3D Hologram Doom Eternal Style – After Effects VFX Tutorial

3D Hologram Doom Eternal Style – After Effects VFX Tutorial


Greetings Earthlings!
Welcome to the Madqueen Show! I am your host the MadQueen. On today’s menu, I have an After Effects
tutorial for you, as I’ve been requested many times to explain how I do the special
effects in my videos I did a couple of “making of”s explaining some Cyberpunk 2077 lore
videos but not something you can recreate, and considering that I learned everything
that I know myself from watching tutorials on YouTube, well, also a lot of experimenting, I think it’s only fair to share a little of it. I warn you that I don’t follow a straight
line, I usually experiment while I do things, even if they are things I did before, I’m
always trying to find new ways of doing the same things better, so it can be more chaotic than expected, and I’m not going to explain basic things, this tutorial is advanced although
the most basic things can easily be found on a tutorial on YouTube and, if you don’t
find it, please let me know in the comments and I’ll send you in the appropriate direction. I also warn you that I may have a very weird
way to solve some things that have an “easy way” to be solved. I experiment a lot and sometimes the assumed
solution, although more efficient when it comes to rendering times, is not the best
visually speaking, so things that I do may look super weird but they have a reason to
be done this way and not the normal way anybody that doesn’t hate their GPU with a passion
would use. Let’s go for it. To make the hologram for the Doom Eternal
lore videos I needed to find a new way of doing a hologram because, honestly, the “typical
way” reminds me a lot of the hologram of Star Wars and looks old and flat. Most of all flat. I also used a similar technique to what I’m
going to show here to recreate the hologram for the Death Stranding review video where
I had the same problem: if emulating something that is done in 3D, like a video game, using
a flat hologram doesn’t look the same, somehow it needs to look a little 3D-ish although, obviously, it will never look the same as real 3D. So this hologram tutorial is very different
from any other you can find on a YouTube tutorial. There is another way of doing something similar
without using any third party plugin but the result is not exactly the same and I don’t
totally like it so I needed to find a different way. And this is my way. To do this we will be using a plugin by Red
Giant called Trapcode Form, I love Red Giant plugins, I don’t know what I would do without
them, and no, I’m not paid for saying this, I wish. Form is a very powerful particle emitter,
the main use for it is to create fractal animations but, as a side effect of how this plugin works,
it can also emulate a fake 3D from a 2D footage, in this case, a person, with a level of detail
that will depend on the power of your computer, obviously is not the same as working in 3D
directly, it has a lot of limitations, but it works great. The most awesome thing about it is that you
can somehow “texturize” the shape you want once you have the base form, so let’s
go first to create the base form. To start with I have here a footage that we
will be using to create a hologram, it’s already keyed it to remove the blue background,
as you can see the key is not perfect, it has some blue on the edges, but for this particular
thing, it doesn’t really matter. I also applied quite an exaggerated blur on
the skin to remove as much detail as possible. You can use your preferred technique to do
so or, or if you’re lazy, you can use the plugin Cosmo. We’re going to pre-compose this footage
and this will be our main scene. We’ll also put this footage in a new scene
called “3D shape” as this will be the base to create the shape in the 3D space using
the shadows and the highlights. We substitute in the main composition the
footage for the 3D shape layer and we’re good to go. Now we create a new solid layer to put the
plugin, we’ll call it form. It goes a little slow because I’m recording
at the same time that I’m working so apologies for that. First, we’re going to the base form and
make sure the size is unliked to the X and Y axis, and we’re going to introduce the
resolution of 4K, which is the resolution that I use. We’re only going to put a hundred particles
in each axis to work faster because my GPU is not the best, it’s 4K and I’m recording
at the same time, but we will change it later. Now we go to the particles settings, remove
the feather, and we’re going to keep the rest of the setting as it’s something we
will change later to work faster and avoid giving to much work to the GPU at this point. Next step, we’re going to tell Form to recreate
the base footage, and we go to layer maps, in the “color and alpha” section we choose
the layer of the Footage, the functionality needs to be RGB and alpha, otherwise, it will
show the dots in the whole scene and not only inside the body, and we’re going to map
it over X and Y, and this is the result, we have a simple representation of our footage
that we can’t see very well because we don’t have many dots in here to avoid making the
GPU crazy, but you’ll have to trust me in here. Now we’re going to create the displacement
in the Z-axis, which means, the fake 3D for this shape, and to do so the first thing we’re
going to do is duplicate the footage shape and we’re going to call it “Displacement
mask”, it’s best not to use the same layer, and we’re going to apply a tint to it to
turn it black and white, there are other ways of turning a footage black and white but if
you use a tint instead of any other technique you’re going to have more control over Form,
so let’s turn it black and white. Before we apply this into the plugin, we’re
going to create a camera to see what we’re doing, and to control the camera we’re going
to create a null, turn it a 3D layer and link the camera to it, this way we can easily rotate
and see what we are doing. We’re going to add the displacement to the
main footage and in the section of Layer Maps of our plugin we’re going to tell Form to
use this layer as displacement. We can see something happened here. If we use the control of the camera to rotate
around the Y-axis we’ll see that there is some displacement done here in the Z-axis, which in English means that this is taking a 3D shape. Not much there, we’re getting there. There are 2 ways of controlling how deep this
displacement is, one is with the contrast of the base image and another with the strength
of this layer, both controls do different things, as the displacement is mapped over
the contrast of the image it is a good idea to make the image less contrasted because
