[AMV] Photograph – Koe no Katachi [PT/BR]

[AMV] Photograph – Koe no Katachi [PT/BR]


Amar pode doer Amar pode doer às vezes Mas é a única coisa que eu sei Quando fica difícil Você sabe que pode ficar difícil às vezes É a única coisa que nos mantém vivos Nós mantemos este amor numa fotografia Nós fizemos estas memórias para nós mesmos Onde nossos olhos nunca fecham Nossos corações nunca estiveram partidos E o tempo está congelado para sempre Então você pode me guardar no bolso Do seu jeans rasgado Me abraçando perto até nossos olhos se encontrarem Você nunca estará sozinha Espere por minha volta para casa Amar pode curar Amar pode remendar sua alma E é a única coisa que eu sei Eu juro que ficará mais fácil Lembre-se disso em cada pedaço seu E é a única coisa que levamos conosco quando morremos Nós mantemos este amor numa fotografia Nós fizemos estas memórias para nós mesmos Onde nossos olhos nunca fecham Nossos corações nunca estiveram partidos E o tempo está congelado para sempre Então você pode me guardar no bolso Do seu jeans rasgado Me abraçando perto até nossos olhos se encontrarem Você nunca estará sozinha E se você me machucar, tudo bem querida Apenas as palavras sangram Dentro destas páginas, apenas me abrace E eu nunca te deixarei ir Espere por minha volta para casa Espere por minha volta para casa Espere por minha volta para casa Espere por minha volta para casa E você poderia me colocar Dentro deste colar que você usou
Quando tinha 16 anos Perto do seu coração onde deveria estar Mantenha isso no fundo de sua alma E se você me machucar Bem, está tudo bem amor
Apenas as palavras sangram Dentro destas páginas, apenas me abrace E eu nunca te deixarei ir Quando eu estiver longe Me lembrarei de como você me beijava Embaixo do poste de luz da 6ª rua Ouvindo você sussurrar pelo telefone Espere por minha volta para casa

How to Film and Photograph Yourself | TECH TALK

How to Film and Photograph Yourself | TECH TALK


What up beautiful people? It is
your homegirl Ms. Shameless all up in your building. Giving you
another Tech Talk, yes. And the video is how to photograph
and film yourself, because we all trying
to be YouTube sensations, and/or Instagram
models. [laughs] But yes, this video is
going to break it down, how I photograph
and film myself. And it’s very easy
and straightforward, so keep watching. OK, so this is the first setup. And what you need to do first, before you start recording,
is have powder and chap stick, because nobody likes
your dry, crusty lips, or your greasy, sweaty face, and I have been guilty of both. So, you can just go to any drug store,
Sephora, you know, and any powder for guys, just get a
translucent press powder. This is like the most
basic, straightforward. And you just go over everything. Because just the
whole act of standing and being recorded is sweaty, and then you add-on the
lights and all that stuff. I rock the Burt Bees, woohoo, or a lip gloss for
girls, all that fun stuff. This is basic, OK. So there, we’re almost ready. Now for the camera setup, we got to make
sure that’s in order. Then you want to make sure
that your camera is on a tripod. Get yourself a nice
lightweight tripod. If your camera is light, or get a heavier, sturdy tripod
if you have a heavier camera. This is kind of
heavy with the lens. I did a lighter tripod,
and I broke my lens once, so. I’d never do that ever again. OK, so then once you have
your camera on your tripod, you’re going to face
it towards yourself, OK. And then you want to make sure
that you have nice lighting. So, you can use
natural lighting, this is like some
nice window lighting, and you can either face
directly towards the light, or you can use
artificial lighting. And I have a video on that, I have a video
dedicated to a lighting setup. So just read the
description box or click here. OK. And then you can
like, ah! Ring light. That’s what all the
beauty gurus are rocking. Just an easy
straightforward setup, OK. You need a remote, if you do not have a camera
that automatically focuses. So my Canon 5D and 7D
don’t have automatic focus, so I just get this remote, and I put it on
camera mode first, so photo, and then I click
it, and then it focuses on me, and then I run to the
back of the camera like this, and I’m like,
“OK, I’m in focus.” And then before you leave
you have like put a marker, so yes look at this, hot. [laughs] My hot slippers
and socks. Just put a marker somewhere. So then you put your tape
down, and then you focus it, and then you’re almost ready. So you switch it from
video mode to photo mode, and then you click here, and make sure you put
it on the remote setting. So, self timer, two
second remote, bam. OK. Then you put it
on auto focus here, from manual if it’s on manual. OK, and then!
That was loud Maya. Then you take a photo. [camera clicks] Because it’s auto
focusing on that photo. [camera clicks] And then I put it on video mode. So video mode, and then I’ll put
this from auto focus to manual. And then I shall
record myself, there see. Look that remote swag, that’s how you take
a video of yourself, and then just put
it on camera mode if you just want to take photos. If you don’t have a remote, for the longest time I
did not have a remote. This thing. I would focus the camera on something that
would be where I am. So I’ll get that. [♪ upbeat music ♪] This is my stand-in. So, I would have her there. And then I would
make sure she’s in focus. [♪ upbeat music ♪]
Record, bam. Get out my way! And then I hope for
the best that it’s in
focus, and usually it is, but there are a lot of
times that it’s not in focus, and I’m just like,
“Whatever. Whatever!” That is how you film
and photograph yourself. [camera clicking] Make sure you
guys like this video, subscribe, comment
below and let me know what is the
weather like in your city? I just want to
know, OK, that’s it. Remember guys to do
you, be you, and stay true, boo. Be shameless. [♪ upbeat music ♪]

