Amateur Photography Tips : How to Make a Double Exposure

Amateur Photography Tips : How to Make a Double Exposure


Hi everybody, I’m Franc Anderson, and I’d
like to tell you how to make a double exposure on a camera that uses film. A double exposure
is where two photographs are put onto the same frame of film. First of all, the first
photograph is made as normal, then the the shutter is worn down without advancing the
film and a second exposure is made, putting the second picture superimposed upon the first.
This requires a lot of experimentation, trial and error, but as a guide think very carefully
about the pictures before you begin and try to imagine the final result. So that for example,
if you want to put a cat into a glass you photograph the glass and then you photograph
the cat. The trick is to reposition the cat so it looks like it was in the glass. This
is not so easy with a live animal. It’s a lot easier with still life subjects. But it’s
fun to try, and it really is worthwhile when you get a good result. With a film camera,
normally after you take a photograph and you wind on this action cocks the shutter and
also advances the film inside. When you want to make a double exposure you want to cock
the shutter, but you don’t want to move the film so that the second picture is put on
top of the first. I can show you how to do this very simply. Let’s open the camera up.
There is no film in this camera, so let’s open the camera up. Normally, the film is
stretched across the back of the camera, and the film is driven by these sprockets here,
so that when I cock the shutter the sprockets advance the film. I can stop the film advance
happening by simply holding in the film rewind button. This disconnects the sprockets from
the wind on, and so now I watch when I cock the shutter this sprocket doesn’t move and
the film stays still. So, now I when I press the shutter again the second picture is made
on top of the first. It’s really that simple. All you have to do is make the first picture,
hold the button at the bottom, and cock the shutter. The film hasn’t moved, and when I
make the second picture it will be on top of the first, easy. All manual cameras have
a button on the bottom for rewind. All you have to do is remember to hold it in. Of course,
this is made a lot simpler if the cameras are on a tripod. Then the frame doesn’t move,
and you know exactly where the original picture was taken. This doesn’t apply to digital cameras,
because with digital cameras the same superimposition of two frames can be done in software, and
there’s no need to have a facility on a digital camera to be able to do this. It doesn’t use
film.

High ISO or Slow Shutter? Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace

High ISO or Slow Shutter? Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace


