LOL Surprise In Real Life Caught On Camera For 24 Hours!

LOL Surprise In Real Life Caught On Camera For 24 Hours!


guys hey guys so today we came back
right back from our vacation for one day it was a 24-hour vacation yeah but
something wrong yeah we came home to some very unusual findings so we came
home there is this pot of water in our mail with lol balls in it someone took
our package right into the house I ordered three of them there’s two
there’s the third mood the gold it was sugar queen oh that’s nice we can’t
leave that stuff out a hammer some blueberries my car keys are gone I have
no idea where they are I love and they’re gone cuz we took
Carly’s dad’s car because he doesn’t like how my mom dad doesn’t like how I
Drive so I’m not allowed to drive and then my exercise ball is on the
floor this which is knocked over what else is up here did you check your room
so the bathroom looking there’s deodorant dad’s deodorant in the
sink bad weird weird the computer is on which I know I shut it off who touched
my Ella did you leave those out no are you sure hey dude three of my favorites
out she’s one of my favorites did we pull the security tapes we got
these little we have these little motion detector cameras so when there’s
movement in a room they automatically start recording should we pull them up
and see what went on here when we were gone yeah all right let’s go queen bee oh he’s doing the floss she’s checking a house top to bottom she’s cooking something this is getting so weird what what is
she gonna make so that’s who made the SpaghettiOs it has water in it that’s my chair someone was sitting in
my chair she’s looking at my checklist who she is that the sushi berries oh
that’s the berries why is she doing this like right up here she just dropped it on the floor getting weirder she is leaving it cooking where’s she
going up now she’s coming back so you fell down I think she has a big too big of a head
and tube what she doing that’s my package it’s a to open
someone else’s mail it’s it’s the gold ball oh my gosh she’s opening up the one
of the bling series she’s flash lighting it
you can’t flash lately I don’t think she’s flash lighting up she is and she’s
trying to open it what do you think she’s my hammer what
is she gonna that’s why the hammer was on the table I wish I was there to yell
oh it just rolled off the tape huh it’s a glitter doll we knew that it was
a glitter dog who saw it on the table we came home and now what is she doing oh
my car keys Oh well let me try it he actually went in
and try to zoom in a little here she can’t drive my magic she pulled the
seat there’s her head top him out of this stereo daddy’s deodorant now where’s she going one piece why that’s a camera that’s in our cabinet
door Oh crabcake a solution play from other jumping it looks like the witch scared her he is in my room that must be she must be grabbing your
lol dolls cuz they were on the floor no remember when we came home there were
some lol bells on oh she dragged her hand across naptime nap is over all right guys it was that lol dog that
other purse remember that other elbow that kami remember it was queen bee
again yes the one who was sitting on the toilet who was sleeping in your bed all
right dad that was kind of weird so awkward someone’s coming in our house
when we’re not home guys I hope you liked this video if you did make sure
that thumbs up subscribe I know

