Buying a Kid’s Camera : How to Find the Best Digital Camera for Kids

Buying a Kid’s Camera : How to Find the Best Digital Camera for Kids


Hi, I’m Frank Anderson. I’d like to talk to
you about how to buy the best digital camera for your kids. Of course, the first thing
is, it’s got to be trendy. And it’s got to be the latest design. Kids want the coolest
thing. And specially, when it’s brightly colored, is probably the best option. You should look
on TV. Try to ask the child, what they’re really interested in. It will probably be
the latest model. You should think of something which is compact, fit easily into your pocket.
You should also consider, what software is bundled with the camera. You might be able,
for example to have fun backgrounds. You might be able to attach interesting surrounds to
it. And of course, you should always be able to upgrade the camera. So start with a cheap
camera. And then you can always upgrade, later. Durability is also a big feature for kids.
So go on-line, check reviews and choose a camera which is going to stand up, to some
hard use. At the beginning of course, it’s probably best to choose a very simple point
and shoot camera. However, later on, you can always upgrade to a camera which has facilities
such as an optical or digital zoom. Which will have anti red eye facility. And perhaps
is got a built in macro attachment on it. If you really have the money, you might even
be able to afford image stabilization. Lastly, don’t worry too much about mega pixels. Try
to find a camera that’s easier to use. The easier it is to use, the better your child
will like it. And remember lastly, don’t buy a camera that you like. Because they will
probably hate it.

How to Use a Olympus XA 35mm Pocket Film Camera


Hi, I’m Jon and this is Prime Studios photography. In this video I’m going to show you how to use the Olympus XA 35mm film camera. This is easily my all-time favorite camera. It’s combination of small size, useful features, whisper quiet shutter, and sharp lens make it a wonderful camera to have with you all the time in lots of different situations To get your own Olympus XA, as well as the batteries and film to go with it, you can follow the links in the description down below. If you like this video Feel free to hit that “Like” button and subscribe to my channel for more film photography videos. The Olympus XA uses two v76 PX batteries, more commonly known as LR44s. The battery compartment can be opened using a quarter and the batteries need to be placed positive side out. You can check the health of the batteries by flipping the lever on the bottom of the camera to the “Check” position and listening for a tone and looking for a small red LED on the front to light up. To load the film you can open the back of the camera by lifting up on the film rewind knob. Make sure to check the light seals along the edge to ensure no light will get in and expose the film. If the seals are damaged you should be able to take the camera to most camera shops for repair. Insert the film into the left side of the camera and push down on the rewind knob to hold the film canister in place. Pull the film tab to the other side and insert the film tab all the way through one of the slots in the right take-up spool. You want to make sure that the sprocket holes are also lined up with the sprocket here on the bottom. Close the back of the camera and make sure it locks in place. Gently turn the rewind knob clockwise until you feel just a little bit of tension. Slide the camera open and set the ISO using the small switch at the front of the camera. If you look carefully you can actually see the light sensor moving right above the lens. Wind the film forward by using the wheel on the back upper right of the camera. You can verify the film is moving forward by making sure the rewind knob is turning counterclockwise. Activate the shutter button by pushing down softly and continue to wind the film forward and push the shutter until the counter, reads one. Keep in mind that the shutter release on this camera is very sensitive by design, which makes it very easy to take a photo whether you intended to or not. Making sure to close the cover when not in use will help prevent accidentally taking a photo. To take a photo, make sure the camera is opened and that the film has been wound forward as it also primes the shutter. The Olympus XA is an aperture priority camera. This means that you choose the aperture and the camera chooses the shutter speed based on how much light is hitting the light sensor. The aperture can be set with the aperture lever on the front of the camera. Here you can see the aperture getting bigger and smaller as I adjust the f-stop. Note that the aperture is actually made up of two blades, each with two sides which can result in a subtle square shaped bokeh. You can also see a shaped piece of metal in front of the light sensor moving back and forth. As you adjust the aperture you can see the shutter speed that the camera is going to use on the left side of the viewfinder. The XA has a maximum shutter speed of one 1/500th of a second and in all of my testing a minimum shutter speed of approximately 5 seconds. Going above one 1/500th of a second will push the needle into the overexposed area. You can force the shutter into a bulb mode by moving the lever on the bottom of the camera into the “Check” position before you push the shutter button. This will cause the shutter to stay open for as long as you like until you move the lever back to its original position. The annoying part is that the loud tone will be on during the entire exposure. Also, keep in mind the camera is not specifically designed to do this and it may cause your battery to down very quickly. The Olympus XA uses a manual rangefinder style focusing system. You can see both the window for the viewfinder and for the rangefinder on the front of the camera. This presents you with a small yellow square in the middle of the viewfinder Which you can place over your subject and line up the split images to achieve proper focus. The focusing lever also has some knurling just above it’s main handle in case you need to manipulate the focus while on a tripod. The camera also has a distance measurement in feet just above the lens. You’ll notice that the 8-foot mark is colored orange, along with the f/5.6 F-stop, as these settings are believed to be a good balance for general shooting without having to focus for every shot. The Olympus XA also includes a few other features like backlight compensation and a self timer. Both of which can be activated on the bottom of the camera by moving this lever. The backlight compensation feature tells the light meter to overexpose the photo by 1.5 stops of light in order to compensate for a dark subject in the foreground with a bright background. The self timer feature turns on a 12 second timer that activates when you push the shutter button. While it counts down it makes an audible beeping sound and flashes the red LED light on the front of the camera. Take note that it does not change the pitch or frequency of the beeping to indicate that it’s about to take a photo. Another nice feature of the camera is that it can be operated entirely with one hand. This combined with its extremely quiet shutter, and ability to fit into most pockets, makes it an excellent camera for stealthy candid shots or street photography. The XA is compatible with several attachable flashes with the most common being the A11. The flash can be attached easily to the side of the camera simply by screwing it on. The A11 flash takes a single AA battery and works well as a fill flash up to a maximum of about 18 feet at full power. You can turn on the flash by moving the aperture lever all the way to the top and firmly pushing it towards the blue flash symbol. It’s designed to give a little more resistance when moving it to this position. This will cause the flash to start charging, which is indicated by a light popping up and turning orange when fully charged. Leaving the aperture lever in the flash position sets the camera to a default of f/4 and 1/30th of a second. The flash itself can be adjusted for either 100 ISO, or 400 ISO film, or put to it’s full power by using a small switch to the left of the flash tube. Through some testing with my light meter, I’ve discovered that the output of the flash stays the same regardless of what aperture or ISO I set on the camera. The only thing that changes the actual output power of the flash is adjusting the lever on the flash itself. With 400 being the least powerful, then 100, then “Full” power being the strongest. Changing just the ISO switch on the camera, and not changing the ISO of the film itself, will change the shutter speed but have no effect on how bright the flash appears in the exposure. Even at higher shutter speeds the flash will still sync as the XA has a two-bladed leaf shutter. Taking the camera off its default flash mode, by changing the aperture, will both change the shutter speed as well as how bright the flash appears in the exposure. You can figure out which aperture will give you a proper exposure by setting the flash to the “full” setting and focusing on your subject to determine their distance. Then you can calculate the correct aperture to use with the formula “f-stop=flash guide number / subject distance. The guide numbers for the A11 flash are 33 at 100 ISO and 66 at 400 ISO. So for example, if we are using a 400 ISO film, and our subject is 8 feet away, then we’ll be using an f-stop of f/8. If our subject is 2.8 feet away, then we would use an f-stop of f/22. You can turn the flash off simply by pushing down on the charging light. You will know you have reached the end of your roll of film when you can no longer advance it. Make sure you do not try to wind the film by force once you feel resistance, as this might cause it to rip. To rewind the film, first close the camera cover and push the rewind or release button on the bottom of the camera. Lift up the rewind lever and begin to rewind the camera back into it’s canister. Once you feel the film physically come loose from the take-up spool and go entirely back into the film canister, you can lift up the rewind knob, and open the back of the camera, and remove the film. Thank you so much for watching and I hope this video has helped you. Please “Like” this video and subscribe to my channel for more film photography videos. If you have any questions or comments, please leave them below. Thanks!

The Panasonic LUMIX S1R: Full-frame Mirrorless Camera Review

The Panasonic LUMIX S1R: Full-frame Mirrorless Camera Review


We were able to get the new Panasonic Lumix S1R in hand for a few hours last week. Our initial impression was, this thing is big. It’s much larger than other mirrorless systems but to be honest, the overall feel was fantastic. It’s exceptionally balanced with a lens, and feels right at home in your hand. It features a triaxial tilt rear monitor for those hard to get shots and an oversized status LCD on top. Dual memory slots, one standard SD, and a XQD slot for high-speed, continuous data recording. The full frame, 47.3 megapixel sensor can be used in high resolution mode, which combines 8 images together to create a single 187 megapixel raw image, ideal for capturing delicate detail. We found the dynamic range to be exceptional, with superb gradation between shadows and highlights. Six stops of stabilization can be achieved when the body is combined with specific Lumix S series lenses. During a test, we were able to handhold shots up to 2 seconds with virtually no blur. We were also impressed with how exceptional the sensor did in low light. Edges are sharp, colors reproduce smoothly, and at high ISO’s, shadows are practically noiseless. For video, both the S1R and S1 are capable of slow-motion in 4K and super slow motion in standard HD. The larger body size dissipates heat better, allowing unlimited 4K recording time with the S1 body. The S1 and S1R offer extensive compatibility with the new L mount. Moving forward, any L mount lens produced by Panasonic, Sigma, or Leica can be used without any loss of functionality. For Panasonic’s first foray into full frame, we were pretty impressed, and we think you will be too.