When Three Species Combine: Multi-Species Hybrids

When Three Species Combine: Multi-Species Hybrids


This episode is sponsored by Skillshare. [♪ INTRO] We generally think of species as discrete
groups of organisms that simply can’t interbreed. But hybrids, the offspring of two species,
do happen. And they can be very useful. Take mules, for example, the offspring of
a male donkey and a female horse. They’re bigger than donkeys and hardier
than horses, making them helpful pack animals. But they’re also sterile, and that’s because,
well, mixing species usually doesn’t work. And that makes it all the more surprising
that there are cases where three or more species come together. These multi-species hybrids are really rare, but they can teach us a lot about
the inner workings of genomes. Most of the time, cross-species mating isn’t
fruitful because for an embryo to survive and develop, there has to be
enough consistency between its parents. The sperm has to be able to recognize and
fuse with an egg, for example. And even if an embryo starts developing, you
still have the issue of incompatible genes. To really simplify it, you can think of different
genes in a genome as a sports team. Over time, players start to work really well
together and the team plays better overall. But if you take those players
and stick them on other teams, they don’t always perform as well,
and in some cases, they can completely clash with their new
teammates, making the whole team struggle. It’s basically the same idea with cellular
machinery, except that inter-gene clashes can’t be solved with a mid-season trade. All of these barriers make it
unlikely for hybrids to occur, and even more unlikely that such hybrids
will produce their own offspring. But sometimes, they do just that. In the summer of 2018, for example, a keen-eyed birder
discovered a 3 species hybrid warbler in Pennsylvania. Warblers are small, often colorful birds that
sing pretty songs, hence the name. This bird looked kind of like a golden-winged
warbler, but was singing like a chestnut-sided warbler. Ornithologists sequenced some
of the bird’s mitochondrial DNA, the DNA that lives in the cell’s energy factories,
and almost always comes solely from the egg, as well as some parts of its regular genome. And it turned out to be the offspring of a
hybrid female, herself the result of a golden-winged warbler and a blue-winged warbler mating,
and a male chestnut-sided warbler, which is in a different genus from either of the hybrid
parent species. This odd pairing probably occurred because
the female couldn’t find a more closely related mate. Ornithologists already knew that
warbler populations weren’t doing so hot, so this is seen as more evidence that
population declines are significant. But it also adds support to the idea that
warblers are a rapidly evolving group where species split off behaviorally long before
their genomes become incompatible. Studying such groups can help scientists understand
what factors cause species to diverge and what exactly makes genomes incompatible. Now, this hybrid warbler isn’t the only
multi-species hybrid you might see if you live in the eastern US. It used to be that wolves were the
big canine predators in the northeast and coyotes were the top dogs in the southwest. But almost a century ago, people started to
see what appeared to be coyotes moving eastward. These weren’t coyotes with wanderlust, though,
they were coywolves: hybrids between coyotes and wolves. And they’re one of the most clear examples
of a phenomenon called hybrid vigor. Like I said, usually, mixing the genomes of
different species fails. But sometimes, it can more than work,
creating an animal that’s better in some ways than one or both of its parents. Wolf attributes like large size and wider
skulls made coywolves better at hunting large prey than their coyote parents, which allowed
them to basically take the ecological place of wolves in areas where humans had hunted
them to near-extinction. And it isn’t just wolf genes helping coywolves succeed. Researchers in 2014 looked at lots of individual
mutations in their genomes, what geneticists call single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs,
and found that coywolves are actually a hybrid consisting of two wolf subspecies, coyotes,
and dogs. So, maybe you should call them coy-dog-olfs
or something like that. Since dogs are so well-adapted to living with people, blending them into the mix might have helped these hybrids adapt to human-dominated environments, like the towns and cities that have sprung up
on what long ago used to be wolf territory. And by studying how the genes
from all these species interact, these hybrid canines are helping
geneticists understand how mixing genes from multiple
species can help organisms survive, something that happens all the time in plants. Unless you’re avoiding gluten, you probably
have a 3-species hybrid in your pantry. Common wheat, which supplies
roughly 20% of the world’s calories, is actually a hybrid between 3 species of grass. And its multi-species origin is
probably what made it so useful to us. Sometime roughly 300,000 to 500,000 years ago, two wild species of grass hybridized,
but in a remarkable way. The hybrid retained both complete sets
of chromosomes from its parents, literally, twice the amount of DNA. Humans soon domesticated that hybrid, known
as Emmer wheat. Then, around 10,000 years ago, it crossed
with another wild wheat species, resulting in modern wheat which has
complete chromosome sets from all three of the species that went into it. Now, in most animals,
having extra sets of chromosomes, what geneticists call being
polyploid, is a big problem. That whole incompatible players thing applies
even more so with extra genomes. Yet, for reasons that remain elusive, plants
seem to be able to handle way more genetic weirdness, so polyploidy is
much more common in them. And having all those redundant genes turns
out to be pretty useful when you want to get a plant to evolve a particular trait through
selective breeding. There’s just that much more genetic material
that can mutate without killing the plant. Even if a particular mutation isn’t super
helpful, there are backup copies of that gene which ensure all the necessary things still
happen, allowing individual genes to be more flexible. So being a polyploid, 3-species hybrid is probably what allowed us to breed
wheat to have traits we really like, like seed hulls that fall off the kernel
more easily so they’re easier to process. By studying wheat and other multi-species hybrids, scientists can gain a clearer understanding
of what works genetically and what doesn’t. Whether they’re grasses, mammals, or birds, these species mash-ups are helping
unlock the mysteries of the genome, and that could lead to everything from
better crops to improved gene therapies. Multi-species hybrids show us how bringing together
different things can create something special. And that’s also true in photography. I love the way double exposure photos bring
together two or more completely different images to create a stunning work of art. This effect can be created with
photo editing software, but these neat dual images have
been around much longer than that! And photographer Tabitha Park
has a class on Skillshare which shows you how to make them
the old-school way: with your camera. In this class, she shows you three different
methods for creating photo overlays. What I like most about it is that her instructions
are so clear and easy to follow. She’s one of Skillshare’s top teachers,
which means her classes are high quality and she’s an engaged teacher. Students receive thoughtful feedback on their class projects and she’s available to
answer questions you may have. If you want to take your
photo game to the next level, you can check out some of her other classes,
which cover all sorts of photography tricks from creating amazing backdrops
to how to edit using Lightroom. And there are tons of other great teachers
on Skillshare, too. Right now, Skillshare is offering SciShow
viewers 2 months of unlimited access to their over 20,000 classes for free! So you can take some great photos,
cook a new kind of cuisine, or learn something else new,
all while supporting SciShow. You can follow the link in the description
to check it out for yourself! [♪ OUTRO]

