in and use my
other tools to take care of any other small imperfections. So I want my spot
healing brush and i use my left bracket. I don’t want to remove too many things
because once again it will look just too unnatural and smooth. I think that looks pretty good the one
other thing I’m going to do is in person I didn’t see that his brow is furrowed at
all so I’m going to take the little furrow out of his brow. And I’ll just
use my lasso tool, circle it, delete and then use content
aware fill, that usually does a good job. And then use Ctrl D to deselect the area. I like to just zoom in to make sure it
looks natural and that actually doesn’t look too great. So I’m gonna try it again. That looks much better. The next thing I’m going to do is just brighten his teeth a little bit. They look great,
they are nice and white, but we’re used to seeing very white teeth in in the media so it’s
nice to just kind of brighten them up a tad bit. And here i added a new layer and i use
the overlay layer I select my paintbrush and use bright
white. You’re going to think this looks insane
but you just fill in just the front teeth. This is really bright, but once i’m done
i’m going to turn down the opacity and it will look natural. We’ll see I don’t want to whiten them them too much. So I’ll zoom out and make sure it looks natural. You can even turn down your opacity on
your brush a little bit it to get these back teeth, but remember that the back
teeth are usually a bit darker, so if you make these really bright, let me show you what I mean. I can’t really because i have the
opacity down, but if you make these too bright it won’t look good. Ok. So the teeth look nice and next I’m
going to just brighten his eyes a tad bit. So i’ll use my Dodge tool, I have the
mid-tones selected and my exposure down to thirty percent and I just do a little half circle. Let me see And the next thing I’m going to do here,
just because he has fair skin is just fill in his eyebrows a
little bit. They’re in the midtones, so I have the mid-tone selected and my
exposure is really low, it’s only sixteen percent, and i’m just going to define
them a little bit. Lastly I’m going to brighten up the
background. I’ll do that by selecting the background
and i’m going to use let’s see, I think I’ll use my magic wand tool
to fix the areas that it’s selected that I don’t want selected I can use this
tool to subtract from the selection but I usually like to press alt, the alt key,
and then it does it for you. You can also use this button here to add to the selection, but i’m actually going to use
layer masks and i’ll show you how. If you aren’t great at selecting by hand, you can
also use the mask tool which i think is easier. So i’m going to show you how to
select the background better using the mask tool. So i will go to the
brightness and contrast and i’m going to raise the brightness of the background,
you can see i missed a big chunk, but that’s not a big deal because then I can
go into the mask and use my paintbrush with either black or white to add or
subtract to the selected area. So white is going to add to the selected area, so I
will make my brush bigger by pressing the right bracket and then just paint it
in. And I selected the wrong parts here, so i’ll use black to get rid
of that. So you can see this is the before and it
still looks natural just a bit brighter and better and this is the after. Since they’re professional photos, you
don’t want them to look too glamorous or touched up that can actually be
embarrassing if they’re going to be meeting with a client and in their
picture they look 40 years younger, that’s going
to be off-putting to the client. So make sure that it looks like they
look in real life but just the best version of themselves. That’s it, pretty simple! If you like this
video please subscribe to our channel and if you like our lessons and teaching
style you can check out our book Stunning Digital Photography. Thank you!