How to Save 100,000 Cameras | A Look inside Camera Rescue Finland

How to Save 100,000 Cameras | A Look inside Camera Rescue Finland


The concept of film cameras having a
value is still out of the grasp of 90% of the population. One. Two. Two and a half. Three. Three hundred. Three hundred and one. Three hundred and four. Five hundred. Eight hundred. Two thousand. Three thousand. Six thousand. Seven thousand. Nine thousand four hundred and fifty two. Ten thousand. Eleven thousand. Fifteen thousand six
hundred and forty-eight. Twenty thousand Twenty thousand five hundred and sixty-nine. Forty thousand three hundred nineteen. One hundred thousand. That’s how many analog
cameras the small team inside this building has vowed to save by the year
2020 This is Juho. I’ve been working with
him remotely for about a year as his US business consultant with a lot of
exciting changes brought on by 2018 I decided to come to Finland chat with Juho and see for myself what he’s been up to. Today he’s invited me along for an
all-day drive up north to a Camera Museum has been closed since 2001. He
wants to buy the cameras – all the cameras, he’s not going to save a hundred
thousand cameras by surfing eBay. When we look at the whole picture
there’s around 30,000 different kinds of cameras, film cameras and I don’t want to
deprive the future generations from like this abundant choice pool that we have
now. The point we have at the rescue center is to move masses of cameras to
get them to new people We’re here today in the showroom of the
camera rescue center in Tampere where you have the goal of rescuing
100,000 analog cameras by 2020. What does that mean to rescue a camera and why
does the camera need to be rescued? Well rescuing a camera for us is a whole
process, taking a camera that is out of the market or circulation out of
anyone’s use and bringing it into use to someone else who is enjoying it who will
enjoy it, who is looking for it. There’s so many choices and keeping them alive
is something I don’t want to deprive the future generations from like this
abundant choice pool that we have now So where you at in your hundred
thousand – how many cameras have you saved so far? I think last week we just went over
41,000 rescued cameras. Most people will not ship a hundred cameras. So you
have to go and pick it up. we’ve done trips to Sweden, Norway, Portugal, Spain,
France, all around Europe this kind of trips to check something out and in most
cases we’ve all also bought it. What are some of the challenges you face trying
to save 100,000 cameras? Well our main challenge at this present time is the
amount of technicians, we have four technicians every single one we could
find in Finland and still all of them have over a half a year of work load
already in their calendar. what’s going to happen when this generation this
somewhat old generation of qualified repair men and women are gone? I cannot
speak for the whole world but we are preparing in Finland. So we took all the
guys we could find that have the experience they’ve been teaching newer
guys we also need that new new guys to to come and learn from them and we’ll
learn from the older retired masters that are willing to teach. What are some
of the other challenges facing analog photography today like outside of just
what you’re doing here in Finland? So there’s… film will be there, labs I
believe will be there, but then there are technical issues which I do not have
answers for. If we want new cameras we need a new shutter a mechanical shutter. The second technical issue is about scanning. most of the scanners that are
around are based on Windows XP and there’s absolutely no support for
Windows XP for – no, there hasn’t been for 5 years. We need a machine that does that. I mean it’s not rocket science it I mean good engineers will do it in a heartbeat but the problem is either money or – the main
problem is money we need three million euros for whoever does it
probably needs three million euros just to make the first batch of the item. If we want new people to come to film, we need to make the first roll very easy
and to make the first roll very easy it has to be cheap. So we need someone to
design an automated film developing machine preferably so that one that you could do
C-41 with, black and white with, and E6 with, not obviously the
same machine but you know versions of the same machine. I took a walk around and got lots of video of the different rooms and things going on here. I’d like to show it to you and if you could tell me kind of what’s
going on here? Well obviously this is the showroom it’s mainly glorified warehouse where you can visit and play with everything that happens to be at any
given time in the camera rescue center. We have a lab it’s for Finland, it
has a darkroom and then we have two mini labs for colored film. This is camera
rescue so it’s basically me on the right and Misa on the left. Now we’ve moved to
a repair department, upstairs every item is checked by an actual mechanical guy
and with a shutter tester and everything. That’s our warehouse room – I
mean spare parts warehouse it’s I mean it’s two rooms full packed from floor to
ceiling and I still say it’s not a lot the spare parts room has a lot of
technical gadgets that do amazing things which I do not all fully understand, but they look very cool and if it says Leica or something on it it looks even cooler.
This is the product photography room where all the items are photographed for
the internet. Depending on a day there’s two to four guys doing listing items
checking the condition again and putting them on kamerastore.com. And we have
some funny cameras right now and then this PINGO camera is fun. Here we have
the packaging department. Yeah this is Jussi, he’s awesome.
Jussi is also the CEO of Kamerastore he does four hours of
CEO-ing a day and then four hours of packaging and he likes it. There’s also a
Camera Rescue Center in Helsinki or it’s basically a drop-off point and we can
also have community meetings and talk about film. And this is us having the
interview looking a bit bored looking at the computer and I think the interview
was about here thank you for having me. – or having you. -Thank you for having me. Whichever way. Thanks. Yea.

Get Started in Film Photography!

Get Started in Film Photography!