Star Gives Birth to Possible Black Hole in Hubble and Spitzer Images

Star Gives Birth to Possible Black Hole in Hubble and Spitzer Images


For the first time ever,
astronomers might have witnessed a star actually become a black
hole right before our eyes… or telescopes. In this visible
light image from the Hubble Space Telescope, we can see a
large star about 25 times the mass of our Sun around 22
million light years away in the galaxy NGC 6946. This was in
2007. But in a Hubble image from 2015, looking with the same
filters at the same wavelengths, the star appears to be gone. One
possible explanation – the star died and became a black hole.
But it gets weirder. The most prevalent theory for how a black
hole forms is through a supernova – if a star is big
enough, at the end of its life it will eject its outer layers
at high velocity in a massive explosion while the inner core
collapses into a very tiny space, creating a gravity well
so great that light can’t escape. Literally, a black hole.
So did we see this star go supernova? No, not really. A
team of astronomers was monitoring this star with the
Large Binocular Telescope in Arizona and saw the star get
brighter in 2009, but not nearly as bright as a supernova. They
call it a failed supernova. The star does expel its outer-most
layer, but relatively gently and not in a big explosion. Ok, so
this star got brighter in visible light in 2009, and then
disappeared in visible light. How do we know it’s not just
hidden behind a cloud of dust or something? The team checked for
that; they looked at infrared observations from the Spitzer
Space Telescope, which would be able to see the heat of dust
warmed by the star. What we see with Spitzer is there is some
emission in the mid-infrared, but it’s fading and fainter than
what you’d expect to see with a hidden star. The team thinks
instead that this infrared light is from the heat of gas falling
back onto the newly formed black hole. To help confirm that this
star is now a black hole, the team plans to analyze
observations taken with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, which
would be able to reveal X-rays being emitted by the gas falling
into the black hole. The team also wants to continue
monitoring the star’s location in visible light with Hubble,
in case the star is still
there and re-appears, and they’ll want to look at the
location with the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope to check if
there’s a surviving star hidden by cooler dust than can be
observed with Spitzer. So if this really is a black hole
birth, what does that mean for astronomy? First of all, this
would show that a star doesn’t need to go supernova to form a
black hole. Astronomers actually haven’t seen as many supernovas
occur with the largest stars as they would expect to see, and
they’ve been wondering why this is. Perhaps 10 to 30 percent of
massive stars don’t go supernova and are still able to simply
form a black hole. If future observations confirm this team’s
findings, this would be the first birth of a black hole ever
witnessed and the first failed supernova ever discovered, both
of which would usher in an exciting era of astronomy
research. www.nasa.gov/hubble
@NASAHubble