GIMP 101 Tutorial for Beginners: Learning the Basics

GIMP 101 Tutorial for Beginners: Learning the Basics


hello and welcome to yet another
tutorial by Davies media design I’m Michael Davies and today I’m going to be
going over the basics of GIMP. This is version GIMP 2.6 there’s a couple new – newer
versions out of GIMP but this one still my favorite so I’m just
gonna go over the toolbar right here and the Layers panel over here which I’m
still getting a lot of questions about even after I’ve done some more advanced
tutorials so I’m gonna go over this and that way you guys can
be better GIMP users so a big question I always
get is where does this layers panel come from over here on the right – the layers bar and if you don’t automatically have it
open like if it looks like this, to get it to
open up go to “Windows” “recently closed docs” and then it’ll be
right here under “layers, channels, paths, undo” so just click that. And that’ll bring up your layers, and I’ll go over the layers here in a second so, going from top to bottom left to
right the very first tool is the rectangular
Select Tool and what this does is allows you to fill
in the area a or at least just select within an area so
that you can paint within that area using either the bucket fill tool
or the gradient tool which is called the blend tool here or any of these paint tools and then to resize a rectangle just click within the rectangle area and come up to
the top and you can click and drag come over to this side and you can do the
same thing on all sides same applies to this tool which the elliptical select tool same basic concept except this you can make the ellipse shape. if you want a
perfect circle with the elipse tool you can come over
here to the toolbar and under here it says size, you can choose exactly what size it is. So here I’ll
change the width and height to be the same so they’ll each be 571 or at least close to it and uh you’ll get a circle you can also
change the exact position here and up here are rulers telling
you where exactly you are positioned on the
image and then up here gives you the dimensions of the image this one’s 1920 by 1080 pixels and you can feather the edges before you draw it which means that
once you draw it if you like color this in with the paint
brushes it’s gonna go a little bit outside the edges Kinda like a gradient type affect so all demonstrate here using the bucket
fill tool and as you can see if I come over to select>none which gets rid of that select tool, the
edges are a little blurry and depending on how I’m high up you
turn the feathering, it’ll make the edges
more more blurred so some other features with the ellipse
select tool, and these also apply to the rectangular select tool is you can change the mode so that for instance if you go to
add to selection mode what’ll happen is
it’ll just keep building upon the shape of the selection and then
there’s also the subtract from the current selection
so we’ll do the exact opposite you know kinda carve out of that shape that you
originally drew and then there is the a intersect with current selection
which’ll make a shape out of whatever areas are being intersected
by the newer ellipse so there we have this new shape. If you come over to select none it’ll just get rid of the selection. The
Lasso Tool or the free select tool allows you to freely draw wherever you want so few if you click once – and by a draw I mean – this is gonna turn into a selection
like that, so if I click once and his move the mouse
over to wherever it’s gonna draw a straight
line for me whereas if I click and hold you can freely move the mouse around and it’ll make a
selection out of that so the instances where this comes in
handy is like if you trying to remove the background of an image. Right now I’m just going over the “a”. But let’s say you wanted to remove everything around this a or you wanna just to delete that a, or paint over it, you just use the select tool and you can you know provided that you’re on the
right layer you can there color over just the a and if you go to select>invert you can color everything except for
the a. So it comes in handy a lot of times when you’re trying to erase a background or color over a background obviously you would use the eraser if you were trying to erase the background to the next thing on here is the fuzzy
select tool so this basically operates on shapes within a layer in this case I have the
text layer selected and it’s going to select everything outside of the text if I
click the area outside the text or if I
click the actual text itself it’ll only select
that text the next who is the selected by color
tool and this is only gonna select objects that have the same color as
what you selected so if I come over here to this layer that I made and I click this white area it’s only gonna select everything with that exact color so I’m going to go to select none. Now the other select tools include the scissor select tool and the foreground select tool I don’t really ever use that stuff so I’m not going to go over it. The paths tool it’s kinda like in Illustrator where you
can create a path by creating points and then clicking
and dragging and this allows you to just draw shapes there’s not really a need for it within GIMP, so I wouldn’t really
recommend using it nobody really ever uses that. Color
picker – that just allows you to choose a color within a layer so that it’ll use that color over here in the
foreground and background color squares which is what you would then use with the bucket
fill tool or the paint tool So the Zoom tool – that allows you to
zoom in on the image so you can get a closer look or if you hold control and then click it’ll make it zoom out and you can toggle those options here to