Film photography can seem so intimidating. But don’t worry, I’m here to take away the mystery and give you all the information you need to get started taking your own photographs on film. I’ve tried to make this video as easy as possible to follow. So I’ve split it up into different sections, which you can see the timestamps for each section here. And I’ve included these timestamps in the description below. So you can click on one of them and jump to exactly what you want to learn about. Keep in mind this is a general introduction to film photography and I do have other videos that are on specific cameras, like the Canon AE-1, the Pentax K-1000, the Nikon F3 and others. So this video is meant to complement those. I will put links to those down in the description below. So what is film and how does it work? Well film is a recording medium for light. So instead of using a digital sensor, it uses chemical means to record the light information. Film is essentially a piece of plastic that has a very thin microscopic layer of gelatin on it, and suspended within that gelatin are light-sensitive granules. For a black-and-white film it’s what are called silver halide crystals. These crystals interact with light that falls upon it, and then we can use other chemicals to wash away the silver that hasn’t reacted, and thus we get a film negative. Color film works in the same way. Instead of having one layer, it has three layers. Each layer sensitive to either red, green, or blue light. So the two main formats of film that you’re likely to start with are 35mm film, which comes in this kind of canister and looks like this once it’s developed. And medium format film, which comes rolled up around a spool and when developed looks like this. Here you can see the 35mm, used in a 3D camera called the Nishika N8000. Here you can see, using a regular SLR. Here for the medium format, this is the same film used in three different cameras, allowing for three different sizes of photographs. This is what’s known as a 645. This is a 6×9 and this is a 6×6. So the physical size of these microscopic granules are what determined the film sensitivity to light. The larger these microscopic granules, the more likely that photons will hit them, and thus it doesn’t take as much a light in order to produce an image. This is what’s called ISO (eye-soh) or I-S-O. It doesn’t really matter how you say it, no one who is important cares. The thing to remember is that it’s conveyed by this number here. So 100 is one of the most common ISOs. There’s a trade off… The lower the ISO, the higher the quality of the image. The higher the ISO, the less light you need in order to record an actual photograph. So here you can see this color film has an ISO of 400, which means it will be easier to take a photo in lower light conditions, but you are more likely to see the grain in the photograph because the granules are literally larger. 400 ISO is literally four times as sensitive to light as 100 ISO. There are even color films like Fujifilm Superia 1600, which I’m not sure is made anymore. But you can still find this and similar films for very high ISO color photography. Most 35mm film cartridges have what’s called DX Coding, which is this bar code and these silver and black squares in a certain arrangement here on the canister. If your camera has contacts in it where the cartridge goes that look like this, then it’s able to read the DX Coding and set the ISO itself. So if you are buying film for your camera, you’re probably asking yourself. What film should I buy? The first choice you have is between black and white and color. Black and white tends to be a little more forgiving when it comes to exposure and developing, whereas color gives you more information. You can always take a color photograph, and after you scan it digitally, you can turn it into a black and white photograph. The next question to ask yourself is, do you want a low ISO film that’s very high quality, or a higher ISO film that’s easier to shoot in lower light situations, but can leave a lot of grain. If you’re really not sure which ones to start with, some easy ones to recommend are Ilford HP5, Kodak Tri-X, Fujifilm Superia, and Kodak Gold. So how does the camera actually work? Let’s get back to basics. This is a pinhole camera, the simplest camera you can possibly have. It’s a box, which you can open. Now in this box, what you do is you’ll put a piece of film back here. And on the opposite side is a hole. So once you’ve loaded your camera and you’re ready to take your exposure, you take a light reading with what’s called a light meter. Most cameras have light meters built into them. This one obviously does not, so you would need to use a handheld meter. But most of the time you can just use the one in your actual camera that will allow you to determine how long the shutter door, which on this camera, is this big door right here, stays open. And since this is a pinhole camera, we can see our little pinhole right there. And that pinhole is the aperture. Meaning the circular opening that the light goes through. That light is then projected through the camera onto the light-sensitive material, whether that be film or a digital sensor and is recorded. Now this is closer to the kind of camera you’ll actually be using. We of course have our lens and if we open up the back of our camera, here we can see we have our shutter door. If we take the lens off our camera, it can be easier for us to see the aperture inside. So as a photographer, it’s your job to decide how big is this aperture opening and how long does that shutter door stay open? This is the way in which we control the light that lands on the film known as the exposure. It’s called the exposure because we are exposing the film to light. So as I said before, most film cameras do have light meters built-in, but not all of them. If the camera does have a light meter, it will likely require a battery and you will be able to use the light meter by looking through the viewfinder and seeing different indicators based on the brand of camera that you’re using. So because we are recording light in a controlled way by using the camera to control the amount of light falling on the film, as a photographer, we have to be able to talk about the amount of light that we’re letting into the camera in a specific way. This is where the concept of a stop of light comes in. If you are increasing your exposure by one stop of light, that means you are doubling the amount of light that comes into the camera. If you are reducing your exposure by one stop, it means you are cutting the amount of light coming to the camera by half. So the concept of a stop of light can apply to the aperture, it can apply to the ISO, and it can apply to shutter speed. But it’s easiest to understand when talking about shutter speeds. So shutter speed is in intervals of time. Specifically, fractions of a second. So if I have my dial here set the 60 on this camera, it means 1/60th of a second. Meaning the shutter door will be open for that period of time. If I increase my exposure by one stop, that means I’m doubling the amount of light coming into the camera, and I can do that by doubling the amount of time that the shutter door remains open. So I go from 1/60th of a second to 1/30th of a second. If I go the other way, and reduce my exposure by one stop, that means I am cutting the amount of light in half. So in this case, it would actually be 1/120th of a second, but the next setting on the camera is 1/125th. So it’s really close to one stop. But let’s say I go two stops. I double the amount of light coming into the camera. So 1/30th of a second, and I double it again by going to 1/15th of a second. So now I’m letting in four times as much light as I was at 1/60th of a second, but that’s two stops. And it goes the same the other way for reducing the amount of light at 1/250th of a second. So what kind of film cameras should you get to start off? Well, that really depends on your preference. There are quite a few choices, And the first one is disposable cameras. Disposable cameras are one-time use cameras that have the film preloaded in them. They have a single lens that’s of a fixed zoom, which is usually about 35mm, so a little wide. Some of the advantages of having a disposable camera are that it is not an investment. They’re fairly inexpensive. They’re easy to use. As long as you have enough light, you can take some pretty decent photographs. It’ll give you a taste of film. Disadvantages are that you can’t change lenses, it doesn’t do well in low light, the lens is small and not particularly sharp. It looks okay, but it’s not nearly as nice as actual nice glass you might put on an SLR camera. But all in all, a disposable camera can be a lot of fun and a great way to just experiment with film if you’re not sure about getting your own film camera. The next category of camera are cameras like this. What are called point-and-shoot cameras. Some advantages are their fairly inexpensive, they’re pretty easy to find they tend to have more features than you would think they do. They largely shoot on automatic. Some disadvantages are it’s unlikely you’ll find one that allows you manual control over the camera. They’re small enough, like a disposable, to be able to fit in your pocket or a small bag. And gosh darn it, don’t they just look so cool! Some cool things that these cameras have: so this one has a weird filter that like flips down to make things softer, and this one, this Pentax, actually has a time-lapse mode. Now most likely you will be using what’s called an SLR camera. An SLR camera is an interchangeable lens camera, so you can change the focal length, or zoom of your camera. Also, they’re probably what you think of when you think of film cameras. Nice things about them is that they are very versatile. They are pretty plentiful still, they tend to give you great photographs. They’re fairly easy to use. There’s not a lot of downsides. They’re a little bigger, a little heavier, they tend to cost more. Typically anywhere between 50 to 150 dollars for a camera and a single lens. But prices can vary and change especially with the resurgence of film. Now what does SLR or single lens reflex mean? Well, it means that a single lens is used both for the viewfinder and to expose the film to light. It does this with the help of this mirror here. So when you actually take a photo, the mirror lifts up out of the way. So let me do a one second exposure. So there you can see that the mirror lifts up out of the way and the shutter door opens to expose the film in the back to light. Now this is different from what’s called a TLR or twin-lens reflex. This is where it has two lenses, the top one is used for the viewfinder, which is up here, and then the bottom one is used to actually expose the film to light. Another type of camera you can get is an automatic SLR like this Pentax ZX-30. So this camera has all the advantages of being an SLR, in that it has interchangeable lenses, so you can make the focal length whatever you want. But it has a ton of automatic features, which is really nice. They also tend to be pretty inexpensive. I got this ZX-30, I believe it was $30 and then this battery pack that lets me use double A’s with it, for another 10 dollars. (Without Lens) These cameras can be awesome to start out with because they have a full auto mode. They have all these presets: portrait, landscape, macro, sports, night time, turning the flash off. Oh yeah, and they often have a built-in flash, which is really nice. They’ll also have manual and semi automatic settings as well, and not to mention auto focus. Auto focus is awesome on a film camera. Now if anybody tries to make you feel bad that you’re shooting a more automatic film camera than a manual one, tell them to be quiet. So where should you buy your camera? Your best bet is a local camera store, but if they don’t have the selection you want, there’s always online. Amazon, of course is one. KEH.com is another good one. They specialize in only used photography gear. And the used section of B&H online. So let’s talk more about the shutter. The shutter is one of the primary ways that you as a photographer control how the light comes into the camera. So this right here is the shutter door. On this camera the shutter door is made of silk. Although it’s often made of very, very thin slats of metal, of aluminum, that move out of the way. So here when I take a photo, you can see the shutter door gets out of the way and then when I advance the film, which is what these spinning things would be doing, you can see it resets the shutter door as well. So the way you control the shutter on any camera is shutter speed. So you decide the duration of time that that shutter door stays open and this is usually in fractions of a second. Now that picture I just took, you can see the shutter speed is set to one full second. If I set it to two, that means 1/2, four means 1/4th, and so on. This particular camera, the Pentax K-1000, goes all the way up to 1/1000th of a second. Now as with all things in photography, there is a trade-off. Here, as you change the shutter speed, the less amount of time the shutter is open, the less light comes into the camera. But you need a certain amount of light in order to expose the film correctly and actually make a photograph. So that’s the primary thing that happens when you change the shutter speed. But there’s a secondary effect of changing the shutter speed and that is making an object that is moving, either seem to stand still or make it blurry. So by using faster shutter speeds, you will freeze movement much more easily than using lower shutter speeds. If you use a slow shutter speed, like one full second or more, then you will have streaking, because you’re getting light from the object here, here, here, here, as it moves across the frame. You’re recording all that light. Those of you curious the “B” represents bulb mode. That basically means as long as I hold down the shutter button, the shutter will stay open. So I can have it be open for as long as I like. So next let’s talk about the second control you have, the aperture. So inside the lens is an iris, which we call the aperture, and this works just like the iris of your eye. It opens up to let in more light and goes down to let in less light. So in the way that fractions of a second are the settings for the shutter door, F-stops are the settings for the aperture. So here we can see these numbers on this dial represent the f-stop settings. So as I turn this dial, it changes the size of the aperture. So an f-stop is usually represented by the letter F, a slash, and then one of these numbers. The actual meaning of an f-stop is is as a ratio between the diameter of this aperture opening versus the focal length of the lens. So for example if I set my f-stop to f/4, I get an aperture of this size with a specific diameter. f/4 means that for this particular lens, this diameter, this distance right here from edge to edge of the opening, it takes four of those distances to go the focal length of the lens. So this is why the F-stops are inverted in terms of lower numbers mean bigger openings. So if I switch it to f/2, which is the largest aperture this lens can do, it’s a larger diameter, a longer length between the edges of the opening. So then it only takes two of those to go the focal length of the lens. So besides letting in more or less light, the aperture also has a secondary effect the way the shutter has a secondary effect. This is what’s called depth of field. Essentially what depth of field is talking about is the amount of things in focus. So if I have a large aperture, like the f/2 I was just using, and I took a picture of say, my hand, at the right distance, there’s a certain amount of things that will be in focus in front of and behind my hand. If I’m at f/2, very little is gonna be in focus. I’m going to have what’s called a narrow depth of field. So the amount of space in front of and behind my subject is very narrow. But as I close the aperture down to say f/22, and I would take the same picture, then everything, or most everything in front of and behind my hand, or the subject of the photograph, is going to be in focus. So as you can see, using a larger aperture gives you those blurred-out backgrounds most commonly referred to as Bokeh. This can help isolate a subject from the background. Especially if that background doesn’t look very good or if that background is filled with lights, you can get some really cool background orbs. So to help you understand depth of field a little bit better, let’s talk about the markings on the lens, because they’re here to help guide you. Turning the lens like this changes the focus and you can see all these numbers on the lens. So here you can see feet and meters. These are of course the distances in English and Metric measurements, but just below that you can see all these different numbers, and the numbers are mirrored on each side with an orange marking in the middle here. So if you look, you can see these numbers correspond to the aperture settings. You can see 4, 8, 16, 22, on both sides. So this is actually a depth of field