How to Make Text Box Overlays for Photos in Photoshop

How to Make Text Box Overlays for Photos in Photoshop


– [Instructor] Hello and
welcome to this Design Cuts video tutorial. Today we’re looking at
adding text boxes for text over images in Photoshop. The first effect we’re going
to create is using a quote. So I have a quote here
from Jack Kerouac. What I’ve done is
to highlight in bold the words that I
think are important. So I’m going to enter
this as separate objects. So the first one will be
“there was,” and then “nowhere” and then “to go but.” so let’s see how we’d do that. I’m going to select
the Type tool. I’m gonna click where I’m
going to start typing. I’m going to use all lowercase, so I’m just gonna
type “there was.” and then I’ll press escape because that finishes
that text object but leaves the Type tool intact, so I can just click and
add the next piece of type. Now to save us some time,
I’ve already done this. So here are all my type objects. Let’s just turn the
visibility on on all of them. So every second one of
these objects is a word that I want to highlight. So I’ll just select on
them in the last panel, control + click on
every second item. Now if you find that you get
a stray empty Type box here, just delete it because you
don’t want any strays in here. It’s a little bit too confusing. Now the font I’m going to use
here is called Lemon Tuesday and I’m going to beef that
up to about 500 points on this image. I’m going to leave the
rest as just Myriad Pro. I’m not too concerned about
the fonts that I’m using here. I’m more concerned about
showing you the effects. So now I’m going to select
absolutely everything, but before I do that, let’s
first of all move Jack Kerouac down a little bit, and I also
want to size that right down ’cause I don’t want
that to be big at all. So I’m gonna make it 120 points. But then we’ll select all
of these type objects, and up here, you can
start arranging them. So I’m going to use this one, which is Distribute
Vertical Centres, and that just aligns them
so there’s a nice space between each of these lines
and it’s an even spacing. I also want them to
align on the right here, so I’m just gonna click
here on Align Right, and then I can just
move them out of the way so that they’re
actually in the document a little bit better. Now I need to put
a comma in here. So I’m gonna add a comma, and
doing it at this late stage has meant that this letter E, you’ll see that the letter
E doesn’t actually move, and that’s good because the
E is going to be lined up with these other letters and the punctuation is
going to be slightly out. It can often look
better that way. I’m gonna add a star at the
end of the word “stars.” So I’m going to Brush tool. There are two star brushes here in the Legacy
Brushes Collection. So click the flyout panel
and click Legacy Brushes to add them. But you might want to just
add something that is relevant to the kind of quote
that you’re using. So I’ve got my Star
brush selected. I’m going to need
a new layer for it because you can’t
paint on text layers. So let’s just click
to add a new layer. White paint. Let’s see if we can see
our star, which I can’t. So I’m using the
closed square bracket just to size it up a little bit. And I’m going to click
twice in the same place to get a nice-sized star. Now the text box I want to use is just going to darken
this side of the image, but I don’t want it
to be really obvious. So let’s add a new layer. I’ll select the Selection tool. I’m gonna drag a selection
out over all of the text and I’m going the full
length of the image because that’s going to
help me make this peter out to nothing, and so you
won’t actually notice that it’s there. So I’m going to fill this
shape with a gradient and I want the gradient
based on black. So I’m making black
my foreground colour. When I click Gradients,
the second gradient in is a foreground to
transparent gradient. So we’re going from
black to transparent. The only thing you need
to be aware of is that if you use colour to
transparent gradients, then when they fill,
they fill with the colour and go across to transparency. If you were using
a regular gradient that didn’t have
any transparency, you could just say, “Okay.
Well, I’ve got this around “the wrong way, so
I’m just gonna drag “in the opposite direction.” Well, when you’ve
got transparency that has an additive
effect rather than totally replacing it. So I’m going to undo this,
and now I’m going to put in the gradient the
way I want it to be. So I’m going from
black on this side to transparent over
here, and when I do that, let’s just press control or
command + d to deselect it, you can see that you can’t
actually see the edge of that gradient;
it’s all petered out. So all I need to do is to move
my gradient-filled layer here down to the bottom of the image and now we can see the
next way more clearly. If this is too dark,
you can just back off on the opacity, but
that transparency on
the left-hand side of this shape is helping
the box to just blend in with the image, so we’re not
losing a lot of the image but we are improving
the readability of the type considerably by
having this box behind it. So that’s the first of
our text box effects, the text box that you
don’t actually see. Let’s have a look at something
completely different now. For this next text box,
I have a different quote, and quote is “I put instant
coffee in a microwave oven “and almost went back in time,”
and it’s by Stephen Wright. In this case, I’m gonna
take the entire quote. I’m gonna make it
inside a single box. So I’m going to copy it
out of my Word document. Let’s go to Photoshop. I’m going to the Type tool. I want to work with white,
so let’s just select white as my colour here. And this time, I’m
going to drag out a box into which my type
will be placed. So it’s just gonna
go in as a paragraph. So I’ll click in here and
press control or command + v to paste it in. Now I’ll go and
increase the size of it. So let’s just have a
look at the sort of size. I think about 300
will work here. Now with this type, I want to
highlight some of the words exactly as I did last time, but this time I’m just
going to use bold. I’m using Myriad Pro as
the font and that helps me because I’ve got a lot of
different styles in Myriad Pro. So I can use the bold effect,
which is built into this font. So I’m just going to
set these words to bold. So I like the words
“instant coffee.” I think “microwave”
is important. So I’m going to
select bold for this, and then I’m going to
select “back in time” because these are the words
that I think are important in this quote. If you want to do
an effect like this, it’s best to do
it with a typeface that comes with lots
of different styles so that you can select the style that matches things
really nicely. It’s better than
using say a fake bold. So this piece I want to be
aligned over to the right and I want it to
be much smaller. So I’m gonna set that
probably at about 120 and I think I’ll
just drop that down, so I’ll just press the enter
key before I get there. Now I can realign this type here by selecting inside
the box here, just clicking inside
the box somewhere. And now if I adjust
the size of the box, the type flows round. Now if you do that the other way and try and do it with
the selection tool, nasty things happen
to your type. So just be aware that you need
to go and get the Type tool. Click in here so that you’ve
got something positioned in here with the Type