Spine User Guide – Images

Spine User Guide – Images


Spine User Guide
IMAGES IMAGES Hi, my name is Søren Nielsen. In this video we will look at images
and take a quick look again at draw order and then some scripts we have available. A skeleton is made up of
images attached to bones but Spine does not edit the images,
so you will need to use your own image editing software to
create the art for your skeletons, The first step to setting
up a skeleton is to bring in each image as
a region attachment. Which is a single rectangular
image that is attached to a bone, But before region
attachments can be created Spine needs to know where
to find the images. IMAGES NODE The images node in the tree stores a path which you can see here. To a folder where Spine will
look for images for the skeleton. The path for images can be
set either relative to where the project file is saved or
you can set an absolute path. Currently it doesn’t
have a path set and that means it will be using
where the project is saved. As you can see here it says. Since I don’t have my project
saved I’m quickly gonna do that. Go here, click save project as and
go to my Spine Examples folder And I’m gonna save it in here and
call it temp.spine and replace it Overwrite it.
And there we go And now if I expand this images node you can
see I have the Export and Images folders. I want to be using this Images folder so I’m gonna go down here and
type in “./images/” like so. Now the images will show
up under the Images node. Spine will watch the folder and
immediately load any changes to the image files if you
change the files themselves. With the images now visible under the
Images node you can drag the images out into the editor area and
Spine will automatically create a slot and place the attachment
of the image below this. We can also take multiple
images at the same time. I select one of them, hold down shift
and then I have multiple selected. I can also hold down CMD
and select individually and then just drag them in. Now you can see we have
multiple slots, each with an image attached to it
under the root bone. You can also add the images
to bones by selecting the image and then
clicking Set Parent and then choosing where you want it. or you can also just press P which
is a shortcut to Set Parent. You can see it opens this pick session. I click the bone and it asks me if I want
to use an existing slot or a new slot. I’m just gonna click “Cancel” here. We can also take an image and
drag it onto an existing slot and now this slot will have
two different images on it. But like I mentioned in the
previous video only one attachment can be visible at any
given time on a single slot. Also notice if you look
here under the Images node that some of these icons are
green and some are red. The green one means that they
are being used in the project. While the red one means they
are not yet being used. So once you have all your
region attachments created then scale, rotation and translation tools
can be used to assemble the skeleton. So you can move all these
different images into place. I’ll be explaining how to use
these tools in the next video. Spine will find the image
for an attachment by taking the path we specified
under the Images node. And then append the attachment name. And this is the attachment name. The attachment does not need
to include a file extension. Spine will automatically
look for PNG and JPG files. If I go down here and change this path
like so. You can see that the attachment
I have defined up here is no longer being shown. But if I double click to rename it. I can go in here, and I
can type “images/head”. And now it is looking in a folder called
“Images” for a file called “head”. And you can see here we
have the Images node, and we have a folder
here called “images”. Now if I change this back to
“./Images/” like it was before the attachment will again be missing. So I’m gonna double click this and remove the
path, and now the image is showing again. An attachment name can
also include subfolders. For example if I am using
this path “./images/” I could have a folder in here
called for example “red”. And I could go here and double click and then type in like so. And I could have a specific version of the
head where he has red hair for example. and this would be placed in a
subfolder under this node. If an attachment has a path set. The path is used to find the image
instead of the attachment name. You can see the path down here. So I could go here and type “head”. As you can see, despite the
path up here being “red/head”. It is using the path down here. Two attachments under the same
slot cannot have the same name but they can have the same path. DRAW ORDER I’ll quickly go over draw
order again despite covering it slightly it
in the previous video and I’ll be using the good old
Spineboy project for this. So the order of which attachments are drawn is defined over here in
the draw order node. And slots higher up in the list
are drawn on top of those below. The slots can be either dragged, like so. Or you can select them and then hit the
“minus” and “plus” keys on your keyboard. You can also hold down “SHIFT” and you can see I’m holding down “SHIFT”
and I’m pressing “plus” and “minus” and it’s jumping by five
instead of just one. You can also select multipe
slots and you can see I’m now moving three different
slots at the same time and again, now I’m holding down “SHIFT”
and I’m hitting “plus” and “minus”. TREE FILTER Another way to change the draw
order is to use the filter. buttons that we have available
at the top of the tree. I’m gonna hide the bones and attachments and now you can see we have a
slightly different icon here. This is the draw order node before and this is the draw order node now. We can change the draw order just
like we did before, by dragging it. The benefit of this is that
now if I’m working with a very large skeleton with lots of
bones and lots of attachments it can be a bit tricky to find which
slot an image is attached to. But now if click this gun here you can see
it selects the slot and not the attachment. While if I have the attachments
on and I select the gun again you can see that now
it selects the attachment. If I take this off again. Select it and instantly
I have the slot selected and I can change
the draw order of it. SCRIPTS I’m now switched over to Photoshop to demonstrate
one of the scripts we have available. When creating skeleton images using an
image editing program outside of Spin it’s very common to create
