How To – Scrap a Digital Camera

How To – Scrap a Digital Camera


So today we’re going to be scrapping an Olympus
Stylus 1050 SW camera. The reason we’re scrapping is because we can’t reclaim the money for
it from any other means, i/.e. selling it to reclaiming business or as a working piece.
As it’s entirely broken. What we’re going to do first is remove all of the screws from
the body, as well as any of the internal components, normally these are things like the battery,
memory cards, other ports possibly a secondary memory card if the camera has one. So we’ve
now got to a stage where all of the external screws are removed from the body of the camera.
As you can see all around the case is already starting to fall apart, a few pieces have
already been taken off, as they just fell apart when the main screws we’re removed.
This allows us to simply take the camera apart, often when you’re doing this kind of thing
there will be certain areas of the body that will be tighter or need more strength than
others, and some thing will just fall off. All you have to do is play with it really
and after a while things will just fall apart, as you can see. So no More screws have been
removed from the last clip and as you can see the more we move inside the body the easier
it becomes to take things apart. Some things will be attached by extra bits of stuff that
you can’t actually remove until you’ve taken out the screws. These will only become apparent
as you take off the external case. A couple more screws have been removed from around
the case now, and you can see the front is entirely open. Leaving a rubber seal and also
as you can see inside lots of nice chips which we can then break down later, for processing
into certain raw metals – things like gold, platinum silver and all the other components
– copper, iron aluminium, the batteries we can recycle separately as well as also the
camera lenses make good pieces to see for things like art projects, people will be willing
to buy them on line. So we’re about half way through the scrapping now, as you can see
I’ve already started to grade the scrap, also if you look closely underneath the button
pads you’ll find gold and silver contacts, you can see the reflection there of the silver
press pad and that’s just pure silver. Often after lifting a corner of the back of the
touch pad you’ll be able to peel off all the remaining contacts, as you can see under there,
nice bits of gold and also the silver discs here. That’s just pure silver that’s ready
smelted down, this gold we’ll remove later using a number of different methods to remove
gold from circuit boards. So all that remains of the camera now is the empty casing also
all of the electronics from inside, the main digital sensor also a large capacitor. You
could sell it as it’ll probably still be intact, a couple of headphones or speaker system which
will still be intact – you could sell it as individual parts. The most important point
though is the PCB which we’ll break down with other components later on. So we’re very close
to completing the scrap now, all that remains is to clip off the gold plated contacts, remove
a couple more silver pieces and then to scrap the board and we’re done. So for the final
part of the strip all we’re going to do is to remove the remaining gold connectors on
the board, and we’re done. That’s the camera fully stripped, it took quite a while. This
form of scrapping is more of an interest piece than anything, just to see what’s inside,
it also adds to my pile of other gold pins, but mainly it’s just quite interesting to
have a look at what’s inside the camera. See all the different components, never stripped
a camera before so a different thing. We’ve got the sensor- it’s very small, I’ve taken
out the optics as well. Fun to play with but nothing else really. So we’ve finally finished
the scrap – looking at it we’ve got quite a bit of waste, mostly waste actually just
casing plastic, boards with no gold left on can’t get much more out of them. We’ve also
got some aluminium and steel which you can run a magnet over to test which is which.
Some Electronic components, capacitors that kind of thing, a small halogen bulb. A tiny
bit of wire, a tiny bit of copper, those silver contacts we talked about from the button pad
before. Various bits of boards plated in gold, this can be removed later and some nuts and
bolts. So that completes our scrap of the Olympus camera, any questions or comments
please subscribe and we’ll see you again.

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