zoom in zoom out if you wanna hold control. The measure
tool allows you to see exactly how far something is from another thing another object and
other measurements are gonna come down here so for instance if I want this GIMP
basics thing to be a certain amount of pixels away from the top I can click on the top and drag down – click on top and drag down till I get to
the letter and see exactly how far down it is here
it saying that its 390 pixels down and it also shows you the angle at which
you dragged down right here it says 90 degrees and another tool that has to do with measurements is the rulers and they are either at the top or on the side and to use the ruler you
just click at the very top where measurements are
and drag down and that’ll give you a ruler and you can do the same from the side
and you’ll see down here at the bottom it’ll show you where
you’re adding that new guide in pixels. So this is good when you need
exact measurements of where to put objects and to get rid of them, just click and
drag them if you have the move tool selected which is
this tool right here so that’s the next tool on the tool bar. And that just allows you to move objects within a layer that you
have selected by clicking and dragging the crop tool allows you to crop a
certain portion of an image you know – if let’s say you don’t want this image
to be 1920 by 1080 you just want this to be your image you would just click and drag like I did from the start top left to bottom
right of where you want to crop and then you double-click and now this image is cropped so that this is the entire image the rotate tool allows you to rotate the
layer so I have the background layer select
right now if I wanted to rotate it I would just click and drag to whatever angle I wanted it to be rotated at
denoted right here or I can change its position as to where it’s
being rotated and just click rotate or you know
reset or cancel real quick I’m just gonna go over the layers
thing over here on the right is the Layers panel and you have a bunch of layers here each layer has has its own name and it has
its own content on it if you are using GIMP right. You want to use the layers in a way that every
object every new object you create is on its own
new layer so for instance I have a background
layer So if I click this eyeball here it’ll make the layer disappear This layer is just a pattern
layer this layer is a- kind of shape design I did and you
can change the opacity of the layer by clicking on that layer that you want to adjust and come up here to opacity and you can change, you know, how transparent that image is and there’s text layers and to tell if it’s
a text layer you’re just going to see a “T” with like a rhombus shape underneath it and to edit a text layer just
double-click it and this text box comes up if you’re using version 2.6 and then you come over here and you can
change the font above the text if you click this button
it’ll it’ll take the font selections and give
it its own little box here which just makes it easier to
look through all the fonts you change the size of the font you can
change in what units you wanna do the size of the font in. So you can do inches, you can do millimeters you can change the color of the
font by clicking in this rectangle here and a you can
change how the font is aligned to the page you can also change the spacing of each row of font. Right here I only have one row so it’s not going to do anything and you can change the spacing of the letters in the font by using this as you
can see the font is spreading out and right now I have other layers on
top of that font so that’s why it looks all weird like that
you can also make a path from the text or text along a path I don’t ever really
use those so you don’t really need to know about that now here’s the bucket fill tool which is a
pretty important to first off to demonstrate this I’m going to
create a new layer so come over here layers and channels tool bar over here and click this page which’ll create a
new layer you can name the layer – I’ll just name it fill. And here you can have the size of the layer change right now it’s at the default
setting 1920 by 1080 which is the same size as
your image here and you can do a layer fill if you want. The
foreground color will be what’s in this box – background-color
will be what’s in this box and right now their the same and you can also just do a white or
transparency which means that the background will be clear. So I’m
gonna go with that here’s the new layer. Whenever a layer
is on top of another layer is going to cover everything underneath it and when there’s other
things on top of this layer, those
things are going to be above this one in the image that you’re making so you can either fill the foreground
color which you can change by double-clicking and you can adjust the colors using
this bar right here and clicking and dragging in here and once you find the color you like
just click OK down here are some pre-made colors. These are colors that were used previously so just click OK and to use the fill just click within
the image and it’ll fill everything you can change the opacity hit control>z to undo so like I said before using the select
tools you can also- in this case I’m creating an elliptical- make sure the mode is is – make sure it’s set to the right mode – in
this case I just want replace the current selection so come back to the bucket fill tool and we’re still on the same layer that we
just created and using the bucket fill tool, when we click
within the ellipse select, it’s only gonna fill in
the ellipse shape. Then go to select none and there’s your fill and the edges are still
blurry because I still have it set to “feather edges”. View part 2 on our channel.