guide. Depending on where your focus is. So let’s say your subject is 4 feet from the camera and let’s say your aperture is set to f/8. Well, if you look you can see an 8 on this side and an 8 on this side, so this is telling you approximately what distance in front of your main subject and behind your main subject will be in focus. Anything in front of, say, looks like about 3 and a half feet and anything further away than 5 feet will be out of focus. But anything between say five and three and a half feet at f/8 when you’re focused at four feet away will be in focus. So let’s talk about lenses. Lenses have what’s called a focal length. So that is measured in millimeters, which you can see here. So the focal length refers to the zoom level of the lens. A 50mm lens on a regular 35mm camera gives you a zoom level that’s approximately the same to the human eye, just way more narrow and cropped down. Sometimes you’ll see lenses that have a single focal length like this one. That means it’s a single zoom level, you can’t change it. If you want the subject to appear bigger in your frame, you have to get physically closer. The actual physical focal length of a lens is technically the distance, approximately, from the front of the lens to where the light comes out the back and converges. If you have a zoom lens, you’ll see multiple focal lengths. Both the minimum and the maximum listed on the lens. The higher the focal length number, the more zoomed in the lens will be. The lower the focal length number, the more wide-angle the lens will be. Some things you’ll also see on the lens are you’ll often see a 1 with a colon and then a number. (1:4-5.6) So in this case, it’s two. This is referring to the max aperture performance that this lens can do. So 1:2, that means a maximum f-stop of f/2, and if we look here we can see it’s f/2. For this lens we can see it’s a 1:4 – 5.6. This is referring to the maximum aperture performance both at 70mm and 300mm as it changes. So even if we have this lens and it’s a maximum aperture of f/4 here, but then we zoom it out, what we’re doing is we’re making the focal length of the lens longer and thus changing the ratio between the aperture opening and the length of the lens, so the f-stop changes. As far as focusing a lens will either be only manual focus, like this one is here, or it will have the ability to do auto focus, with most older lenses that do auto focus relying on a motor inside the camera. Although some later models will rely on a motor in the lens itself. You can usually find a switch like this one here, to switch between manual focus and auto focus, if you have an automatic camera. So how do you load film into one of these cameras? Well, if it’s a more traditional SLR like this, it will almost certainly have a rewind knob here where you can lift it up and open up the back of the camera. You’ll then take your film cartridge and insert it into the left side. You can push down the rewind knob to hold it in place. You’ll then take your film tab here and pull it out so that you have enough slack to be able to take this tab and put it into the take-up spool through one of these slots. You want to make sure to get that tab all the way through the take-up spool. Next, you can go ahead and advance the film. So once I know that that’s wound correctly and it’s in there, I’m going to close the back of my camera, push down the rewind knob, and next I’m going to turn my rewind knob clockwise in order to make sure that there’s tension on the film. So what this is doing is it’s winding the film in the cartridge, just to make it tight. That way, when I advance my lever next, this will turn counterclockwise. And that way I know that the film’s advancing. So here on my camera I also have a counter. So I can take photos and advance the film until I reach zero. Now the last thing you want to make sure to do is set the ISO. On an older film camera like this it’s not going to know what the film’s sensitivity is. So for the black and white film I just loaded, it is 100 ISO, which on older cameras is also represented by ASA. So here you can see I have a little 400 here. The way this works is I pull up and change it that way. So then you should be ready to go. Now. If you have a more automatic film camera like the ZX-30 here, it’s a little different. You’ll probably find a switch similar to this on the side to open it up. It will also probably have a little window here to let you know if there’s already some film in there. If there is already film in there and you want to rewind it, this symbol right here is a pretty universal symbol for rewinding film. You can take a paper clip and you can push that button and it will force the camera to rewind the film all the way back into the canister, regardless of how many photos have been taken. So you can open up the back of the camera by pulling down there. Then take your film, same thing, you’ll load it into the left side. And if you look you can see there’s almost always some kind of marking on this side showing you where the camera wants the film tab to be. So you’ll take this film tab and here I’m going to insert it. So the tab is right there. So here you can see that there are little hooks that have grabbed on to the sprocket holes. The film tab is laying exactly where the indicator says it should. You can close the back of the camera and you’re good to go. So let’s talk a little bit about composing your photographs before you take them. When you’re looking through the viewfinder, the very first thing you should do is check the edges of the viewfinder. The important thing to keep in mind is that the photograph you take in the camera is not the final photograph. You are recording the information you need to make the final photograph. So you should always leave just a little bit of room all around the edges for the photograph you actually have in mind to be able to crop it out later, exactly how you want. Giving yourself this extra space can be extremely helpful and make it way easier to get that final photo you want. The most common type of composition is center. Meaning the subject is directly in the middle of the photograph. Now this can make for some excellent photographs. There’s no reason to shy away from it. It is tried and true. The next method of composition is rule of thirds. This is where you can split the photograph into thirds, both horizontally and vertically, and at the intersection of these thirds you can place your subject. Another type of composition technique is leading lines, where you have lines going from the front of the photograph to the back of the photograph in some way, leading the viewers eye along that line. Keep in mind there are a lot of different ways to compose a photograph. These are just some of the most common and well-known. So let’s talk about P, S, A, M, or in this camera green smiley face, Tv, Av, and M. So these are settings that you will see on pretty much any modern DSLR or a nicer electronic SLR film camera. What do they mean? Well Program means fully-automatic, S or Tv, meaning time value, means shutter priority. Meaning you choose the shutter speed and the camera will choose the aperture. It’s a semi-automatic setting. The other semi-automatic setting is A or Av, aperture value, meaning aperture priority. Meaning you choose the aperture and the camera chooses the shutter speed. And manual is where you are controlling both the aperture and the shutter speed and they will be exactly what you set them to and the camera won’t mess with them at all. A lot of electronic cameras also have these preset modes. These are pretty universal symbols. So you’ll see portrait, landscape, this little flower pretty much always means macro, or close-up shot. Running guy means sports. You have night time and then another one where the flash just never goes off. It can be fun to experiment around with these to see if they give you the results you want, or if you’re not familiar yet, or practiced enough with the manual settings, you can try these out. So let’s say you’re on the Program, or green smiley face mode, and you want to change the brightness level of your photograph, but you don’t really know how to use the manual settings yet. Well, don’t worry, there is a setting that allows you to change the brightness levels without you having to know anything that’s called exposure compensation. And it’s represented by this square with a plus and a minus symbol in it. So what you can do is you can find the button on the camera that has that same symbol, which is right here. I can hold this down, this button and then I can change my exposure compensation, which is here. So at 0 that means that the camera will expose the way it thinks it should which right now is 1/250th of a second at f/6.7. But let’s say I want the photo to be darker. I can just go negative one stop, negative two stops two and a half. Or I can go the other way, plus one stop, plus two stops, plus three stops. So you can see 1/125th of a second at f/3.5. It’s slowing…It’s letting the shutter stay open longer, it’s opening up the aperture, because I’m trying to make it brighter. The only thing to keep in mind, and this is really important, is that the camera will stay there. It will stay at three stops overexposed if you don’t change it back to zero. So don’t forget that you’ve done exposure compensation. Otherwise your entire role could be overexposed. So I’m sure you’re saying to yourself, “Well, okay, I understand what the shutter is, I understand what the aperture is, and I know I can change them. But what do I change them to if I’m shooting in a full manual?” Well, that’s where the light meter inside the camera comes in. In this camera the light meter is represented by a needle that will move up and down, indicating the amount of light coming into the camera based on the current shutter speed and aperture settings you have selected. So as you manipulate the different settings of shutter speed and aperture, the light meter peg goes up and down with the goal of getting that light peg in the middle, indicating that the correct amount of light is entering the camera during the photo in order to get a correct exposure. So this is the time in which you have to think about things like, okay, well, it’s darker. So I could let in more light by slowing down the shutter, keeping it open longer. But I need to make sure that if my shutter speed goes too slow, that I’m either sitting really still when I take that photo, the subject isn’t moving necessarily, unless a blurry subject is what I want, or I’m using a tripod. With the aperture, same thing. Go, well, I can let in more light by opening up the aperture, using a lower f-stop number. Or I could let in less light by doing a bigger f-stop number and a smaller aperture. The trade-off being that more or less of the photo is in focus. So if you’re taking a landscape shot, having a wide open aperture isn’t necessarily a good idea. Because not a lot is going to be in focus. It’s just going to be focused on the one thing your lens is focused on and everything to the horizon behind that will be out of focus. So you can use a lower f-stop number, but then that lets less light. So you go, okay, well, I need to compensate by making the shutter stay open longer. It’s this balance. This is exactly what photography is. As a photographer you are balancing all these considerations of what you want the photo to look like, how much light there is, what your camera is capable of doing in terms of letting in light. That’s what it means to be a photographer. For unloading film on an electronic camera, once the roll of film reaches the last picture, it will actually rewind itself, and you’ll be able to easily hear it. It’ll be kind of loud. As I stated before, you can always rewind the film any time you want by looking for this symbol on your camera and using a paper clip to hit that button to force the camera to rewind when you want. If you’re using a more traditional camera like this, to rewind the film you’ll wait until you get to the end of the roll and then you’ll hit the rewind release button here, and just push that in, and then the rewind knob, flip that out, and then you’ll turn it clockwise and you’ll be able to feel the film going into the canister. Once you reach the point at which you’re not really getting any resistance, then the film should be all the way back in the canister, and you can pop open the camera, and take out your film. So you’ve taken all your photos, you’ve unloaded your film, now it’s time to get it developed. If you get it developed by somebody else, that’s the easiest way. It’s definitely more expensive, usually about 10 to 15 dollars a roll and this is what you’ll get back, is negatives cut and put into a sleeve of some kind. Now you can also get digital scans which I recommend. But getting actual prints can be nice too. Getting actual prints which 4×6 is the most common format that you’ll get. The lab will crop and color balance your prints for you, so they’ll look the best they can look. Now speaking honestly, if you develop your own film using equipment like this developing tank here, it will save you a lot of money, especially if you’re going to be using film on a regular basis. There’s a big misunderstanding that you need a darkroom in order to develop your own film and that is not true at all. You don’t need a darkroom, but you only need a darkroom if you are developing photos, making your own prints. That’s when you need a darkroom. But to develop film, no, you don’t need a darkroom for that. In fact, I have an entire video on how to develop black and white film at home. I will put a link up here in the right and in the description so you don’t miss it. And color film development is actually almost identical to black and white film development. It’s just that you use different chemicals and color film tends to be a little bit more temperamental in terms of timing and temperature, but otherwise, they’re basically identical. Once you have your films scanned into your computer, you can edit it digitally without having to buy any editing software. So some free options are Adobe Photoshop Express, which is a free software program. You do have to create an Adobe account in order to download it and they do try to get you to buy the actual software within that software. But it’s a great way to just get started with basic photo editing. It’s very user friendly. If you want something more advanced that’s also free, there’s GIMP. GIMP is an open source photo editing software that is basically a Photoshop alternative and it’s very powerful. Although it can be complicated. So Those are two options that are free so you can try either one of those out for editing your photos digitally. As far as needed accessories, a cleaning kit is always a good idea, with a microfiber cloth, a brush, and a blower. I will link down below to a Giottos brand cleaning kit, which I can easily recommend. If you’re interested in an entry-level tripod, there are a lot of tripods that are twenty-five or thirty dollars. I would steer clear those. Instead I recommend the SLIK U8000. It usually costs around forty five dollars and it is a great entry-level tripod. It is quality. It’s not going to break on you. It’s not going to fall apart. It’s easy to use and easy to recommend. So listen, once you start shooting with one of these cameras, you are going to make mistakes. You’re going to mess up. You’re going to lose rolls of film. Things are going to go wrong. You’re going to have light leaks, whatever. Don’t worry about it. That’s normal. Making mistakes with these kind of cameras is understandable. Keep in mind that photography is a lot different from the way it used to be. It used to be something that took a lot of effort for you to get a great photograph. These days with digital cameras and artificial intelligence software, it can take a great photo for you by just pushing a button. But film is a little harder. So don’t be discouraged if you mess up. In fact, you should expect to mess up, plan for it. But once you do get the hang of things it can be extremely rewarding. Also know that whatever camera you get, there’s going to be a learning curve for it, and if you switch to a different camera, it will take a little while to start taking good photos with a new different camera. If you practice enough, you’ll get to the point where you won’t even have to look most of the time down at the controls. You’ll just have them memorized by feel and be able to focus more on the composition and getting the exact photo you want. My final piece of advice is when in doubt, hit the shutter button. Don’t hesitate, don’t treat film as some precious commodity. There’s still a lot of it. You can still buy it for fairly cheap. Just shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot. So thanks for watching my video! I hope this has helped you out in getting started in film photography. If you have any questions or comments, please leave them in the comment section down below. And if you feel I’ve deserved it, I’d love to get a thumbs up and if you’re interested in film photography or film cameras, go ahead and subscribe to my channel. Thank you so much for watching!

