Award-Winning Photojournalist Helps Put a Human Face on War

Award-Winning Photojournalist Helps Put a Human Face on War



photojournalist Lindsay ah Dario points her camera at the most dangerous places in the world to expose the cruelties of war poverty and disease for me it is a calling it is about doing something that I believe in doing something that I believe will enlighten people or educate them the Pulitzer Prize winning photographer has risked her life repeatedly on the frontlines from the invasion of Iraq to the uprising in Libya ah Dario pays special attention to women's issues in conflict zones for gender giving her access denied to her male colleagues I am sort of underestimated often like kind of dismissed as like we don't have to worry about her and that also gives me the ability to move around sort of undetected often graphic sometimes heartbreaking her images have graced the pages of the New York Times and other publications putting a human face on suffering for the world to see it's been quite an experience for the Connecticut woman from a middle-class italian-american family she has no formal photography training she taught herself after receiving her first camera when she was 13 years old her first trip to Afghanistan was in 2000 capturing the lives of Afghan women under the Taliban's rule there wasn't much interest in her photos until September 11th after the terror attacks she was in high demand covering first the invasion of Afghanistan and then the war in Iraq in Fallujah in 2004 insurgents kidnapped her and her team I just kept thinking we're dead we're dead we're dead were dead they were released hours later during the Afghan war a Dario went on a two-month long in bed with US soldiers in the Korengal Valley the soldiers were on a mission to look for senior Taliban fighters when the Taliban ambushed them three soldiers were shot and one sergeant was killed a Dario's camera captured the bloodshed it was incredibly emotional and seeing these young guys crying for their best friend carrying his body was really the first time I felt so close to the war and what it meant to be there and to be part of it a Dario was part of the team that won the Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for the New York Times Magazine story Talib Aniston that same year coming back from an assignment in Pakistan she smashed her collarbone in a traffic accident that killed her driver she recovered from that close call but three years later in Libya a Dario found herself in even greater danger when soldiers loyal to Qaddafi kidnapped her and three other journalists we were beaten repeatedly punched in the face the men were smashed on the back of the heads with gun butts for me as a woman I was groped repeatedly over and over by basically every man we came in contact with the journalists were released six days later a Dario used her renewed lease on life to make good on a promise to her husband to have a child in her book it's what I do a photographer's life of love and war a Dario talks candidly about her concerns about being a mother while following her very dangerous passion I was terrified I was terrified ai would stop getting assignments I was terrified that I would be my own I would sort of inhibit myself I was terrified that people would say oh she's a mother let's not send her anymore a Dario continued her assignments acutely aware of the life growing inside her as she photographed women and children dying of malnutrition in Africa it was just very hard to photograph children dying while I was pregnant while my son my unborn son was kicking inside of me because it felt really unfair it felt like well you know this is one of the cool realities of life and being born in one place versus another her choice to continue working during her pregnancy see was met with criticism after she wrote about it in the New York Times but a Dario stands behind her decision they should worry about the women who lived there who were pregnant all the time and the conditions those women are giving birth in a Dario's also spend a considerable amount of time covering the crisis in Darfur her camera bears witness as villages burn and refugees wait for humanitarian aid she returns again and again because she feels her work there is making the biggest impact now the mother of a three-year-old a Dario has found a balance between her professional and personal lives she still travels all over the world on assignment not as often and not usually to the front but she continues to tell stories through her lens to show people what's really happening in the dark corners of the world I do feel like I need to be there and I do feel like I have these tools to cover war and there aren't that many people who can and who have that experience

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