tool and then you can just size your box to suit. So I want mine to be
pretty much like this. I think my font is not
quite large enough. Now I’ll just move
my box into position and I want it over
the top of the cup. It’s a little bit difficult to
see over the top of the cup, so let’s see how we
would solve that problem. I’ll go to the selection
tool and I’ll drag out a box. Now I’m gonna fill
this with a colour and place it underneath the type and it’s going to
help make the type just a little bit more legible. But before I do that, I want
to apply a narrow stroke using this. So what I’ll do is
create a new layer. I’m going to select a grey
colour, so let’s just go and select a sort
of neutral grey. Mine’s 165, 165, 165. That just tells me it’s grey. Now I’ll go to Edit
and then Stroke, and I’m going to put a
three-pixel-wide stroke in this colour
around this shape, and it’s gonna be on the inside
but it doesn’t matter much where it is. So I’ll just click OK. And so if I move away from here, you can see that’s what
I’ve got, this fine line. I’m just going to undo that. So now I’ll go to
Select and Modify and I’m going to contract this. And I want to contract this
something like 30 pixels. So I’ll just click OK. The selection is now
inside that line. So I’m gonna add a new layer
and I’m gonna fill this with my grey colour. So I’ll do alt + backspace,
option + delete on the Mac. So now I’ve got my grey boxes that are going to help
my type readability. So I’ll grab both of these and move them
underneath the type. And I’m going to adjust
down their opacity. So I’m going to bring
the opacity right down. So they’re only just there, but they are going
to make the type just a little bit brighter and they’re gonna help
its readability a bit. I’m not gonna do quite as
hefty an opacity change on the outer line as
I do on the inner one because I still want
to be able to see it. We can link these layers
by selecting both of them, right-click and
choose Link Layers. And that means if you
need to move these boxes, you can do so. So I’ve got these
selected, they’re linked, and so they’re going
to travel together. So if you need to position
them slightly differently, they will go as a team
’cause you don’t want them to split apart because they’re
integral to each other. So there is a nice simple
text box for placing over the top of an image
with some text in it. For the final example,
we’re going to do a little bit of work with
this particular image. I want to crop it first
to a square shape. So I’ve got a
one-to-one crop here. So I’m just going to crop it. I’m going to place over the
top of it a couple of shapes. I’m using shapes because
they’re going to help me with the effect
I’m trying to get. So I’m gonna make sure that
I have Shape selected here. I’m going to create a
circle first of all. So I’m just going to
drag out a circle, holding down the
shift key as I do, and place it sort of
roughly in position. Now I want my circle to have
a Fill button, no stroke. So I’m going to the Stroke
and I’m going to set that to No Stroke. I’m now going to add
another shape over the top and that’s going to be a square. So I’ll select the
rectangle, hold the shift key as I drag out a square,
and I’m gonna place it sort of roughly in position
where I want it to be because I want my final
shape to be the accumulation of these two shapes. So I don’t want this to
have a stroke either. It’s just going to have a fill. If we have a look
in the Paths panel and let’s just go and get
the Layers panel as well, we can see what’s going on. So this is my rectangle
and this is my ellipse and I can mere them
together into one shape, but before I do that,
I want to make sure that they’re perfectly aligned. So with them selected, I’ll
go to Layer and then Align, and I’ll choose
Vertical Centres, and then Layer>Align
>Horizontal Centres. And that makes sure that
the two shapes are aligned. I’ll right-click the selection
and choose Merge Shapes, and that creates a merged shape. Well, it’s going to in a minute, but it’s not quite merged yet. You can see two
distinct shapes here. To merge them, we’ll
go to this option here and choose Merge
Shape Components. And now we’re going
to get a single shape that is this shape. I want to colour it
with a colour I’m
sampling from the image, so I’ll go to the
eyedropper tool. I’m just gonna sample this
sort of blue colour here and I want to use
that for my rectangle. So I’ll select my rectangle,
go back and select some sort of shape tool. So I get these shape
options up here. Go to Fill, and this is
the colour I want to use. So I’ve got my blue colour, but I also want a sort
of border around here. So what I’ll do is make a
duplicate of this shape. So I’ve got two of them. The topmost one I’m
going to add a border instead of the fill. So we’ll go and select No
Fill, and for this one, we’ll select a stroke
and the stroke’s gonna be the same colour as we’re using. Now the stroke is set to 14. That will probably be enough. I’ll select the
rectangle layer here. I’ll go to the Move
tool, hold the shift key and the alt or option key,
as I just drag this out and that allows me to put
an edge around my shape. So I’m gonna apply
this transformation. So I’ve got these two elements
and offset edge to my shape. I’m going to link these
two together as well because I want them to
move obviously as a pair. I also want to reduce
the opacity of them. And I could also set a
blend mode if I wanted to. So you could experiment
with different blend modes. Hard light’s got
some nice colour. But that’s up to you to see if you can find something
that you particularly like. Over the top of this,
I’m going to add my text. Now I don’t want this to happen. Photoshop wants to attach
this text to something, so let’s just go
and add a new layer. And now it’s prepared to put
the text where I want it to be. I’m working in
Myriad Pro regular. I want to work with
white, so let’s just go and select white and I’m gonna
type IN SEASON in capitals. I want this to be quite small,
so I’ll set it at about 120. And then I’ll type the
word “blueberries.” I want to be well away from
this type when I do that. I’m going to choose
an alternate font. I’ve got one called Alex
Brush that I kind of like, and I’m going to
increase the font size. Let’s try about 400
and see how that looks. So I’ve now got text
layered over a text box. We can always improve the
legibility of text like this by adding a drop shadow. So let me just select
this piece of text. I’m going to the FX icon and
I will select Drop Shadow. And I’ve got set a really,
really small drop shadow. I’ve got a black or sort
of dark blue colour here. I’ve got it set to
Multiply Blend Mode. I’ve got sort of
middling opacity but the distance
here is set to one, the spread is set to two,
and the size is zero. So this is only
just a drop shadow. But it’s enough to improve
the readability of the type. If you turn it on and off, you’ll see a very
slight difference, and it’s just lifting
that type a little bit away from the image. It’s just improving its
readability just a little bit. Now you could increase
this to say two pixels. It’s going to depend on
the image and the typeface that you’re using. But I find it that
that really helps with the text over the image. I hope that you have
enjoyed learning these Photoshop techniques. Let us know what you think
in the comments below and give us a thumbs-up if
you enjoyed this tutorial. Until next time, I’m Helen
Bradley for Design Cuts.