unless all your skin has the same tone it will create odd shapes, for instance, my skin
is pale but not pale enough to be as white as the shirt, which makes the shirt bump up
more than the skin, so we can reduce the contrast to avoid having an exaggerated effect in here
and then control the general displacement with the strength of the displacement. I know it looks a little odd at this point,
but you have to trust me in here, we’re not done yet. We’re not done, because I forgot to tell
Form that I only want it to map this image on the Z-axis and not all of them, because
not specifying only Z sends particles in all directions, so we’re going to map over individual axis and use the source map only on the layer Z. And this, kids, is the problem of having to
work blindly because your GPU is not fantastic, sometimes you don’t realize you did a step
wrong but you have to choose between working blindly and trust you’re doing the correct
process or takin an insane amount of time because the GPU has to render the previews. Now we have created the base form for our
particle setting, there is a third way to create a deeper illusion of 3D, but we’re
going to keep it for later, because now we get to the fun part. If we take a look at the original hologram
of DOOM Eternal we can see that it has some sort of weird texture, like the hologram had
scales. Depending on the part of the body is also
different, if you take a look at the hands you will see that it has some sort of round
shape and in the body, it has a square shape. We’re going to try to recreate this inside
trapcode form to make the hologram as close as possible to the original. We could separate as well skin from clothing
to have two different textures depending on the part of the body, but I don’t want my
computer to explode, so we’re going to apply the same texture to all the body. To apply this texture I copied the texture
from the original image, reduce the saturation and saved it as a transparent png and let’s
see what happens when we do so. Later on, I’m going to change it, but this
is a great functionality with a lot of potential, so it’s good that you know it exists. We’re going now to this part where we add
more particles until they are close to each other, until we find the approximate result
to what we want, and we’re also going to blur the displacement map to avoid the changes
in color to be so drastic, this will smooth the 3D effect. Well, we’re getting somewhere. Not yet there, but we’re getting somewhere. To create more illusion of 3D we’re going
to change the size of the particles, the ones that are further away should be smaller while
the ones that are closer to the camera should be bigger, and we will do so in the “Size”
section of “Layer Maps”. As I want to have more control over the size
I’m going to create another layer called “Size Mask” that is going to be the same
but the contrast will be separated from the previous displacement mask, this way we can
control both things separately. Playing a little with the size and the number
of particles and changing the original Sprite to black and white to have more control over
it, this is what we have so far. I have 500 particles in x, 450 in Y and 4
in size, although please remember that I’m in 4K so if repeating this in HD most probably
the values shall be quite different. Now let’s go for the interaction and the
final touches. I’m going to suffer to render this. So before giving the finishing touches the
first thing we need to do is to see how does it look in the place and then we will adjust
the touches to the background so we’re going to create a new composition using this trapcode
form composition that we’re going to call UAC video, and we’re going to add the background
of the UAC that I shoot inside the video game, the photo mode is a little hidden, and we’re
going to loop the animation of the background to be the same length as the hologram. We’re also going to scale up the hologram
because people don’t need to know I shot this in underwear. Now, the original hologram is blueish, but
the thing is that inside the game this hologram is around a blue-ish environment, as this
color is created by the light of the hologram itself, but the setting in this part of the
gameplay is greenish so the thing is completely different. As we want our GPU to suffer I’m going to
add an Optical Glow, also by Red Giant, there is another glow integrated into after effects
but I like this one better, I find it more realistic, and we’re going to change the
alpha channel because without alpha this doesn’t make much sense. As the spaces between the hologram are transparent, if we change the shading of the background, the shade of the hologram is going to change
as well. So, to change the color in the background
and pretend that this color is due to the light emitted by the hologram, as, again,
we hate our GPU with a passion and we want it to suffer, we’re going to put over the
background the original shape of the hologram and apply an Optical Glow over it, that will
allow us to give different tints for the inside and the falloff of the light, so we’re going
to try our best to adapt to the colors that DOOM is already using, so this colorization
of the background is quite in line with the game. We change the amount and the size like we
knew what we are doing and once we have it, we change the mode of that layer to color
to affect the background. Now the background has a similar tone to other
moments of the game when we see the hologram, but these holograms also cast a light, that’s
where the color comes from, so we’re going to create also the glow that would be emitted by the hologram by applying curves to an adjustment layer with a mask, and this way we recreate
the color in a way that it seems as it’s cast by the light of the hologram and the
light that the hologram emits on the wall. Some of the blue tints on the wall are affecting
parts that shouldn’t be affecting so we’re going to solve it by masking those parts out. But if we mask it directly into the layer,
what happens? Nothing, because the layer doesn’t reach
that far, what reaches this far is the Optical Glow effect, so we need to pre-compose to be able to use a mask that will affect the effects. Now let’s work a little more in the hologram
because we need to justify the 35 hours of render of the final video. The hologram lacks a lot of contrast, and
we could do this with curves or levels but it would totally destroy the glow and shape
of the original Form, so we’re doing it with blending modes, which is a great way
to send the rendering times to hell, but the final result is way better so we’re going
to do it this way. Also, this is DOOM so let’s go to hell. We’re going to add the base footage and
change the color to something more blue-ish, since the hologram has a base of blue, so