Hi everybody welcome to another episode of Exploring Photography right here on AdoramaTV. I’m Mark Wallace in Darling harbour Sydney Australia and we’re going to take on a challenge and that is which one is the best thing to do in low-light or in the dark? Should you use a really low ISO value and a slow shutter speed or should you crank up the ISO and use a faster shutter speed? Which one is going to give you the best image, the best image quality? Well we know there’s a trade-off between those two things. so ISO the higher it goes the more noise you’ll see in your image but on the other side, the shutter speed, the slower it goes the more motion blur you’ll see in your image so we’re going to show motion or freeze motion and how much noise is going to be reasonable? What can we use there? So what we’re going to do right now is we’re going to shoot Sydney, our Darling Harbour. Right behind me there’s the cityscape, there’s some boats down on the water. They’re moving a little bit. The water is moving a little bit but pretty much nothing back there is moving and because motion is really the thing that we’re worried about with our shutter speed, with a scene like this we can start with a really, really slow shutter so that’s what we’re going to do. So I’m shooting with my Leica M10 here and I have a 28mm lens. I’ve set it at f/8 and we’re going to first shoot an image at ISO 100 so let me step over here I’m going to look through my viewfinder and this is telling me that my exposure is 16 seconds so I’m going to take a 16 second exposure I’ve already focused this previously, so this is going to go for 16 seconds and what that means if there’s anything that’s moving that’s going to show up in this image but the cool thing is water usually looks better with the slow shutter speed. It sort of smooths all that stuff out and so when we look at our final image, you can see that it looks very pleasing and so in this instant a low ISO and a slow shutter speed wins but just to prove that, what we’re going to do is we’re going to reshoot this, so what I’m going to do now is, I’m going to change my ISO. I’m going to change that from 100. We’re going to go all the way up to ISO 3200, that means my shutter speed is now a half a second so I’ll shoot that click to half seconds and when we play this back and look at it, we can see, well the noise isn’t too bad, but notice the difference in the water, the water looks much better with that slow shutter speed and if we really zoom in on the image you can see that the noise in the high ISO image just isn’t really pleasing, so with things that aren’t moving at night I would say shoot with a slow shutter speed and a low ISO, but what happens if you’re trying to shoot something that’s moving? Maybe you’re shooting along the street or you’re trying to shoot something like cars or whatever and you want to freeze that motion. Well then that’s a totally different story so let’s do that next. We’ve seen what happens when everything is still motionless ,we had our camera on a tripod, the buildings weren’t moving. The only thing that was really moving in the last picture was the water and the boats just a little bit but we were able to take our ISO way down and use a long shutter speed but now I’m on Calco Bay Wharf there’s people walking around, there’s this really cool nightlife, I want to take a few pictures of the people and the scenes here and I’m going to do that without a tripod and without a flash and that means if I do this with a low ISO, my shutter speed is, it’s going to be so slow we’re talking about a half second a full second exposure then it’s just going to be a big blurry mess. So in this situation I have to take my ISO way up, so I’m going to put my ISO up to ISO 6400 maybe even a little bit higher. I’m shooting at a wide open aperture of f/2 with the 35mm lens and that way now I can shoot handheld, walking around without a tripod I can get away with this type of photography, so this might work if you’re shooting a birthday party or a wedding or any kind of event where you can’t have a tripod or a flash and so let’s do that right now we’ll walk through here and I’ll show you my results. Well the glory of high ISO is that you can shoot handheld with scenes like this, so I’m shooting an f/2 and I don’t have a tripod but I can still capture the scene with the ferris wheel and all the boats and everything and at at 6400 that is a 1/60 of second exposure which is totally fine shooting a handheld you know at the scene like this right here I can shoot that because it’s emitting light with an ISO of around, I’m going to do 800 maybe a 1000 and we’ll see how that works. We don’t need that much I’m still at 90th of a second and I can really just play with the scene back here it’s going to look really really cool. So what did we learn? Well we learned that if we’re shooting something that’s not moving, like a building or a mountain or maybe even the ocean and the camera is on a tripod, we can use a very low ISO value and then let that shutter just hang for 20-30 seconds or even a few minutes but for shooting something handheld or walking around in low-light and we don’t have a flash, what we need to do is, we need to open up our aperture to let in a lot of light and boost the ISO to something like 6400, 3200 or even higher than that. So the question is how high can you go with your ISO? Well the good news is that most newer cameras handle high ISO values very well so it’s not like a really grainy noisy nastiness that we used to get just a few years ago. Now we can shoot at ISO 6400 or 12000, 800 and it’s totally acceptable but it really depends on the camera and how old it is, so do some experiments with your camera. Take your camera. Open up the aperture. Take your ISO value and play with it. Put it at 800. Take some pictures. Put it at 16, 32 and on up and see where it gets to be a little bit too noisy and then you’ll know what that high ISO limit is for you and your camera. Well thank you so much for joining me for this episode. It was a ton of fun. I love hanging out here in Sydney Australia. I’ll be in Australia for a few more months, so make sure that you don’t miss a single episode. We’ve had a lot of cool things planned here for Australia and you can make sure you don’t miss an episode by clicking subscribe, so click that subscribe button right now. Also check me out on Instagram you can see my trip through Australia and around the world and you can see how I put some of these practical tips into everyday use. I’m posting pictures every day, so make sure you check that out as well. Thanks again for joining me and I will see you again next time.

Our Must-Have Photography Gear for Shooting Weddings (Canon 5D Mark IV Review)

Our Must-Have Photography Gear for Shooting Weddings (Canon 5D Mark IV Review)