Landscape Photo Editing Workflow Part 4 Special Effects in Photoshop

Landscape Photo Editing Workflow Part 4 Special Effects in Photoshop


hello I’m Robin Whalley welcome to Lenscraft and this fourth video in my mini-series
editing this image in the first video we went through an assessment of the image
in the things I wanted to change in that video I mentioned that the Heather was a
little bit too sharp for my liking and I wanted to soften that we’ll be dealing
with that in this video which concentrates on special effects and I’ll
show you how I’m going to use the Orton effect to soften the Heather in the
second video we actually looked at processing our image in capture one
which is how we ended up with the image that you can see on screen now in
Photoshop and in the third video we then looked at how to edit that image using
the Nik collection to emphasize some of the elements in the scene and this was
the image we produced now if you miss the first few videos of this series
don’t worry I’ve put the links in the video information below I’m going to
start now by creating a frequency separation and use that to create a
norton effect now if you haven’t seen this done before you can find
information in a video that i’ve published previously and again I’ll put
the link in the video information below now to do this rather than we create it
manually I’m going to be using an extension panel for Photoshop called
whoa frequency equalizer Pro and again I’ve reviewed that and you’ll find a
link to the video in the information below now in frequency equalizer Pro
there’s this option here to create a quick frequency separation and I’m going
to do that and it will decompose my image into two layers and I’m going to
set a pixel radius and this effectively controls the level of blur in the image
and I want something around 30 pixels given the size of this image as a rough
guide work on the number of megapixels in your image as this is a 24 megapixel
camera somewhere between 20 and 30 produces the right level of blur let’s close that down now and I’ll show
you what the frequency equalizer has done so we’ve got our image now
separated onto two layers we’ve got this low-frequency layer and a high-frequency
layer no the low-frequency layers got all the color information from the image
and as you can see it’s blurred and that’s what we’ll use to create our
artifact the high-frequency layer has all the detail and if I turn off the
low-frequency you can see what that does but together the two layers actually
just create the normal image there you can see I’ve turned off the separation
that’s being created if I turn it back on there’s no difference this is how I
create my Orton effect so I’ll go to the high frequency layer and I’ll reduce the
opacity down to something around 80% and as soon as I do that we get this lovely
blurring effect on the header and it may be too strong but you can see it’s
soften the header up very nicely unfortunately softened up all the
hillsides as well and the sky and I don’t really want that I’ll show you how
we tackle that in a minute on the low-frequency layer what I’m next
going to do is duplicate it so I’ll use command + J on my keyboard to create a
duplicate and I’ll rename that soft glow and I’m going to reduce the opacity of
that layer down to something around 20% to start with and now I change the
blending mode of that layer to be soft light and that creates this lovely
glowing effect that enhances the saturation at the same time so if I turn
that off you can see the original turn it on and you can see this lovely
glowing Orton effect now that we’ve got now the thing for me is the Orton effect
shouldn’t really be plied globally to every element of the image it starts to
get a little bit samey after that I really wanted it to deal with the
heather in the foreground and possibly soften up some of the clouds in the sky
what I need to do know that is add a layer mask so that I can hide the effect
so I’ll add my new layer mask I’ll invert it and that hides the artifact
from my image next I’m going to use a luminosity mask to select the Heather in
my image now I could use a saturation mask and that would work as well but I
think the luminosity mask will work best and I’m going to use this panel that
I’ve previously reviewed called interactive luminosity masks and it’s a
free panel that you can get again I’ll put the link to that video in the
information below and I’m going to create a luminosity mask and in there
I’ll create a zone mask though the areas you can see in white and the areas that
are being selected by my luminosity mask and I can move this left and right to
either select brighter tones or darker tones so I want to select something