How to understand Film Camera Led lights

How to understand Film Camera Led lights


Just show me a little bit how to understand these lights here when you have a point-and-shoot film 35 millimeter camera from either 90s mm Hmm. So there’s the model of camera one like this one has a top green light in a bottom orange light I’ll show right now in a few minutes another camera which has a single green light how to use it Basically, the green light is always it tells you you are too closer to your object So that’s the first criteria. You need to meet you need to observe. Otherwise, you shouldn’t be taking that picture So usually these cameras have maybe a minimum distance of 2 feet or 60 centimeters. Sometimes it’s a little bit lower more It’s just tryin close to the window. Now the green light will blink Which means I’m too close I need to step a little bit back and at this time at this moment it’s steady So the distance at this point is enough now the second criteria the second thing once the distance is good I need to look for the exposure light the orange light I think because the camera is just the camera that will Show it a little bit like a green light but it’s actually orange. Yeah, we will see it’s orange now What’s happening? Is this light? works mainly basically when you put the Flash to off. So when you take pictures without flash you force it to stay off You should be worrying about this orange light blinking If it doesn’t blink if it doesn’t light at all, it means you are ok to take the picture Just keep the camera steady. Just as always If you notice the origin light is blinking, it’s because let me just show again It means at that moment the camera will take the picture But the exposure time is going to be longer than 1 by Usually it’s 40 50 seconds So that means at that point you really need to keep the camera very very steady or preferably on a tribe So let’s just take a test. So I have the window if I point the camera towards the window the orange light should not appear I Just stand back a little bit. So there’s no orange light Maybe there is like a reflection but the orange light it’s off at this point It means the exposure time is going to be shorter than 1 by 60 or 40 or 50. So no No much risk to have a blurry image because I shake the camera a little bit But if I point it downwards where it’s less light, you’ll notice the orange light will start blinking. It means at this point I really need to keep the camera very very steady without flash or The picture will will be blurred but it’s the question actually, how do you know how? how long the exposure time is when you see the light blinking because perhaps The orange light will blink. Like I said for longer exposure times, then let’s just say 1 by 41 divided by 40 seconds, but how do you know is it 1 by 40? Maybe you are just at the limit. So a little bit shake won’t cause too much trouble or how do you know? Maybe you are at 1 by 4, which is a long exposure time at that moment The slightest movement will cause a blurry image So how do you really know how close you are the debt limit that would influence the picture if you shake a little bit there isn’t the way to find this out is really to find a bright source of Light and a shot a more shadow area. So what you need to do is just like I’m doing now If you see the camera is pointing towards the light just pointing pointed pointed a little bit far away from the light And you just extend back again more far away a little bit more a little Bit more a little bit more and at Point at the moment You will notice the light the orange light is blinking It means you are really at that edge at 1 of 1 by 44 1 by 50. So I really need to diminish the light that the camera is reading here with the Until the point you see that light blinking at that moment, you know, you are really at the limit. So if you Point towards a darker area is going to be the exposure time even longer So that’s how we really somehow try to read i’m Am I safe, even if it’s blinking to keep the camera my by hand or not? Am I that limit of exposure time or not? So this is it. Let me just show a camera with a single green light You This is a second kind of light indicator here on a different camera point-and-shoot film Cell what this green light actually will tell you these same functions. Are those two lights But it’s just a different blinking Basically, there are three state states of the slide the first state when it’s steady on that means you can take the picture There’s no problems. The second state is going to be blinking Slowly kind of slowly that means you are too close to your objects I need to step back and the third state is blinking quickly. It means you don’t have enough light You really need to keep the camera very very steady or put it on a tripod. So Basically, just like before you need first to make sure you are enough far away from your object so you don’t see that slow blinking does the first period then you Then you move to the second criteria of light available light. So let’s just check the distance first I’m too close right now is going to blink slowly so I need to step back Until I get the light on And constant has steady on and also when I’m like this, it means the available light. It’s good enough I’m perhaps at that shooting speed of Shorter than one by forty fifty depends on the camera So even if I move a little bit the camera there should be a problem. But let’s just try now because I’m pointing towards the Window, I have enough light if I point downwards You see the fast blinking it means at this point My exposure time is going to be slower than one by let’s just say 51 by 50 So this point perhaps if I move a little bit the camera when taking the picture especially when they depress the button the image may be blurred and Again, just like before you can try X pointed towards a more bright area – more or less bright area Until you see this blinking fast And that means you noticed at this point There’s no blinking it means and at least at this direction to a darker area It’s blinking fast. So basically between these two areas The exposure time is passing from one by fifty to something Slower, which is going to be perhaps one by 30. So this is the shift point basically, so if you Have steady light here and if you have blinking light here You know you are about at that limit of 1 by 50 so you can take the picture without worrying too much Even if it’s blinking Just keep reading the camera are really really steady So that’s a little bit of finessing, but you can still take that picture without flash so right now I’m talking really about without flash and also one last thing remember that this Cameras can come with a zoom lens right? So I may have a lens from 38 millimeters to 80 millimeters or 100 millimeters remember always that if you extend this room, like I did now that The available basically the camera will need even more light to take a steady picture. So if I’m Retracting right now the lenses and I have enough light at this point. So it’s just Step a little bit back. So the light it’s good enough if I If I extend the zoom maybe I won’t get enough light I Didn’t move the camera at all. It’s really when it’s zooming out. The lenses need more light to take the same picture so if I zoom back There will be enough light if I zoom out There’s not enough light. So keep in mind this thing Because it will affect your picture. So when your zoom this cameras, by the way, you have the maximum aperture it will most of them will run between 3.5 4.2. Sometimes I point something That’s a small aperture. So basically with these cameras even if you use a 200 or a 400 film or 800 film you Usually you’ll need to have a good light like a bright sunny day If you are indoors, you definitely need to have a lot of light from the ceiling from your bulbs and stuff like this Keep in mind that aspect there are other cameras that are really more expensive with maximum aperture of 2.8 Those may do a little bit better but with this camera, I’ll give you an example if you are on a camera with an aperture of let’s say 3.6 3.7 a maximum one and you fully zoom out to say 80 millimeters and The day is going to be cloudy outside You may be missing enough light. You may see the blinking green light here and you need to keep it steady So that’s how and let’s just say you are using Li 200 film perhaps you if you move 2 or 400 film the blinking light in a cloudy day With a zoom extended to 80 millimeters and a maximum aperture over 3.5 is going to be just fine You can still take pictures but you really need to keep the camera. Very very steady backhand. This is it I hope you find this useful a really long video sorry bodies, but Yeah, this is how to use this blinking lights tense

搶先看!更勝原廠GM?Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG DN Art 台灣第一手評測【器材老實說】ft.A7Riv [字幕]

搶先看!更勝原廠GM?Sigma 24-70mm F2.8 DG DN Art 台灣第一手評測【器材老實說】ft.A7Riv [字幕]


Hello everyone I’m, photographer of camera-lover, Enzo Now I want to introduce Is the latest 24-70mm lens from Sigma. It is specifically designed for mirror less full-frame camera use It had provides lens mount for L-mount and E-mount The full name of this lens is Sigma 24-70mm f2.8 DG DN Art Because there is another 24-70mm Sigma on the market So guys don’t get it wrong This is the latest 24-70mm lens just launched at the end of 2019 What about this video other than making reviews on this lens I will also compare this with Sony 24-70mm GM with you guys Because the camera model I mounted on this time is Sony A7Riv So, of course, the photo quality is very important Then let us take a look at a 24-70mm lens with almost half of its price With Sony’s original GM lens Which one’s performance will be better In addition to the photo quality I will also test the performance of bokehs OK, let’s look at the performance of this lens together Then the next detailed comparison is Sigma 24-70mm And Sony’s 24-70 GM Which one will perform better I will take out the aperture value of each one for comparison And then comparing it to the center and edges The comparison image files will be linked below You can compare it yourself, it will be more accurate. Let me tell you about my overall experience (PS.Imaging Edge RAW to JPG without correction) 24mm within F2.8 (PS.Imaging Edge RAW to JPG without correction) The centre quality of GM is obviously sharper The image quality at the edge is similar within the F2.8 When it comes to F4, the centre performance of both is almost the same. Instead, Sigma’s edge picture quality is better. Almost after the F11, the quality of GM’s image clearly began to decline. Instead, the performance maintained at the center and edges of Sigma overall. Are better than GM ’s. Then at 70mm, the center image quality of both is almost the same from the beginning till the end. Probably not until after F16 will be starting to decline At the edges, GM lost to Sigma from beginning till end. Sigma wins GM at the edge of 70mm. This is great , because of the price of this Sigma lens maybe is Sony original manufacturer half of its price (NT32600) So after watching the above picture quality comparison I can say that the picture quality of this Sigma 24-70mm is really very good Is that it can be compared with GM Overall, its photo quality is still better than GM It means that the C/P value of this lens is really high, everyone may purchase it Let me show you next are What is the bokeh performance of the two looks like This bokeh is different. After all, GM emphasized that his bokeh is more distinctive Because I use a lot of vintage lenses I think these two bokehs are quite normal Nothing very distinctive The main thing is to compare the differences between the two. OK, now I can summarize the overall performance of this lens. Its price (NT32600) is about half of the Sony 2470GM So its C/P value is really high And its overall photo quality is better than Sony’s 24-70mm GM And it’s smaller and lighter So this lens is really recommended for everyone This standard lens is suitable for work and life purposes. Indeed is very convenient Any questions about this lens can be commented below Discuss with netizens or with me If you like this video, welcome to share and subscribe and click on the notification bell bellow I’m, photographer of camera-lover, Enzo Thank you everyone