we’re going to tint the base footage in the blending mode “Overlay” to add a touch
of color to the hologram that, at the same time, is going to affect the contrast. But we need even more contrast so we’re
going to repeat, another layer of base footage, we’re going to play a little with the curves
and the tints until we find the exact thing we’re looking for, and multiply to multiply
the contrast, always having in mind the original hologram of DOOM. We’ll precompose and decrease the opacity
of this layer to look like an actual hologram. And this is the result we have so far, we
created a great base to start adding details and refining, which is where the true mastery
is involved and more experimentation is needed to find the exact thing you’re looking for. Let’s save as a new file in case we have
to go back because we touched things we don’t like and, let’s refine our hologram. Let’s go to the Hologram effect and the
first thing we’re going to do is to blur the rough edges we have in the channels we’re
using to mask color. To do so we apply a channel blur and blur
the alpha. Then we’re going to do the same with the
Overlay footage, but as we have some weird pixels at the edges, we’re going to set
a matte for the base footage this way we can blur and get rid of that weird spill that
always comes out from keys. The darker parts of the Overlay are too dark, so we’re going to adjust the curves to that. Seems we went back but don’t worry, we’re
on it. At this point, when it comes to tuning, there
is no specific recipe. It’s all about touching settings, moving
layers and try what works best for you, because the final tuning is something based on taste, so some of the things I’m going to do here are experiments and you may not like the result
of. I Always go forward and back, and before you
ask “why didn’t you experiment before doing the tutorial and then, in the tutorial
moment, you just recreate exactly what you did?”. The thing is that I never do two things the
same way, I’m always trying to find something that is visually better than the solution
I did before, so everything always looks different. And, again, the key is experimenting and finding
out what works for YOU, so don’t be afraid of doing so, that’s how you improve. We applied some Optical glow but, the thing
is, we should have different glows in different parts to imitate the original, so we’re
going to add some more glow to very specific parts. First, the dark parts are too dark in here,
we’re going to play a little with the opacity to make it more subtle, and we’ll get back
to it later. By the way, the appropriate way of doing all
this would be to pre-render the original hologram because this would go great for reducing the
rendering times but as I’m going to do several videos using this kind of character what I’m
creating is the template. Once that I’m done with this video I’ll
just substitute the footage for the one of the new video and I’m set, so no pre-rendering for me, but is a good idea because what I’m going to do now is going to make everybody’s pc explode, unless they borrowed one from the NASA. We’re going to duplicate the UAC hologram
and we’re going to also duplicate the Overlay footage, the UAC hologram layer will be called
Hologram Glow, and the other Glow Matte. We’re going to play with the curves of the Glow Matte layer until only the lights are seen, we make the Hologram Glow track the
luminance of the Matte layer to make the mask and we go to the hologram glow. As we can see, if we apply the glow directly
in here, the glow itself will be cut by the matte so, what shall we do? You guessed right, pre compose and move all
the attributes to the new composition. Now we can add a glow to it and be happy. We can also see in the original image that
the hologram has a white aura around it. To do so, we’re going to create a solid,
we’re going to set matte on the Overlay channel, but apart from adding effects and
masks we need to put it at the same size and position because welcome to After Effects. Then we duplicate the matte effect and we
invert it, to create this outline, that we’re going to glow. And for the flickering in the final video,
I added a wiggle expression to the opacity to give it more life. As it’s normal when you do those things,
we went back and change the particle master type to square, I think I like it better. I also changed the number of particles in
Y to 300 and we have the original image in color again, so let’s play with this, as
using tints is turning everything into something too flat, so we shall go back and correct
it sooner. I’m going to put on the screen the original
holograms so I can directly copy them. I’m going to use them as color guides for
the base image where trapcode form is taking the color from. So we’re quicky going to color correct the original footage using the guided color correction of Colorista because today I’m lazy and then we can start playing with the colors. And here comes more experimentation that I’m going to save you because, again, this doesn’t have a formula and it all revolves around
playing with these things, what I wanted to show you is the base of working with Trapcode Form, and that you can import your own particles, once you know the basics then going deep on
them is entirely up to you. But, as a final touch, I added a mask using a squared fractal noise for the glitch flickering that we saw on the game, this is one of the
most basic things of After Effects so I’m not going to expand in here about it. Then we hit render, we wait for 35 hours to render, and we have it ready to go to Premiere for editing. The visual effects are only a part of the
process, a very time consuming one, but now we need to edit, edit the sound to sound similar to the hologram lady, some music in the background, sound effects, titles, etc. And this is the final result after some crazy
tuning and all the rest Greetings Visitors!
Welcome to the UAC database. Today we’re going to learn how the UAC can improve your life and has been doing so since its origins. For people that are watching this
video because they watch everything I do, yes, that’s what it takes to make a lore
video, the simpler ones take around 3 days while some that entail me finding out how
to do what I want to do take around a week, and for those who found this tutorial looking
for it, I’ll do more, please leave a comment and let me know what would you like me to
explain, but I advance you that if it’s a subject that you can easily find explained
on YouTube I’m not going to do a video on it, only specific advanced things that no
one else does or, at least, I didn’t find. Please like and subscribe, blah blah blah,
see you in next videos and stay being amazing.

