How to Use Manual Mode on ANY Camera in ~5 MINUTES!

How to Use Manual Mode on ANY Camera in ~5 MINUTES!


Good morning. Hope you guys had a wonderful Christmas. Today I’m going to teach you how to switch
your camera over to manual mode so you can stop fiddling with it and then take some pictures
like this. Okay, let me give you a tour. Hello and welcome back to the channel. Good morning, good evening, good afternoon,
wherever you are. Today we are going to learn how to use manual
mode in about five minutes. Look, when I first picked up a camera, the
most intimidating thing for me were all these buttons. I just wanted to go out and shoot and take
freken nice pictures and instead I was fiddling around with my camera settings. You know what’s really fun too in its own
way, but a lot of people just want to avoid all of that and just take really nice pictures
from the get-go. So I shoot Canon, but all these settings apply
to pretty much any phone, mirrorless, DSLR nowadays as long as you understand this holy
trinity of camera settings, then you’ll at least be able to establish your foundation
for using your camera in manual mode. All right, let’s get started. Okay, so the first thing I want to talk about
is ISO. So ISO is your camera sensitivity to light. You always want to keep it at around 100. The lowest, the better because the more ISO
you introduce, then the more noise you also introduce into your picture. Now on top of that, the higher the range of
ISO you go, then the brighter your picture will be. Depending on your camera, some cameras are
able to push ISO way further than other cameras before you start introducing noise. For the ADD, for instance, I never go any
higher than 800 ISO because after that pictures looks disgusting. But then on the 1DX, which I’m shooting right
now, I can push that to way, way higher amounts for ISO. But bottom line though, you want to keep your
ISO at the lowest possible setting. Now, a lot of the times when you’re picking
up a mirrorless or DSLR camera, a lot of professional pictures, they have a nice blurred background
and that blurred background is called bokeh. Now, the one setting that is pretty much responsible
for that is called the F-stop. So you have ISO, which is adjusting your camera
sensitivity to light. The second setting that we’ll talk about is
F-stop. The lower your F-stop is, then the more light
you’re letting in because you’re opening your lens up, and on top of that, the blurrier
your background will be. So a lot of times when people are talking
about lenses and they’re talking about how fast it is, if they’re saying a lens is fast,
then it means that it probably has a lower F-stop and also means that it’s way more expensive
than the other lenses because 1.2, 1.4 lenses, those usually go for a lot more than 2.4,
2.8, and so forth. But remember, you don’t want to abuse this
blurry background image. For example, let’s say I’m doing landscape
photography and you have this nice mountain range and a giant boulder in front of you. Do you want to take a picture of the boulder
or with a blurred background of the mountain range, or do you want a nice clear picture
of the mountain range? Probably the mountains, right? So in cases like that, that’s when you want
everything in focus. Or for family photos, all that I would recommend
you use F-stop of F-5 or higher. Okay, so let’s combine those two settings
and understand them together. Right now the lens I’m shooting in is that
an F-2.0, which means that the ISO, I don’t have to adjust too much because it’s letting
in a ton of light already from two studio lights here. If I were to crank that to F-5, F-7, the room
is going to get way darker and then I’m probably going to have to compensate for that by adjusting
ISO to make it brighter or else you won’t be able to see anything at all. So ISO, artificial in-body lighting, F-stop,
how much light you’re letting in. The third and final setting I want you to
understand is shutter speed. Let’s say you want to take pictures of your
dog. How often are they going to sit still? Probably not, right? So here you want to freeze your motion in
place, and to do that, that’s when shutter speed comes into play. Shutter speed is that click that you have
for your camera. It’s pretty much dictating how long you’re
going to let light hit your camera sensor. So that means that the higher your shutter
speed and the faster you can freeze motion. The slower your shutter speed, then the longer
it’s going to remain open. So the higher shutter speed, the less light
you’re letting come in and therefore your picture’s going to turn down darker. But in exchange, your motion’s going to be
frozen in place. Okay, so let’s combine all three settings
as an example. I’m in front of a beautiful waterfall. What do I want to do first? For me, I always adjust F-stop first because
I think about what is my subject and focus. In this case it’s the giant waterfall, so
you don’t want a low F-stop for that, you want a high F-stop. So landscape photography, you don’t really
want anything blurry, high F-stop. Now in exchange when you are cranking up your
F-stop, your picture gets darker. How would you fix that? You want to keep ISO at one to 100 if we can. It’s mid-day so there’s a ton of light coming
in, which means we can now play with these shutter speeds. But since I want a nice flowy smooth motion
of the water, I want to move my shutter speed to like 15 seconds. I want it to remain open for a long time that
way you get a nice long streak of water. So high F-stop, it’s dark. Slow shutter speed, it gets brighter, and
therefore I can leave ISO at about 100 and then boom, you get a nice smooth waterfall
picture. I also use the ND filter on my lens here just
in case so I can keep the camera settings a little bit darker, but more on that on the
next video. But I’m going to talk about specific camera
gear or specific essential camera gear in another video. So more on that later. Okay, let’s try another example. I’m outside mid-day and I want to take picture
of a miniature from Lords of Helis, so product photography. I want a nice blurred background but I don’t
want the background to take away from my main subject, which is the miniature. So I have a small subject, blurred background. What would you do first? F-stop, right? So you’re going to crank your F-stop down
that we have a nice blurred, delicious background. But the thing is, you’re letting in a ton
of light. It’s mid-day, so it’s way overexposed. How would you fix that? ISO is already at 100. The last thing you want to adjust now is shutter
speed. So now you can crank your shutter speed a
lot. I can even go to like 1/4,000 if I want to. It’s not going to take away from anything
really. So that’s what’s nice about photography. You can always compensate with shutter speed
once you adjust the other two settings because it won’t matter as much as it would for video. For video you would get these staticky motions
and then you would see individual droplets of water if you have a shutter speed that
doesn’t match your frame rate, but more than that later. Let’s focus on the photography aspect here. So low F-stop, subject’s in focus, background’s
blurry. ISO’s at 100 and then I compensate for shutter
speed to make sure it’s perfectly exposed and then boom, example number two complete. Okay, last quick example, one of my favorite
types of photos are long exposure photography. Now for that one, let’s say I have a miniature
and I want to do some steel wool, so I just want to whisk it around the back and get these
nice long streaks of light. Now to do that, we’re going to mimic the same
thing we did for the waterfall example and keep a slow shutter speed, so we’re going
to keep it open for 30 seconds. It’s pitch black at night so you can’t see
anything else anyway, so 1/30th is going to give a ton of light coming in. And then for F-stop, I actually like to put
my F-stop higher just so you can see complete details of what’s going on and keep your camera
on a tripod tube. And then here I played around with F-stop
and ISO just a little bit here and there until I finally got nice streaks of light which
were, some were in focus, some were out of focus. But the main focus here, I said focus like
five times, but the main subject here is of course the miniature, so I want to make sure
all the details of that can be seen super nice and crispy and then the background just
accents what’s going on here. In this case it’s the monument of light, so
naturally it fits with the whole light streaks in the background. And that is basic camera settings, pretty
much how to use manual mode in about five, I’m probably way over that by now, five minutes
or so. But I hope you enjoyed how we puzzle pieced
the trinity of camera settings that way we can take nice, beautiful photos. Hope you found it helpful. If you found all this helpful, please hit
subscribe so we can grow the channel together in 2020 get it to as big as it can possibly
be. I’ve also linked my social media here if you
want to keep up to date with daily content or what I’m doing, and until next time, see
you guys later.

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