images on separate layers as you can see I’ve done here. I have all of these different layers
with different parts of Spineboy. And for example if I hide the head here, you
can see that this part is no longer shown. Let me put this back on. Now exporting all these layers manually, by
first trimming them to get rid of whitespace and then saving each layer
individually is very time consuming and you will then also have to
manually place them inside of Spine and this would be double work
because as you can see he’s already posed as I want him to look in
my setup pose inside of Spine. To save time we’ve included
a script that will not only export each visible
layer in Photoshop. But also export a JSON file that
you can then import into Spine and your images will then
be in the correct position. You can find the
script if you go here. You can see I have my Macintosh HD
here, I have applications, Spine. This is where I’ve installed Spine. Now inside of here I have a scripts folder. You can see in here we have GIMP,
Illustrator and Photoshop scripts. If you’re not sure you are using the latest
version of the script you can go to our website. And then go to documentation. Go to User Guide. And under Images here And we’re gonna scroll
down here to scripts. You can see here it says that the script can be found in the Spine
installation folder, in the scripts subfolder. The latest version of these
scripts can always be found here. And then if I scroll further
down you can see we also have links for Illustrator,
GIMP and even After Effects. PHOTOSHOP To use the Photoshop script,
the images that make up the skeleton should be on separate
layers, like I mentioned before. Like the setup I have here. This is also true if you’re using GIMP. As I also mentioned before when the script is run, it will
export each layer as a separate image file and then create a JSON file
that can be imported into Spine. I’ll show you how this
import is done in a bit. But first let me go over the
settings for the Photoshop script. The first thing I’ve done here is I’ve
actually bound a the script to a hotkey So if I hit “F5” on my keyboard
it will launch the script. Now to do that you need to place the
script file in the correct position. Or the correct location. What I’ve done is. I’ve found
my Photoshop directory here. And I’ve gone to presets. And in here we have another
folder called Scripts. And if you place the
LayersToPNG.jsx file in there It will then show up
if you go to edit. And then keyboard shortcuts That I have open now. And then you go here to File. Scroll down, all the
way down to “Scripts”. You can see we have LayersToPNG showing
up here and my shortcut for it. So I’m just gonna hit
“Cancel”, like so. And then F5. All these different settings we have
in here, let me just go over them. The first one will write
layers as PNG files. And this means that all
these layers we have over here, it will write them
out as a separate file. So for example the head layer
here would be called head.png. And front_shin would be called
front_shin.png and so on. The next setting we have
is “Write a template PNG”. And this means that all the
visible layers we have. Or all the layers we have, depending
on this “Ignore hidden layers” here. Will be written as a single image that you
can then use as a template inside of Spine when you’re placing your images. Now the “Write Spine JSON”
setting here, just means that it will output a JSON file
that we can import into Spine and it will then look
through everything we have imported and place
the images correctly. Now we have the “Ignore
hidden layers” setting here. This also just means that
layers, like for example these two here will be
ignored when I hit “OK”. The “Use groups as skins” setting. Over here in my layers, if I’m
using groups to set up my layers it will create a skin with
the same name as your group and it will then place your different images
in a subfolder for the different skins. This “Use ruler origin as 0.0”. Just means it will take
this ruler position here. For example if I place it here, this will
now be the root position of my images. Let me open up here again. Now the PNG scale percentage
that I have here. I can take this to one
percent, or a hundred percent. This means that. You can see if I zoom in. It’s actually rather large
images that I’m working with. And I prefer to work at high resolution
when I’m creating the assets. So now, when I export it, this would of
course be way too large for a game. So when I export it I turn
this down to a different scale. And it will scale the images
before actually exporting it. The “Padding” setting we have here will
give you some extra room to work with. For example the head here,
if I set the padding to zero it would trim all the white space to the
very edge of the pixels on that layer. If you’re working with meshes it’s a
very good idea to set this padding up because it will give you a
little more room to work with, And this can also avoid aliasing artefacts
for opaque pixels along the image edge. Now the output directory, I’ve set
this to “./images/spineboytemp/”. And I’m just gonna add a slash here. And this is where my images
will be exported to. The JSON path, I’m gonna leave this blank. Because I’ve saved the
Spineboy PSD file, in the same foldere as where I
have my project file. So I’m just gonna hit “OK”. And we’re gonna let the script
run here, and let it finish. And when it’s done, I’ll
then switch into Spine. So I’ve switched back into Spine again now and you can see I’ve opened up the
“temp” project that I created before. And now now I want to get the images
that I created in Photoshop into Spine. To do this, I click the Spine logo
up here and I go to “Import Data”. Click “Browse” and then I
find the spineboy.json file that I exported from
Photoshop and hit “Open”. And now it asks me for a skeleton name.
I’m just gonna leave it at “spineboy”. Hit “OK” and now you can see
it’s created a new skeleton. I can delete this one here. Just gonna do this. And if I go to the Images
node, you can see the path that I defined before
“./images/spineboytemp/” is being used. And all the images are now
placed in the correct draw order based on what I had in Photoshop. And they all have an attachment and they’re all named
based on the layer naming convention that I used
inside of Photoshop. So this was a pretty long video, but
I hope you’ve learned something. In the next video we will start taking a look
at the tools we have available for Spine and I hope to see you there. So thank you very much for
watching, bye for now.

