Sony 35 f1.8 Review – The BEST Prime Lens for the A6400 | A6300 | A6000?

Sony 35 f1.8 Review – The BEST Prime Lens for the A6400 | A6300 | A6000?


If I could only buy one prime lens for my
Sony APS-C camera, even in 2019 I would still buy the Sony 35 1.8 mm. In this video I will give you a brief overview
of this lens and show you what I think are its most important strengths. My name is Werner, I live in the Italian Alps
and this channel is about filmmaking and GoPro. There is not the one perfect lens that is
optimal for all situations and needs. Many things I say about this lens today are
directly related to my personal situation and my personal needs. It may be that you yourself have completely
different needs and that a different decision would make more sense for you. For this reason, I would like to briefly explain
my situation before showing you the strengths and weaknesses of the lens. The region I live in is called South Tyrol. It is located in the southern Alps and only
about 14% of the territory is under 1000 meters altitude. Actually it is the perfect area for landscape
photography. Nevertheless, my focus is clearly on filmmaking. I just want to capture the beauty of this
country and spend as much time as possible in nature. For me this is a hobby and I am lucky to be
in a position to film and shoot what I like and do not have to earn my living with it. This is another reason why my needs and approach
differ from those of a professional filmmaker and photographer. Of course, this also applies to the equipment
requirements. I need equipment that is small, handy and
versatile. In most cases I want to film hand-held. Only in rare cases I want to use a tripod
or a gimbal. As I said, my main focus is on filmmaking,
but photography also plays a role. It often happens that I film myself, especially
to make these videos for Youtube. I’ve been using a Sony A6300 for a year and
a half, but most of what I say in this video also applies to the recently introduced A6400
or the now very affordable A6000. The 35 1.8 was the first lens I bought after
the KIT lens. If I have to judge a lens, then the following
aspects are important for me: Which features does the lens have and how is the build quality,
what is the lens suitable for and how versatile can it be used or do these properties meet
my needs, how is the optical quality and what look can be created with this lens, how do
I like the bokeh. The 35 1.8 is a very small lens. It therefore fits perfectly to the small body
of the A6000 series. It looks very high quality and stable, even
if it is mostly made of plastic. The lens is relatively light and the camera
seems well balanced. In combination with an A6300 or A6400 you
have a very small and light package that you can take with you anywhere and that can achieve
very high-quality results. The first special feature of this lens is
of course the large aperture of 1.8. This wide aperture makes it very easy to create
a shallow depth of field and thus obtain a cinematic image. In addition, a wide aperture lets a lot of
light onto the sensor, which leads to advantages in low-light conditions. The Sony 35 1.8 OSS has an excellent autofocus. Since I often film myself, a reliable autofocus
is very important to me. In combination with the A6300 and probably
even more so with the A6400, the autofocus works extremely fast and absolutely reliable. A large part of the videos on this channel
and almost all of the shots I speak into the camera were shot with this lens. I can’t remember a single time that the lens
didn’t capture me correctly. The autofocus is almost silent and can’t be
heard on video recordings. The lens also has a focus ring for manual
focusing. It is a Focus by Wire and therefore an electronic
Focusing system. In general, you can focus very well manually
with it. However, the distance between near and infinity
is relatively long – you need a whole turn, which can make it difficult in some cases
to pull focus manually. On the other hand you can set the focus very
precisely. Besides the very good autofocus, the image
stabilization of the lens was absolutely crucial for me. In most cases I shoot my videos hand-held
and often I shoot in 4K. Like the A6400, the Sony A6300 has no internal
image stabilization. In addition, both cameras in 4K have a problem
with rolling shutter. This is another reason why a good stabilization
of the video image is especially important. It’s clear that there are other ways to stabilize
the image, for example in post. However, all alternative ways of stabilization
have decisive disadvantages. Whether an image stabilization in the lens
is really necessary for you is up to you. Of course, it depends on how you shoot and
whether you usually use a tripod or whether your main focus is on photography. Personally, I wouldn’t buy a lens for the
Sony A6300 or A6400 that isn’t image stabilized. However, this has to do with my needs and
because handheld filming is important to me. The image stabilization is also probably the
biggest difference between the Sony 35mm and the Sigma 30mm 1.4. What is the lens particularly suitable for
and what is not. 35mm on APS-C corresponds to about 50mm on
full frame. It is often said that this is the typical
field of view of the human eye. The special strength of this focal length
is that it is very versatile. It is still wide enough to capture an action
scene, an establishing shot or a landscape shot. And it’s still good for potraits or close-ups
without causing too much distortion. On the other hand, with 35mm the lens is not
a specialist for wide landscape shots, nor it is a specialist for portraits With an aperture of 1.8 you can achieve a
nice shallow depth of field even at 35mm. As you can see, you can make beautiful cinematic
shots, which is very important for me. The lens also has an acceptable minimum focusing
distance of 30cm, which means you can get relatively close to objects. You can make beautiful B-Roll close-ups in
this way. Due to the focal length of 35mm, which is
perhaps wider than that of a typical macro lens, objects in the foreground appear a little
larger. But of course, this lens is not a macro lens. Now I’d like to show you some examples of
the look you can create with this lens. The Bokeh is pleasantly soft and beautiful
with the aperture wide open. I would also say that the lens is really sharp,
even though this feature probably doesn’t play such a decisive role in filmmaking. Overall, the optical quality of the lens is
very good. There are no particular distortions or other
major flaws. Even the sun stars get beautiful. Especially from Sigma there are some interesting
alternatives. However, these lenses do not have image stabilization. But you can only decide for yourself whether
this is decisive for you or not. In a nutshell, the lens has the following
strengths: a good build quality and a size that fits
very well to the small body of the A6000 series. The combination of camera and lens is very
handy. with 1.8 a very wide aperture, which allows
you to take nice cinematic images as well as great portraits. an image stabilization that also allows you
to shoot video handheld with 35mm a focal length that is very versatile
good optical quality and a very nice and soft Bokeh. With this I would like to say goodbye from
the Alps for today. If you liked this short review, give me a
Like as feedback and I will see you next time.

LUMIX Academy S1H | 01 LUMIX S1H Introduction

LUMIX Academy S1H | 01 LUMIX S1H Introduction


[music] Jacob James: I’m Jacob James. Photographer, filmmaker
and Panasonic LUMIX Ambassador. Here we have the new
Panasonic LUMIX S1H. The S1H builds on the legacy
of Panasonic’s professional video technology and the success
of the GH-series. The S1H comes packed
with new features designed to match filmmakers’ needs. It also comes with the features that filmmakers’ have grown
to love in the LUMIX GH-series and it brings
these for the first time to the full-frame S-series. The S1H bridges the gap
between solo content creators and the cinema production world, with
included features such as V-Log and V-Gamut with more than 14
stops of dynamic range, 3:2 6K recording capability,
class-leading HLG HDR recording options, timecode
in and out via the flash sync port and compatibility with the XLR1
adapter to record 24-bit, 96KHz, high resolution
audio ensures that this is a camera ready for even the most
demanding of productions. So what’s new with the S1H? The S1H’s 24-megapixel
full-frame sensor is equipped with dual
native ISO functionality. The dual native ISO was first
seen in the VariCam range and has revolutionised low-light work for production since
its introduction. This technology allows unprecedented
image quality even at higher ISO. The S1H also utilises the L-Mount
the same as the S1 and S1R giving filmmakers access
to the great native lenses from Panasonic such as this 50mm
as well as lenses from L-Mount alliance partners
such as Leica and Sigma. The L-Mount also has the benefit
of a short flange distance that can easily be adapted to
other lens mounts when required. Naturally,
this includes the widespread EF mount with the MC-21 from Sigma and also PL mount
adapters too for use With cinema lenses in production. For those of you who are familiar
with the S1 and the S1R, the S1H is equipped with the same
ultra-high-resolution EVF, Eight-way joystick control, full-size HDMI,
cable lock, microphone, and headphone inputs as well as USB-C direct charging and powering
of the camera even when in use. We will deep dive into many of these
features in the accompanying videos. What’s different
with the S1H compared to the other S-Series cameras? New for the S-series
is the integration of a fan outlet, a fully articulating screen,
twin SD card slots, two dedicated record buttons one on the front, one on the top,
a new top LCD screen design and tally lamps front and back to ensure you
know when the camera is rolling. The S1H also offers unprecedented recording formats
in a full-frame sensor. Resolutions up to 6K,
cinema 4K 10-bit 4:2:2 and even anamorphic modes,
meaning that the S1H can keep up with pretty much
any complex or technical requirements a DP
or director may desire. If you’re familiar with the GH5S,
many of the best features of that camera have been
built upon and brought to the bigger sensor format. 400 megabits all-intra codec, check,
cinema 4K 60p, check, variable frame rates of up to 180 frames
per second at Full HD, you bet. As well as this abundance
of recording formats and codex,
users of the S1H will be excited to see other small tweaks
to the camera to make it integrate into a production
environment easier. For example, the left-hand side
strap mount is now perfectly aligned with the sensor for a more
accurate focus distance measurement and a newly refined status LCD
& video menu allow for quick and easy control of the important
functionality of the camera. Finally, the newly designed fan
prevents excessive heat build up allowing unlimited high-resolution
recording even in 6k Ensuring that this camera can
keep up with the most demanding of filming and this is the brand
new Panasonic LUMIX S1H. Broadcast: Panasonic