FIMI PALM Gimbal Camera review  Part 1評測

FIMI PALM Gimbal Camera review Part 1評測


let me introduce Fimi Palm gimbals camera review Part 1 review video so long, because of that review video will be separate 3 parts actually, Fimi palam is Founded and become one member of xiaomi ecosystem fimi outlook similar to Dji Osmo pocket Fimi specification really similar dji osmo pocket hardware actually, 99% is same particular is Dji osmo pocket if you want to pan or title of angle you need to buy accessory for easy control it but fimi is already built in joystick no need to buy accessory benefit of control fimi exclusive 128′ wide angle of view compare with Dji osmo pocket fimi is much better test video is show on later connect section no need to plug in jack for connection not like Dji osmo pocket need use USB port / lighting connect to smartphone fimi use wifi connect to smartphone outlook lens two microphone two key buttons touch screen 1 microSD slot actually , 99% same as dji osmo pocket except one fimi provide 1/4 screw thread on rear side for mounting another equipment let see specification weight battery capacity it seems same in packing except fimi built in wifi 2.4GHz / 5 GHz and Bluetooth 4.0 Dji osmo pocket is not provided it image senor size is similar fimi CMOS is 1/2.6 inch Dji osmo pocket CMOS is 1/2.3 inch both of CMOS senor effective pixels is 12M Dji osmo pocket provide 3840 x 2160 60 but fimi 3840 x 2160 just 30 only 1080 Dji osmo pocket provided 1920 x 1080 120 fimi provide 1920 x 1080 just 60 only both video bitrate is 100Mps video format fimi provided H.264 / H.265 most important 2 firmware must be update first it will be less more function setting will be show you simple test angle view of test walk or running test video because weather is too bad when you completed update processing add on gimbals alignment and advance function setting so I suggest update firmware before to use it that’s all for this video thanks for watching if you liked it you know what to do and go ahead and subscribe f you want see more videos like this in
the future and see you next time