Adobe Photoshop Tutorial – Adding Bleed

Adobe Photoshop Tutorial – Adding Bleed


Hi and welcome to this printed.com tutorial on how to add bleed in Photoshop. My name’s Dan, and I’m going to show you through the process. Bleed is an area of print outside the document that’s trimmed after printing. It’s there as a precaution to make sure there’s no white space left on the document after it’s trimmed. When preparing a document for print, it’s really important to make sure the image extends right to the edge of the bleed, and that any text is set at a safe distance from the trim line. Photoshop doesn’t have a bleed option, so instead we have to manually add space to the edge of the document. To start, click file-new, and set your document size. At printed.com we require documents to be set to CMYK colour mode, with a resolution of 300 dots per inch (dpi). Once those are set, click OK. Now the document’s set up, we can prepare to add bleed. To make sure we can see where the trim line will be, we need to drag guides to the edges of the document. Go to view-rulers to show the rulers, or press ctrl+r (or cmd+r on a mac). Use the mouse to drag line guides from the rulers to the edges of the document. They should snap to the edges. If they don’t, make sure snapping’s on by clicking view-snap to, and make sure document bounds is ticked. Once we have guides on all four sides, we can add bleed. To add bleed, go to image-canvas size, and make sure the units are set to millimetres. We need to add 6 millimetres to the values in these boxes. That’s 3 millimetres on each side of the document. Photoshop doesn’t add the number automatically, so you’ll need to calculate it yourself. Once your values are correct, click OK, and the document should expand on all sides. It’s really important to make sure any images extend right up to the edge of the bleed. The area inside the line guides is the area that will appear in print – the rest will be trimmed off. Make sure any text is set over 3mm from this line, so it won’t be cut off. To export your document for print, click file-save as, and choose Photoshop PDF from the dropdown menu. Turn off layers to save file size, and make sure ‘as a copy’ is selected. Type in your filename, and save. For print, we recommend the PDF/X-1a:2001 preset. Once that’s chosen, click ‘Save PDF’ Be sure to check your PDF is exactly how you want it before sending it off. If everything looks ok, you’re ready to send your document to print. Thanks for watching — we hope you found this tutorial useful.