Super 8 Filmmakers Guide: Working with Projectors | Shanks FX | PBS Digital Studios

Super 8 Filmmakers Guide: Working with Projectors | Shanks FX | PBS Digital Studios


[MUSIC PLAYING] [FILM REEL CLICKING] ANNOUNCER: You’ve
undoubtedly heard about Super 8, the dramatically
improved 8-millimeter film format. [FILM REEL CLICKING] Hey, guys. Joey Shanks here once again. And this is part three of
our Super 8 Filmmakers Guide series. And in part three, we’re
going to be covering Super 8 projectors. ANNOUNCER: This one weighs
less than a telephone. But don’t let that
compact size fool you. It shows your movies
sharp and clear. JOEY SHANKS: So we’re going to
be working with three different projectors– a classic Super 8
projector that only takes Super 8 film, an older 8-millimeter
projector that just takes 8-millimeter film, and a dual
Super 8/8-millimeter projector that can do both. Now, the 8-millimeter projector
and the Super 8 projector have different sprocket
sizes in the projector. The one that does
both doesn’t deal with grooving in
the sockets when it turns the film,
which is really the reason why it can do both. Super 8 film gives you 50%
more picture area than regular 8 millimeter for bigger,
sharper movies on your screen. JOEY SHANKS: I don’t
know if you can tell. You see how the sprockets
are, like, twice as big– the 8-millimeter? It allowed for a
lot more frame size. That’s why a lot of
times, these projectors can’t play Super 8, because
the sprockets are too small. I went to an
antique store, and I found a few rolls of
random 8-millimeter film just so I could throw in
an 8-millimeter projector, because I have like two or
three 8-millimeter projectors. I got those for the “Star
Wars” lightsaber episode for the sound effects,
where Ben Burtt hooked a mic up and recorded
the motor tones of projectors. He actually did it with the
35-millimeter projector. But I kind of got away with
an 8-millimeter projector. [LIGHTSABERS WHIRRING] This guy I got off of eBay. It is a Keystone Super
8 projector automatic. The guy that was selling
this said it worked fine. And the thing is,
a lot of times when you buy these things online, the
user may not be into filming, not be into projectors
and what have you. So they may turn it on, and it
may look like its running good. But there may be
certain components that don’t work that
they don’t realize, and that’s what happened here. First off, you always want to
make sure that the bulb works. And usually, you just
unthread it here. Get it off. So this is, I think,
150-watt bulb. This is kind of what
the bulb looks like. They’ll vary in
size and strength. But usually, they
look like this. The end, it looks like this. You see, it has kind of
a– an indention here that goes outwards. ANNOUNCER: When installing
the projection lamp, line up the flanges on the
base of the lamp with the slots in the lamp’s socket. Then press down firmly and
turn in a clockwise direction until it locks in place. [PROJECTOR CLICKING] And it works like so. First, you want to make
sure the motor runs. [WHIRRING] She’s loud. So it’s turning here on
the forward position. But I go to Rewind. And the rewind doesn’t work. So I’ve gotten two
projectors, I think. And the rewind has not worked. And that’s something
that a lot of times that the people that
are selling these just don’t realize that the
rewind doesn’t work. A lot of times
what I’ve had to do is just hand-spool it to rewind
it, which is definitely a pain. And I guess this is only,
like, a two-minute clip. It’s not that bad. But I also have this
other Super 8 projector that I got that’s a dual
standard and Super 8, where you can flip a switch
and use either format. When I turn the motor on,
turns it from this one. And then Rewind rewinds
the film from here. So let’s say, if I was getting
tired of doing it like this, I could take my other projector
here, take it off like this. It’s probably not the
best way to rewind film. But we can remove our rewinder,
kind of like a VHS rewinder, you know what I mean? If you guys know what
those things are. ANNOUNCER: They thread
themselves automatically. Watch. Right onto the take-up reel. Make sure that the sprockets
are kind of sitting in there. Push down on this. [CLICK] And it kind of makes a nice
little curved cut on it so it feeds it
through a lot easier. OK. So the sprockets are
facing towards us. This is going to
let your film in. We push this down. When I just hold it
in, it’ll feed it through here, come down here. It’ll loop around. So it’ll feed back
down through there and then pop it
out through there. We don’t want to
have the light on, because if it gets
stuck for some reason, it will burn through the film. So we just want to
turn the motor on. So here we go. [WHIRRING] I see it’s going through. It should come out here. And out of the three projectors
that I tried, all of them got jammed up at
one point in time. So always be ready to
cut your projector off if the film gets jammed up. [WHIRRING] And then you turn it off. I was hoping it might,
like, catch automatically. But that’d be too
easy, wouldn’t it? Stick it on in there. OK. [WHIRRING] All right, so here’s
some of what we shot. You see that the frame is
kind of coming through there? This is your framer. So sometimes when
you’re washing it, you’ll notice,
like, the frames are like– you can see half of a
frame and the other half coming in. So I’ll just flip the knob a
little bit, and that exists it. [WHIRRING] [MUSIC PLAYING] I shot one roll of
black-and-white reversal of my friend’s daughter’s
birthday party. The great thing is
with black and white, all you have to do is get
it developed and sent back. And then we’re just
going to set up our camera and film
the white paper and essentially
digitize it ourselves. I use photography paper. I use the opposite sides
so it’s not too shiny, but it’s still really clean. ANNOUNCER: This is dirt in
the aperture of the projector, which must be carefully
cleaned before the showing, for the dirt is not
only disturbing to see, but it will scratch the film. JOEY SHANKS: An air
canister, blow it. Try to get some of the
unwanted hairs out. [BLOWING] See? I was able to get
it by blowing on it. And when you guys are
setting up your camera to record this, record at 30
frames a second, not 24 frames. Recording at 30
frames a second is going to take out that
flicker and look a lot better, believe it or not. And there is also
another technique that you guys can try out. You can pop the lens
off of your projector. And if you have a
really good macro lens, you can get super close to the
actual gate of the projector and film it that way. You might be able to get a
little bit more of a pure image by doing it this way. But for the most part, I really
couldn’t tell the difference. So I was telling
you guys about how it looks when you try to
project a color reversal. So we’re going to
do that right now. So we have our first two
rolls from “Galaxy Gulch.” [WHIRRING] All right. So I see that it’s running good. So now I’ll turn the lamp on. All right. Oh, yeah, I see
that pretty good. So as you can see– [DOOR RATTLING] Like I said, I
tried even bringing this in post-production
and flopping the colors. But it’s just– there’s
just so much information that the camera needs or
that the computer needs that you’re not going to
get the same color the way it truly looks. So this was my first time really
working with film projectors. And I think it’s a good
idea for anyone who’s starting fresh into working
with film projectors is to get an 8-millimeter
projector, because they’re
cheaper, easier to find. And go to antique
stores, thrift shops. Even go online and find
old film reels of footage and load it into
these projectors just so you can kind
of get your hands dirty and working with the projector,
seeing how it operates so, when you do make
your mistakes, it’s not going to be making your
mistakes with your footage. Oh. Catch. Yeah, it wasn’t tight enough. So– oh no. All right. It’s just the adventures
of projecting film. OK. So I don’t know if it was wound
tight enough or if I just– oh, I have it on rewind. All right. And over. Back under. And then through here,
through the gate, you just lift up and
slide it through the gate. And you want to leave yourself a
little bit of slack right here. ANNOUNCER: The film
is threaded with loops above and below the gate. If the loops are too short,
they will tear the film. Then you run it up under
here and then back over there. [INAUDIBLE] getting in
the episode like always. What’s up, [INAUDIBLE]? And she’s out. And you see the sprockets
fit in perfectly here. [CLICKING] And it’s also
really cool looking at these old-school home movies. [GIGGLING] JOEY SHANKS: For
the look, the feel, you can kind of see what
your footage could look like. [WHIRRING] And also, it’s kind of
fun to burn film frames. [CLICKING] Thanks again for checking
out part three of our Super 8 Filmmakers Guide series. Stay tuned for part
four, where we’re going to be going over, looking
at our digitized footage that we sent off and editing
our film, “Galaxy Gulch,” going over some sound issues. It’s very hard to
work with sound when you have these
noisy Super 8 cameras. [CAMERA CLICKING] We’re also going
to be seeing if we can work with some of
our digital footage and make it look
like Super 8 film. Thanks again for
checking this out. And please stay tuned for
more in the near future. Thanks again.