HTML: Images | Intro to HTML/CSS: Making webpages | Computer Programming | Khan Academy

HTML: Images | Intro to HTML/CSS: Making webpages | Computer Programming | Khan Academy


– [Voiceover] We’ve been
talking about rabbits this whole time. Describing them with paragraphs and lists, but we could just put a
picture on our webpage and actually show what
a rabbit looks like. Well, to insert a picture on
a webpage, we use the img tag. Which, as you might
guess, stands for image. If we just type image though, we don’t see anything, why not? Well, we didn’t tell the
browser which image to show. There are millions of
images on the internet, and we certainly don’t want
it to pick a random one, because it might be something
gross that we don’t like. And it also just won’t be
what we want it to be of. We need to tell it the url of the image. The url is what shows up
at the top of the browsers, in the address bar, and
that’s what it is, an address. It’s a way of finding
some resource on the web. And it means we can only insert an image, if it’s already on the internet somewhere. We can’t just insert images
that are only on our computer. There are many ways to find
images on the internet, but we’re making it easier for you here by providing an image picker
and a photo collection. To get that to pop up, we need to add an
attribute to our image tag. An attribute is an additional
bit of information about a tag and this is the first
attribute that we’ve seen. So to tell the browser the url, we’re going to add an
attribute with the name source. And I will add a space, and then type src. Now it stands for source, but it’s very important
that you spell it src, because the browser will
ignore it if we misspell it. Now I need to put in an equal sign so that I can tell the browser
what the attribute value is. And now I’ll add a quote, and the editor will
autocomplete the end quote, so the attribute values are
always wrapped in two quotes. Okay, so normally, this is
when we’d start typing our url, but here on Khan Academy that’s when our image picker will pop up. So I’ll just hit pick image, and I want a picture of a rabbit, so I’ll click the animals tab, and select the adorable
rabbit, and click okay. Do you see how there’s a
url inside our quotes now? And, do you see how that
url starts with HTTP? That’s how we know that
it’s pointing at some image somewhere on the internet. And, hey, look, there’s
a bunny on my webpage. But, what if the server
hosting the image was failing, and the browser couldn’t load the image? How would the viewer know
what my amazing image was of? They’ll see nothing, and wonder
for the rest of their lives what they missed out on. That’s why image tags have
another attribute, alt, which we use to tell browsers what the alternate text for an image is. So, to add another attribute,
we just put a space after the final quote for the last one. Then we type alt equals
quotes, and inside these quotes the text will be some helpful
description of the image. Like, rabbit with lop ears in barn. That also helps people who see webpages, but can’t really see them, like the blind. They use an app called a screen reader, which will literally
read a webpage to them, describing each tag it sees. When it sees an image tag,
it’ll read off the alt text, since a blind person can’t see images. So you should always, always use alt text, so that the whole world can
experience your webpage. Okay, back to the image we can see. It’s a little big. Let’s resize it. We can do that with more attributes. With our width or height. So let’s say width equals 100. Okay, so now it’s 100 pixels wide. That’s a little too small,
let’s put our cursor inside, and use the number
scrubber to make it bigger. Okay, that looks a lot better. Now let’s try adding height. I’m going to say height equals 50. Uh oh, I squashed my bunny, poor bunny. See that’s why I should
usually only specify either width or height, but not both. Because you might use the wrong dimensions and squish your bunnies. So I say just let the
browser do the math to decide what the other dimension should be. I’m going to delete height. Now that you can make images, start thinking about
combining all the tags you have in your toolbox. Lists with images, and paragraphs,
top 10 craziest animals. Just don’t put too many
images on your page, because the person
checking out you webpage will have to load all of them. But, you can still have a lot of fun.

Photoshop: Saving Images

Photoshop: Saving Images


In Photoshop, saving works a bit differently
from other programs. Instead of working with one main file type (like a document in Word),
you’ll find several options to choose from, including JPEG, PSD, and more. If any of these formats sound unfamiliar,
that’s OK—I’m going to tell you more about them over the course this video. Ultimately,
the option you choose just depends on the project. Take this image for example. Here I have a simple photo that I took myself.
All I did was crop and rotate it; now I’d like to send a copy to my friends. A common
file type like JPEG or PNG would be a great choice for this—probably JPEG because that’s
better for high-quality photos. These file types can be viewed and edited on almost any
computer or device, so that makes them perfect for sharing with others. What if you had a photo that you put a little
more work into; for example, something with text or adjustment layers? If you only saved
it as a regular image, you wouldn’t be able to come back and re-edit those things later.
Luckily, Photoshop has a special format called PSD that’ll preserve your layers and other
important info. PSD files can only be opened in Photoshop, so if you plan to share the
image, you’ll just need to save a copy in one of the common formats too. No matter what format you plan to use, you’ll
find everything you need under File on the menu bar. If you’re saving an image for the
first time (or saving a new version), you’ll generally use Save As. This will give you
access to all the common file types, including PSD. This part of the process is pretty simple.
Just type a name for your file, then choose where you want it to be saved. If the original
file is in the same folder, and you don’t want it to be overwritten, just make sure
to use a different file name. When you’re done, go ahead and click the menu
here… and you can select the format you want. As you can see, there are lots of options
to choose from beyond what we’ve already talked about, including bitmap, GIF, and much more. In this case, we’re going to choose Photoshop
(also known as PSD), so we can keep editing the image later if we need to. With this option,
make sure Layers is checked… then click the Save button… and that’s all it takes.
Now you can save your progress anytime by going back to File… then clicking Save. Let’s take a look at Save for Web next. This
is a really good option if you’re planning to post the final image online; for instance,
on your blog, portfolio, or any other website. All you have to do is click… and you’ll
be taken to a special dialog box. As you can see, this works a little differently
from Save As. You’ll still find formats like JPEG and PNG to choose from, but this time,
you can optimize them for the web. You’ll also find other settings that’ll help you
prep the image for posting. If you go with JPEG, for instance, you can
customize the quality level. You may want to experiment with this while you watch the
preview on the left. The goal is to find the right balance between quality and a smaller
file size—that’s what really makes an image suitable for the web. The number below the
preview will tell you exactly what the file size is. Now, look closely at the tabs at the top of
the window. See them up here on the left? If you click the one that says 2-Up… you
can actually compare your changes to the original image. This is an easy way to make sure you
haven’t lost too much quality with the options you’ve chosen. In this example, the images
look pretty similar, but the file size on the new version is quite a bit smaller. You can also change the dimensions of your
image right here in the dialog box. This can be a good way to reduce the image if you’re
still struggling with file size. Just enter the width or height that you want, then press
Enter on your keyboard… and you can see the effect immediately. When you’re ready, go ahead and click Save…
then follow the usual steps of naming the file, and choosing a location. Now click Save one more time… and that’s
it. Ultimately, the saving option you choose will
vary from project to project. Sometimes you’ll save a copy in more than one format, like
we just did here. The best way to go about it is to think ahead, and try to imagine what
you’ll need from the image—both now and in the future. Soon the whole process of saving
will start to feel like second nature.