We shoot with a Canon 5D Mark IV for digital photos and a Leica M6 for film, but today we’ll just focus on digital. While it’s relatively new to our collection, but we already can’t imagine shooting without it. The Mark IV is a real workhorse camera which is great for strenuous shoots like weddings. It got a much-welcomed megapixel increase from its predecessor, meaning you’ll get more detail and higher resolution than on previous models. So when you have that bridemaid that just won’t shut up about something she saw on Pinterest, you can print off a life-size photo of Karen looking real boo-boo. That also means if you shoot full RAW, it’ll take up more space on your memory cards, so be sure to use a high quality and fast compact flash card for optimal performance. The Mark IV also shoots terrific video, allowing 120 frames per second at 720p and 60 frames per second at 1080p. And you can shoot 4k video to top it all off. It’s got a touch screen LCD which is great for tapping on a subject to focus, swiping between photos, and zooming in. It has built-in wifi, so we can post same-day photos straight to Instagram, so your Insta-Pod has something to do. It also has Dual Pixel Raw, which allows you to make micro adjustments to the focus after you shoot the photo. So if you’re shooting with a shallow depth of field, this is a pretty cool feature. It does take longer for the files to write to the card, so it’s not ideal for the fast-paced nature of a wedding day, so we recommend you use it sparingly. t’s better in low light than the Mark III, but it still has room for improvement. We use an array of lenses, but if we had to narrow it down to just two, they’d be the Canon 35mm f/1.4 II series and the 85mm 1.2. We used to own a few zoom lenses, like the 24-70 and 70-200, but we prefer shooting with prime (or fixed focal length) lenses for a few reasons. We love the shallow depth of field that you can get with prime lenses. Not only is this essential for the look we’re aiming to achieve , but it also performs better in low light. The second reason is it forces us to think about our shot and composition more than if we relied on a zoom lens. The third reason is that prime lenses are generally sharper than zoom lenses because there’s less glass involved in the physical makeup of a prime lens. We pretty much shoot with a 35mm throughout the vast majority of a wedding day. When we need variations and tighter shots, the 85mm comes into play. The 85mm is great for couples portraits and even wedding party or family photos, as long as you have the space to get back far enough to fit everyone into frame. It’s also great for ceremony shots when you can’t get as close to the action as you’d like. Once the last light of day is gone and Karen starts putting back those tequila shots, we break out our flashes. The Canon Speedlite 600EX-RT is what we rely on. In our experience, this isn’t an area you want to skimp on, especially when shooting weddings. It’s powerful, has a decent recycle time, and can be used off-camera with a wireless transmitter. We recently started using these diffusers for our flash, called Mag Mods. This particular model is the MagSphere. It helps tame the flash by creating a more diffused look. The downside is it adds a considerable amount of weight to your camera. There you have it. The Canon 5D Mark IV, the Canon 35mm f/1.4 II series the Canon 85mm f/1.2, and the Canon Speedlite 600EX-RT

Amateur Photography Tips : How to Use Filters in Black & White Photography

Amateur Photography Tips : How to Use Filters in Black & White Photography


Hi, I’m Franc Anderson and I’d like to tell
you something about using filters in black and white photography. First of all, let’s
look at how do you actually attach filters to your camera lens. The most economic way
to do this is to choose a filter system. This is a relatively cheap filter system and this
is the amateur version and here is the same system, but the professional version. As you
can see, there’s a considerable difference in filter size, this is because, some of the
time, professional camera lenses have much bigger front elements than other lenses. Let’s
look at attaching the filter holder. The system comes with a set of rings which can be matched
to the front elements threads. The ring simply slides into the holder, like so. Then it’s screwed onto the front of the lens and the filters can just be slipped
in. Let’s have a look at the yellow filter. Of course these filters are only useful for
black and white, since the color doesn’t register. The filter has the effect of lightening those
elements of the picture which are of the same color. So this yellow filter will cause yellow
objects in your picture to become lighter. They can be use for this purpose of course,
to lighten foliage, to make green look paler in a black and white picture. Often yellow
filters however are use to darken a blue sky. Since they lighten yellow, they darken blue,
because blue is the compliment of yellow. So yellow filters are often use to darken
a blue sky. Green filters are use to lighten green foliage. Another very useful filter
is a red filter. This has a very, very powerful effect on a blue sky and will darken the blue
sky and give you a very, very dramatic effects, if a blue sky is combine with white clouds.
The third most useful filter is a graduate filter, a gray graduate filter. This is extremely
useful for controlling the brightness of the sky and leaving the scene underneath untouched.
Filter systems like this have a huge advantage in that, you can look, screw the lens, slide
the filter up and down and adjust the strength of the effect on where it takes place. So
that you can slide the filter down until the dark part of the filter is line up, for example
with the horizon, and now you have a sky which is considered to be darker but leaving the
scene underneath untouched. This can be very, very useful.

