Batch Image Processor

Batch Image Processor


Hi! Whether you are a designer looking
for ways to automate your image processing tasks, a photographer
looking to enhance and watermark photos, or just someone trying to resize
or convert large batch of images, you picked the right tool for the job!
This short video will help you get started by giving you easy, step-by-step
instructions that illustrate typical workflow and highlight core features
designed to save you loads of time and effort! So let’s get started! Image
processing workflow consists of three basic steps:
First choose processing mode and images for processing.
Then specify actions to perform on those images. And finally choose where and how
to save processed images and begin processing. Main window represents each
step by a distinct region where all the step details can be configured. On the
left you choose processing mode and specify images that need to be processed.
On the right you specify processing tasks with ability to choose from more than
100 actions, filters, effects, and conditions. Finally at the bottom you choose where and how processed images should be saved and begin the processing. Images
can be processed in any one of the four available modes. Main processing mode –
where you manually initiate the processing after explicitly specifying
images to be processed. Automatic or background processing mode – where program
continually monitors folders for changes and automatically processes matching
images according to the rules you specify. Scheduled or triggered
processing mode that is automatically initiated based on specified time or
trigger. Command line mode that is similar to manual mode but operates in a
console window or without any user interface. In the rest of this video will
cover main processing mode. To begin you must specify what images
the program should work with. There are quite a few ways to do it. The most basic
is to add image files individually. You can also add all images from a given
folder. You can also recursively scan specified folder for all images matching
various properties you can specify like file name, file attributes, image
properties like size and many others. All matching images will be automatically
added for processing. You can also copy- paste files from clipboard. Simply select
the desired files in your favorite file manager, copy them to clipboard, return to
the program and paste them. All the files you just copied will be added. Images can
also be added by copy-pasting a list of file paths that may contain tasks with
wildcards and point to both files and folders. Last but not least: you can drag-and-drop
image files directly from Windows Explorer which is especially handy if
you have a multi monitor setup. Once you have specified the images you want to
process you need to tell the program what operations should be performed on
those images. To do this simply drag-and-drop desired actions and effects.
Each action usually comes with various settings that you can customize in the
area below the actions list. Some actions have quite a few settings that are
grouped into tabs. Any changes you make to the action settings are reflected in
the actions list next to the selected action. There are over 100 actions and
effects to choose from and you can add as many of them as is necessary to
accomplish your goal. Actions can also be added by double-clicking on the desired
item in the action bar. Actions list reflects the processing order which can
be easily changed using Mouse drag-and-drop or with keyword keys. You
can easily preview the effects of various actions on the resulting images
by clicking on the image thumbnail. The preview area shows both the original and
the modified version of an image side-by-side. As you zoom and pan one view
the other automatically stays in sync making it easy to spot the differences.
The preview window shows a lot of information but if you just need to see
the modified image you can toggle off other panels to maximize the viewing
area. As you adjust various action settings the preview automatically
reflects the results so you know ahead of time what the processed image will
look like. You can add branching to processing flow using conditions.
A condition can be added by drag-and- dropping it to the desired position in
the actions list. Conditions check a given image against a predefined set of
characteristics. If all the requirements set by a condition are satisfied
processing will continue; otherwise all actions nested inside a condition will
be skipped. Here we’re nesting Contrast and Brightness actions within the Image
Size Condition so that these actions will be performed only on images whose
width is a bigger than a 1000 pixels as the condition requires. You can easily
find the desired action simply by searching for it in the actions bar. When
no longer needed the actions bar can be collapsed with a click of a button. If
your action sequence contains more than a handful of items it may be a good idea
to save it as a template for future use. You will then be able to easily restore
all the actions and settings from a saved template file saving yourself a lot of
time. Once you have selected images and specified actions to perform you need to
specify output settings like: filenames, save location, and image format. To give
processed images desired filenames you can either choose from a list of
predefined templates or create your own template using a dedicated window with a
variety of built-in tags that let you use various file and image attributes
including EXIF data as part of a new file name. Save location can be specified as either
absolute or relative folder path or chosen from a predefined drop-down list.
You can save processed images in more than 15 different formats that you can
choose from a drop-down list. You can further customize format-specific
options in a preview dialog that shows what the saved image will look like
given selected quality and image format settings. Once all the desired output
settings have been specified you can begin processing by clicking on the
Start button. Processing progress will be visually displayed on the image list and
in the status area below. When processing is finished program will display a brief
summary message. Processed image thumbnails are color-coded and show
changed properties in bold so you can easily see if the processing succeeded
and images were saved with proper file names and incorrect location. This
concludes our short tour! We hope we got you interested and you’ll give it a try!
Thank you for watching!

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