that’s picking up on the Heather and it’s probably slightly darker tones at
this stage and I can use these feather sliders to restrict or enlarge the range
that’s being selected now I don’t really want the effect to be seen in the
shadows I really want it to be seen more in the higher lives so I’m happy with
that and what I’m going to do now is create a selection from it I’ll hide
that panel and now I’ll hide the selected edges so that I don’t see them
anymore now over here I’m on my mask that’s attached to the entire group and
what I can do now is select a white paint brush so I’m using white with the
paintbrush and I’ve got the opacity set at about 50% I’ve got a soft edge to the
paint brush and the size is set suitable for this image I can adjust the size
using the bracket keys on my keyboard so the left bracket will reduce it the
right bracket increases it and now I’m going to just paint over the areas where
I want to see the artifact so the Heather here
is one of the areas where I want to see it and again the heather over here now
are painting the areas of the heather to start with just to create that softening
effect on the heather because that’s my priority and the thing you’ve got to
watch out for when you’re using this technique is that because I’m using a
soft blending mode here on the soft glow layer it will actually darken and
intensify the color so you may get a color shift involved here don’t worry if
you find that the whole thing makes it look too saturated we’ll deal with that
in a moment so let’s Oh turn it back on and you can see that
I’ve restricted my adjustment now just to the Heather if you look at the
maskers I’ve created you can see that it used the luminosity information that I
picked up in the luminosity panel now just soften the edges of the path as
well slightly I’m reasonably happy with that maybe we want to include a very
slight soft glow in the distance that looks reasonably good and now maybe just
on these clouds here to soften them up possibly
those clouds as well so let’s look that was the original and that’s my softened
image using my artifact so I just renamed that layer now if I think that
the image is looking a little bit too saturated now what I can do is add a hue
and saturation layer and just make sure that that’s outside of my Orton effect
on the layer stack now because I already had a hidden selection that I was
painting through it’s actually created that adjustment as a mask so I’m just
going to remove that mask and just add a new one in the human adjustment layer
we’ve got the master saturation and that will allow me to control the saturation
on the master layer which I probably don’t want to do too much and it would
also allow me to then pick a layer now in here we’ve got the magentas that are
in the heather and I can pick those and it’s actually saying that we’ve got them
as red now if I wanted to I could shift those and turn them into a different
color so maybe I do want to shift them very slightly
and I could also increase or reduce the saturation level depending on what I
felt was appropriate and I could actually change the lightness or
brightness of those now if I look back at my original image with that turned
off I’m actually happy with that so I’m not going to make any further
adjustments to this I’ll remove the hue and saturation lab and I’ll just accept
that I’m happy with that image now if you feel it’s a bit too light or too
dark I would suggest adding the curves layer
to it so that you can lighten it up or down it down I’m quite happy with that
now I think that looks like a good finished image I’ll just again make sure
that I’ve got that curves adjustment on the very top of the image and that’s me
complete now this has been the first mini-series that i’ve tried where i’ve
tried to demonstrate the end to end editing of an image right through from
assessment through raw conversion through enhancement using in this
instance the Nik collection and then onto special effects
now the first video a lot of people were very keen on this mini series now we’ve
finished it I’m hoping that you’ve enjoyed the series and thought it was
worthwhile if you did please leave me a comment below because I’m wondering
whether or not to do a number of other of these mini series where I demonstrate
different tools because I don’t always use the tools that I’ve demonstrated and
used in this series if you want to see something else another mini series with
another image and other tools please let me know in the comments below and I’ll
see what I can do in the future I’m Robin Whalley
you’ve been watching Lenscraft I’ll see you soon for another video