Cheapest way to make your own Photography Zine

Cheapest way to make your own Photography Zine


today i’m going to be showing you three different ways to make your own photography zine for a very little amount of money the first way is using a company called curate space Our print on demand service which means they only print the book once someone has ordered a copy because of this the price per book is significantly lower than it would be if you just ordered one copy from a professional printer I’ve used create space now, to make my last two books and i couldn’t have been happier So the first thing you need to do is obviously have an idea or at least some sort of content put in your book now even though it doesn’t matter and you can put whatever you want in that i definitely recommend you have at least a basic theme or body of work after this you need to create two pdf files the first of which should be both the front and back cover together and the second one needs to be the internal pages i Used adobe indesign to create both the files and if you don’t have it don’t worry because there are plenty of alternatives And if you go to a school or university I’m sure they have access to it i also know a lot of libraries now have the adobe suite so it made sure to check that
You need to set the page size to a 5 and i’d recommend you have no less than 20 pages because you don’t want the Final book, to be too thin Once you’ve created the files you need to go to the create space website and make an account after you set up your account click on add new title Here type in the name of your book select paperback and then click on guided setup Once that’s loaded fill in the necessary details and then click assign a free isbn here you can customize the size of your book and whether or not you want it to be printed in color after you’ve set that you need to upload the interior pdf file you’ve created once it’s finished uploading and you’ve reviewed the file pick a finish for the book and upload the cover pdf once this is done you could submit the book, for review which shouldn’t take more than 24 hours When your book is approved you need to proof it after this you can either honor a copy directly from createspace which might take a few weeks to arrive or you Can publish it on amazon the benefit to publishing it on amazon is it gives people a trusted source to purchase your book from It also only takes a day to appear that so you can order a copy on amazon that will arrive sooner that one through crate space directly would to do this you need to select the channels for it to be distributed on i recommend early setting amazon comm and amazon eu as the other channels will drive up the minimum price you can set your booking if you’re looking to get a book only for yourself set the price at the minimum possible This will usually be no more than five pounds and it’s a great deal if you want to sell your book To a few people you can set the price a little higher in create space will pay the profits at the end of the next month If you’re expecting quite a large amount of people to buy your book i wouldn’t recommend use great space This brings me to the next way to make design which is getting it professionally printed Using a printing company isn’t really something that’s necessary unless you know you’re going to sell something like 50 plus books The reason for this is the more books you order the cheaper it cost to print per book for example getting one book printed might cost 15 pounds whilst getting 50 books printed might cost 200 pounds which equates to only four pound per book most professional printing companies will work with you whilst creating a book and they offer a much wider range of layouts papers and style so there multiple benefits i recommend getting in contact with one as they’ll usually give you a direct quote and talk you through the whole process finally there’s the polar opposite approach to all of this and that is diy create your own zine yourself i really like this method as it’s the most personal there’s nothing better than hand making something and being proud of what you’ve made The same goes when you buy a handmade product it’s really nice knowing how much effort has gone into making it and each product is slightly unique you get creative freedom and whilst it’s not the most cost effective and easiest approach it’s certainly my favorite photography is an art so why not put as much effort into displaying the photos as you do taking them thanks for watching authentic aesthetic bye

Cambodia Low Light Challenge: Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace

Cambodia Low Light Challenge: Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace


Hi everybody welcome to another episode of Exploring Photography right here on AdoramaTV brought to you by Adorama it’s the camera store that has everything for photographers like you and me well I’m hanging out in Phnom Penh, Cambodia at night in downtown by riverside, it’s where they this city comes to life. It has all kinds of vendors and people moving around and clubs and all kinds of really interesting things and so I’m taking a photo challenge to shoot all of this craziness at night with no flash so it’s a low light challenge now we’re going to try to see all the different people that we can talk to you and say hello and to do this I have a translator Derek come on over and so here this is Dara Rin He’s going to help talk to the people that I can’t talk to to make sure we have permission and everything, it’s all good he is also going to make sure that as we’re filming so Matt is running the camera right here nobody comes and steals the cameras from either one of us so let me just show you Matt so a lot of people wonder how are we doing this that’s Matt was up there you go just to make it clear that we do have extra sets of eyes to make sure that somebody doesn’t come around and grab our stuff we’re using camera straps so I know a lot of people ask about safety so the key is don’t go out alone if you’re going to do this all right so what we’re going to do is I’m going to increase my ISO on my camera I’m shooting with my Leica M I’m going to shoot almost everything at 1.4 or maybe 2 I’m going to shoot with different lenses 35mm, a 21mm, a 50mm and I’m going to shoot at different ISO settings 800, 1600, 3200 We’re going to see what we get. We’re going to start by walking around, talking to some vendors, shooting some of this stuff and learning some tricks of using some of the light that’s hidden inside of these carts, so let’s get started. In this setup I’m facing a few challenges. What I’ve done here, I’m using a 35mm lens because I want to show all the fried frogs and the squids and all that kind of stuff and our vendor here, she’s a very nice woman and so I’m using a 35mm. I’m manually at a 1/60th of a second, f/2 ISO 800 Make sure that’s right yeah 800 and
one of the things I’ve noticed is there’s a light, that’s right by her eyes and as she’s moving in and out of that her face is getting darker and brighter so I sort of have to wait for that light to work. The other thing if we look right down here there’s a bed of hot coals where they’re been cooking and so I almost burned myself on that and then right beside me I don’t know if you can see this but there is lots of traffic so I’m trying to avoid being smashed by a car. Why are we doing this? So it’s just a ton of fun and we’re going to shoot some more of this and see what we get one of the things that we need to do before we shoot anybody is get permission and so we’re asking is it okay if we shoot can you ask if it’s alright oh okay okay so he said it’s okay for us to shoot and so I’m going to use this light right here to illuminate in his face oh he’s giving us treats no you eat it for a second I want to shoot first. Okay you see if I can get this really quickly, we’re shooting with a really slow shutter speed here beautiful I love with the flame, I love that, wonderful! Excellent, excellent I love it. I’ll show him what we’re doing, here you are. These are snails and eggs snails and eggs do you eat the snails? Yeah sure. I’m not going to I’m just going to take a couple of pictures here and notice that this is our this is an LED light strip here and that’s going to be the only light. Hey where are you going? You have to come back Our subject just left but if he sits here this is going to illuminate him so if I shoot where Matt is right now I think we’ll get a really cool shot of the snails and the eggs in the foreground and our subject back here, so yeah have a seat so I’m going to shoot, Dara is just making sure none of these bikes hit me and we will see what we get, so I’m shooting everything in manual mode because things tend to get wonky when I get lights from the background, that kind of stuff, so this is exactly what I want this is a wide-angle lens. This is a 35mm so I’m getting close and I’m shooting a lot I don’t want my model to pose here this is real life stuff, there we go. Snails and tiny crabs. Who doesn’t like a snail in a tiny crab? Mmm, yummy once again we have this light providing all the light for our scene here. I am not brave enough to have some of this food but maybe later. I just notice behind me there is this hotel and a boat going by on the river here and that it’s going to be really awesome because all we have these reflections on the water, so if I shoot that at a really slow shutter speed we should have some really nice light leaks and I’ve got my tiny Coleman tripod to make sure that my camera doesn’t move so I’m going to set this up down here and then I’m going to get a little bit dirty. Frame everything up and see what we get, so I am shooting right now at f, I’m going to shoot at about f/5.6 I’m focusing at infinity. This is going to give me a one and a half second shutter speed. That’s close to level. Another one of the things I love to do in low-light is Pan and that that means is I’m setting my ISO to ISO 800 it’s sort of high, I have my aperture opened all the way up to f/2 to let in a lot of light but even in these lighting situations it’s really dark which means I can use a really slow shutter speed so right now I have my shutter set to 1/8th of a second. I’m shooting in manual mode and what I can do is I can find a motorcycle or tooktook or a car and I can track that and that means that my camera and my subject are moving at the same speed, but the background is going to be blurred and because across the street we have these really cool trees with all the lights on them those are going to blur it’s going to be a really colorful scene so I’m going to shoot a few of these. Panning can take a little while to get right so I’ll probably have a few blurry images but all I need is one that’s going to be spectacular so I’m going to do that right now. So we’re walking down the street and I’ve noticed that there’s a lot of people that are having their evening meal and so hopefully I can find somebody that will let me take their pictures. We’ve got some lights that are sort of hanging on some stands here and I think it’ll be a really interesting shot to show sort of what life is like and Phnom Penh at night. Is it’s okay if I take your picture? Is that good okay. Yeah you can, awesome I found a balcony here that overlooks a really busy intersection and so what I want to do is use a really slow shutter speed to get some light streaks of all these cars and tooktooks zipping around, so what I’ve done here is I have set my ISO down to ISO 200. I have cranked my aperture closed, it is at an aperture setting of f/16 and that means that my exposure here is going to be about sixty seconds, my camera is on aperture priority mode, it’s going to try to go as long as it can using a cable release and I have this on my little Coleman tripod, so I’ll take a few shots and we’re going to get some really interesting results from this balcony overlooking the intersection. Well I had a blast tonight zipping around Phnom Penh and seeing all the nightlife. Dara thank you so much for being security and helping out translating and all that kind of stuff. So you’ve been an invaluable help you know, one of the fun things about shooting at night is just experimenting you’ll notice that I shot some things with a really wide open aperture but I also shot some things with a closed aperture. I shot things at a high ISO and low ISO, so you can use any of your settings, just play with it. Get out at night, get a tripod and have a lot of fun. You’ll see that it is a total blast. Thank you so much for joining me. Don’t forget to subscribe to AdoramaTV, it’s absolutely free, so click on the link right now, Dara did it so you could do it too and we will see you again next time.