Camera MOD DIY Stabilizer Steadicam from a mouse wheel homemade for Syma X5C Quadcopter

Camera MOD DIY Stabilizer Steadicam from a mouse wheel homemade for Syma X5C Quadcopter


hello guys. in a past video I modified the
angle of the camera to look more straight forward, on a Syma X5C quadcopter once it was done I said to myself: what
if I want to make a camera Stabilizer or a Steadicam for this one? not bad. good. i searched the internet for the solutions
that are available but couldn’t find something enough small and functional to fit this beauty quadcopter then I started to imagine a few
possibilities looking through my junk stuff and trying to fit things together and suddenly… the inspiration stroke. A mouse wheel ! That’s right. We will build a camera stabiliser from a mouse wheel. and probably it will be small and light enough And it will look something like that: We pull out the camera holder by gently prying it out in diagonal and we’ll open first two screws that
hold the camera on the cover of the quadcopter we leave the camera for a while and we
moved to the mouse’s wheel we try to get rid of anything is not
useful for this project this is the piece that the camera will be joined to you can see I already made two holes and here are the correspondent two holes made in the upper side of the camera’s body and the piece of copper wire which will
attach the camera to the stabilizer here is how it was supposed to come but it
was not a good idea because the wheel couldn’t pass over the wire so I got back to the good old double side
tape and in the end it looked like this et voilá now, if you think that’s it, well a few
modifications more are needed to the body of the quadcopter
and there are quite a few to make room for the stabilizer and to offer a point to attach it to the body and be able to balance it we need to remove the battery holder space. But wait. That holds also the main board. in my case the problem was easy because I will suspend the main board on the top side of the body process that was already rolling because
I decided that I would be able to use most kind of batteries not just this tinny one that offers only 7 minutes of pleasure and after that turns into a bomb. if you don’t want to make this modification just skip this part to where I attach the stabilizer with elastics and you’ll have to find
your way of attaching those elastics without cutting or modifying the bottom side of the body and figure out I still can use the camera with the original cover holder But now it’s time to attach the stabilizer to the quadcopter and see how it looks And why not… see how it moves. See that the elastics are acting as a damper also. well i think it looks pretty well that was a camera stabilizer from a mouse wheel and… thanks for watching

Google Translate App – use your camera to easily translate

Google Translate App – use your camera to easily translate


Hi everyone this is Brad and we are taking a
look at Google Translate and how Google Translate almost has an augmented
reality type feel to it you can see at the very top that’s gonna
translate from English as Spanish if you want to reverse that select the arrows
in the middle and on now girl from Spanish to English for some reason you’d
like to change language go head in and then you can type the language that you
would like now we’re going to go back we’re gonna go from Spanish to English
you can see the options at the bottom where there’s the voice conversation
handwriting and a camera we’re gonna use a camera in just a little bit but what
we want to do first is download this offline translation file it’s really
helpful to have download it doesn’t take too long to download when you’re ready
it doesn’t take too long select the camera you’re gonna need to allow access
to the camera and determine it’s in Spanish is 10 gossip and boy and idea
which means have a good day so it’s written on my computer and you can see
right in there it has now been translated so there you go that’s a
Google Translate app if you have any questions let me know thanks for
watching take care bye bye

New Feature in 1.22 – Camera Shift

New Feature in 1.22 – Camera Shift


Update 1.22 introduces a new feature called Camera Shift. This allows you to offset your camera in order to give you greater control of what you see on the battlefield. To do this, swipe on the mini-map in the direction you want the camera to move in. This allows you to look further ahead while still giving you full control of your movement and abilities. When you want to return the camera to the default position just tap on the minimap and it will center back onto your hero. This is extremely useful for abilities with a long range, such as Baron’s Jump Jets. The ability can reach beyond the edge of the screen. Normally in order to use Jump Jets at it’s maximum distance, you would have to tap on the ability, hold on the minimap and then tap again to use the skill. However now you can shift your camera in the direction you want to jump, making maneuvers like leaping over the Kraken pit much easier to execute. Now  let’s look at a couple of examples of the Camera Shift in a real game. In this clip, Baron is currently fighting against an enemy Ringo. After landing one of his porcupine mortars, he shifts his camera forward in order to get a better view of the lane. This allows him to more accurately aim his Ion Cannon at where he suspects Ringo will be. Shortly afterwards the ultimate connects and immediately deletes the enemy hero from the Halcyon fold. In the next example, the enemy team is attempting to capture the Kraken. Skye uses her forward barrage in order to force them off the objective and manages to get the Reim low, who started to back away from the fight. Skye then shifts her camera towards the locked-on Reim in order to keep him in view. Thanks to the Camera Shift, she is able to land a long range Suri Strike to cut off his escape. Afterwards another Forward Barrage allows Skye to pick up the kill. Now that you know how the new Camera Shift feature works, make sure to give it a try in the next update. It might take a bit of getting used to, but I think you’ll find there are a lot of situations where this becomes handy. Good luck out there on the Halcyon Fold.