Scandaleuse Photography – About Us

Scandaleuse Photography – About Us


hi guys Anthony hi I’m Julia we are the co-founders of scandalous photography to make eight years ago in photographic career in Paris and we have been working together ever since our goal photography is without capturing everyone can succeed this is our only lead body and immobilizing it it’s not about shape or gender and go open to women men export whether your obsession for yourself always a partner you’re getting married only star rating the tendency or even reverse your fitness goals that’s always your first scandal a little attitude it’s about going to xml and being strong enough to go after watch for it’s challenging yourself and not caring about other people’s opinion it’s slamming the door when anything we spend so much time staying in the shadow in our everyday life but we only sell spotlight let us create a [Music] with Canada’s we’re bringing boudoir photography to the next level we want to make it accessible for everyone and here are offering high insertion in larger environments so want to redefine what sexy is and fights against today’s get offended we’re game if you are [Music]

what is shutter & shutter speed – photography Basics – II

what is shutter & shutter speed – photography Basics – II


Music Music Hi Guys In my last photography basic videos I explained one of major Pillar of photography Is Aperture , Now Today I will discuss another Pillar of photography is shutter And what is shutter speed & How it works Shutter speed is responsible For two particular things First changing the brightness of the subject And creating dramatic effects of freezing the action and blurring the motion This video of photography basics I will explain all about shutter & shutter speed That we need to know about it Let’s go and know more about it Before watching this video I love to like to subscribe my channel if you would like Click the SUBSCRIBE button & click on the bell You can also subscribe my channel by clicking the subscribe icon embedded on any of my video So will keep enjoying my latest video What is shutter? shutter speed exists because of something known as your camera which shutter simply put is a curtain in front of the camera sensor that stays closed until the camera fires. When the camera fires, the shutter opens and fully exposes the camera sensor to the light that has passed through your lens. After the sensor is done collecting the light, the shutter closes immediately, ,stopping the light from hitting the sensor. The button that fires the camera is also called “shutter” or “shutter button,” because it triggers the shutter to open and close. When it comes to a DSLR camera shutter there are 3 basic mechanisms: the mirrorbox, the bottom door, and the top door. When you look through a DSLR view finder you are essentially looking through a series of mirrors that get their light directly from the lens. When you click the shutter button that system of mirrors flips upwards to allow light to pass to the sensor. This is why the viewfinder goes black for a short amount of time when taking photos. Once the mirror is flipped upwards a small door will move from top to bottom exposing the sensor beneath. After that another door will fall down, covering up the entire sensor. This process can vary in time depending on the length of your shutter speed. Sometimes a shutter speed can be so fast that your camera sensor won’t be entirely exposed at any one time. After the second door closes your mirror will fall back into place. The doors will then reset to their original positions underneath. This entire process from mirror up to mirror down is known as an Actuation. It is typically very easy to find the shutter speed. On cameras that have a top panel, the shutter speed is typically located on the top left corner, as circled: If your camera does not have have a top LCD, like some entry-level DSLRs, you can look through the viewfinder, where you will see the shutter speed on the bottom Left side And if your camera has neither a top LCD nor a viewfinder, like many mirrorless cameras, you can see your shutter speed simply by looking on the back display screen. Shutter speed is a measurement of the time the shutter is open, shown in seconds or fractions of a second: 1 s, 1/2 s, 1/4 s … 1/250 s, 1/ 500 s, etc. The faster the shutter speed, shutter speed, the shorter the time the image sensor is exposed to light; the slower the shutter speed, the longer the time the image sensor is exposed to light. If you are photographing a subject that is in motion, you will get different effects at different shutter speeds. Fast shutter speeds will “freeze” motion, while slow shutter speeds introduce blur from two sources: camera movement (camera shake) and subject movement In other words, the faster the shutter speed the easier it is to photograph the subject without blur and “freeze” motion and the smaller the effects of camera shake. In contrast, slower shutter speeds are suited to suggesting the motion, such as that of flowing water or other moving subjects. Changing the shutter speed gives you control over whether to “freeze” or suggest motion. A darker picture is produced when the shutter moves very quickly and only allows light to touch the imaging sensor for a tiny fraction of a second. So a shutter speed of 1/2 of a second will allow more light light to touch the image sensor and will produce a brighter picture than a shutter speed of 1/200 of a second.

Capturing Movement With Continuous Shooting | I AM Different Tips ‘n Tricks

Capturing Movement With Continuous Shooting | I AM Different Tips ‘n Tricks


[Continuous shooting.] Hi, I’m Thomas from Nikon School. We’re here
on the set of the Blossom project and I will give you
some tips about photography. In order to capture
the moment you really want, especially when you take
some pictures of movement, the burst mode will help you to break down the movement
with many images. Especially if you have a moment
that will never happen again. You can use this burst mode
and secure your images. So about the D7200,
what makes it stand out is that there is a special burst mode
at 7 frames per second which is made by the crop mode. And then you’ll have
even more images to bring back
the right moment in your images. [Discover other inspiring ideas!
Explore more.]

SHORT Long Exposure VS LONG Long Exposure | Long Exposure Photography and Seascapes

SHORT Long Exposure VS LONG Long Exposure | Long Exposure Photography and Seascapes