Cheapest Medium Format You Can Get in 2019 – Pentax 645Z

Cheapest Medium Format You Can Get in 2019 – Pentax 645Z


Alright back in another episode Ah crashing there Welcome back Jayz here. Today, we’re gonna talk to something big something large something huge Nah not what you think Tadaaa is medium format but what is medium format let’s talk about sensor size Tiny little Aps-c sensor size And this is everyone`s dream The full frame But today we’re gonna talk something way bigger than this Medium format Basically you are looking at the mirror is not a sensor But I just got to show you this one They are sharing the same sensor. Ta daaaa A medium format sensor in comparison to the tiny little aps-c sensor Shooting with medium format always is my dream when I first joined photography But to have a medium format is not an easy things. The entry ticket is just way too high Thank you to the Pentax 645z this is first introduced on April 2014 and this is among all the digital medium format the cheapest and the most affordable one today we’re going to find out how good medium format is Back in lens library What an experience shooting in medium format itself is a blessing. Medium format is known as a high-resolution machine high megapixel But today we are not just talking about megapixel because everyone can do it A7R3 5DsR Nikon Z7, even Lumix S1R. so why is the true difference between full-frame medium format in my opinion is down to the two things First the depth second user experience and talking about the depth my personal favor will be the sensor size I’m not talking about the big size or small size, but the ratio 4 by 3 ratio in a high resolution big sensor Eh.. Wait a moment 4 by 3 An anamorphic projector lens with this thing Yeah, look at that 4:3 sensor with the anamorphic lens is a true anamorphic 2.39 to 1 Lovely the depth feeling is not something I can simply explain here You gonna hold one in your hand and take photo by yourself to feel it out To put it in a simple perspective Those day we are upgrading from an aps-c sensor to a full frame Whoa, everything’s different right now the feeling double up from a full frame to a medium format. Can you imagine that? The second thing the user experience the moment you check back the photo in your computer the detail, the color, the resolution, the micro contrast, the color bit, and the fall off of your bokeh Just instantly fall in love with medium format. In my opinion This camera is suitable for those who are doing commercial shooting corporate profiling, product, advertising shooting even wedding. The photo taken out of this camera just gonna make your photos stand out from all the full-frame user Alright to have a full review on this one. It’s not by me But by you. Swing by lens library, to have a hands on by yourself If you like more video like this give us a thumbs up and subscribe us hit the notification button comment below about what to improve see you next one