China’s Tortured Beauties: Make Me Look Western

China’s Tortured Beauties: Make Me Look Western


This is the modern face of China. The whole
nation looks to Shanghai for a vision of their future – modern, rich, and luxurious. The oriental superpower is undergoing a radical
transformation. The economic miracle has fundamentally changed the country; China is becoming a consumer
society. And according to Chinese sociologists, the beauty craze is its most striking effect. A glance at this chemist leaves no doubt about
what’s desirable in modern China: white skin is chic. Whitening beauty creams outnumber
non-whitening varieties everywhere you look. With the opening up to capitalism there came
a flood of foreign films, books, magazines. This made a huge impact. It changed our ideas
and values. This is why many young women want to look
like Western celebrities. 30 years ago this would have been unthinkable. No one could
afford cosmetic surgery. No clinics offered cosmetic surgery for reasons other than accidents. So just what should a woman in China look
like? What now counts as desirable? And why have these ideals of beauty changed? In a
former factory on the outskirts of Beijing, Photographer Zheng Chen believes he has some
of the answers to these questions. This is a woman from the Tang dynasty. Under
the Emperor, being curvy was considered beautiful. A wide face, long eyebrows, small mouth… Until recently, communist ideals valued natural
beauty. Women didn’t use make up. The natural, realistic look was ‘in’. Today other things are considered beautiful.
Big eyes, small mouth, high nasal bridge, pointy chin and of course, one’s meant to
be skinny. Unusually tall with white skin and an oval
face, model Ai Xiao Qi has more than a hint of a Western appearance; and she makes good
money on it. At just 19, she is already a well-known model. But she’s still not totally
happy. I want to look even more Western. My job demands
this. Especially when you’re a model, when you’re standing in front of cameras, your
face must have a strong profile. Cheng Zhen does what he can to help out: computer
software allows him to pick up where nature has left off. I make the skin cleaner, then change the face
shape, I make it smaller and longer. This makes people look younger and cuter. Then I take care of the eyes and nose, and
other details. According to Xiao Qi, cosmetic surgery is
out of the question… at least for the time being. Asian models with Western faces adorn the
showrooms of European luxury goods stores throughout Shanghai. Do you like this woman, her mouth, her face?
Do you think she looks good? I like her. She’s sexy. But why? She’s very pretty, she’s almost ideal… Her face shape is very three-dimensional.
Especially her cheekbones and pointy chin. What do you think is so beautiful about European
facial features? The European face is three-dimensional. The
eyes have got a good shape, a high nasal bridge. European women also have full lips. Us Chinese on the other hand have very flat
faces. It doesn’t look good in pictures. That’s why many Chinese women would prefer to look
more European. These four friends initially claim they wouldn’t
go under the knife for the sake of beauty. But they’re not being completely honest. Do you like my new chin? Yes, very pretty. The surgery did you good. Another girl from the group has recently had
an eye surgery. She also keeps quiet about it. Somehow, they find it all a little embarrassing. The girls are
typical of a new affluent, young demographic.
So they have a good handle on the latest tastes in cosmetic beauty. Small face, big eyes, high nasal bridge, white
skin. That’s pretty. I would look better with a smaller face. But
women are never satisfied. A good appearance helps at interviews. But
ultimately your achievements matter most at work. But apparently, this isn’t always the case.
This recording clearly suggests cosmetic beauty can seriously help your employment prospects. What looks like a fashion show is in fact
a serious application process, organised by an official employment agency. Beauty promises success to women in China,
both personally and professionally. I went to the States. I studied at Colombia
University in New York… This wealthy bachelor is in search of a beautiful
dream wife, and he’s come to the right place. This marriage market has been organised by
an exclusive dating agency, designed for rich men to meet beautiful young women. In China,
as in the West, financial concerns often come to the fore when it comes to choosing a partner. A
recent study questioned tens of thousands
of couples and singles from the across the country. 4 out of 10 women will only marry
a man who earns at least 1,000 euro a month. 7 out of 10 insist he must own a flat. Ms Fei manages the Peking office of a nationwide
marriage agency. Only the cleverest and prettiest women stand a chance here, and many applicants
are rejected. In contrast, male customers must meet only one condition: they must have
plenty of money We are very exclusive here. The men who come
here must have an excellent financial base. 10 million yuan is the minimum requirement. Once they’ve signed up, the male clients of
this exclusive and expensive agency expect to be able to ‘order’ a dream wife. This customer for example is 55 years old
and wants a woman aged between 27 and 35. He has clear aesthetic expectations. Her face
should be oval and have pretty facial features, such as young skin colour. He wants her to
have voluptuous breasts, and she should be between 5’4 and 5’6. Not many are able fulfil such high expectations.
The average height of Chinese women is just below 5’2″ tall. This is why some opt for
drastic measures. In this operating theatre, one of the most
extreme cosmetic procedures imaginable is being undertaken. This treatment has in fact
been banned in China, but some surgeries will still perform the operation for a five-figure
payment. First, the bones of the leg are sawn in two. Then, holes are drilled through the
calves. Long metal pins are hammered into the legs, before a brace is attached that
will stretch the legs as the bones grow back. Due to the high risks involved, leg extensions
are illegal in China; the procedure may lead to muscular atrophy, nerve damage and arthritis.
Nevertheless the demand for these risky cosmetic treatments remains high – some clinics are
performing as many as 300 procedures a year. Leg extensions may seem drastic, but they
aren’t the only cosmetic procedure to come with risks. The victims of the beauty craze are well documented
on some Chinese websites. Wang Bei was an up and coming pop star. She
wanted to narrow her jawbone. She died during this routine surgery, aged 24. This is an
extreme case, but there are many things that can go wrong in China’s beauty clinics. According
to some estimates, 200,000 faces are being deformed every year. This woman is one of the many victims – even
if it is barely visible today. Qi Lixia comes from a village hundreds of kilometers away
from Beijing. 4 years ago, the tour guide decided to have nose surgery. After the first
surgery failed, deforming her nose, she needed three further, painful interventions to correct
the botched job. When I complained after the surgery, the doctors
tried to re-assure me. They said the nose looked good. But it was completely deformed. She refuses to share pictures from that period.
Instead, she will only show photos of her face after the first corrective surgery. Qi
Lixia spent 3000 euros to make her nose look natural again. That’s as much as an annual
salary in China, and she had to pay for it all by herself. Any suggestion of compensation
was firmly rebuffed by her surgeons. Lawyer Zhang Gang represents many cosmetic
surgery victims, and says Qi Lixia’s case is not unusual. Many go to private beauty salons and clinics
without a medical license. The relevant documents are missing, there’s no treatment contract,
no official accounts. No medical records. Nothing. When something goes wrong, when the
result isn’t good, it’s almost impossible to demand your rights. Such warnings generally go unheeded. Cosmetic
surgery is booming. There’s a 20% increase in the size of the chinese market each year.
With 4 million operations and 3 billion Euros in sales last year, the Chinese cosmetic surgery
market is now second in size only to the US. China has bid socialism farewell long ago.
China is like an apple – red from the outside only. In China, capitalism is more brutal
than in the West. This discussion doesn’t concern Qi Lixia.
She’s now happy with her appearance. Her fear and pain seem to be forgotten. She tells us
she’d be happy to have further operations. Many customers want to have a good-looking
tour guide. Looking good helps me in my job. Before my colleagues were in a better situation
contract-wise. Now this has changed. The
beauty industry is big business. And as it
becomes more accepted as the norm in China, the message to young girls is clear: it is
what’s on the outside that counts.