Super 8 Filmmakers Guide: Shooting a Test Roll | Shanks FX | PBS Digital Studios

Super 8 Filmmakers Guide: Shooting a Test Roll | Shanks FX | PBS Digital Studios


[MUSIC PLAYING] NARRATOR: You’ve
undoubtedly heard about Super 8, the dramatically
improved 8 millimeter film format. [FILM REELING] A lot of times
when you’re going to shoot a film or anything
that’s important to you and you’re not sure
about a certain camera, you need to shoot
a test roll just to see how the auto exposure
works, how it looks, if the light meter is reading
properly, if it’s overexposing, underexposing. So that’s what we’re going to do
is go out and shoot a test roll and make observations of
how much light is out, what our light meter says. We have a two- to three-minute
little script that the camera man, Kyle Platz, wrote. It’s called “Galaxy Gulch.” The opening shot is of
a window, the reflection of the sky behind it,
and you see this comet. So we just want to make
sure that this camera is working correctly. Right now, technically
it’s magic hour. It’s like 7:45 right now. The lighting is perfect. Ideally, this feels like it’s
the perfect time to film. But I’m not sure what the
Super 8 camera fit is. I hope it is because that would
suck if this was too dark, but I don’t think it is. The good thing with this
one, this Cannon one is 1.4 aperture, so it opens
up about a stop more than that those cheaper cameras. We’re going to composite
a tree line into it. But if you come down
more, you can frame it up just where you see nothing
but sky if you get lower. Do you see what I’m saying? So that’s kind of the
angle right there. All right, so I was telling
you guys about 85 filter. So I found a couple at a local
camera store, vintage ones, and they were really cheap. If you’re doing a test
roll, I would try one with using this and turning
off your daylight filter. So if you were
using this one, you would want to flip this guy. And I would shoot five seconds
worth to see what it looks like with this filter engaged. Then I would also take
it off and shoot it and see how the
daylight filter works, the internal one, because
you may gain maybe a half a stop by using this one as
opposed to using one inside. Set it to auto. So this camera, you can
do a manual aperture. And look through it,
and once it’s on, it’ll tell you what it thinks
the aperture needs to be. It’s like an F8 to 16
split, which is good. That’s great. Usually when you’re
filming, it’s always better to overexpose
as opposed to underexpose. I would first fire
off five seconds of whatever the light meter
says just to see if it’s right. And it’s always
good to use a slate, so if we were going
to film five seconds we know we’re at
a F16 to 8 split. So you maybe would want to
get a white piece of paper or a slate, write
at F8/16 split, clap it out just so you
know because there’s no metadata on the
film that will tell you what you were filming at,
so just so that you know. You then throw it into
manual right here, so now it’s in manual. And now you want to get
it to where it’s at an F8, so you’re opening
it up by half a stop just so you overexpose
it just a little bit. So that’s kind of– if your
light meter works properly and you have a manual
aperture, that’s the best way to
get a good exposure and to overexpose a smidge. So we did a few tests with the
camera on the tripod like so. And since it doesn’t– the
mounting point is much closer to the camera body,
it remains more still. But when we did a
test with this one, we actually saw a
little bit of movement. So if you have a camera
where you can only mount to the
bottom, you’re going to probably want to–
let me take this guy off for right now. And remember, when we’re done,
always turn this bad boy off so the battery doesn’t drain. If you were to film like this–
and there’s no film in this, so I’ll just run
it– sometimes, it might actually just
move a little bit when it’s not perfectly
parallel to the ground. So sometimes you might
want to get bungee cords and bungee this down
here on both sides so it’s just a little
more firm if you’re going to be filming
via remote, or you may want to actually
hold it like this and just try to keep
it as firm as possible so it doesn’t have
that unnecessary shake. And then probably we may shoot
the tree line right here, if you turn it that way. Just a nice shot of those trees
probably in like 20 minutes because it wants to be
really dark, and then maybe shoot– we’ll shoot
maybe another one even 20 minutes after that. And Kyle was telling
me that watching behind the scenes, the
Super 8, the JJ Abrams film, they had a few scenes that were
written in that they wanted to shoot on Super 8, but it
called for visual effects, and it was too soft, too
dark, so they actually had to shoot those
scenes in 16 millimeter. To create mood,
tone, environment, a sense of kind of
a throwback look it’s great for, there’s
some shots in our script that calls for
sweeping, grand shots, like the opening
shot where there’s a reflection of a window,
and we see a comet pass. We may even shoot the
comet element in 4K and then just really
crush the hell out of it and soften it up, a lot noisier,
and I think that could work. What we’re going
to do is film it from about right
here straight on. Obviously, these
chairs won’t be there. And shoot it with our
Sony FS7, but also with the exact same angle,
shoot it with our Canon 814. And even if we realize that we
can’t use the Super 8 footage, we’re going to have a perfect
reference, a perfect match that we can get the grain just
right, the look just right. So that’s definitely
just something that we’re considering
and knowing that certain shots
aren’t always going to be perfect or ideal
with Super 8 in mind. So some other
stuff we were gonna want to shoot for
our test roll is some shots of the
camera hooked up to a car driving down the road. We’re going to shoot kind
of around sunset or sunrise to create kind of
a dust-like feel. We’re going to use the
more inexpensive camera. The first angle we’re going to
do is mount it right up here. And we have a super
clamp, and don’t use the cheap super clamps. And we also have a
ball head Manfrotto. And you might wonder
why this is here. We’re going to
connect some bungees, so this is going to give us
a nice little access point to bungee down from right here. We kind of probably
need to angle it a little bit like that. And I always think it’s
fun trying to capture stuff on film that people
didn’t really capture back in the day, at
least home movies, you know? Want to smell what
forever smells like? That’s what it smells like. Oh, that’s great. And that’s where this remote
trigger comes in so handy. Like I said, this one came
with a remote trigger, about 10 feet on it. So if we hook it up, we have
to turn it on to RL here. Now, if I push in the
trigger, it’s ready to go. So now what I need to do
is I would take it down here, open this window,
pass it through. Since we’re doing
it at sunrise, I’m probably going to go out
in the morning by myself, so this gives me the
chance to drive and just be able to hit it from here
and turn it off from here. We need to make sure this
is a little more secure. So I got an
assortment of bungees just to keep it a little more
firm and connected because, I mean, with this camera, it
would be nice to have it here because the body’s closer
to where the plate is. This has got a nice
little point right here. And maybe one coming
back down this way, and even getting like a long
one and going all the way over there just so it’s a lot
more secure, a little more firm. Oh, and always
like have a safety harness on here connected
from your camera to right here just so if
it ever does come off, it’s not going to shoot out on
the road and endanger anyone. Maybe throw on the
wide angle lens right here if we wanted to. Just make sure we
set it to infinity, zoomed all the way out. Since we can’t
close this thing, we would want to put
gaffers tape on it. And we would drive down
the road and hit our switch when we wanted to. Another angle would
be, is I actually mounted one right here. Ran the cord around
to right through here, and I just control
the view there. I’ll show you another one that
I did that was kind of crazy. How did I do it? Let’s see, I rigged it
kind of like this, I think. What did I do? It’s on this trailer hitch,
so it’s pretty secure. So you could even
do one like this. There is enough slack
on that remote trigger to run it all the way around
and into the driver’s seat or probably be smarter to have
just another person with you maybe right here
to flip the switch. And I thought, what, about four
inches of clearance, three, but I was trying to
do it on a dirt road so when I turned onto the
road, it just went– it just– and it fell down. And you see all
these scuffs here. But luckily, the camera
was perfectly fine. Nothing was wrong with it. But it was– that would have
been a pretty sweet shot though if I could have
got it like this. Wouldn’t you say? I think that’d be pretty sweet. Maybe we’ll try it again. We did some pretty cool
rigs on Burt’s truck. So I have Joey Shanks
Galaxy Gulch one because we’ll be
shooting more of these, and I’m gonna put
it back in here, and we’re gonna tape this up. So you probably want to wrap
it one more time in something black to trap all the light. Even a garbage bag would
work, and wrap it up. Ex out all this stuff,
old barcode stuff. We’re going to want to write a
few times on this box, “film – no x-ray.” Pretty important. So I got my test rolls
ready to ship out, so I’m going to go
out to the mailbox and put that in the mailbox. And that’s going to conclude
part two of our Super 8 filmmaker’s guide. And stay tuned for
part three where we’re going to show the whole
process of finding a Super 8 projector, hooking it up,
running the film through it, and projecting it onto a
screen, and then filming it with a digital camera, and
then essentially digitizing it. And with our test
roll here, we also shot the same shots
with our digital camera, so we’re going to see
if we can pull off that Super 8 look with using
basic filters in Premiere. If you liked this episode,
please check out more of the “Shanks Effects” series. Some good ones to watch if you
really were doing like the car mount stuff and all the
bungeeing of the camera is the stroller dolly, where
I make a camera dolly out of a stroller using the
same mounting principles and bungees, and then there’s
also the bungee gimbal episode where I create this kind
of crazy gimbal contraption with bungees in my car, and
it worked out pretty good. And I’ve also made
an additional video that’s going to
go really in depth into how to fill out a form and
send it out to these film labs to get your film processed. And I would suggest to go to
my website, moviemagicnow.com, to check out that video. And if you guys
have any questions, please leave them in the
comment section below, and I will try to
address those questions at the end of the next episode. Thanks again for watching,
guys, and stay tuned for more Super 8 filmmaking. And we will see you next
time for part three. Later.