What Are Three Lessons Photographers Should Learn? | Q&A w/ Chris Knight Episode 1 of 18 | PRO EDU

What Are Three Lessons Photographers Should Learn? | Q&A w/ Chris Knight Episode 1 of 18 | PRO EDU


(upbeat music) – Number one, know that the techniques
should never be the goal. They are always a means to an end. They help you achieve your goal, whatever your goal happens to be. So, something that’s well executed isn’t necessarily good. Two, restraint. Never underestimate less is more. Boiling something down simply is sometimes a much better way to learn. And a more successful way to learn. Think of it like cooking a chicken. It’s really easy to do,
but it’s hard to do well. Boil down your idea, really strip it down into it’s most basic thing and that will help you
communicate more effectively. One of the best exercises from the book A River Runs Through It was, it was a writing exercise where he had to write, and
then strip it in half, and strip it in half,
and strip it in half, and strip it in half until it was basically just a sentence. And if you can reduce
your idea down to the most the most basic sense you’ll be able to more clearly articulate what you’re trying to achieve. Third, the Gestalt Principles. It changed the way I
looked at composition. It’s something that they teach in design. It’s not really something that’s taught as heavily in photography,
but it’s tremendously useful. It was developed by German
psychologists in the 1920s. It tried to explain how we see and we organize visual
information in our brain. And the one that’s the most important is the idea of figure
ground relationships. If you understand that, you’ll start to to be able to differentiate your subject from the background in a
lot more different ways. Specifically through
contrast and composition and it will really help facilitate better organization of your images. (upbeat music)