Your problem: You can’t open your camera raw files. Here’s how.

Your problem: You can’t open your camera raw files. Here’s how.


[Music] Hi there it’s Marlene from ImageMaven.com and in this week’s video blog post I’m going to talk about what happens if
you shoot RAW files and they won’t open. This happens when you have a new camera,
or a fairly new camera, and you have slightly older (not even that old)
software. So I’m going to show you what to do when your RAW files don’t open.
This can happen whether you’re using Photoshop Adobe Camera Raw, whether
you’re using Lightroom, Photoshop Elements, Aperture, iPhoto, anything that
you use to open RAW files. You have to keep your raw software up to date. The
reason is is that camera manufacturers haven’t come up with a standard raw file
format. Well actually they have, but very few camera manufacturers are using
it. It’s called the DNG file format, which stands for digital negative. Pentax uses
this file format so their files will open up in any software even older
versions. But Canon and Nikon and Panasonic and all the other popular
brands, often you’ll get a disparity. You have a new camera and older software. And
I’m going to show you steps you can take so that you will be able to open your
RAW files even if you have slightly older raw software. It is recommended
though that you keep your software up to date and that you don’t use a software
that’s too too old. One of the reasons is there’s so many great new features and
newer versions of software and you’re going to want to take advantage of them.
Alright let’s have a look at the software. So this is what Photoshop
Elements looks like when you have no files open. And to see if you can
actually open your RAW files, just go under File, Open, and navigate to a folder
that has RAW files in it. And you can see that in this case it lets me open this
file. However I’m going to navigate to a folder that doesn’t have files that will
open. I have a new Panasonic camera and you can see that the JPEGs open no problem.
But if I look at the other files RW2, those are raw files, my Panasonic RAW
files. They’re grayed out. So I know that I need to upgrade my Adobe Camera Raw
plug-in for Photoshop Elements 9, which I have here. And I know that my plug-in is
not up-to-date for this software. So I’m going to show you how to do that now. So
how do you know if what version of Adobe Camera Raw you’re using? All you do is go
under the Photoshop Elements tab and go About plug-in. Go down to Camera Raw. Click
on it. And it will tell you what version that you’re using in the Camera Raw
plug-in. So in my case it’s 6.1.0.250. I know
from just checking the Adobe website that the latest plug-in version is
actually 6.3, so now I know why my files won’t open. I’ll have to
update to version 6.3 first. If you’re using a Mac, and you have Adobe
products installed you can just go up to the top right corner of your top menu
bar, and you see this A symbol and in my case it has the number 4 here. If I
click on that, it’s actually going to open the updater, the Adobe updater. So
now the Adobe updater has popped up. And, I can see that I have lots of software
to update so all I do is I hit “update” and all of my camera RAW plugins will be
updated. I have a Photoshop version. I have an Element’s version. I have Bridge
here that needs updating. And Adobe Photoshop CS5. So I’m just going to
update all those, and I’ll come back to you when that’s done. When you’re all
done your updates it should look like this. Now let’s see if we can open up
those RAW files. So now let’s try to open that raw file again that wouldn’t open
before. So go under File, Open, go to our folder where those test images are, and
now you can see that the RW2 file isn’t grayed out anymore. So we can click on it
hit Open. There we go, there it’s open, and it’s showing us the Adobe Camera Raw
window. We’re off to the races. And just one more thing I have a page on
my website with information on all the links and where to look and how to find
the latest version of the Adobe Camera Raw software. So have a look in the video
description below. Click on those links it will take you to my website, and there
you can get further detailed information as well as a step by step instruction
guide on how to actually open your files. Leave me a comment. Subscribe to my You
Tube channel. And see you soon. [Music]

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Create a Digital Portrait from a Photo

Photoshop Tutorial: How to Create a Digital Portrait from a Photo


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
I’m going to show you how to create a digital portrait from a standard photo and how to
replace the photo without having to redo the effects. This is an update to a tutorial I
did on an earlier version of Photoshop. Open a photo you’d like to use, I downloaded this one from Shutterstock.com. To add effects to the photo non-destructively, convert it
into a Smart Object. To do this, click the icon at the upper, right of the Layers panel
and click “Convert to Smart Object”. Go to Image and Image Size. To ensure that your results will be the same as mine, make the Resolution: 150 pixels per inch and the Height:
850 pixels. The Width will automatically update itself to another amount because the width
and the height are linked. Then, click OK. To fit the photo back onto your canvas, press
Ctrl or Cmd + 0. For the best results, the subject should be on a white background. If
your subject isn’t on a white background, we need to make a selection around the subject
and then cut it out. For this example, I’ll use the Quick Selection Tool. I’ll make the
Size: 15 pixels and drag the tool over the subject. The selection doesn’t have to be
perfect. If you want to see it as a quick mask, press “Q”. Press “Q” again to revert
it back into a selection. Press Ctrl or Cmd + J to cut your subject from its background and copy it to its own layer. Make a new layer below it. To do this, Ctrl-click or Cmd-click on the New Layer icon. We’ll fill the empty layer with white and since white is the background color, press Ctrl or Cmd + Delete. Merge these layers by clicking on the thumbnail of your subject to make the layer active and pressing Ctrl or Cmd + E. Make this layer into a Smart Object and go to Filter, Pixelate and Mosaic. Make the Cell Size: 15 pixels square and click OK. Go to Filter, Noise and Median. Make the Radius 5 pixels. This modifies the square mosaics into round shapes. Go to Filter and Filter Gallery. Open the “Stylize” folder and click “Glowing Edges”. I’ll make the Edge Width: 1, the Edge Brightness: 15 and the
Smoothness: 15, however, feel free to experiment with the amounts to get the combination you
like. To replace the photo with another without having to redo all the effects, double-click
on a Smart Object to open the source photo. Open the new photo and go to Image and Image
Size. Make the Resolution: 150 pixels per inch and Height: 850 pixels. Then, click OK. Press “v” to open your Move Tool and drag it onto the tab of the .psb file, which is
the Smart Object. Without releasing your mouse or pen, press and hold Shift as you drag it
down onto the image. Then, release. Go back to the Smart Object tab and click the small “x” to close it. When you see this warning, click “Yes” to accept it. Click back on the tab of your portrait to open it and your new photo will automatically update itself with
all the effects. To crop it, open your Rectangular Marquee Tool and drag a rectangle over you image. Go to Image and Crop. Then, deselect it. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
Thanks for watching!