[Old Video]Try not to laugh looking at the most epic pictures in Runningman Ep. 399 (EngSub)

[Old Video]Try not to laugh looking at the most epic pictures in Runningman Ep. 399 (EngSub)


(Seok Jin, look at this.) (Ji Hyo attacks with a picture
of a young Seok Jin.) (Seok Jin, look at this.) (Jae Seok attacks with a picture
of Sae Ho’s look-alike.) (Seok Jin staggers
due to 2 consecutive attacks.) (Laughing) (Haha’s bare face knocks him out.) I got three consecutive attacks. (I need to hold back.) (Seok Jin receives a penalty badge
and leaves to get flogged.) (Kwang Soo, come over here.) (Jae Seok hurriedly calls
Kwang Soo over.) (I want to study law
at Seoul National University.) (He can’t control his laughter.) (Kwang Soo gets knocked out
by Jong Kook during his Turbo days.) It’s impossible
not to laugh at this. (This is driving me crazy.) (Jae Seok tries to show it
to Se Chan as well.) (Se Chan strikes
with a picture of himself.) (Laughing) (The shocking picture sends Jae Seok
to the flogging instrument.) Hey! I have that picture, too. (Why does he have that picture?) This is driving me crazy. (He attacks with a picture of Sae Ho
in his early days.) (She is about to collapse.) (Remaining Silent turns
into a battle of shocking pictures.) (Jong Kook begins to attack.) (Han Gi Beom, the basketball player,
makes another appearance.) (They are nearing their limits.) (Jae Seok gets a penalty
thanks to Se Chan’s counterattack.) (He gets flogged.) (It’s payback time.)

Deer caught on camera in Zionsville Kroger

Deer caught on camera in Zionsville Kroger


LAND, NO PROBLEMS. SOME OF THE WINDS WERE AROUND 50 MILES AN HOUR.>>YOU’VE GOT TO SEE WHAT WAS CAPTURED IN ZIONSVILLE. SHOPPERS GOT QUITE A SURPRISE AT THE GROCERY STORE. A DEER ACTUALLY WENT THROUGH THE FRONT DOOR OF THE KROGER IN ZIONSVILLE AND STARTING PRANCING DOWN THE AISLES. ONE WOMAN POSTED VIDEO. IT SHOWS THE DEER JUMPING OVER A COUNTER. IT DID HAVE A COUPLE OF MINOR INJURIES TRYING TO GET OUT. THANKFULLY THE DEER WILL BE OKAY. IT WAS ALLEGEDLY HEADED TOWARD THE MEAT SECTION, WHICH, NO,