the more I look at this light the more I
think is going to be tricky today the good thing though is that nobody else is
here I will need to be very creative in order
to try to make this video interesting for you but I have an idea as you can see the sky is pretty gray
because basically we are covered by the fog and since I drove two hours I
thought I will give it a try anyway usually if the spot that I’m going to
take picture of is not too far from where I parked I will park my car walk
to the spot check with my iPhone if I see some potential then get back to the
car get my gear get my tripod go back to the spot and I saw on those rocks that
are diving into the water some potential I always see some potential that’s the
truth let’s see if with this flat light we will be able to capture something
interesting let’s go so I saw this rock in the water I’m
thinking to do a couple of different long exposure one will be a shorter
around exposure where I will see the water relieving towards the sea creating
nice white stripes and leaving the eyes into the photo and one traditional
ethereal super long exposure where basically the rock would be floating
into a silky white water for this composition I will keep the
horizon in the middle of my frame and the rock to my left using a rule of
third technique 20 millimeter lens focusing on the rock which is possibly
about 12 feet from the camera in order to capture the wave with training into
the sea I will need possibly a one second exposure maybe three seconds
exposure I will need to do a few tests so I think I will start with the six
stops and the filter let’s see what happens I will use a polarizer because I can
take some reflecting light off the water it will also increase my exposure so the
six stops will become like a stops and magically my exposure
is now one second but I think I will need to add also three stops
nd grad the skies super bright it’s a little more balanced now 1.3
seconds exposure now I need to wait for the way to arrive and retrieve that did not work out at all I need a longer exposure so in order to have a longer exposure
I’ll take off the ending red take off the six stop get my 10 stops MD get my two stops back in again so I’m now at 20 seconds in order to
reduce my exposure that’s what I’m going to do
I will change my eyes Oh so from ISO 6400 to 100 and we are already at 13
seconds I won’t stop there 200 and I’m out six seconds and now from f8
I will go to F seven point one and I have five seconds I think five seconds
might work I bring everything in manual now five
seconds f seven point one ISO 210 stops in the polarizer three stops and the
grad soft edge the reason why I’m going back to manual is that I can easily then
change my shutter speed increasing or decreasing depending on the result so
let’s try the five-second the wave is coming in and as soon as actually that is going
back in the meanwhile I slightly changed my
composition as I want to give more emphasis to the water stripes retrieving
into the sea it takes a lot of patience because once you find the settings that
you like you will need to wait for the right wave there are shorter waves
longer waves and then you will fine-tune the exposure the length of your exposure
according to your taste and the results that you are getting and so that is what
I’ve been doing until now I will show you some different results with
different exposure lengths and different wave lengths I am done with a short longest poser and
I will start with a very long long exposure so I changed my composition
again just to make it a little less boring for you guys and I will also
change my neutral density filter the light didn’t change much as you can see
but right now because I changed my composition I have less sky in my photo
at f/8 I am 1 over 30 which we did 10 stops and the filter becomes a 30 second
exposure but I want a longer project so I will switch and put my 15 stops and
the filter I will need to attach my remote shutter release and also user an ende calculator app to
understand what is going to be the exposure of this photograph so with 1
over 30 and the 15 stops and the filter I have 16 minutes so this is not gonna
work I don’t want to wait here for 60 minutes so I will need to do a little
change which will be increased my eyes again noted 200 and I have 1 over 100 and with
1 over 100 I have about 5 minutes which wish my work
so I change the exposure at F 7.1 I have 1 over 125 it is exactly 4 minutes
exposure but I will make it 5 let’s give it a try so you might wonder
why I decided to increase my exposure and to 5 minutes even if my MD
calculator app was saying just for what the reason is that I like to expose my
picture to the right to move my histogram to the right as much as
possible without clipping of course so this is my attempt I want to be able to
retrieve details from the shadows without adding any noise these are five minutes exposure worked
very well at least looking at it on my display so I don’t think I need another
photo here the light is not going to change at this
point but it’s okay this is part of the process and part of the process of being
in nature is finding creatures like this majestic and beautiful and I don’t mind
for a one time to switch a beautiful sunset with some wildlife photography I
hope you like this video I hope that you like to spend time in nature I assure
you it’s always rewarding thanks for watching and I will see you in the next
video

Design Challenge – designing and making a set

Design Challenge – designing and making a set


As a set designer, you will see the design from concept right through to opening night. You’re really the caretaker for that set throughout the whole process. You’re the filter, visually, for everything that happens on that stage. I don’t want people to think they need to be architects or builders or have a degree in engineering in order to be a set designer, you don’t. You need to have an awareness of space and depth and you need to be a great storyteller, you need to know how to get people to believe in a space. The process of creating a new set involves lots of collaboration and lots of discussion to begin with. I first approach a brief by talking to the director about how he wants to approach the piece. Then we do lots of research. I look at films. I look at music videos. I look at other people’s work. I look at other performances. I research past productions and themes within the piece. I research genre, period, architecture. I go to libraries I google, and then I have meetings with the director and we look at how we want to approach the piece and how we want to approach the design. Eventually, fast forwarding, we start producing a scale model. The scale model is a tool for us to work out how the performers are going to move and interact in the space. Eventually that model becomes a tool that we send to the builders in order for them to create the set in real life. A set can help to tell the story of an opera or a ballet by either being architecturally naturalistic, so it provides a recognisable backdrop, or it could be poetic and abstract, it can be providing a colour, or a mood, or a feeling. Essentially there isn’t any difference in how a set can work for opera or ballet or for straight theatre or for an installation. It’s really about supporting the art work that the director is making and hopefully the atmosphere that you create informs the character as to the world they live in and, therefore, what kind of person they are. Because if you know the world you live in, you know who you are. If you’re interested in a career in set deign, a degree is definitely useful. There are lots of great courses, I trained at Central Saint Martins. I don’t think it’s essential to have a degree, you’ve just got to have a lot of exposure to theatre, and the people that I work with on a daily basis come from all different walks of life and have had all different experiences, and it’s those different experiences that create interesting theatre, because everyone brings their own story to the table. I think as long as you have the basics, you have an understanding of scale, and shape, and space, I would say you’ve just got to volunteer in theatre and take every opportunity you can to work in theatre and tell stories. The best advice I can give to somebody designing their own set is to see as much theatre as they can, see as much of other peoples work as they can because the more you see, the more ideas you can feed upon. Ultimately, there’s no such thing as a completely original idea, all there is is an amalgamation of experiences that you’ve had, that you bring together into one cohesive final scene.