The Rise and Fall of Asahi Pentax – Pentax 6×7, SMC, Ricoh History

The Rise and Fall of Asahi Pentax – Pentax 6×7, SMC, Ricoh History


so we finished the previous video
talking about the Pentax spotMatic how the Asahiflex ultimately led to like
the invention of the quick return mechanism for the mirror which set the
standard for like the cameras everywhere in Japan as ie Pentax came up with the
first through the lens of metering so that was like their invention and during
these years we also saw the introduction of some of my favorite lenses primarily
the super Takuma 50mm f1.4 I have a separate video just about the
lens but it was rumored that at the times Zeiss was dominating with the 50mm f1.4 Planar , Pentax created this lens to dethrone the planar like they
created an eighth element lens and it was also rumored that every time they
sold one of these lenses Pentax was actually losing money because of the
production cost but once the media had basically crowned Asahi Pentax 50
millimeter 1.4 as like the as being better than the Zeiss Pienaar they
swapped the optical formula so it went from being 8 elements to being 7
elements and actually well there’s more than two versions of this lens but
ultimately there’s the non-radiative version 1 which is the 8 elements and then
there’s the and then there’s the radioactive version that one has 7
elements and it has thorium baked into the element so people actually think that
it’s a coating but it’s not a coating you actually melted the thorium straight
into the lens it wasn’t even one lens element I think
it was the rear three elements that’s why we have a Super Takumar 50mm
f1.4 it tends to get pretty yellow not only that but there’s also
another lens that I really like the SMC Takumar 55 millimeter 1.8 and that one you can get it really really cheaply but it’s
actually really really great lens I mean I really love my radioactive lenses so I
just want to throw this out there and let’s get back to like Pentax history
before we get sidetracked if you’re interested in like the radiation lenses
and like how do the yellow um and all that kind of stuff I actually have
videos on this already including videos on all my Pentax lenses anyways back to
Asahi Pentax okay so now we’re in 1965 Pentax releases the Pentax 6×7 which is
actually like a very very it was pretty popular for its time you know it’s uh it
wasn’t like the other medium formats are like huge and bulky this one just looked
like a big camera and you you were able to carry it around with you and there’s
actually different versions there’s like the Pentax 6×7 there’s a Pentax 67 and I think
there’s a Pentax 67ii – I never really got into medium format but I did have chances to
play with it with my friends and even today I still see this camera like
everywhere like especially with like Koreans and I call it the thunderclap
because you can hear like a cross-city but I like the way the shutter sounds
like there are much more louder anyways this camera was actually super popular
like the last February’s as well and if I remember one of the most popular
lenses for is the Takuma Pentax 105mm f2.4 I think that’s right and like some people just
sell off everything they have just to get the system you know just like to get
the TakuMar 105mm with the Pentax 67 whichever one of those variations and
supposed to be like super good for portraits someday if I ever venture into
medium format that’s probably the lens and camera system I’m going to try but
for me it’s kind of out of my range these days and especially film can get
kind of expensive but I just want to throw that out there because this was
like a pretty big thing for Pentax and a lot of people love this camera and you
can still buy it quite easily while least here in Korea in Asia
also just a bit of trivia but uh around this time there was actually a
CIA gun that they used like I think it was called the Stinger and you ever see
those like spy movies where they have like a gun inside the camera this was
basically it the Stinger had like 22 millimeter magnum rounds it would
it was like a single single shot gun slash camera where like when you cut the
lever you like I’m not really good at gun terminology stuff but let’s just say
when you click the shoulder you shot someone but you can only do it like one
time anyways that’s just a little bit of trivia if you’re interested in how this
looks you probably be able to find it online just like search for like Pentax
CIA gun stinger and pretty cool thing it’s also worth noting that like Pentax
like sold more than a million or two million cameras in the 60s I forget the
dates exactly but they were really pushing hard to make this like the do
bigger is a big camera like it was marketed through schools and to
college students you had like all these celebrities using their cameras I’m not
sure if I’m early or late for like Ringo Starr be poorly would always carry his
Pentax camera around with him Drew Barrymore I remember reading some
magazine articles saying that like what she was a photographer and she shot many
kinds of cameras but ultimately she always went back to I believe it was the
k1000 which I don’t think the k1000 has come out yet but since we’re talking
about celebrities I might as well throw it out there so I think she shot with
that camera for like 10 years which is pretty cool because I still have my K
1000 and even though I had like the Pentax ME Super the LX the Pentax Q and like a bunch of
other Pentax cameras I sold all of them and I stayed with a
Pentax k1000 mainly because I just liked the basics and a simplicity and now I
kind of wish Pentax beat Fuji to the like the mirrorless or digital age with
like the retro design like what if they created
like a Pentax k1000 similar to like the Fuji x100s you know just the
style but with a digital back I think a lot of people would buy that
especially since Pentax used like the same Asahiflex design for like over 30
years they should have done that with like the digital cameras too and I think
that would have been really cool anyways I’m getting sidetracked it’s time to
stop Pentax fanboying and get back into it
Oh actually I think now would be a good time to start talking about Ricoh a
little because like I forgot exactly when was it like 2010 or something like
that but Ricoh bought Pentax and this video wouldn’t be complete if
we didn’t talk a little at least a little bit about Ricoh history now the
way I see it Ricoh was always one step behind Pentax like at least back in
those days like Pentax would release a product and Ricoh would I don’t wanna say
copied it but they just kind of copied it you know psycho it actually Rico
started off as Riken and I think they started like in 1917 well I know they
started before Pentax was founded Ricoh or Riken started off by making kind of
like I want to say it’s like film but it was like a paper similar to film in the
60s or 70s they started getting into like this the watch selling and printer
business that’s why that’s why these days are known as Ricoh imaging they work
a lot like printers and faxes actually I believe they started producing like fax
machines or facsimile is for Toshiba and I think in the early 2000s they bought
the the printing business I wanna say printing business but the printing
division of IBM I probably got those dates wrong and also a random fact but
Ricoh was the one who made the 8-bit processor for the Nintendo but yeah I’m
talking about this because Ricoh is gaining
a lot into electronics Pentax was also getting into electronics a lot of these
camera companies they didn’t just do camera stuff like they started like
doing different things especially a lot like medical equipment because they had
the optics for it and you know saying that you can put all your eggs in one
basket because like Pentax if they put all their they put all the resources
purely into photography they would not even exist today but they still actually
exist in different ways that I will get back into later in this video anyways
back to Ricoh they did produce lenses in the m42 months which was able to fit on
the Pentax cameras and they also made lenses for the caiman in fact at the
time many camera companies are made came out lenses Oh
Pentax actually like has their mounts open-source and I don’t really know of
any other camera company that does that I mean I know like some of the bigger
companies license their mounts to other manufacturers but Pentax has her mount
as open-source so pretty much anyone can create lenses for Pentax and I think
that’s like a really unique thing I could be wrong I mean maybe they aren’t
the only ones who do it like that but I thought that was pretty cool about them
that’s probably one of the reasons why you can put so many lenses on Pentax
cameras speaking of lenses I own the Rikenon
55mm 1.4 wonderful lens it is really radioactive but actually
the images coming out of it are pretty amazing and I have some videos with it
and just a random story that has nothing to do with the history of Pentax but I
ordered the lens from Germany it came with the original Ricoh cap which is
really awesome but it took almost two months to get here because it ended up
going to South South Africa instead of South Korea and then I ended up in
Zimbabwe and then back in South Africa and then back in Zimbabwe and then back
in South Africa and then finally made its way here to South Korea after like
two months of me tracking it but uh I’ll make I’ll make a video just
the lens even though I have a few already just throwing it out there we
were talking about the the Pentax 6×7 right and a neat thing about this camera is that
actually took both 120 film and 220 film I think and you can think of it as a
huge SLR camera a huge medium format camera that looks like an SLR very much
the way the GFX is like a digital rangefinder medium format ish camera –
like the Fuji’s rangefinder cameras it was basically the same thing was like
one giant Pentax I think it should it’s a good time to note that Pentax is the
only camera company of all these companies to make 35mm 6×7
645 110 and now even full-frame SLR cameras so well actually full-frame and
35 millimetres the same thing nevermind but yeah they’re like the only company
to touch on all these different film formats and I think that’s really
telling of a company probably why I was pretty much all over the place and
everybody liked them the 110 camera is actually pretty interesting and we’re
gonna get back into that later anyways now we’re in the 70s Pentax came up with
something called the SMC coatings actually they there’s a story that it
actually came up as a development with Zeiss like a partnership but we’re gonna
get into that later let me talk about SMC first so SMC coatings were like
super multi coatings and it’s actually more than no it was seven different
coatings that you can put on a lens and the the great thing about this was that
like it reduced like ghosting which if you own any like vintage lenses you know
it’s like a very big problem with most of them and another thing is like there
was a lot of light loss when you use these older lenses but I think I
remember something like with SMC coating the lens kept like ninety nine point
eight percent of the light or something like that and only two percent of the
light was actually lost so like that helps speed up the less
quite a bit and it reduced quoting it was basically pen taxes pride and joy I
even heard this rumor that they loved SMC coating so much that they even
quoted random parts of the camera with it even though I had nothing to do with
like the optics like they they just like SMC coating that much but uh don’t quote
me on that that’s just like a rumor that I heard but I want to believe it no it
sounds sounds pretty interesting but anyways they they have like quite a few
world-first already they got the first quick return mirror through the lens
metering I know that’s a few more world-first stuffs but like this is also
like the world’s first reduced ghosting and flaring or almost completely
eliminate ghosting and flaring multi coatings right so kudos to them oh and
since we’re speaking about Road first around this time they also released the
electro spot Matic so they had the world first for quick return mirrors they had
the world first for to the lens metering I’m sure there was more work first oh
yeah the the SMC coating which reduced ghosting and flaring and now they also
had the electro spotMatic which do two things let me see if I remember oh yeah
it was the first open aperture metering because you know the first spotMatic was
like I think it was called closed aperture meeting metering right so with
the original spot Matic you had your camera you would focus you would close
down the aperture then you will do your metering then you can like take a
picture with the electro spermatic you could actually just meter with the open
lens like a normal camera or we’re getting closer to a normal camera and
then you can just take a picture I’m actually sure it’s much more complex
than that but I never owned an electro spotMatic so I can’t really tell you
that’s just my understanding of the mechanism and also they come
with the first thing goes this lectures pragmatic but they came up with the
first aperture-priority system so in aperture
priority your camera is the one who chooses the shutter speed and you just
leave your aperture the way you want it it makes sense I mean yeah I think
that’s the whole point of the electro spotmatic because you have like a
circuit board in the camera and the camera decides which shutter speed to
use and you are you able to choose which aperture you want right so that’s the
electro spotMatic if I make some mistakes I’m sure someone will correct
me but it’s my understanding that that’s the way this counter went down and
that’s why I do it out there alright so earlier while I was talking
about SMC we mentioned Zeiss and there was a collaboration between zeiss west
over cooking and they were actually looking for a Japanese partner because
they originally tried to make as SLRs and I think they did in Seoul as well
they felt I think it was the Eco X and the contracts SLRs line of cameras so
they were looking to get more momentum with the SLR industry and one of the
companies that the first had like a fling with was Asahi Pentax now here is
a rumor and I don’t know how true this is but they say that the SMC coatings
that Asahi Pentax came up with were came out was co-developed by his eyes and
Asahi Pentax and so Pentax use SMC and Zeiss walked away with like the if you
ever had like a Zeiss lens had like a little tea a red tea with a little
asterisk so that’s like they’re they’re coating right so some people say that
those are actually the same coatings now I don’t actually know or I don’t even
know if this story is true but that’s what the rumor going around saying is
that like the the SMC coating and zeiss t* risk coating came out of this
alliance or legions and some people say it’s the same thing I have no idea but I
do know that the K mount was born out of this collaboration and actually some of
the lenses that they came out from this time were actually kind of I want to say
the clones of there’s ice counterparts but they’re very directly influenced by
Zeiss they were like Zeiss plans but they were Pentax produced and one of
them is the Pentax 28mm f/2 aka the hollywood lens and another one I think
it was the Takumar 15mm f3.5 I think that that was also like a pretty
big lens for them I’m not sure it was like the first super wide angle lens
they made but I believe it came out of collaboration with Zeiss along with the
came out and quite possibly some would let me know the SMC coatings yeah
anyways this fleeing with Zeiss was ultimately cut short and they ended up
making a partnership with Yashica and I believe that his eyes gave them the gave
Yashika the Contax name as I guess like a friendship friendship kind of
thing like a friendship gift here you keep context and that’s how your sheikah
contacts was born one eternity later ok like just right now I I had to look up
the whole the T*s and SMC coding information and this is what I
came up with so I’m just gonna put it out there and quote such multi-layer
coatings were first used in the 1950s for wide-angle lenses that often
consisted of 18 or more optical surfaces we’re talking about the multi-layer
coatings these multi-layer coatings were labeled MC
in Jena and T* in OberKochen I only know how to
say a job because German names anyways as of 1972 each size camera lens has
been provided with a multi-layer coating that’s quote Dr. Hans Sauer Zeiss press
of information February 20 1973 so there you go
whatever you want to make of it this whole Zeiss Pentax thing is really quite
interesting but uh yeah anyways I’ve also heard another thing like the T* multi layer coatings were actually a response to the Pentax SMC
coatings so like they didn’t wanna stay behind so they develop their own multi
coatings but anyways I’m putting this information out there and like I said
someone’s going to let me know the correct thing but it’s really
interesting others like camera information stuff this why I say that
history gets so convoluted with these like old camera histories and that’s one
of the reasons why I probably liked them so much anyways we’re still in the 70s
right we haven’t gotten very far and it’s worth noting that another really
awesome lens unfortunately this is not a lens that I own because 85mm
lenses are actually quite expensive but here we have the SMC Takumar 85mm
f1.8 if I had to get another lens another 85 which already have some
85 s and but I would really like to get my hands on this lens and if you have
one consider yourself lucky I only need the 85 and the 105 to complete my
super takumar collection so it’s in the plans for someday we mentioned that this
was the production of the creation of the came on right this collaboration
with ice and my favorite SLR camera came out that’s the k1000 the k1000 deserves
its own video to be on like I said I sold all my other Pentax
cameras in a attempt to declutter and I just kept the k1000 it is the student
camera most people have started using
unlearning films start off with camera many college courses people use this
camera I said drew Barrymore uses the K100 for like 10 years and even
though she tried other cameras she always came back to this one I always
liked this camera because it’s so basic like when I should film I just I just
want to enjoy it and I just want to take pictures and the great thing about the
k1000 it is it isn’t reliant on electronics like it’s like very
bare-bones if the battery dies only the light meter dies and then you can just
use like the sunny 16 rule or something and you’re fine so the k1000 had like
the longest production run I believe from the time of production I think it
stopped stopped being produced in the early 2000s like I don’t know the exact
year but I do know that the k1000 had like the the world record on the like
longest production run for an SLR camera and yeah I like my K 1000 more much I
would never part with it and maybe in the future I’ll make one video just
about it but if you’re watching this video you probably use the k1000 when
you were in school or you’re thinking about buying one or you just probably
remember seen one somewhere because these things were everywhere and by now
Asahi Pentax has sold like millions and millions of cameras so yeah oh another
piece of trivia is the the K mount was actually like bayonet mount a bayonet
style mount and around this time Pentax was still clinging to the old m42 mounts
but the problem was those were a little bit too too narrow and by now all the
other camera companies had already switched to it like the some kind of
bayonet style mount so these are by net style mounts you just kind of positioned
and you clicked no like a little dot put the doll in place and then you
clicked into place that’s a bayonet style mount and I think the exacto was
the first bayonets down mount I’m not really sure but anyways just a little
information about the the key mounts oh I I must also add that Pentax is like
one of the only camera companies that their cameras can pretty much all use k
mounts were like not like the super newest I think we’re like almost other
cameras can use came out lenses even without the like the the automatic
features and regarding the digital SLRs of Pentax and the mirrorless ones too I
believe that they all of them from the very beginning were able to save in
Adobe raw DNG and that separated them from the other camera companies that
always constantly needed like Lightroom updates to be able to read the format
but like that’s one of the things about Pentax is like they were always able to
read no matter which Lightroom or Photoshop you had you were always able
to use that format so I thought that’s real cool piece of trivia and probably
another reason why people love him so much and probably know the reason why
I’m making this video because I love Pentax too but yeah this video is
getting quite long with all these little trivia things but that’s kind of what I
like about these videos anyways back to the k1000 the reason it’s called the
k1000 is uh actually he was able to reach a maximum speed of one over a
thousand and so hence the name was a k1000 and like I said this camera was
ridiculous it was everywhere and even among older SLR cameras for some reason
this one still costs more than the others even though there are like more
newer ones and modern ones those are actually much cheaper I always see the
k1 thousands go for more than the newer cameras and I really wonder why that is
because they actually had the most of these cameras theoretically these
cameras should be cheaper and they are still cheap relatively but
they’re usually a little bit more expensive than other SLR cameras
probably because they last forever and they’re just really will build cameras
and everybody loves them anyways we’re barely around we’re getting into the
like the late 70s now and we start seeing the introduction of the MX and ME
cameras and I think I didn’t want to get into every single camera that Pentax
made but like here is like a response to Olympus because Olympus is trying to
market the whole small and portable thing and like Pentax starts going for
like the same kind of angle with its PR like these are small cameras and they’re
easy to use and they’re very portable but they’re still rugged so that’s the
thing with these Pentax ME cameras or Pentax MX cameras compactness was the name of the
game and we also see the introduction of the Pentax Auto 110 I forget the exact
specifications of this camera I never was able to get my hands on one of them
but like I heard that they were like really small really compact and by some
people they were referred to as kind of like spy cameras and this took 110 film
it also had like its own cysts and interesting note about this camera is
like I believe I heard that the shutter acted as its own aperture and that’s one
of the reasons they were able to keep this camera like so small and yeah like
the electronics in this camera don’t really didn’t really last as long as
other cameras so that’s just what I heard I I don’t have any experience
using the Auto 110 but it sounds like a pretty fun camera and the complaints I
heard were mostly that as a photographer you really didn’t have much control over
the image like their camera did everything pretty much by itself and you
couldn’t really do many artsy things with it except just kind of point and
shoot for the most part and yeah it was like the only one time camera with
interchangeable lenses at the time and then that caught on and I believe all
the other job his camera company started doing their
own thing around the 1:10 system too but yeah just another one of those of Pentax
things that they’re going more towards the whole just it’s fun it’s easy and
point-and-shoot kind of cameras we’re not pointing shoot but they’re really
trying to market Pentax as like it’s an air is a thing everybody’s doing just
hold the Pentax it’s easy to use and I think that’s one of the part of the
reasons that they failed is that at the time all these cameras were starting to
embrace electronics and technology and I don’t want to say this where the pixel
peepers really started to take off but like this is where the camera geeks ruin
Pentax I guess could like they just wanted to have fun they just wanted
everyone to take a picture but like everyone else we’re starting to chase
the electronics and the latest features that cameras had to offer and even
though Pentax was like way ahead of their time in terms of innovation and
creating their own things and not following the trends they were just not
very good at marketing themselves you know like Canon Nikon and all of them
they were trying to market themselves like a professional cameras and
top-of-the-line electronics and Pentax was just trying to market themselves as
just like easy-to-use and fun you know with these kind of cameras and you’ll
see a later on where they start releasing all these colorful cameras in
the 2000s 2010s i don’t really know what to think of those cameras but anyways
i’m getting off track now right now would be a pretty good time to start
talking about the different kinds of Pentax lenses Pentax lenses or deserve
their own video – like there’s just so many of them I mean you have like the
yeah like the preset system with the early Takumar you have like the auto
Takumar yeah the m42 mounds you have the K by
your mount then you start getting the M mounts which actually I think the
lenses the K lines are still working like on the M but the M was more for
like compactness and your with the ME series so these lenses are
all about these are small and cute but still rugged and useful then you start
getting like is it the a yeah the a mounts actually it’s still you can still
use the K lenses like interchangeably I think no you can still use the K
lenses but like the a was more for like outer aperture I believe there’s
actually so many lenses there’s also like the F series which are like full
for auto focus and then there’s like the DAs and the FAs there are so many kinds
of lenses I don’t really think I can get into all these lenses so I know some
people out there going to get kind of mad but I just want to point out that I
know these lenses exist so if I don’t really talk about them in this video
it’s just that there is just so many of them and like yeah I don’t know how long
this video is already but I’m probably going to have to make this video 3 parts
I thought that the Pentax history video would be two parts but I think it
wouldn’t have to make it three parts in the end and next time we’re gonna start
talking about the LX system which is like Pentax only attempts to get into
like the whole professional realm which might have been too late for them we’re
going to find out but yeah leave your thoughts let me know if I made any
mistakes and yeah let’s I’ll see you around next time