Super 8 Filmmakers Guide: Cameras and Accessories | Shanks FX | PBS Digital Studios

Super 8 Filmmakers Guide: Cameras and Accessories | Shanks FX | PBS Digital Studios


You’ve undoubtedly
heard about Super 8, the dramatically improved
8 millimeter film format. Here, try it. See how easy it is. DICK VAN DYKE: Drop
another in, you’re all set. NARRATOR: So this week, why not
make your family movie stars? OK. What’s up, guys? Joey Shanks here once again. And we’re going to be
doing a two-part series dealing with Super 8
cameras, shooting on Super 8, going old school,
and yeah, actually catching some stuff on film. Everybody has a camera
nowadays, and you want to do something that
will separate yourself from everybody else. And this is definitely
one of those ways. NARRATOR: Even if you’ve never
snapped a picture before, you’ll make it exciting
movies indoors or out. JOEY SHANKS: Yard sales,
grandparents’ attics. I’ve found tons
of Super 8 cameras at thrift shops in the past. First, we’ll talk about the
older 8 millimeter cameras. WOMAN: To load it, you drop
in the film and click it shut. See? It didn’t take your
standard Super 8 cartridge that the Super 8 cameras do now. If you find a camera
and you open it up and it looks
something like this, this isn’t the
camera that you’re going to be able to shoot with. MAN: With the Kodak
Ektasound Movie Camera, it’s as easy as this. What you want to look for
here is that it takes a Super 8 cartridge, like so. So if you’re at a
thrift shop, you would want to bring
with you some batteries. Usually these cameras
take four AA batteries. Pop them in, see if
the motor worked. This one’s really quiet,
but I can hear it working. Listening to this one,
it sounds a little funky. But if you can hear that,
that sounds pretty smooth. And it sounds clean. You want it to sound clean. With some of these cameras,
the light meter sometimes runs off of other batteries. This camera actually needs
smaller, little guy batteries for the light meter. Weird kind of smaller battery. So you see these guys
at the bottom, this one, the smaller icon here, that
will test your light meter batteries. And this will test
your grip handle batteries for your motor. The light meter, if it doesn’t
have the right batteries, it won’t work. And that could cause problems
when you’re shooting, and you have it in auto, and
the auto meter isn’t working. So another thing
to be mindful of. Checking all of the
other settings on it, making sure through
the viewfinder the lens looks pretty good. Everything’s in focus. The lens cap needs
to be off, though. That’s always a good thing. The light meter is
kind of working. We’ll get into
more of that later. Most of these were built with
zoom capabilities, the tele and the wide. So obviously, wide will
is essentially a zoom out. Tele, for telephoto, zoom in. And what you also
need to look for is the better cameras
will give you the option to shoot at 24 frames a second. The cameras that were made
to do 24 frames a second are just a little
more on the high end. Also look for anything
that gives you the option to view a manual exposure
or a manual aperture, like this Canon one does. So I can leave it wide
open, or I can close it down like an f/22, if I want to. Even if your camera
doesn’t necessarily have manual exposure,
a lot of times you have the option to tweak
the exposure a little bit. So a lot of times
you’ll see a spotlight and a backlight setting. So it’s pretty much
giving you the ability to underexpose or
overexpose a stop. So this gives you a little
bit of manual control, but not much. Super 8 film gives you
50% more picture areas than regular 8 millimeter
for bigger, sharper movies on your screen. JOEY SHANKS: OK. So this is your basic
Super 8 cartridge. The great thing about Super
8 is it’s really compact. And you just pop it in. You don’t have to worry
about loading, loading it in the dark. You can even take it out. All that would be exposed are
these seven frames right here. Standard 50 feet of film. These cameras were actually
meant to shoot at 18 frames a second. That was normal. And 24 frames a second would
be considered slow motion, which is kind of funny. And a lot of times,
there’s options where you can film at 12 frames a second. When shooting at
24 frames a second with about 50 feet of film,
you have about two and a half minutes worth of
footage that you can shoot, a little over
three minutes if you’re shooting at 18 frames a second. A lot of people don’t realize
that only certain types of films, you can send
in, get it exposed, and they’ll send
you the reel back, and then you can hook it up
to an 8 millimeter projector and watch it on a screen. NARRATOR: The projectionist
gives the signal and the curtains are closed. The assistant turns out the
lights and the show has begun. If you’re wanting
to shoot on color, the only thing that they
can do when you send it off to get it processed
is that they’re going to digitize it for you,
which is great, because that’s what I want to do. But if you were wanting to
get it back and project it on a projector– and
then you could set up your camera and film the
screen, and then essentially kind of digitize it your own
way, which is cheaper, as well. You would need a reversal,
black and white reversal film, which is cheaper. So we’re going to shoot
one roll of the reversal, just so we can hook it up to
the projector and check it out. But that’s just something to be
mindful of that not every film stock you’ll be able to
get back and project. So this one had a really
nice remote trigger switch. And, you know, this looks
like an 8- to 10-foot cord. You can plug in right
here, remote control. This is my neutral switch. So now with it plugged
in, it doesn’t work. And have it on RL. I now can kind of control
it from a distance. These are remote
shutter triggers. So right here, next to the
handle, or next to the trigger, you can thread it in. You can control
it that way, too. So if you were to plug in
here and do the same thing, it’s taking just one picture. Some cameras come with
an open and close option for the eyepiece. Shooting something via remote,
you want to close the eye hole. Some light would get in here and
create what they call ghosting. This one has it. This guy does not have it. So you would almost
want to just like put some black gaffer’s tape over
top if you were doing a remote. Little add-on lens that will
make it a smidge more wider. And you do the conversion, 7.5
millimeters to a Super 8 camera is roughly like 50 millimeters
to your normal, full-frame HDLSR. But you really,
essentially, have a 50- to 300-millimeter lens. I just make sure you
get the threading right. Instead of a 50, it’ll
give you about maybe like a 40 millimeter. But I would avoid
zooming all the way in, because you’ll see a lot of
distortion around the edges if you use that. Every time you’re
about to shoot a roll, you take a baby toothbrush
and you just kind of clean the gate a little bit. And the gate is this
opening where the film opens up and is exposed. And you just kind of
run it up and down once, and that will clean out some
of the hairs that may be there. To really make sure that
your viewfinder is in focus, you just turn the dial. And if you can see the light
meter numbers are in focus, just get it where it
matches your vision. If you want to go old school–
because you’re just never sure quite sure how well
they’ll focus by doing it through the eyepiece– if you
really want to get it right, for the most part
I would consider bringing a tape measure
with you and actually measuring off stuff. You always want to make sure
you’re on off when you’re not using it. This guy, there’s an
L. That’s for Lock. And if you had this
on N for Normal, it would be using
the light meter, and eventually your
battery would drain. Especially with this one,
because it has these smaller batteries it takes
for the light meter, if you were to leave it on like
this for maybe even a night or two, it could drain
all of that battery. When you’re about to
film, you sometimes want to make sure that
the film is turning. Because I’m a paranoid
guy when I’m filming, I’ll make a little mark with,
like, a Sharpie on here. I’ll just make a
little mark here with the film facing
towards the lens. So let’s just run
a little bit here. All right. So I just squeezed
for, like, a second. So let’s take this out. And you see, the black is gone. So you know that your camera’s
actually turning the film. The film reader, right here,
it reads to 50, for 50 feet. This is just reading as
once a cartridge is in. It’s not necessarily is reading
the film going through it. It’s starting to count the
number of cycles it does. So if you were to take this
cartridge out shooting halfway through, it would reset to zero. So just something
to be mindful of. When you shoot
all 50 feet, this, you’ll see at the very
end, will say exposed. Hey, Nala. You want to get in the episode? You want to get in the episode? Super 8 cameras
were made to take film that was balanced
for 3,200 degrees Kelvin. And these Super 8 cameras
have filters built into them that think you are going to be
shooting in the daytime a lot. So there is a little
orange, I think they call it an 85 filter,
that are in these cameras. So with this one right here,
you see this little sundial. That means it’s
made for the sun. And if you were to flip this
down to this little bulb, it takes out the
orange 85 filter. Can you see that? See that orange
filter disengaging? So that is the 85. Now, this is something important
because sometimes these 85 filters can get corroded. And you’re throwing something
in front of the lens, so there’s always the
ability of something bad with that filter to mess
up the exposure or the shot. So what a lot of
people do is always shoot with the bulb
mode, the indoor mode, and then they would get
their own orange 85 filter to put on so they don’t
have to worry about having it engaged all the time. There’s even a spot inside here. This guy right here will
disengage the orange filter. So you can see this notch
right here, this guy. So that fits perfectly,
where it goes right between this
switch for the 85 filter. NARRATOR: Each
film cartridge has this indexing slot that tells
the camera all about the film speed. JOEY SHANKS: This
is the 7219 stock. I believe the other
one that we’ve used that’s better in
sunlight– this actually did not have an indention right here. This was just clean
all the way through. So it automatically
disengages the 85 filter. Even if you had this film
in, and it was engaged, your indoor outdoor
dial would be bypassed. A way to get around
this, you would probably have to cut out a little
indention on your own, so it won’t bypass the
85 filter automatically. So hopefully, that’s
not too confusing, but that’s definitely something
you need to be mindful of. MAN: Here’s a reel
of home movies. Suppose these were your movies. That’d be worth a
fortune, wouldn’t it? Oh, yes. All right. Well, I hope you
enjoyed the first part of this three-part series
dealing with Super 8 film. For part two, we’re going
to be going outside, shooting a test roll in a
few different environments. We’re going to make sure that
the camera’s working properly, that the exposure looks good,
that our light meter’s working good, and just stuff that you
need to check with the camera when you’re out in the field. Then we’re going to go through
the process of actually sending it out to get it processed,
developed, digitized, and all that, because
kind of half the battle is just knowing how to do that. And then for part
three, we’re going to be dealing with shooting
a little short film that our cameraman,
Kyle Platts, wrote. It’s only a two- to
three-minute page script. If you dig kind of the old
school, old world filmmaking techniques, I have a
lot of other videos. There’s a front screen
projection technique that Stanley Kubrick used
in “2001, A Space Odyssey.” I did one on that. We even did a film
versus digital comparison with stop motion animation. Thanks again for watching, guys. And more soon to come, and
we’ll see you next time. Later.