How to Deal with Moiré: Take and Make Great Photography with Gavin Hoey

How to Deal with Moiré: Take and Make Great Photography with Gavin Hoey


In this video I have a look at how you
can deal with the problem of Moiré in your photography. Adorama TV presents
Take and Make Great Photography with Gavin Hoey I’m Gavin Hoey and you are watching AdoramaTV brought to you by Adorama, the camera store that has everything for us photographers and today I’m in the studio and I being joined by Sam. Do you want to come in? So Sam’s going to be
modeling for me today, and I’m just gonna take a picture and show you a potential
problem that you may come across.Ok lets take a shot. At first glance it looks
absolutely fine but closer inspection and you’ll see it as a problem. The problem is known as a Moiré pattern, now
in this video I’m gonna talk about what causes it, how to check for it whilst your
shooting and also how to remove it. Moiré patterns appear whenever you combine
two fine patterns, and in this case, it’s the man-made pattern on Sam’s shirt combined
with a very fine pattern of pixels on the sensor of my camera. Now when you
combine them together in just the way, you will see a rainbowing or
circular patent appear, and that’s Moiré. Now we never used to have this problem
we had something in the cameras called an anti-aliasing filter or low pass
filter and it’s one job was to remove this problem and it did it by every
so slightly blurring the picture and of course we don’t really want slightly
blurry pictures so those sorts of filters are slowly disappearing from
modern digital cameras. Now it’s not just a portrait problem, it can happen with
architectural photography and anything with a fine pattern, nature and landscape
where it’s less common. With mother nature it’s generally man-made objects that
have this effect. Now look over to the side for me, and then back at the camera. So, how do you know you’re going to have a
problem with Moiré patterns? Well sometimes it’s obvious just the clothes
that someone’s wearing is a giveaway. Other times you not going to expect it
and it’s not easy to see it on the back of the camera. To be sure it’s there, it’s always a good
idea to take a test shot and then use the zoom facility to review your images at
100% or more. That should really be a good idea as to whether there’s a
problem or not. Of course if you access to a computer actually putting your images on
the computer, well that will show you straight away.
And if you can get to the problem first. You can deal with it in camera to a
certain degree, so once you know that you’re going to have a problem with Moiré,
there’s a few things you can do to alleviate it, and I’m gonna look at three
different solutions, the first solution is pretty obvious, I could get Sam to wear
a different shirt, that would solve the problem. Anything with a bigger pattern, or even
no pattern whatsoever, and I wouldn’t have a problem anymore. Downside is, that’s not necessarily a
solution, it could be a photo shoot where this shirt is vital for the entire shoot.
It could be an architectural shoot and the Moiré is coming off of roof tiles from a house for example. That you couldn’t really change. So while that’s a solution, it’s not always
practical. The second solution is to change the camera’s settings, so I can do
a couple of different things and I’m going to start with the aperture. So I’m
currently shooting at f5.6 lets take a shot like that. Here we go Sam, great, one
more, put your thumbs in your pocket for me. So with f 5.6, there is plenty of problems
with that shot, the Moiré pattern is there, and very clear, what would happen if I
choose f8? A stop difference. Well, I can dial f8 into to my camera, just
need to adjust the flash, that means it needs to produce one more stop of light. I
can do that on the remote, three clicks. That’s one stop extra light from the
flash, that should balance up the exposure, let’s take the same shot, and f8,
there’s still a problem. I can still clearly see the patern on the shirt that
didn’t work. Ok let’s try one more, let’s try f11, so again I can dial in f11 on my camera, increase the flash power to
compensate by one more stop, and take the same shot again. So at f11, the problem looks like it’s almost
gone there’s still a hint of it here and there, but surprisingly, by changing the
aperture I’ve managed to reduce if not quite eliminate the Moiré effect, so
what else can I do? Well I can also zoom in, so I’ve gone for quite a wide shot at
the moment but if I take a much closer, more tight shot, the problem should just
go completely, just look down over there for me, bring your eyes back to me, and as you
can see, on that shot there is no problem whatsoever, by zooming in closer,
I made the pattern on the shirt just a little bit bigger, so it doesn’t
interfere with the pattern of pixels on the sensor and solved the problem instantly, but once again of course it
may not be a solution, because maybe you need a certain angle of view. of course is
always a third option and that’s to fix it in post production both Photoshop and
Lightroom have some tools to help you reduce Moiré, and we are going to have a look at those right