InDesign How-To: Put One Image in Multiple Frames (Video Tutorial)

InDesign How-To: Put One Image in Multiple Frames (Video Tutorial)


Hi, I’m Erica Gamet with InDesign Secrets.
In this video, I’m going to show you how to place one image inside multiple
frames inside of InDesign. On this page, I have several different graphics frames
ready for images to be placed inside. And I can tell they’re graphics frames because
they have the blue X in the middle of them. But what I want to do is place one
image inside all of these, so I get sort of this windowpane effect. To do that, I
need to create what’s called a compound frame. I’m going to select all the frames
on my page, go up under the Object menu, down under Paths and choose Make
Compound Path. And when I do that, you can see that I now have one big X that
basically tells me that’s one big image frame. They’re still sort of separate, but
it’s going to act as one frame. Now I can go up under my File menu, under Place and choose an image I’d like to place. There’s a nice picture to be looking at
outside your window. And since I have Replaced Selected Item already selected,
it will automatically put this image inside that frame we just created. I’m
gonna go ahead and click open…and it drops it inside. Now it’s not quite the
image that I was hoping to see. What happened was, it placed it at the size
of the image and it’s too big. So I need to head up to the Object menu, down to
the Fitting sub-menu and say Fill Frame Proportionally. Now it fits so that the
image fills the entire frame. Now remember this compound frame acts as just any other regular image frame. So I can actually use my Content Grabber to
click on the image and manipulate it in any way. Like I might want to hold down my Shift key, maybe the Option or the Alt key and just drag, just to make it a
little bit bigger, and I can also move this around inside the frame. Let’s just
frame that up nicely so we can see everything. Beautiful. On my next page I
have a series of circles. In this case, I’m going to place an image and sort of
position it where I want it to be and then we’re going to paste it inside our
compound path. So let’s go up to the File menu and choose Place and grab our image and I’m not going to Replace Selected Item…just gonna say open. And I’m going to just click and drag, sort of on top of
these circles that are here. I kind of want to get an idea of where everything
needs to be sitting. I can also send that to the back…so that I can see my image
sort of back behind those circles. And I’m doing that because I want to make
sure that all the components of this compound path are in place before I make a compound path. So I’m going to choose the Selection tool and just sort of move these images around. Now I do have white fills on those circles. It makes them
easier to see but also harder to see the image back behind. When I’ve got it about
where I want it I’m gonna leave it and I’m going to Command- or Control-X to cut that image. Now I’m going to go ahead and select all of my circles, go up under the
Object menu, down under Paths, Make Compound Path. And now I’ve got my
compound path ready to drop my image inside. I’m gonna go up to the Edit menu
and choose Paste Into, and it pastes it into that path exactly where it was when
I copied it. Again, you’re not stuck with this. You can go ahead and use the
content grabber and move that image just like you would in any other frame. On a new page, I’m going to go ahead and place an image and then draw some frames on top of that to place that image into. I’m gonna go up to the File menu and choose Place and click Open…and I’m just going to go
ahead and drag this out. And I want to draw some frames on top of this image. Now I want to make sure they’re easy to see, so I’m gonna make sure that my
stroke color and my size are easy enough to see. Now I just want to draw out some
regions that I want this image to fill. So I’m going to go ahead
draw out some squares. As I’m drawing them, I can actually see how they’re
coming together. I can use my Smart Guides to guide me. And make sure the
family gets in its own little frame here. I’ll draw that out very roughly. Then I’m
going to use the Selection tool, select the image, Command- or Control-X to cut
that, select all those frames, go up under the Object menu, Paths, Make Compound
Path, and choose Edit, Paste Into. And there you go! There are a couple ways to
take one image and put them inside multiple frames inside your InDesign
document. Well, I certainly hope you found this tip helpful. Be sure to check out InDesignSecrets.com for thousands of InDesign articles and tutorials, and to
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