Adam Savage’s One Day Builds: Space Camera Shroud!

Adam Savage’s One Day Builds: Space Camera Shroud!


Adam Savage from tested here in my cave
and it is all space cameras today careful viewers of the channel might
recognize this contracts camera as a Ryan that got to build I did a
show-and-tell of a few weeks ago and this is an exact replica of the camera
that the Gemini astronauts the very first American astronauts to leave the
comfort of their spacecraft this is the camera that they used and it’s not just
a camera it’s also a rocket maneuvering unit yeah
these cylinders held a compressed gas and the astronauts used these rocket
ports to steer themselves around later in the Apollo days NASA went to a medium
format camera like this Hasselblad and this is another Ryan that got to build
this build is actually really cool because while it looks exactly like the
original Hasselblad it’s actually cast in hollow resin this weighs almost
nothing in fact it weighs about one-sixth of what a Hasselblad would
weigh which is really cool because that’s the moon’s gravity one-sixth of
Earth’s gravity so Ryan made a Hasselblad camera that weighs on earth
what it should weigh on the moon I added a little Polaroid action camera to the
front lens port here that can slot right in there with magnets and that’s so that
I can gather footage from my digital camera yeah it’s like adding this whole
extra dimension to my space cosplay but neither of these is the camera when came
here today to talk about we came here to talk about this camera now by the time
NASA was launching the Space Shuttle they were moving towards more modern
single lens reflex film cameras back into the 35 millimeter realm and this
Nikon f3 body was used by NASA on dozens and dozens and dozens of missions but
more important to me than the f3 body just a fine body is this beautiful 55
millimeter f1 point2 lens that big fat piece of glass means that lots of light
is moving from the world onto the film plane I love nothing more than fast
glass because it looks so gorgeous and that particular eyeball of NASA’s f3
lens is like something that I think about when I think about shuttle air
photography but doesn’t have that classic NASA look does it and that’s
where today’s one day build begins we need the help of my friend Anthony
Kovacs hello sir hey em how are you great are you Anthony is a fellow NASA
obsessive and a dab hand at the sewing machine you’ve made some parts and
pieces for me over the years in the past I mean this is the first time we’re
working here in the cave to make a shroud for this Nikon f3 body that’s our
one day bill so just kind of a rough idea just a drawing of the thing
exploded oh wow did okay so right this is a fabric that will wrap
around this and did you just draw this from scratch to begin with or did you
start working I drew it from scratch after I’ve made this pattern to get it
full like wrap my mind around it but if you want to set it right there
perfect all right turn it sideways and so this should wrap right up I’m very
and you get it kind of yes any cuz it’s fatter on the one side you have to
finesse it like you just said yeah so that lines up there and the nikons not
covered it is not well it’s so strange and actually I have my laptop and I
think it’s a fundamentally different view finder on the NASA one then I
haven’t been able to find that correct view fine I think it’s a little bit
fatter okay I can’t quite remember but that’s fine yeah I honestly I struggled
to find photographs of this shroud other in other places I sent you a few of mine
yeah well yeah that was but it’s amazing it was harder than I was
yeah shuttle era camera right so here you can see these tabs in the back go up
they’ll have velcro right they’ll velcro to the inside of here right and that
will velcro there yeah he’s just kind of slide in and velcro dude and once it’s
fabric and yeah yeah and everything it will you know I think it’ll also have a
serger stitch it’ll do an over stitch that’s way to an edge yeah okay around
this dude um there you go if you have like some scotch tape we can just throw
it on there just to kind of hold it in place but there’s your there it is
there’s my NASA shroud and now that’s already starting to look
like oh right and proper yes it can’t you unfocus your eyes it’s we can we can
call it cut oh I love objects like that and here’s what’s interesting and what I
found and I don’t have anything to back this up other than just what I can see
with my eyes and how my mind disassembles stuff when I replicate it
but the majority of this NASA stuff is usually one layer and then a layer
underneath it’s the same size it has enough seam allowance to usually wrap
over once that’s it and just folds and yeah so it’ll basically be two of these
one will be a little bit bigger and you can see I just the under no yeah I’m
piece will just be where these little flaps are the extra pieces are this flap
will just be made separately and stitched once there okay this one
stitched once here and then there’s a little flap that will will actually put
a piece of velcro and cut the circle out of the middle oh nice awesome and then a
little flap will go right here to be stitched once folded down stitch it over
top that I have a crap-ton of leather punches which will not only project
perfect circles in fact slows yeah that’ll be great and you know I’m not
exactly sure I don’t really think they were holding it up to their eyes no they
weren’t yeah yeah I say because you can’t put your eye up to it in the
helmet it’s literally you’re pointing it at it and kind of getting that yeah the
best you can so all right cool it looks like then that we may punch that after
the fact once we’ve got it mostly constructed but I’d say that this yeah
that looks I mean that’s when it’s cloth it just needs to be like and is that
open on the bottom it is yeah yeah it’s kind of ugly because there’s a tripod
mount there I’m guessing you have access to the quarter-twenty bolts that was
down there yeah not the correct motor drive for this f3 NASA had a custom one
I haven’t gotten around to fabricating it alright ok well then yeah I’m never
thinking that as a pattern that sounds good to me kind of curious with my role
this one day build this I think you’re doing much as most of the sewing here
and I’m curious to learn from watching you go yeah that’s that’s totally fine
I’ll tell you what I have that you could utilize here Oh excellent yes okay we’re going to do
and yeah this one needs to be longer because it’s fatter on that side so I
think we can just this piece when it’s all finished is going to lay on top of
that slightly larger mm-hmm piece when I have the slightly larger piece cut out
if you just want to run like a tight almost like a like a faux Serge stitch
oh yeah they added a larger piece while you’re okay yeah I’m out like pieces for