now. There are of course plenty of different ways of achieving the same result inside of post-processing software. But the way I’m going to do, works with both Lightroom and Photoshop Adobe Camera Raw
which is what I will be using and it’s pretty effective too, lets have a look.
So here we got Sam, and at first glance there doesn’t seem to be a problem here and
that’s because we’re looking at a high-resolution image on a low
resolution screen. To really see the problem you always have to double click
on the Zoom tool or have a look at the one-to-one view, and that’s when you’ll see for
real, the damage that the Moiré effect is
having, and there’s two problems here, There is some weird stripes and circles
that’s a telltale sign, but also a rainbow color that doesn’t exist, this is
a pure grey shirt, so two things I need to deal with, the color in theory
and I guess I can just take the saturation away and that will fix the
problem. Except it doesn’t, because I’m left with
the stripes still and of course I might not want a black and white image, so that’s
not really a solution at all. What I need is a tool, and there is one that specifically
removes Moireé, now you might think it’s going to be hidden away with the noise
reduction and the sharpening, that would make sense, but it’s not, this is a local tool,
so it’s found underneath, either the adjustment brush and if I come down here it is, Moiré reduction, or the graduated filter. Moiré reduction, there it is, or the
radial filter has it too, so those are the three tools, at the time of recording that
you’ll find this effect on. Now I’m gonna use the adjustment brush, it’s the slowest,
but more accurate way of working and everything on the adjustment brush
setting is zeroed out except Moiré reduction that I’m going to put to around
+50. Then what I’m going to do, is get a nice big brush, and we’ll just start painting
over this part of the shirt. Up at the top here, and hoping, crossing my fingers that
it’ll work, as nothing appears to happen for a while, and then magic happens and
it disappears more or less, There is always a bit you missed, isn’t that good. Now let me just tell
you a couple of things before we get too carried away. First of all this is a slow process it
will slow your computer down it will take time be patient. Secondly, it’s not an out-and-out
solution this is a software solution, it has it’s limitations and it can have some
disastrous drawbacks. I’ll look at those in just a second so keep that in mind, but
on the whole that looks pretty darn good Ok, let’s just move down to the the rest
here and I’m going to paint over the rest of his shirt and obviously the more time
I spent here would give me better results, because things like his sleeves,
and everything else that needs to be done. There are some areas where I’ve got
that sort of patterning and it doesn’t matter how many times I go over it, it won’t
go, so keep that in mind not everything is a perfect solution. Now, when I came up to the top I can see there’s a little kind of gray
area on his neck here if I accidentally painted bit harder around that area that’s
going to extend and become worse, the reason I like to do this with a brush, is it gives
me the control to paint the effect where I want it to go, Now I mentioned earlier
that I start with 50 as my control here by popping out to a 100, you’d
think that’s going to be better but it will have a more detrimental effect on
areas where you have a crossover of tones and patterns because it’ll try and
apply a Moiré reduction even where there isn’t any, and you end up with a
sort of bleed effect, coming in on to things like skin tones and hands and
other things around the object of trying to remove the problem area from. So the
art with this is to take the Moiré reduction down, and start with it fairly
low, if you can get away with it, so down here I can still see a hint of something,
it may or may not come over on the video in that area there. I probably need to
go up to sort of mid thirties before that goes, probably even sort of 40 before it is gone to
a level where I’m happy. Now I’m still left with a slight gray halo around the neck area here so I’m going to
jump from the add to the erase, I’m going erase that back using a nice neat small
brush, again I need to be patient because this won’t happen live, when I let go, I have
to wait for that to render out again faster computers may make that happen
even quicker from my little computer here. Well I just wait a few seconds, and there
we are. So there we go, there is the Moiré fix. Let’s have a little look at before and after,
side-by-side and I’ll think you can agree that whilst it’s not absolutely perfect, that
is acceptable. Good enough and I don’t think anybody would
notice a problem was there at all. Well if you enjoyed this video and you
want to see more from myself and the other amazing presented here at AdoromaTV you know what you’ve got to click on the subscribe button. I’m Gavin
Hoey thanks for watching. Do you want great-looking prints at low-cost be sure
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