Amateur Photography Tips : How to Set Up a Home Darkroom

Amateur Photography Tips : How to Set Up a Home Darkroom


Hi, I’m Frank Anderson and I’d like to tell
you how to set up a home darkroom, of course first you’ll need a room, it doesn’t have
to be a very big room but it does have to have a water supply and it does have to have
some power points. The first thing you have to do is to get the materials to blackout
the room, there must be no light coming from the windows and no light coming from the door.
Of course, you’ll need an arrangement of equipment, for example, you’ll need a safe light, you’ll
also need an enlarger with which you can make black and white or color prints. You’ll need
an enlarging easel to hold the paper flat, you’ll need some photo paper to make the prints
with and then you’ll need a minimum of three trays to develop and stop and fix your prints.
These print tongs are also very useful, you shouldn’t put your hands into the chemicals,
your skin might be sensitive to it. Of course, you’ll need a sink and, in this case, a print
washer to wash your prints. The prints can be washed in the sink itself with running
water and you can use one of these to plug the sink, so the sink can actually fill up
with water and then it won’t escape by the top of the tunnel and you can wash prints
in the sink. After your prints are washed you can squeegee them and then you can dry
them in racks, if you like, but you can also use one of these, this is quite cheap. It’s
a print dryer and this will dry resin coated prints very quickly, only a matter of minutes.
In order to make up and store chemicals, I would suggest that you try to find storage
bottles like these. They’re very useful because if the bottle is half, or a little bit more
than half full, you can compress it like this to exclude air from the container inside and
that way you can keep the liquid for much longer. You’ll need some measuring cylinders
for mixing chemicals and you’ll also need a timer to time your exposures. In this particular
case, this enlarger comes with a timer, if it doesn’t you can use timers like these or
you can use, very small and very convenient digital timers like these. Finally, although,
again, it’s not necessary because you can do it simply by hand, it can be very useful
and release you to do other things, if you buy a film processor. These processors are
useful because they rotate the developing tanks and keep fresh develop around fresh
chemicals, coming to the film and they do it instead of you so they can release you
to do other things.