the flaps and stuff and then when that’s done that Serge edge will be the wedge
that folds over oh nice you’ll just we’ll do a straight stitch right over
top and it’s gonna look for this circle hold on yeah yeah I was gonna say I was
I have a thing for you yeah a fabric cutters template perfect so you should
be able to find and then I you could use an exacto blade right on this yeah great
hang on I’m gonna give you a better surface for it wonderful board and then
yeah there you go thank you Oh wonderful do you want me to do a surgery round
this yeah if you want to do it directly along the edge mm-hmm and then that edge
is the one that will fall over and that will look very true to the original nice
I’m glad I get to contribute yeah absolutely
basically we’re just taking all these extra flaps and you’re just doing it’s
about just about 5/16 of an inch or so yeah yeah just just so that they meet
the corners you know like that and then you can leave this little half circle
here okay you can leave that as is that actually was gonna get folded up inside
we won’t see that okay yeah I’ll probably fold it and stitch it separate
from the construction of the whole thing let me grab some more this pins for you these specific clips have a name um I
don’t know I know I bought them every time I have to go looking on Amazon
again yeah I call them like I do I think I do a search for sewing clips I’m about
to get to sewing well Anthony is working on this other piece there we go yes I know it sounds like the world’s
crappiest wind chime but it’s not okay number ten number ten takes right the number B this is these are fabric shears those
are those are 19th century fabric shears you can still find them on eBay for
reasonable amounts of money Wow yeah then that gorgeous this like
brass right piece yeah they’re they’re actually not stupid expensive I’ve never
had anyone sharpen that one but they almost sound like for like trimming
branches when you close them right yeah thing that’s about sewing that I find so
fascinating is that still with more than almost any other tool working with a
sewing machine is a process of troubleshooting right like you’re like
the machines always kind of misbehaving in some small way and you’re trying to
bring these like five different relationships into an orientation yeah
but you have to give over to that the tool itself requires a constant
maintenance right oh yeah yeah and the fact that it’s the mechanism is
operating in such a way that I mean can your mind has a hard way to wrap around
yes hard time wrapping wrapping around how it functions it’s just well you know
how you know how it came to the United States do you know this I don’t actually
sew the sewing machine is the thing that started the Industrial Revolution oh
sure absolutely it is being able to mass-produce
clothing was was the beginning of the Industrial Revolution and it was a state
secret in Britain and an American memorized how the sewing machine was
built and came to America and made one it was it was it was literally a trade
secret stolen by the early United States there you go yeah perfect thank you so
much let’s take a look at this um yummy – so these yeah if you want to
do just do a straight stitch all along the outer edge does it get in velcro on
one side that at the same time or show you get separate we can do the velcro
after this okay after these are stitched yeah so you just do those first but I
I’m gonna connect these two pieces which is the main body and then we’re ready to
just cut out some velcro attach it and I think you’ll be good to go I have had a
lot of this pretty well oh yeah okay I do have an industrial
bobbin winder oh really yeah I invested in one a few a few years
ago oh that’s great yeah that’s that’s something that with every job I usually
spend about fifteen and it’s beginning just rolling Bob and after bobbin or
winding bob and after bobbin you all right it’s looking pretty good yes
that looks at looks exactly like the reference photo what’s that just like so
you stitch that on and then you have this like yes crooked well I know I love
that yeah well that’s like the first I’ve gotten to experience that like
knowing like spacesuit soft good and that’s the thing is like when you end up
seeing those artifacts that the same craftspeople doing the thing you’re
doing experienced 50 60 70 years ago you’re walking in there like I feel
always feel this simpatico like I’m walking in their footsteps
oh yeah right yeah it’s just kind of lovely thinking like I’m doing almost
exactly the same operation to someone who was thinking I’m putting a person in
space by making this seriously yeah it’s like it’s it’s so funny because you
stitch on this piece of velcro and you don’t turn it over and you’re like oh
man it’s like nope I stitched it and I know it’s gonna stay on there and that’s
that’s what matters you know so let’s take a look and see dude almost almost
I don’t you want to hold that put your hand right over top of him yes now looks great
dude yeah that looks really great Anthony cumin awesome Benin this guy’s
still over the holes well know right that goes there and that gets it here
long it stitched here and then velcro so the day yeah will do will do vote will
do a pieces of velcro there yeah and on the inside fantastic perfect this is going to get stitched on like
that yeah okay that is looking like a dude
oh yeah well Pam recover oh that is freaking fantastic oh man awesome okay
so now we need to punch some holes yeah punch some holes okay ash these flaps
and I think we’re let me break out my hole punching mechanisms boink wasn’t that lovely
oh my god it’s satisfying yeah I think we’ve all been weibo in there with those
partial Oh special cuts then you gotta line it back up you are beautiful
alright and the last one is this little guy yep okay and then this zigzags like the last deal
yeah that’s it yeah then they pretty much done 12 and 12 is 5 and somewhere
between 1 and 2 we go way better than I thought it would be oh
wow that’s like exactly what we need I’ll stitch the how no yeah yeah that
like folded edge gets kind of caught underneath I think that is clean enough
are all the little flap ease flap flap trying to make sure that the floppies
were flapped okay what’s up all right Avengers Assemble
all right so hey kid what’s going to the prom it’s time to get dressed so the back one first looks like alright
alright pull those down oh yeah go dude wait hold on yes right there we go there you are I’m gonna pick
it up with the correct gloves there it is
look at that oh yes Anthony at him I appreciate that I had a naked camera at
the beginning of today and now I have a properly dressed camera do yes sir that
was what a pleasure to work together for the first time yeah absolutely not the
last you know here’s lookin at you kid