My little secret compact film “camera”

My little secret compact film “camera”


Man, it’s good to be back to all this traffic It really is good to be back I mean, look at that! It’s foggy, it’s always foggy here Listen to this If you thought that I wasn’t shooting film during my recent road trip Well, you were wrong! This has been my little secret, and I really mean very little because I didn’t use it much only 24 frames in a month and a half I’m going to be finishing this roll today, going to be shooting another one and I’ll be talking about this camera, what it is and where it came from I don’t think there’s much to say about this camera it’s a compact 35mm camera There is no control whatsoever, you cannot control shutter speed, aperture, anything I do not know the specifications of this camera I’m going to do some research online to see if I find something Also, my dad had 3 or 4 of these around the house, I don’t know why, I’ll ask him just in case he knows just in case he knows more about them than me, I don’t he will but The only thing you can do is open and close the lens here it has a panorama switch, it moves a plastic mask in the finder and here on the film itself, which is disappointing because at first I thought that the panorama switch would take a longer strip of the film but no, all it does is it crops a regular 35mm frame into something smaller so it just crops the top and the
bottom, so you’re not getting more resolution so the panorama is going to be lower resolution than what you would get if could use a longer piece of film but whatever, so yeah, let’s go out and keep shooting it I think you want the other… you want to
be over here let’s sit down Xesta, sit down good girl! Stay I’m going to be like strangling her And now what? I need to figure this out I guess you press here, right? Well, I hope it’s okay, you can tell that this camera is just a piece of plastic and a piece of something else too ssssh, there are kids watching this I really hope so Sop this was a roll of T-max 100, it expired some 15 years ago someone sent it to me, someone from Instagram I do not remember their name right now, I’m sorry, I’ll look for it later and going to mention them here their username, I really appreciate that they also sent me I hope I brought it, yeah, another roll here It’s a roll of FP4, this is ISO 125, so both of them are pretty slow films I don’t know how that’s going to work out with this camera which probably has a very small aperture anyway it’s another 36 exposures, let’s load it that’s pretty cool All right, so it’s been a while since I
developed 35mm To open the cartridges, I had a very useful tool in the US that I don’t have here with me unfortunately so I’m going to be trying different tools and if everything else fails… Let’s do this, this is probably not going to be pretty and it’s going to take me a while Remember, if you use devices like an Apple Watch or a Fitbit, to take it off before getting your hands inside the
changing bag because they emit light, and you don’t want that This should be done, at this point you’ve seen the images and I haven’t I hope they worked Luckily for me, both films, FP4 and T-Max 100 had the same developing times when pushing them to 200 I was mostly guessing the developing times because I could only find values to push them to 200 but not beyond that since these are very slow films and I’m afraid that the camera is something like f/8 or f/11 I wanted to push them at least to 400 or something like that otherwise, I would get very dark images so what I did, I just took the times for ISO 200 and I increased the time and the temperature a little bit From 5 minutes at 20 degrees C, to 7 minutes and 21 degrees C I’m hoping that the expired film wasn’t
that expired and still worked fine but yeah, I don’t know, it was just a guessing game here and we’ll see if it paid off I don’t know what happened here I guess those are the panoramas There is something wrong here This didn’t work at all Completely overexposed It has only a few frames I’m going to be able to save The panorama frames didn’t work at all, they’re completely overexposed I see myself there, a selfie Some frames overlap… 4-5 frames on the roll that I might be able to use, which is not great Let’s see if we have more luck with this other one I don’t know if it was the developing, maybe I overdeveloped these These seem overexposed as well Well, there is one frame there Some of them are like double and
triple exposures Ok, well, so I don’t think I’m going to be using this camera anytime soon again Let’s wait until they’re dry and let’s try to scan them, maybe I can get something from them but it doesn’t look good So this experiment didn’t work out as I thought it would, for many reasons For starters, I messed up the development I don’t think these two film stocks, T-Max and FP4 are good film stocks for pushing anyway but I think I did it way too much, I was guesstimating as I said, and I just overdeveloped them also because this camera is a little
bit, let’s say worse, than I thought it was Not that I thought it was very reliable, but it feels like every time you press the shutter it does something different, sometimes it feels like it’s stuck, sometimes it feels like it’s fast so I don’t really know what it’s doing There is some overlapping between the frames too, so the winding mechanism doesn’t seem to be working well either Way too many things for this experiment to really work out It’s not a big deal, because this was not my main camera during the road trip or that I was taking important pictures with it but it’s disappointing, I was very excited about the panorama feature Lately I’ve been experimenting with more aspect ratios and formats I really like the extremes, square and very, very panoramic and I thought that this could do the trick it was disappointing to see that it was actually cropping the frame I think I would rather have it crop in the
viewfinder, so you still see the framing Even if it’s not accurate, you more or less could see what you were going to get but I would rather have the whole frame so I could do the cropping afterwards That’s what I do with my digital camera, I take the whole frame and then crop the top and the bottom to make the panorama another thing that was disappointing about this camera is that I asked my dad where these cameras came from As I said, there were 3 or 4 around the house and it turns out this is a… I knew it was familiar, this is a contact lens liquid company and they were giving them away with the liquid, when you bought it so there is not even a cool story behind these cameras I don’t think I’m going to be shooting them again any time soon, but it was still fun Photography is all about experimentation, this time didn’t really work but it could have! There’s more film coming to this channel very, very soon, as soon as the next video with a much better camera and hopefully with much better results so stay tuned for that, until then I can
only thank you again for watching see you in the next one!