50 Shades of White (wall): Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace

50 Shades of White (wall): Exploring Photography with Mark Wallace


Hi everybody welcome to another episode of Exploring Photography right here on AdoramaTV brought to you by Adorama, the camera store that has everything for photographers. I’m Mark Wallace and I’m hanging out here in Kampuchea Party Republic studio and I have this amazing infinity wall right here. It’s a white background. You might have something like this in your studio, maybe you have a white roll of seamless and this video is all about working with this big white beast. How do you control that? How do you get it to go from white to gray to black? The reason I’m making this video is because so many people have seen me take photos on a wall just like this and the wall goes to complete black or a really dark gray and I get emails almost every day saying how is that happening? Well that’s what we’re going to talk about in this video and we’re going to end with a really amazing portrait, so let’s get started right now. Alright well now we have a light and we have a model. This is Kongka and so what we’re going to be doing is I’m going to just first show you, that we have a light, a model and our big white background but when I take a photo at this distance, right here so look right into my lens. Beautiful! What the heck? The background is absolutely dark so what is going on back there? Well to understand that, we need to break this down step by step. We need to first understand what we can do with the ambient light because with their eyes we see a white background but on the picture it doesn’t show up. So what’s going on? We have to control the ambient light, then we have to understand something called the inverse-square law. So we’re going to do that really quickly and simply then we’re going to put everything together to control that background, to create a really beautiful portrait so I’m really excited. Let’s get started. To understand what’s happening with our white background we first need to understand a very important principle of flash photography and that is when you add a flash to your photo you actually have two exposures, you have the ambient light, that’s light from the Sun or light in the room like these fluorescent lights and you have the light from the flash and you can control those two things independent of each other. So the first thing we need to do to control our big white background is to control the ambient light. So let me illustrate this. So I have my flash turned totally off. I don’t have a trigger on my camera. I have my camera set to f/9 aperture priority mode and I’ve increased the ISO to ISO 800 just for this illustration, so let me show you what will happen here if I take a picture just with the ambient light, so we’re going to look right in the lens Kongka looks great. BAM!so I take that that’s at 1/60th of a second it’s a really not a very good picture because we don’t have any flash but you can clearly see that the camera can see that white background and it shows up crystal clear. We don’t want that, we want to eliminate that and the simplest way to do that is just to underexpose the background, so what I’m going to do is I’m going to change my camera to ISO 200. That’s my base ISO for this camera and then I’m going to speed up the shutter speed so from I think it was the 1/7th of a second something like that. I’m going to go to my camera’s sync speed that’s the fastest speed that my camera can use, the fastest shutter speed that my camera can use with the flash. Now if you don’t know about sync speed fear not. I actually have a bunch of videos about sync speed and I have link to those in the description of this video so if that’s a new concept for you just watch those videos and it’ll all make sense. So now I have my camera at f/9 at sync speed 1/180 of a second and at ISO 200 now let’s take that same a picture again, so you’re going to look right at me same exact thing, click, it’s totally black, there’s nothing there look it’s just blank and so what we’ve done is we have eliminated the ambient light. There is nothing that is showing up on that white background except the light that comes from our flash and that means now that we can control everything the only thing that’s going to show up on that background is the light that comes from this flash or other flashes and so we can do some really groovy things but now what we need to understand is what happens when we move this closer and farther away from our subject and to the wall and how can we make that brighter and dimmer so we’re going to do that next. Now that we know how to control the ambient light we need a quick refresher on the inverse square law. Now if the inverse square law is confusing to you don’t worry, I’ve already made a video in depth about this but let’s just have a refresher. What happens with the inverse square law is it’s the law that illustrates how the power of the light falls off from the source and so it comes out really strong right here and then it just has a little cliff wow it gets much, much less powerful and then it just sort of evens out as it goes along and so we have this really strong light and then it drops off and then it evens out back here and that has a lot of implications for us when we’re shooting with a white wall, and so Kongka, you’re going to come right back out and we’re going to illustrate this and so here’s what we’re going to do. So we’re going to start with you close to this light. I’m going to turn this guy on and we’re going to shoot with model close to our light. Now remember the light is falling off rapidly, so that means that the light is much more powerful here than it is back here which means that she’s going to be exposed properly but the white background is going to be underexposed making that darker and her perfectly illuminated. So I’m going to meter this and so we’ll do that. I hope this meter should meter right about f/8 so we’ll do that and it’s exactly f/8 ISO 200 f/8 and I’m a shooting at sync speed which is 1/180 of a second. Look right in my lens, beautiful, so we’re going take this shot and it looks just like it did before. We have that dark grey background. Now watch what happens remember this light is falling off, with an evening out so we’re going to have you come back here much closer to the backdrop. Remember the light now is evened out and so the backdrop, the white background and Kongka are both going to be exposed about the same so I’m going to meter this again because we don’t have as much power as we did before, so I’ll meter this. That meters at f/3.6, so I’m going to adjust my aperture accordingly and we’re going to take a photo, beautiful I love that right there and look now we have a perfectly exposed model and a nice white background. That’s what the inverse law does for us, so if you want a dark background, you got to make sure that your light and your model are close together. If you want a nice white background make sure that your light is farther away and that your model and your white background are closer so that, that inverse-square law works for you. Alright we know how to expose the ambient light so that we have a black background. We know how to use the inverse square law to control the different shades of gray that we have on our background let’s put that all together and make a really nice portrait Kongka is out here she has a nice white top and black pants and that is going to be nice and contrasty with the background. We’re going to let that fall into darkness, now to do this I want soft light, so we’re starting with our fill light. This is this giant 7′ silver umbrella that’s just going to sort of shower down light. It’s going to bounce off the white floor and fill in but we want nice directional light as well and so we have this small softbox and that is going to come from the side and make sure we have fall-off and so that’s going to sculpt her cheeks and give us some directional soft light now because these are so far from the background Kongka’s white top is going to contrast with this dark background, it’s going to fall into darkness not completely into darkness, we just want a dark gray but that is exactly how it’s going to work out. We’re going to shoot this outfit and maybe a couple of different wardrobe changes and I’m going to show you the results, so let’s get started right now I love these images, I think they’re soft and wonderful. Thank you so much Kongka Chan and you know what she won Cambodia’s Next Top Model and if you want to see all of our amazing pictures and behind-the-scenes stuff here is her Instagram so you can make sure you check that out. I want to tell you about two other videos that I’ve made, about white backgrounds. I did one called white paper tricks that will show you how to sculpt really interesting things on a white background using some of the principles that I taught today and I also want to remind you about the inverse square law video that is a deep dive into the inverse square law, if that’s a little bit confusing to you. I have provided links to both of those videos in the description of this video and a link to her Instagram account in this video and so thank you so much. How do you say thank you in Camia? អរគុណ orgoon thank you. Don’t forget to subscribe and we will see you again next time.