How to Use a Canon AE-1 35mm Film Camera

How to Use a Canon AE-1 35mm Film Camera


Hey! Jon here with Prime Studios and in
this video I’m going to show you guys how to use the Canon AE-1 35mm film camera which is one of the most commonly used film cameras by
students today. Alright, starting off I’m going to go ahead and put in the battery.
This camera uses what’s called a V 28px battery. It’s a small 6 volt and in my
opinion I think Varta is a great brand to get batteries from. So the actual
battery compartment for this camera is actually on the front right here. There’s
a little latch that you can push with your finger to open up the door and
you’ll see the positive and negative terminals on the inside. Then take your
battery positive side up and you just go ahead and insert it in there. Now if you
have any kind of corrosion in there you’re going to need to clean that off
before you put in any battery. The camera itself won’t work without a battery. The
shutter won’t click and the winding knob will not move forward so you definitely
need a battery in order for this camera to function. In order to test the battery
there’s a button on the top of the camera right here. When you push this
button down you’re going to see the light meter inside the viewfinder
move. Now as long as the viewfinder is sitting at f4 that’s good for a new
battery. If it goes closer to 5.6 then that means
your battery is dying. Now in a lot of cameras you’ll have something that looks
like this on the bottom and often times on film cameras this is where the
battery for the light meter goes; a little button battery. But on the AE-1
this is not a battery compartment. This is actually a compartment that covers a
winding knob that’s meant for use when you attach a motor onto the bottom of
the camera in order to motorize the winding of the film. Now for those of you
don’t know how to load film yet you can go ahead and check out my how to load
film video and then you can jump back to here and as we keep going. Now after
you’ve loaded your film you can go ahead and put part of the film box right here
in the back to remind you of what film you’re using. All you have to do you just
take your film box here and you can just rip off the front, and you just go ahead and slide it into there so
it can act as a reminder: oh yeah I’m shooting llford Delta 400 film. So that way
if you put your camera down for a month or two and then pick it back up you can
see exactly what film is in there whether it’s black and white or color and what
ISO it is. So now that we know we’re using 400 ISO film we’re going to need
to go ahead and tell the camera that. So the ISO is adjusted by this outside
silver knob here and the indicator for ISO is this little green numbers right
here. The way you adjust it you can move the advanced lever out of the way here
and you actually pull up on this silver knob and you can turn it. Now as I turn
the knob you’ll see that the green numbers are changing and you want to go
ahead and we’re going to put that on 400. Now in the camera it says ASA which
stands for American Standards Association but that has been replaced
by the more modern ISO and it means the exact same thing. Now for those of you
who don’t know the basics of aperture and shutter speed you can go ahead and
check out my video how SLRs work to see all the basics of that. So the shutter
speed for this camera is this black knob here and in order to change the shutter
speed you’re going to go ahead and just rotate the knob and the AE-1 has shutter
speeds from 1/1000 second all the way down to 1 second and then 2 full seconds and
it also has B which stands for Bulb mode. On the Bulb mode the shutter door will
stay open so long as the shutter button is being depressed. And that’s for really
long exposures like 5 minute, 10 minute, hour long exposures. Now on the Canon AE-1 in order to adjust aperture it uses lenses that have an aperture ring which
is this adjustment right here which I can move back and forth like this. So
this particular lens goes from f/1.8 all the way down to f/22 and it also has a
green marking, a green “A”, and other lenses will have maybe a green O or green zero.
Now that means an automatic setting where as you adjust the shutter speed
the camera’s going to choose the aperture for you instead of you doing it
manually. So this is manual aperture where you directly choose it on the lens
or you can let the camera choose it by switch…by depressing this button here
and switching over to “A” just like that. The next thing I’m going to
show you how to use the light meter but in order to activate the light meter
there’s two different ways you can do that. First is the auto exposure button
which is this black button right here and as you hold it down that’s going to
turn on the light meter which you’re going to see inside the viewfinder itself. You
can also do this by holding down the shutter button halfway just like this.
Now I feel that this is a little more risky way to do it because it’s very
easy to accidentally take a picture. Now in the Canon AE-1 the light meter is a
little bit different than most cameras. On the AE-1 the easiest way to use the
light meter is to have the aperture ring set at “A” and then you’re going to be
adjusting the shutter speed using this knob here. As you adjust the shutter
speed in this mode the light meter is going to be telling you what aperture
it’s deciding to use on the lens. Now if you’re adjusting the shutter speed and
the needle goes into the red area, that means that the picture is going to be
overexposed and way too bright. If you see a red light appear at the bottom and
start blinking that is the under exposure warning light and is telling
you that the film isn’t going to get enough light and it’s going to be
underexposed. Now another way to use the light meter is to take the aperture ring
and take it off the “A” mode. Now in this mode when you use the light meter, and
hold the auto exposure button down, it’s going to tell you as you adjust the
shutter speed what aperture you should use but it’s not going to do it for you
like it will in the “A” mode. In this mode you’ll have to adjust the aperture ring
to whatever the light meter is telling you. This is also an easy way for you to
over-exposure or under-expose on purpose by seeing what the light meter says and
then going one stop or two stops above or below what it says to do. Focusing on
the AE-1 is quite easy. So it’s all manual focus and you’re going to be
adjusting the lens using its focus ring. As you adjust the focus ring you’re
going to see a part of the viewfinder right in the middle that has a split
image and in order to know if something’s in focus or not you put that
over the object and then adjust it until everything lines up. Another button on
the AE-1 is the depth of field preview button which is right here.
Now what this button does is when you push it in,
now you can take a little bit to lock it down, it will close down the aperture on
the lens to what it will do when it actually takes the photograph. This will
give you a preview of what the depth of field or basically the range of focus is
going to be. Now in order to use this button you need to remember that you
need to have the film wound and the shutter cocked in order for it to work. So right
now I have it on f/8 and if I push it down you can actually see the aperture
close down. And if I put it in place it’ll stay locked like that. To release it
I just push down this little silver thing here and it’ll pop back. Now doing
this will also lower the amount of light coming into the viewfinder and it can
make it quite difficult to see. My personal opinion is that the depth of
field preview is fairly useless, and really you should just be pre-visualizing the photo in your head anyway and using the markings on the
lens as a reference for what your depth of field is. So to further explain
depth of field you can look at these markings on your lens here. Now when you
turn your focusing ring you can see that it has green numbers and white numbers.
The green numbers are in feet and the white numbers are in meters. This little
sideways 8 symbol is an infinity symbol, meaning you’re focused all the way to
infinity. Now you’ll also see the aperture ring here but between the
focusing ring and the aperture ring is this guide and this is actually aperture
numbers that it’s talking about here. So for example, if I focus my focusing
ring here and I shoot at f/ let’s say 11 right, and I look at my guide here
there’s an 11 here and there’s 11 on the other side. Now what that’s telling me is
that if I shoot at f/11 with this focus ring in this position, then everything
between about 8 feet from the camera and 30 feet from the camera is going to be
in focus, but anything closer than 8 feet or further away than 30 feet is going to
be out of focus. Now this small silver button above the auto exposure button is
what’s called the backlight control switch. Now this button is kind of
interesting. It’s basically used when you are on the automatic mode here and
you’ve chosen a shutter speed but let’s say you’re shooting a scene
that has a really bright spot in it like you’re in a dark room with a single
small bright window, but you want to get the exposure right for the room. Now the
camera light meter will try to read just an average of the entire frame. But by
holding down this button when you take the photo it’s going to automatically
overexpose by about one and a half stops. Basically purposefully overexposing the
photograph in order to get the detail in dark areas. Now I think that’s kind of
silly and a strange way to do it. I feel it’s a lot easier just to use a light
meter to figure out what your settings should be like let’s say it’s telling me
at this shutter speed that I need f/5.6 to get the right exposure. But
let’s say I need to overexpose a little bit because of that bright area. Well
then I’m just going to go ahead and do f/4 or maybe f/2.8 to go
ahead and let more light into the camera and without having to use this button
that frankly I think is kind of weird. So on the top of the camera here you’re
going to go ahead and find the shutter button. Now the shutter button, it seems
obvious, is what you’re going to use to take the photo. Now remember a halfway
depression of the button will activate the light meter inside the viewfinder
and as well as the auto exposure black button right here those both do that
same thing. Now the shutter button has a couple functions: pushing it all the way
down takes the photo, but there’s a couple other things that you can do. This
lever on the side here, if you pull it down like this that’s the lock position
for the shutter. So let’s say you’ve cocked your shutter but you want to
throw it in your bag but you don’t want it to accidentally take a picture. You go
ahead and set that lock button now it won’t take a picture. Now if you flip the
lever the other way that’s actually a self timer which is pretty cool and you
get this little red light indicator so if I want to take a picture now and I
push down the button, this red light starts blinking and it gives me about
ten seconds to get in front of the camera or set up whatever the shot is,
and then after those ten seconds it’ll take the photo. Now if you look at the
top of the shutter button here you’re going to see a little screw recession
there and what that’s for is for a remote cable just like this one where
you push it down and I’ll stick out a little rod there and you actually just
screw that into the camera itself and then you can activate the shutter
remotely. Now this lever right here is what’s called the winder lever and
that’s how you actually advance the film. So after you’ve taken a picture you can
go ahead and pull this and it will pull the film this way. Now as you pull this I
don’t have any film in here right now but if I did this should be turning
indicating that the film is being pulled out of the canister and across the back
of the camera. Now this lever when you’re shooting should be set right here at
this angle so that’s easier for you to take a picture, wind, take a picture, wind, and every time you wind the counter here is going to go forward and show you which picture you’re
on. Right now it says 11, now I’m on 12,13. Now in order to change the lens on the camera it
actually kind of depends on which lens you’re using. On Canon lenses you’re
going to find a button right here on the ring that attaches the lens to the
camera. So what you do is you push that release button and you’re going to turn
the whole lens and it’s going to pop right off. Now there’s a marking here, a red
dot and on the camera there’s a red dot. When you want to put it back on you line
up those red dots and without pushing any buttons you just turn it until
clicks and it’s on. Now other lenses like this Vivitar lens here are going to
attach a little differently. They still have the same mount which is called the
FD mount and it’s completely different from what Canon uses today. But you’ll
see the red dot here. You go ahead and line those up and instead of having a
button as you’re depressing the camera you’re simply going to turn this ring
until it’s nice and firm and that’s it the lens is on the camera and then when
you want to take it off you just turn the ring back the other way
and it’ll come off. Now the last outside part of the camera to talk about is this
little port right here which has a cover. Take that off you’ll, see the what’s
called the PC sync port. This is an older style way of syncing flashes and it’s
basically you plug in a cord here that then runs over to an off-camera flash so
that the flash will go off at the same time that the shutter does. Now when
you’re all done shooting your roll of fill in order to rewind it the release
button for rewinding the film is down here. So you’re going to go ahead and
push that down, that’s going to unlock the film so that you can flip this open
and you can wind the film back into the case. Now once you know that the film has
gone all the way back in the case you can open up the back of the camera by
pulling up, and it’ll open up back, and then close it just like that.
And that’s how you use the Canon AE-1 film camera.

Street Photography |  Hollywood, Los Angeles | Olympus Om-1 | Tri-x 400

Street Photography | Hollywood, Los Angeles | Olympus Om-1 | Tri-x 400


Hey everyone! In this video I’m going to
be shooting some Tri-X 400 that I bulk loaded myself. I’m also going to be
shooting on my Olympus Om-1. I’m also going to be shooting on the 50
millimeter Zuiko lens. Oh, and welcome to ‘Shots Up’. Today we’ll
be exploring Hollywood Boulevard. I chose this location for this winter to kind of
go back to a couple times and explore. And I chose this location because I
really don’t like this neighborhood and I wanted to see if I could capture that
on film, or figure out why I feel this way about this neighborhood. It could be
all the clutter, could be all the tourist attractions, it could be all the
spectacle. Who’s to say? Who’s to say? It could be the smell of marijuana in
the air all the time. It’s, it’s a lot. A lot of characters. A lot of what’s
happening? Like this van doing this stupid turn in front of me. I mean it’s
so many things. But um it was a good day and I got some shots up which is what
this series is all about so I hope you guys enjoy it. And yeah let’s get into it. As always if you liked this video
please give it a thumbs up and subscribe to see more videos like it.

厲害!iPhone 11 HDR超強!人像模式有進化?防手震如何?【器材老實說】ft.Osmo Action

厲害!iPhone 11 HDR超強!人像模式有進化?防手震如何?【器材老實說】ft.Osmo Action


那接下來我來跟各位介紹就是人像模式的部分 那我這邊先給各位看 Google人像模式還有iPhone人像模式算的差別 色調差異先不講 iPhone 11我覺得有個缺點就是 它的人像模式要用26mm去作拍攝 然後它在拍人像的時候沒辦法作變焦的動作 這點我覺得非常可惜 因為我們在拍人像的時候通常習慣遠一點的焦段 而不是26mm 邊緣的話呢 邊緣這次的iPhone表現我是覺得有進步啦 比iPhone X或是XS還要好 我直接跟Google比 因為Google是當年算的最好的 那我覺得到這代呢 iPhone的邊緣算是可以跟Google作比較了 真的算得還可以 真的算得還不錯 第三組照片我給各位看這個點是因為 如果我要讓人是同一個大小的話呢 iPhone 11要這麼近 Pixel 2只要這麼遠就可以拍到一樣的大小 我自己會非常希望就是 Apple可以在iPhone 11人像模式的時候 可以讓我做放大的動作 那像是之前在拍iPhoneX或是XS的時候 它的人像模式都是52mm 我有時候就想要35有時候就不想要52 所以我希望在人像模式的時候還是可以做變焦的動作 這樣我在拍攝的時候會比較方便一點 那這邊要給各位看一個比較地獄的東西 因為它在人像模式的時候它可以做調光圈的動作 那它調光圈動作是假的
(我意思是不是真的有光圈葉片在動) 就是它給你光圈的概念 讓你去調它景深的模糊程度 那我給各位看這是它調1.4的情況 1.4的情況幾乎是 一張非常奇怪的照片 不存在的照片 很像切出來的照片 非常非常的假 這個我完全不行 那它可以繼續縮下去 可以縮F2阿 2.8 4 5.6 … 這樣 因為畢竟它不能放大 所以你在用iPhone 11拍人像模式的時候 如果你想調它的光圈值的話 我建議就是開在F4以下 你的畫面會比較自然 因為畢竟它只有26mm 不是52mm 所以它如果開光圈太大算下去的話 畫面會非常非常奇怪 那這張照片我給各位看就是因為 這次的抗耀光非常的差 可是抗耀光差的時候有時候就有些優點就是 像拍人像的時候 如果抗耀光差的時候 你就很容易產生出有耀光的照片 會讓這張照片有一種更為夢幻的感覺 其實嚴格說起來抗耀光是要越好才對 雖然有時候抗耀光不好你會拍出更夢幻的照片 那大家通常還是比較喜歡抗耀光好的鏡頭 不過就是各有所好啦 那HDR這邊我直接給各位做比較 這是iPhone 11直接的HDR下去 我個人這邊給各位建議就是 你iPhone的話不要去開啟手動HDR 它的自動HDR表現比手動HDR還要好 我實測起來 大家可以看到這張照片 它保留了天空的細節然後又把暗部拉起來 那我用Google的時候呢 我給它開HDR+ 會沒辦法達到這樣子的(iPhone 11)動態範圍 我覺得在HDR的部分iPhone算是贏的這樣 像這張我們可以很明顯的看到 它HDR表現非常的自然 非常的好看 不管在超廣角還是普通鏡頭上 它的HDR表現都是一樣好的 像這個它可以把天空保留成這樣 然後人也拉得起來 這連Nikon的RAW檔的做不到 Nikon的RAW檔就是這次我們一起來拍的Basir有做拍攝 那個RAW檔它的天空 如果人是清楚的話 天空基本上是救不回來的 所以大家可以知道就是 iPhone到底救了多少的動態範圍 那接下來我給各位看錄影的表現 那這邊的表現呢主要是著重在防手震的部分 iPhone 11跟iPhone X這兩個的防手震的表現 還會給各位看就是 iPhone 11跟Pixel 2 那接下來給各位看就是 iPhone 11的超廣角PK Osmo Action 直接走路 我們可以非常明顯的看到 Action是完勝iPhone 11的 畢竟Action的電子防手震就是很強 iPhone 11會輸是正常的啦 但是還是滿有趣的啦 給大家看看這個評測 它不是發表會有去跟各位宣導就是 它可以錄影的時候變焦 然後非常非常順暢 那我在做變焦的時候發現真的超順的 我從超廣角變到1倍到1.5倍都很順
(2倍是口誤抱歉) 我後來發現阿 iPhone 11的話 它不會作換鏡頭的動作喔 所以iPhone 11錄影的變焦它是不會切鏡頭的 11 pro會然後11 不會 那這邊有一個影片我給各位看就是 我們很明顯的就是從 從0.5拉到1在拉到1.5的時候呢
(2是口誤抱歉XD) 它並沒有換鏡頭的動作 那我們這邊把普通鏡頭直接遮住的話 我們在作放大的動作 可以明顯德看到它不會有切鏡頭的動作 我原本以為是光線很充足它就不會切鏡頭 結果不是 它在光線很暗的地方它也不會作切鏡頭的動作 你開0.5的話它就是用超廣角鏡頭去作放大
(而且畫質不太優) 那你開1倍的話呢它就是用1倍的鏡頭去作放大 你在錄影的中途你也沒辦法推到0.5的部分 那這點算是它的缺點 那11pro的話可以 iPhone 11的話不行 那這點我覺得還滿奇怪的 那我其實也滿推薦大家去作購買 因為畢竟它是一台CP值最高的iPhone麻 那喜歡iOS的玩家呢 我覺得你不用猶豫了 iPhone 11算是攝影表現真的是OK的一台手機 好 那這次的評測就到這裡了 那喜歡我的頻道歡迎訂閱分享以及打開小鈴鐺 我是興趣使然的攝影師Enzo 謝謝各位 ㄅㄅ

Film Photography – A visual review of Kodak Porta 400

Film Photography – A visual review of Kodak Porta 400


Un análisis visual Un análisis visual (No profesional) Escaneo en TIFF —————————————Edición final Espero que hayas disfrutado ¿Cuál es tu foto favorita? ¿Cuál es tu foto favorita? (Déjame tu opinión en los comentarios) Y sígueme en Instagram